Moses Beckstead Sr

2 Jan 1857 - 24 Nov 1916

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Moses Beckstead Sr

2 Jan 1857 - 24 Nov 1916
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PAGE 11-13 Our ancestors kept few records. Wearevery grateful, however, for the assistance given by the Rev. Isaac N. Beckstead, Ottawa, Canada, who wrote the first portion of the Introductory History, of our ancestors in New York and Canada. He has worked many years in genealogical research assembl

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Moses Beckstead Sr

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Died:

Spanish Fork City Cemetery

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Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah
United States

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ajq46

June 7, 2012
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B Hold

May 23, 2012

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DESCENDANTS OF JOHN BECKSTEAD INRODUCTORY HISTORY (PAGES 17-25)

Contributor: ajq46 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

PAGE 11-13 Our ancestors kept few records. Wearevery grateful, however, for the assistance given by the Rev. Isaac N. Beckstead, Ottawa, Canada, who wrote the first portion of the Introductory History, of our ancestors in New York and Canada. He has worked many years in genealogical research assembling data on the Beckstead families. The latter portion of the History, from September 1838 when our ancestors arrived at DeWitt, Missouri, from Canada, to the present, was written by Lee A Beckstead. This information was deveLoped from research, family diaries, and data furnished by members of the Beckstead family line. The present history and genealogy is on a modest scale, taking us back to John Beckstead (probably Johan Bech- stedt in German form) born 1738 in Saxony (some say Hanover), Germany. It is believed he migrated to England, where he joined the armed forces. Later he saw services in Canada, in the closing period of the "Seven Year's War", which ended with the cession of Canada by France to-the English, in 1763 At the close of the War, disbanded soldiers, who wished to settle in America, were landed in ports of entry, especially Philadelphia and New York. This would account for failure to find our ancestors' name in any regular passenger list. It is believed that John settled first in Pennsylvania, moving later to the colony of New York, where he became a blacksmith in the A1bany district, New York. The first public reference to our ancestor, shows that in 1767 he attended, as a junior officer, a muster of Militia in the Albany area. His name also occurs later on, in connection with certain land dea1s. The next landmark is in 1790, when the first U. S. Census was taken. In the returns we find listed, 'John Bechsted", as a resident of Rensselaerville, Albany County, New York - his family: "Four males 16 years old and over, two males under 16 years, and one female." Evidently by 1790 all the daughters had left home. It is also indicated that two of his sons were not yet born. In addition to the foregoing, there are Church records in which John's name appears. These relate to baptisms of his own children, or others, possibly grandchildren, at which he was a sponsor. From the data afforded, our ancestor and his family had connections with both Evangelical Lutheran, and Dutch Reformed Churches. During 1775-1781, the Revolutionary War between England and the thirteen American Colonies took place, ending in victory for the latter. The Albany district was the scene of bitter conflict. Indian allies, armed with muskets, tomahawks and scalping knives, added to the terrors of the War. Neighbor fought against neighbor, friend against friend, and even brother against brother. An indication of the fierceness of the struggle in the Albany sector is seen in the record that the grave of Sr. William Johnson, who had supported the British cause, was opened, and the lead of his casket moulded into bullets. We do not know what part John Beckstead took in the great War of Independence. His sons were too young for active engagement But subsequent events suggest that as far as possible he maintained neutrality, despite fierce fighting on every hand, yet he may have favored the British cause, because in 1797 his eldest son Alexander (4-2) was given a 200 acre land grant in Canada, as recorded at York (Toronto) on 2 Aug 1797. Then in later years the records reflect grants were awarded a number of John's grandsons in Williamsburg and Matilda, Canada. In Matilda, Jacob J. and Jacob L. received 100 acre grants in 1839 and 1846; grants to Joseph and Francis L. in Williamsburg of 100 acres date from 1839 and 1856, while Lucius, in 1865 received 200 acres. These grants of land show that John and his family were regarded as Loyalists, though not U. E. Loyalists, a distinction reserved for those who had enlisted on the British side, served actively in the War, and in 1784 many had moved to Canada and became British subjects. There is no reason of the Becksteads going to Canada at that early date. Many colonials were in the same position as our ancestor. They favored the British cause, but continued their American citizenship. England even indemnified some of them for losses suffered because of their loyalty to the Crown. It may here be recorded that John Beckstead lost his life in 1808, in an accident with horses. He died at the age of 70. The records to this date indicate that John Beckstead died in New York, and never went to Canada. However, some of his children, with families, moved to Williamsburg, Canada, a year or two before John's death. ********** It seems appropriate at this time to give our readers a little information about Williamsburg, Canada, a it first appeared to our ancestors in the eqrly 1800's as they crossed the St. Lawrence River, and started to build their homes. Williamsburg had already seen some land clearance and other improvements. A few small communities were forming. Pioneer lumber and grist mills were on the way, with two or three in operation. A small boat-building industry had been established near the Morrisburg, of today, or the St. Lawrence River. Forests still covered by far the greater part of the country. The stump of a tree that stood stately and tall in the Williamsburg woods, 200 years ago, has been preserved as a relicof the past. It measures nearly six feet in diameter, and is still sound and firmly rooted. We can appreciate the great fight settlers had to make in wresting land from the wilderness of trees. Fire, axes, saws, chains, and the might of men and oxen, were all taxed to the utmost in the struggle. Yet the woods moderated the heat of summer and were a shelter against winter storms and cold. They also conserved water to power the little mills located on creeks and streams, provided medicinal herbs, chewing gum, wild honey, dyes, baskets and maple sugar and syrup, now a luxury product in strong demand. Further benefits induded building material, tan-bark and an important cash crop, masts for ships, and squared timber, for which there was a market in England. Pioneer doctors did the best they could with their limited science and equipment. However, people generally had remedies of their own: pine pitch for cuts and wounds, gold thread, gathered from the woods, for babies' sore mouths; cohosh, sassafras, catnip and burdock for the blood. Warts were removed by rubbing them with the moist underbody of a frog, while goitre (known as thick-neck) could be dealt with by wrapping a garter snake around the part, and then releasing the remedy. Sometimes, unfortunately, mistakes were made, as in steaming a fever patient, by loading him down with heavy blankets, and then seating him over a tub of hot water. PAGE 17-25 Henry Beckstead (11-2), was the youngest of the family and married Elizabeth Shaver. Beyond these particulars, concerning Jacob, Joseph and Henry, we have no data. However, their names often reappear in later generations, showing that they were respected and esteemed by those who knew them. Alexander Beckstead (4-2), and Francis Beckstead (7-2): From the information assembled it is quite evident these brothers were very close to each other. And, it is likely that their sister, Catharine (5-2) may have had something to do with their moving to Canada in 1807. These brothers procured 200 acre farms near the town of Williamsburg, then only known as the "Corners". Their farms were about one mile apart. Alexander's lot was a crown grant, half of which was owned by Christopher Reddick, a U. E. Loyalist, father-in-law of Alexander. This half was transferred to Sarah, the daughter, while the other half was procured by a " Bargain and Sale" transaction. On the property of Alexander's was a small frame dwelling, in which the family must have been uncomfortably crowded. The writer's grandfather, Alexander, Jr. (12-3) was at that time 14 years old, and not by any means an only child. However, by 1810, a roomy stone house had been built, which at the time, was probably the best farm home in the Township. It is still standing, in 1962, its 2-feet thick walls and foundations as sound as the day Alexander and family proudly moved into it 150 years ago. This old homestead is now owned and occupied by a fine Dutch family, who take great pride in it, and, are making it young again with children, with improvements and up to date equipment. Francis (7-2) also made great progress on his farm. Two Canadian families now occupy it. A young wife in one family is a descendant, in the 6th generation of Francis. In 1812, War broke out between the United States and England. Canada, of course, could not avoid involvement. American forces invaded the country along the St. Lawrence and Lakes Erie and Ontario. One battle, that of Crysler's Farm, was fought within a few miles of Alexander's homestead. He probably took part in the fighting, as he had enlisted for service in the War. The battle resulted in a victory for the Canadians. Contributing to their success, so it is reported, was over-indulgence in honey, found in Matilda Township by the invaders, not long before the battle. The Canadians had also Indians fighting with them, whose terrifying war cries and savage tactics helped to unnerve the enemy. This must have been a distressing period to our Beckstead families, who had so lately come from the United States to Canada. Francis' farm, located not far from that of Alexander, was a beautiful piece of property, having good well-drained soil, while its elevation afforded a pleasing view in every direction. This farm, too, had been a Government land grant. It is recorded that Francis purchased the 200 acres for 1.50 pounds, about $700.00 in later currency. Here, aided by a diligent family, he built up one of the best farm homes in Dundas County. On the whole, it was probably a more valuable property than that of Alexander. In 1837-38 a great change took place in the lives of these two brothers and their families. They were brought under the influence of three Mormon missionaries of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. It is known that Francis, and most of his children and grandchildren became converts during that period. However, it is not known if members of Alexander's family were likewise converts. It is recorded, however, that members of the LDS Church were anxious to join the main body of the Church, then in Missouri,and later in Nauvoo, Illinois. Therefore, this move called for preparations by the families of Francis. One necessary step was the sale of the farms- the properties being good ones, sales were soon made, There followed other preparations tor the great adventure of faith, the journey to Missouri. Wagons, oxen and provisions were needed. The company, also, had to be organized and put under responsible leaders. This need was met by appointing Christopher Merkley, who, with his family, had joined the movement, as first and Francis Beckstead, second in command, with assistants. All told, it is believed the party could not have numbered more than 30 or 35, its size being reduced by the decision of Alexander (4-2) and his family, with the exception of Maria (Mary), not to make the journey at that time. There were present, however, three Mormon missionaries returning to their homes from their missionary work in Canada. It is also to be kept in mind that not only were grown-up members of Francis Sr.'s family with the expedition, but a considerable number of his grandchildren as well. It may be noted here that some of Francis' children did not join the movement at that time, and remained in Canada; those remaining in Canada were sons - Jacob L., Moses, Henry, Mathew and Charles; and daughters - Maria, Hannah, Nellie, Helena and Betsy. It is reported that after two or three days with the expedition, Charles, a younger son of Francis, Sr., lost heart, and at night left the camp and set out for Williamsburg, where he arrived safely in due course. He had been helped by an older sister, who supplied him with food and a bit of money. And so Francis, Sr., (7-2) and members of the group moved away from Williamsburg, which must have been a tremendous sacrifice to them, To leave their homes which were well established, and other members of the family. As they traveled on, it is known that they encountered great difficulties, with sickness and other hardships, from day to day. It was a long journey moving by oxen, and among other things, it is reported they encountered a serious peril at one time, when they were attacked by armed enemies of the Mormons, who threatened them with destruction. They were camped near a stream, and it is told that it was impossible for anyone to go to the stream for water, as the enemies would fire on them. However, a torrential rain came and dispersed their attackers, and early the next day they were rescued by friends, under the leadership of the Prophet Joseph Smith. After a journey lasting almost three months, the company reached DeWitt, Missouri, in the latter part of September, 1838. The " Historical Record", edited and published by Andrew Jenson in 1886, records, pages 603-4, "About the 25th of September, 1838, Elder John E. Page arrived in DeWitt with about fifty wagons and several hundred Saints from Canada, and a few days later a small company arrived from the same province under the direction of Christopher Merkley, Zenos H. Gurley and Francis and Alexander Beckstead, from Williamsburgh (now Morrisburgh), Upper Canada." This was the beginning of a ten-year period during which they suffered and were severely persecuted, as were all the Saints, from mob violence in this and other areas. The "Historical Record" continues: "... About the 20th of the month a mob of about 100, perhaps 150 men rode into the settlement (DeWitt), and threatened the Saints with violence and death if they did not agree at once to leave the place and move out of the county; . . . they finally gave the Saints until the 1st of October (1838) to take their departure. They threatened further that if the " Mormons " were not gone by that time they would exterminate them, without regard to age or sex, and destroy their chattels by throwing them into the river. " About this time the Prophet Joseph Smith learned of the difficulties being encountered by the Saints in DeWitt, and he immediately tried to make his way to that location, but was only successful in reaching them by traveling unfrequented roads, as the principle roads were strongly guarded by the mob, who refused to ingress as well as egress. The Prophet reported: " I found my brethren, who were only a handful in comparison to the mob by which they were surrounded, in this situation, and their provisions nearly exhausted, and no prospect of obtaining any more. The Saints were forbidden to go out of town, under the pain of death, and were shot at when they attempted to go out to get food, of which they were destitute. As fast as their cattle,horses or other property got where the mob could get hold of it, it was taken as spoil. By these outrages the brethren were obliged, most o{ them, to live in wagons or tents. . . . Some of the brethren died for the common necessities of life and perished from starvation . . . many houses of the Saints were burned, their cattle driven away, and a great quantity of their property was destroyed by the mob. . . . The militia having mutinied, and the greater part of them being ready to join the mob, the brethren came to the conclusion that they would leave the place and seek shelter elsewhere; and gathering up as many wagons as they could get ready, which was about 70, with a remnant of the property they had been able to save from their matchless foes, they left DeWitt and started for Caldwell and Far West on the afternoon of Thursday, October 11, 1838. Many were sick and weak, and that evening a woman who had a short time before given birth to a child, died from exposure, and was buried in the grove without a coffin. During our journey we were continually harassed and threatened by the mob, who shot at us several times, while several of our brethren died from fatigue and privations which they had to endure, and we had to inter them by the wayside, and under circumstances the most distressing. We arrived in Caldwell on October 12, 1838." Some of the Saints settled in Caldwell, while others went to Far West, for the winter of 1838. Francis Beckstead (7-2), with his children and grandchildren, was in the midst of those trying times. It is not known at which location they settled during the winter of 1838, however, from our records we believe it was at Far West, Missouri, inasmuch as a daughter of Alexander Beckstead (36-3), Sarah Elizabeth Beckstead (108-4) was born at Far West, Missouri, 31 December 1838. Sometime in the spring of 1839, Francis and his group, with many hundreds of the Saints, began their movement towards the Mississippi River, and up the River towards Quincy, Adams County, Illinois, a distance of more than 200 miles. The weather was cold and the roads generally muddy and bad. Scores of Saints died from exposure and fatigue on that memorable journey. They traveled in organized companies, so they could help each other. It is believed that Francis Beckstead settled in Lima, Illinois, while others of his families settled in Warsaw, and area, near Nauvoo. (From information noted in Journal of Christopher Merkley.) It should be noted, at this point, that although Alexander Beckstead (4-2) sold his 200 acre farm, at about the same time as his brother Francis (7-2), it is not known for certain if he and his family were influenced by the Mormon missionaries, to the extent of becoming members of the LDS Church. At least, neither Alexander, or any of his family left Williamsburg, Canada, with Francis and his group. It is recorded, however, that all of his family left Williamsburg in 1840, and moved to Fulton County, Illinois, with the exception of Elizabeth (11-3); Alexander (12-3); Francis L. (14-3); and Adam (17-3). These four children remained in Williamsburg, Canada, and vicinity. The families going to Fulton County settled in the rich farming areas. Their descendants have made a worthy contribution to the business and cultural life of the communities where they have lived. Unfortunately, what befell Alexander Beckstead (4-2) after 1840 is not known. There is nothing to show that he went to Illinois, neither is it known where or with whom he lived, or when he died, and the location of his grave remains undisclosed. In 1840 he was 73 years old, and his life-span may not have extended much beyond that date. Our ancestors did not leave many records for the period 1838, when they moved to the area near Nauvoo, Illinois. In 1846 we find them in Pottawattamie County, Iowa. Their records indicate however, the birth of some grandchildren to Francis from 1840-1845 in Warsaw and Carthage, so we can be sure they lived in that area until the Saints were driven out of Nauvoo. It is recorded that Francis Beckstead (7-2) died in 1841 in Adams County; further, that some of the children were in the vicinity of the Carthage Jail when the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum Smith were killed by the mob. A granddaughter of Alexander Beckstead (36-3) related the following item of interest: " Grandma Jenkins said that she could remember her Grandfather, Alexander Beckstead (36-3), telling of the occasion when they came and asked him to help guard Joseph Smith. He (Alexander) said he witnessed the shooting and killing of Joseph and Hyrum, and saw Joseph fall from the jail window after he was shot. While Grandfather was on this duty, two ugly men rode up to the house and told Grandmother they wanted her husband, and asked where he was. She told them and they said, 'Oh, he is out guarding Ole Joe Smith.' There were about 30 families in that little village where the Saints had stopped, and these men told her they would give her until morning, and if she wasn't gone by then, they would burn the place down, and kill the children. She pleaded with them, saying she had a very sick little boy, but that made no difference. They rode away, saying they would be back." The little boy who was sick at that time was Thomas Wesley Beckstead (105-4), Lydia Ann Beckstead Jenkin's father, who related this story to her granddaughter Letha Hair. This story reflects the truth, that our ancestors lived in constant fear for their lives, and never knew from one hour to the next if they would be attacked by the mobs. After the death of Francis Beckstead (7-2) in 1841, the great responsibility of keeping the families of our ancestors together, rested upon the shoulders of his two sons, Alexander (36-3), and Francis, Jr. (38-3). History tells us that during the latter part of 1845 and the beginning of 1846, all of the Saints were busy preparing for the journey they were soon to begin - even the children were busily assisting in those preparations. For example, they parched quantities of corn, which was taken to the mill and ground up. This parched corn could be eaten with further cooking, during stormy days, or at times when they could not stop to make a fire to cook their food. It can be assumed that our ancestors were among this group. It is not known just how, or the exact date, they crossed the Mississippi River, but it is believed they were among the first parties. Some of the parties crossed the River by way of old watercrafts, which were in use day and night to convey the exiled Saints and their belongings to the opposite shore of the River. It is also recorded that on 25th of February 1846, some walked across the River on ice and the next few days witnessed the strangest sight of all, long caravans streaking out across the mighty river over a solid floor of ice which stretched from bank to bank a distance of one mile. . . . A few days later this unique roadway was broken, and the line of caravans was halted as great blocks of ice choked the river. As they crossed the Mississippi River, there is no doubt their hearts were sad, with not knowing where they were going nor what the future would bring them. It is not known the exact date our ancestors arrived in the area of Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, Iowa, a distance of about 400 miles from Nauvoo; however, the main body of the Saints reached there by the middle of June, 1846. Shortly after our ancestors arrived in the area of Council Bluffs, Iowa, the family sustained another set-back. In July, 1846, President Brigham Young was asked by the President of the United States to furnish 500 volunteers, from the Mormon ranks to serve in the War against Mexico. This group was known as the Mormon Battalion. Three Beckstead boys were among the first to respond to this call, just at a time when their services were needed by their families - they were William Ezra Beckstead (48-3); Gordon Silas Beckstead (101-4); and Orrin Mortimer Beckstead (148-4). The hardships encountered by this group of volunteers are described hereinafter (148-4), in a story written for a Carson City, Nevada newspaper, by Orrin Mortimer Beckstead, dated October 20, 21, 1909. During the period 1846-1848 it appears the families were making preparations for their journey to the Rocky Mountains. Suddenly another tragedy occurred which was a severe loss to them. They had not traveled far when Francis, Jr., (38-3), was stricken with Cholera, and died after a few hours of illness. He was buried on the banks of the Missouri River. Alexander Beckstead (36-3) now had the full responsibility for the movement of the families to the Salt Lake Valley. He had a large family of young children to look after, as well as helping his younger brothers and sisters with their families. Tragedy and sadness continued with the families as they journeyed westward. As they neared Wood River, Nebraska, Alexander's sister, Sarah Louisa Beckstead Forbush (44-3) was stricken with Cholera and died almost immediately, leaving four little children. The families were determined in their efforts, however, and finally arrived in Salt Lake Valley, September 15, 1849. Upon their arrival in the Valley, they settled near relatives or close friends in the Cottonwood area, east of Murray. They helped one another in providing food for the families. In the spring of 1850 Alexander Beckstead (36-3) moved to the west side of Jordan River. He purchased 160 acres of land which extended from where the D&RG Railroad is now located, southward along the river to Riverton. A number of the group located along the river because it was their only source of water supply. They were obliged to live in "Dugouts" for a short time, until they could haul timber from the mountains to build log houses. They immediately provided a meeting house for worship, and a school house. Later they built the "Beckstead Ditch", and were able to get water from the river on to their lands. As they prospered they built better homes. Some families located in Weber County, where Henry Beckstead was the first sheriff. Others moved into Utah County, and some to Arizona. A few years later Henry Beckstead moved along the Jordan River, and later Thomas Wesley Beckstead moved to the Whitney-Preston area of southern Idaho, where they settled permanently. As the children of these groups were married, some moved to other States where they could secure better employment, or had greater opportunities for the future. Becksteads have engaged in all types of business endeavors and work. It is interesting to note they have served more than 320 years in law enforcement work, in such position as Sheriffs, Police Officers, Constables, Justice of the Peace, and State and Federal Officers. From the Beckstead families who came to Utah, a majority still remain in the area of Utah and Idaho. Biographical sketches are set out hereinafter for those who have reported the data.

DESCENDANTS OF JOHN BECKSTEAD (Pages 42-44)

Contributor: ajq46 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

(Reference Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah. Esshom, Frank, 1913) 1st wife 100-4 1. Margaret Mariah Beckstesd Dec 9, 1823 101-4 2. Gordan Silas Beckstead Nov 25, 2825 102-4 3. Henry Beckstead Sept 4, 1827 103-4 4. William Beckstead 24 Sept 1829 21 July 1830 104-4 5. Harriet Vernitia Beckstead 17 June 1831 6 Jan 1905 105-4 6. Thomas Wesley Beckstead 27 Apr 1833 21 Sept 1893 106-4 7. Lucy Ann Beckstead 16 Mar 1835 21 July 1848 107-4 8. Emeline Beckstead 4 Apr 1837 1 Jan 1917 108-4 9. Sarah Elizabeth Beckstead 31 Dec 1838 16 July 1890 109-4 10. Samuel Alexander Beekstead 25 Dec 1840 28 Mar 1861 110-4 11. Amanda Jane Beckstead 3 Jan 1843 6 Sept 1844 111-4 12. George Washington Beckstead 3 Dec 1845 19 Dec 1912 112-4 13. John AIma Beckstead-twin 9 Aug 1848 9 Feb 1927 113-4 14. Mary Ellen Beckstead-twin 9 Aug 1848 9 Aug 1848 114-4 15. Joseph Alonzo Beckstead 27 Dec 1850 18 Feb 1923 2nd wife: 115-4 1. Hyrum Beckstead 27 Oct 1855 24 April 1937 116-4 2. Moses William Beckstead 27 Jan 1857 25 Nov 1916 117-4 3. Aaron Beckstead 12 May 1858 21 Jan 1924 118-4 4. Fannie Keziah Beckstead 5 Dec 1859 28 Apr 1936 119-4 5. Robert Beckstead 7 Mar 1861 26 May 1921 120-4 6. Margaret Albine Beckstead 26 May 1862 8 Sept 1944 121-4 7. Martha Ann Beckstead 16 Jan 1864 28 June 1930 122-4 8. Francis Albert Beckstead 15 Jan 1866 19 Sept 1952 123-4 9. Ira Beckstead 26 Dec 1867 9 Oct 124-4 10. Alexander Beckstead 17 Feb 1870 17 July 1942 3rd wife: 125-4 1. E Araminta Beckstead 10 Apr 1857 6 June 1923 21 Jan 1926 126-4 2. Catherine Lince Beckstead 16 Feb 1859 127-4 3. Clarissa Ann Beckstead 8 Jan 1860 8 May 1860 128.4 4. Vioia Janette Beckstead 4 June 1862 11 Dec 1863 129.4 5. Heber Alexander Beckstead 11 Aug 1854 22 June 1925 130.4 6. Evalyn Abagail Beckstead 55 Mar 1867 5 Jul 1867 131-4 7. Susan Filinda Beckstead 22 Sept 1868 15 Sept 1869 Alexander Beckstead, son of Francis Beckstead, Sr., and Margaret Barkley, was born in Schoharie County, New York, 16 Mar 1802. When he was about five years old his father and family moved to Williamsburg, Canada, where his father secured 200 acres of land, under a Land Grant. It is assumed, therefore, that Alexander worked with his father on the farm until he was married in 1823 to Catherine Lince/Lenss, at which time he farmed for himself. During the period 1837-38 three Mormon missionaries visited the homes of Alexander, his father Francis, Sr., and others of the family. Most of them accepted the Gospel, sold their land, and made preparations to join the Saints then located in Missouri. They traveled by ox-team and wagons enduring many personal hardships, and finally reached DeWitt, Caldwell County, Missouri, the last week in September 1838. At that time the Saints were being persecuted severely by the mobs, and after a short time our families escaped to Far West, Missouri, where they spent the winter. The next spring, 1839, they moved with the Saints to the area near Nauvoo, Illinois. Our families located wherever they could find suitable places to make a home - some were at Lima, some at Carthage, and some Carthage, Illinois, all near Nauvoo. By this time Alexander's family consisted of 9 children. After the death of Francis, Sr., in 1841,the great responsibility of looking after his family, and the others of his father's family, rested upon the shoulders of Alexander. When the Saints were driven from Nauvoo in 1846, Alexander and the other families moved to the area of Council Bluffs, Iowa. Almost immediately upon their arrival the United States Government requested President Brigham Young to furnish 500 volunteers for the Mormon Battalion to fight in the War against Mexico. Three of the Beckstead boys joined this group, thus reducing the help that was so much needed to look after the families. Alexander was not discouraged, however, and commenced preparation for movement of the families to the Great Salt Lake Valley. Just as they were moving, and had gone only a short distance, tragedy struck again; this time in the death of Francis Beckstead Jr., a younger brother of Alexander, which was a great shock and a tremendous loss to the families. However, Alexander continued on, and most of them reached the Utah Valley in September 1849. For more detailed information of the history of our ancestors read the Introduction history section. Alexander Beckstead settled in West Jordan, Utah, where there was practically nothing but sagebrush. They all located on what was known as the River bottoms, of the Jordan River, which was their only source of water. Alexander and his family were reported to be the first to get water on the land from the River. They worked with pick and shovel, and mostly by hand built the Beckstead Ditch, which permitted them to take the water from the Jordan River for use as they needed it. They had to dig wells for drinking water, and at first most of their homes were adobe huts, and some were merely holes dug into the bank along the river bottoms. Then as rapidly as possible better homes were built, a Church meeting place was provided, and they had a place for school children, very meager of course. Later Alexander erected the first Blacksmith shop in that area. This shop, built before 1853, was west and south of the Old Rock Meeting house, in West Jordan. The building was made of slabs and rough lumber with a roof of slabs. It did. not contain a bench to sit on. The men who came to visit or were waiting for their work to be finished, just stood around In 1861 to 1863 Alexander Beckstead assisted materially in sending outfits back to the Missouri River to help the Saints in the movement West. During the hard times when flour cost $25.00 a sack. Alexander, instead of selling his flour, divided it among the poor. It is reported that on one occasion he sent his son John Alma Beckstead with 5000 pounds of flour to the poor people in the St. George Utah, area - without cost to them. Alexander was a veteran Elder in the LDS Church during his entire life, and a friend to everyone in need. He passed away at his home in West Jordan 25 Feb 1870, and was buried in the South Jordan Cemetery 37-3. MOSES BECKSTEAD, b. 8 Oct 1807, Williamsburg Dundas, Canada, d. 22 July 1883, Williamsburg, Canada. Md. (1) PERMALIA A AULT, b. 3 Apr 1808, d. --. Md. (2) HANNAH HUDSON, 22 Jan 1851, Williamsburg, Dundas, Canada, b. 20 Mar 1822. 1st wife: 132-4 1. Lucius Beckstead 2 Feb 1829 133-4 2. Fanny Beckstead 15 Oct 1831 134-4 3. Joseph Moses Beckstead 6 July 1833 31 Mar 1914 135-4 4. James Lonzo Becksted 15 May 1835 10 Nov 1898 136-4 5. Elizabeth Beckstead 23 Jan 1837 2 Mar 1918 James L. Cook 137-4 6. Hester Ann Beckstead 12 June 1839 138-4 7. Philip Beckstead 24 Mar 1841 139-4 8. Chariotte Beckstead 1 June 1843 140-4 9. Mary Beckstead 3 Mar 1845 19 Mar 1903 141-4 10. Sarah Beckstead 22 Sept 1847 16 Mar 1899 2nd wife: 142-4 1. Ozias Becksted 15 Sept 1853 1934 143-4 2. Wellington Becksted 9 Sept 1855 144-4 3. Hurlbert Becksted 27 Sept 1857 145-4 4. Margaret Ann Becksted 15 Mar 1860 17 Aug 1933 146-4 5. Edwin Moses Beckstead 16 Jan 1864 5 Mar 1931 147-4 6. Martha Ellen Beckstead 25 July 1868 Ernest McMillan 38-3. FRANCIS BECKSTEAD, Jr., b. 4 July 1810, Williamsburg, Dundas, Canada; d. __ 1848 of Cholera, shortly after the family had started to move towards the Salt Lake Valley; he was buried on the banks of the Missouri River. He md. MARIA (MARY) BECKSTEAD, 1829, in Williamsburg, Dundas, Canada. She was born 15 Sept 1810, Williamsburg, Dundas, Canada, dau of Alexander Beckstead and Sarah Reddick; d. -- about 1867. (see 19-3) She md. (2) Mr. -- BAILEY. 148-4 1. Orrin Mortimer Beckstead 2 Feb 1830 1912 149-4 2. Sidney Marcus Beckstead 19 Mar 1832 7 Aug 1864 150-4 3. Alexander D. Beckstead 12 Apr 1834 151-4 4. Sarah Ann M. Beckstead 19 Jan 1836 152-4 5. Joseph E. Beckstead 12 Apr 1838 153-4 6. Elton Efron Beckstead 14 May 1840 30 Jan 1900 154-4 7. William I. Beckstead 11 Dec 1842 29 July 1880 155-4 8. AIma Albert Beckstead 28 Dec 1846 12 Dec 1925

ALEXANDER BECKSTEAD AND EARLY RESIDENTS OF THE SOUTH JORDAN AREA (SOUTH JORDAN HERITAGE BOOK 2 BY Lonnie and Annette Holt page 5-7)

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Reference: US/CAN 979.225/53 Now Francis and Margaret Beckstead are the first to join the Church as I have previously stated. Margaret died and Francis remarried for the second time. George Wesley Beckstead was born to them. Francis died on his way to Utah. Alexander Beckstead with his family, came to Utah in 1849. He spent the winter at the Cottonwood east of Murray. In 1850 he moved to the west of the Jordan River about 50 feet from the D.R.G. tracks. There they made a comfortable home, raised three families. He was the father of 32 children. He located his new home in the spring of 1850 of about 100 acres of land south the old He river bottoms. He bought a tract of land from George A. Smith and George bought this piece of land from a Mexican. It extended from the Sandy Road about three miles south to what is known as the old Hansen farm Northline. It was a squatters right. At that time an old Mexican owned this part of the country. Alexander Beckstead then sold pieces of the land he had purchased to people that wanted homes as they moved in. Seven of his sons had homes on this strip of land. At this time this was in West Jordan Ward as the ward extended to the point of the mountain south and north as far as Taylorsville, about 18 miles. Samuel Egbert was the next house south. He settled the spring, 1850, as Alexander Beckstead and he lived on this first farm he located in Utah and was a very successful farmer. He lived the remainder of his life there. He lived a ripe age and raised a large family from two wives. The settled and built-up the west side of the river. They were good Latter-Day Saints. The next family south lived on what was known as the Needham Farm. They came in the early fifties. Their names were Tom and Ed Booth. Tom lived there the remainder of his years. There were several families that lived on the Needham Farm during the fifties and sixties besides the Booth Brothers, namely Mr. William Dowden, George Wright, Charles Krammel. In 1868 William Aylet moved onto the Needham Farm. He lived there the remainder of his life. He died in 1902.. The next place was called the Woodmansee Farm which is known as the Richarson Farm just north of the Sandy Road. Isaac Harrison was one of the members of the Mormon Battalion. He lived the remainder of his life in Sandy and held many responsible positions such as postmaster and justice of the peace. He died a true Latter-Day Saint. The next family south was William Wardle who came from England in 1862. He lived one-half mile south of the Sandy Road. He lived in a dugout for a number of years. In 1867 he went to Sanpete to guard the settlement there during the Black Hawk War. He died in 1898. There was Joseph Wardle and his wife, father-in-law of William Wardle. The next family south was John Wardle, father of William Wardle. He lived by William in a Dugout. He came from England in 1862. The next family was old man Cooperi, father of T. Cooper, Sr. He lived in a dugout. There were the Maine boys who lived with old man Cooper, brothers William Maine, John Maine, Tom and George Maine. They were his brothers-in-law. They were not married. . The next family south was William Cooper, son of old man Cooper, who lived about a half-mile south. William finally moved to Bingham. The next family south was Mr. Keeton who lived one mile south of the Coopers. He lived under the hill east of David Shields. The next family south was Henry Tempass, he lived about three-fourths mile from Mr. Keeton. He bought land from Alexander Beckstead. In fact all of the homes south of Sandy Road bought their land from Alexander Beckstead. Tempass did not live there long. He moved to Herman. John W. Windward moved on the Tempass Farm for a short time in 1860. the next family south was James Shields in about 1868. The next family was Sidney Beckstead about 80 rods south. He only lived there a few years, then he moved to Pond Town in Utah County. Later Mathew Holt came from England and lived on the same piece of land as Sidney Beckstead had lived on. Henry Arnold made arrangements with Alexander Beckstead for the ground. Mathew Holt finally bought the ground from Henry Arnold and lived there the remainder of his life. He raised a true family and was a true Latter-Day Saint. Ann Holt must be remembered in this short sketch. She was a true Latter-Day Saint and was a mid-wife for many years. She was the means of bringing into the world the babies on the west side of the river, South Jordan, Riverton, Bluffdale and many outside places. She was ready to go any hour at all day or night, rain or shine. She did not go for the money that was in it, but to help her neighbors. Her fee for a confinement case was $2.00.What a change has come over people now that we have doctors that charge $35. Sister Ann Holt never considered the money, it was a real love for her to help her fellowman. She was the first president of the relief society in South Jordan organized in about 1861 and she remained at the head until her death in 1900. We have omitted John A. Beckstead that lived on the Tempass place after J.W. Windward moved to the old farm. The next family south is George Nimrod Soffe who moved there in 1859 from Provo. They made themselves a dugout and lived there for a number of years until they built themselves a nice comfortable home. They moved from the dugout in about one year into their new adobe home. He was a true Latter-Day Saint and took an active part in guarding themselves from the Indians. He met with an accident. He fell from a load of hay and was paralyzed for the rest of his life as an invalid. The next family south was Jesse Vincent. He was a mason by trade, having done mason work around the country for a number of years. He was also in the bishopric and was a true Latter-Day Saint. The next house was James Oliver who moved in 1859 from Provo. He also bought the land from Alexander Beckstead. He made a dugout into the sand hill and lived in it for a number of years. They moved from the dugout into a comfortable adobe home. He was leader of the South Jordan choir for 30 years. He died a true Latter-Day Saint. The next family was Thomas Alsop who came from Provo in 1859. He got his land from Alexander Beckstead, made a dugout and later on built an adobe house. About 1872 he moved to Sandy. Dave Jenkins bought Alsop's farm and stayed there for several years. The next family south was James Wood. He lived about 80 rods south. He moved from Provo in 1859. He made a dugout and lived in it for a number of years, then built an adobe house about 1864. He was president of the South Jordan Branch about 1865. He apostatized and joined the Josephites and moved to Missouri. The next family was John Wood, son of James Wood. He also apostatized and joined the Josephites. The next family to come was Rich Louder. He lived about 80 rods south but only stayed a short time before moving to West Jordan. The next family G.S. Beckstead Sr. moved on the same piece in 1862. He was president of the band. He only lived here a short time and then moved to Brigham City. Gordon was a member of the Mormon Battalion, a son of Alexander Beckstead.

ALEXANDER BECKSTEAD, THE FIRST PIONEER OF SOUTH JORDAN (OF DUGOUTS AND SPIRES, PAGES 6-8)

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Samuel Aiexander Beckstead was an original settler in West Jordan, arriving on 15 September 1849. He was born 16 March 1802 to Francis and Margaret Barkley Beckstead in Williamsburg, Ontario, Canada. Francis Beckstead and members of his family joined the LDS church in 1837 and traveled to Illinois in the company of others to be apart of the main body of church members. Francis' son, Alexander, was the second assistant captain of the company of Saints emigrating from Canada. A vicious mob surrounded the group as they approached Illinois and held them prisoners for several days. Their plan was to massacre the whole company. Suddenly, torrents of rain forced the rabble to seek shelter. They were held at bay by the storm until the following morning, when the Latter-day Saint prophet Joseph Smith and fifty armed men arrived to escort the company safely to Nauvoo. The Becksteads traveled to Utah with the Redden Allred Company. Alexander's father, Francis, died in the cholera epidemic of 1841; his mother was buried in a lonely grave along the pioneer trail to Utah. Alexander's younger brother, Francis, also died of cholera and was buried on the banks of the Missouri River. In 1849, Alexander and his family settled in West Jordan. Alexander was married to three women and was the father of thirty-two children. He and his first wife, Catherine Lince, were the parents of fifteen children, the last of whom was born a year after their arrival in the Salt Lake Valley. Keziah Albin Petry was Alexander's second wife, and they were parents of ten children. Clarrisa Ann Gilson was Alexander's third wife, and she bore seven children (see Chapter 3). Alexander Beckstead built his first home southwest of the historic rock meetinghouse (still standing) in West Jordan, of which he was "the main pillar in building." He operated the first blacksmith shop in south Salt Lake Valley, erected some time before 1853. The twelve-foot by sixteen-foot building was made of slabs of rough lumber and had a sloping roof. Inside were a forge, bellows, and an anvil, along with such tools of the trade as hammers, tongs, horseshoes and nails, rasps, pincers, and knives for trimming horses' hooves. Numerous wild horses lived on the range west of the Jordan River. Some of these mustangs were captured, tamed, and brought to the blacksmith to be shod. The smith would tether the horses with ropes because "sometimes the wild blood would come back and the horse would attempt to kick the blacksmith all over the shop." The four-dollar cost of shoeing a horse was often tendered in food or produce. Oxen were also shod in the blacksmith shop. One early pioneer recorded the circumstances of living those first years in the valley. Lorenzo Dow Young described the sustenance he obtained from the Jordan River bottomlands. He observed that thistles grew abundantly and could be found in mid-winter because the dry top remained attached to the edible root through the winter. That made it easier to find and dig the root in times of scarcity. Consequently, acres of bottonmland were harvested during the winter. When spring arrived, new vegetation emerged. Roots and herbs were eaten as food. Sego bulbs were eaten at first. but because some people died after eating the wrong variety, they soon were in less demand. Cowslips, or marsh marigolds, were a source of greens and proved palatable and refreshing. Such meager fare provided the nourishment necessary to sustain life and provide strength to accomplish the labors of the time. No doubt Alexander Beckstead and his family were in similar straits. In about 1850, Alexander helped dig the first ditch through which water was diverted from the Jordan River. It was called the Jordan Mill Race. Two and a half miles in length. This was the first canal dug in Utah and was built at a cost of five thousand dollars. It ran by the Archibald Gardner flour mill in West Jordan. Alexander began with a farm of 160 acres in West Jordan. In 1859, he moved his family to South Jordan. He settled on a tract of land that extended southward along the west side of the riverbottoms from what is now 9400 South to 12500 South and west to about 1300 West. He purchased land from George A. Smith, who had obtained the land through a Mexican land grant. The land was subdivided and sold to other settlers. Seven of Alexander's sons helped begin the settlement of South Jordan: Henry, Thomas Wesley, Samuel Alexander, George Washington, John Alma, Joseph Alonzo, and Robert. The first homes were nothing more than holes dug into hillsides west of the river. Such available materials as willows, cane, and dirt were piled on top to form a roof, These were called dugouts. In 1859, Alexander Beckstead, Isaac Wardle, and others began work on another ditch to divert water from the Jordan River, two and a half miles south of the settlement. It began at the Draper bridge (at 12600 South in modern-day Riverton) and traveled northwest to the community. The settlers used picks and spades to painstakingly etch out the ditch. A spirit level was used to survey and grade the entire ditch. The man-made water channel became known as the Beckstead Ditch and was essential to the permanency of the population. With a sense of satisfaction, the ditch diggers allowed water to flow through the winding excavation about the first day of June 1859. They irrigated and raised a small grain crop and vegetable garden the first year of using the water course. The ditch still passes through the city today. Alexander, his family, and friends also dug wells by hand for drinking water. Besides overcoming the challenge of securing sufficient water, Alexander and other early colonizers had to contend with grasshoppers or mountain crickets. At times the insects appeared as a thick carpet, completely covering the ground. The pioneers would plant tree seedlings, small potatoes, or grain only to see hordes of crickets descend from the mountains. The insects would eat every green leaf and stem in sight. Tens of thousands of tender fruit tree seedlings were eaten down to the ground. Attempts to kill, burn, or drive away the crickets with brush failed. Potato seedlings were covered with sheets and tablecloths, only to have the crickets eat holes in the cloth, leaving the "short, naked stems" of the potatoes remaining. The hope of raising a sufficient supply of grain to make bread expired as the farniles fought in vain to keep the crickets from climbing the stalks of wheat. The crickets would "cut it just below the head." Nevertheless, Alexander was eventually successful at farming. He is said to have raised seventy bushels of wheat per acre, seventy to one hundred bushels of oats and barley per acre, and five hundred to six hundred bushels of large-sized potatoes per acre. Alexander served in the Blackhawk War, which lasted from 1865 to 1868 (see Chapter 3). Alexander's sons, Henry and John Alma Beckstead, also volunteered for the war effort, as did several other South Jordan pioneers. Alexander helped with many projects in building up the settlements of West Jordan and South Jordan. A very generous person, he gave materially to the cause of settling by sending wagon outfits to the east. The outfits helped in bringing other pioneers to the west. When flour was selling for twenty-five dollars per sack, he divided it among his neighbors rather than profit from it. He lived in the area until his death on 25 February 1870. The efforts of Alexander Beckstead and his associates opened the way for many others to come live "under the hill" in following years. Some of Beckstead's descendants continue to reside in South Jordan more than a century later and benefit from the legacy he and other pioneers left for them.

DESCENDANTS OF JOHN BECKSTEAD INTRODUCTORY HISTORY (EMAIL SENT BY STEVEN BECKSTEAD TO LINDA LARTER, MARCH 13, 2000)

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From: Steven S. Beckstead To: Linda Larter Date: Monday, March 13, 2000 8:51 PM Subject: DESCENDANTS OF JOHN BECKSTEAD INTRODUCTORY HISTORY DESCENDANTS OF JOHN BECKSTEAD INTRODUCTORY HISTORY Our ancestons kept few records. We are very grateful, however, for the assistance given by the Rev. Isaac N, Beckstead, Ottawa, Canada, who wrote the first portion of the Introductory History, of our ancestors in New York and Canada. He has worked many years in genealogical research assembling data on the Beckstead families. The latter portion of the History, from September 1838 when our ancestors arrived at De Witt, Missouri, from Canada, to the present, was written by Lee A. Beckstead. This information was developed from research, family diaries, and data furnished by members of the Becksead family line. The present history and genealogy is on a modest scale, taking us back to John Beckstead (probably Johan Bechst€edt in G€erman form) born 1738 in Saxony (some say Hanover), Germany. It is believe€d he migrated to England, whee he joined the armed forces. Later he saw service in Canada, in the closing period of the "Seven Years War", which ended with the cession of Canada by France to the English, in 1763. At the close of the War, disbanded soldiers, who wished to settle in America, were landed in ports of entry, especially Philadelphia and New York. This would account for failure to find our ancestors' name in any regular passenger list. It is believed that John settled first in Pennsylvania, moving later to the colony of New York, where he became a blacksmith in the Albany district, New York. The first public reference to our ancestor shows that in 1767 he attended, as a junior officer, a muster of Militia in the Albany area. His name also occurs later on, in connection with certain land deals. The next landmark is in 1790, when the first U. S. Census was taken. In the returns we find listed, "John Bechsted', as a resident of Rensselaerville, Albany County, New York his family: "Four males 16 years old and over, two males under 16 years, and one€ female.'Evidently by 1790 all the daughters had left home. It is also indicated that two of his sons were not yet born. In addition to the foregoing, there are Church records in which John's name appears. These relate to baptisms of his own children, or others, possibly grandchildren, at which he was a sponsor. From the data afforded, our ancestor and his family had connections with both Evangelical Lutheran and Dutch Reformed Churches. During 1775-1781, the Revolutionary War between England and the thirteen American Colonies took place, ending in victory for the latter. The Albany district was the scene of bitter conflict. Indian allies, armed with muskets, tomahawks and scalping knives, added to the tenors of the War. Neighbor fought against neighbor, friend against friend, and even brother against brother. An indication of the fierceness of the struggle in the Albany sector is seen in the record that the grave of Sr. William Johnson, who had supported the British cause, was opened, and the lead of his casket molded into bullets. We do not know what part John Beckstead took in the Great War of Independence. His sons were too young for active engagement. But subsequent events suggest that as far as possible he maintained neutrality, despite fierce fighting on every hand, yet he may have favored the British cause, because in 1797 his eldest son Alexander (4-2) was given a 200 acre land grant in Canada, as recorded at York (Toronto) on 2 Aug 1797. Then in later years the records reflect grants were awarded a number of John's grandsons in Williamsburg and Matilda, Canada. In Matilda, Jacob J. and Jacob L. received 100-acre grants in 1839 and 1846; grants to Joseph and Francis L. in Williamsburg of 100 acres date from 1839 and 1856, while Lucius, in 1865 received 200 acres. These grants of land show that John arnd his family were regarded as Loyalists, though not U. E. Loyalists, a distinction reserved for those who had enlisted on the British side€, served actively in the War, and in 1784 many had moved to Canada and be€came British subjects. There is no reason of the Beckstead's going to Canada at that early date. Many colonials were in the same position as our ancestor. They favored the British cause, but continued their American citizenship. England even indemnified some of them for losses suffered because of their loyalty to the Crown. It may here be recorded that John Beckstead lost his life in 1808, in an accident with horses. He died at the age of 70. The records to this date indicate that John Beckstead died in New York, and never went to Canada. However, some of his children, with families, moved to Williamsburg, Canada, a year or two before John's death. It seems appropriate at this time to give our readers a little information about Wlliamsbu€rg, Canada, as it first appeared to our ancestors in the early 1800's, as they crossed the St. Lawrence River, and Started to build their homes. Williamsburg had already seen some land clearance and other improvements. A few small communities were forming. Pioneer lumber and gristmills were on the w€ay, with two or three in operation. A small boat-building industry had been established near the Morrisburg, of today, on the St. Lawrence River. Forests still covered by far the greater part of the country. The stump of a tree that stood stately and tall in the Williamsburg woods, 200 years ago, has been preserved as a relic of the past. It measures nearly six feet in diameter, and is still sound and firmly rooted. We can appreciate the great fight settlers had to make in wresting land from the wilderness of trees. Fire, axes, saws, chains, and the might of men and oxen, were all taxed to the utmost in the struggle. Yet the woods moderated the heat of summer and were a shelter against winter storms and cold. They also conserved water to power the little mills located on creeks and streams, provided medicinal herbs, chewing gum, wild honey, dyes, baskets and maple sugar and syrup, now a luxury product in much demand. Further benefits included building material, tanbark, and an important cash crop, masts for ships, and squared timber, for which there was a market in England. Pioneer doctors did the best they could with their limited science and equipment. However, people generally had remedies of their own: pine pitch for cuts and wounds, gold thread, gathered from the woods, for babies' sore mouths; cohosh, sassafras, catnip and burdock fort he blood. Warts weer€ removed by rubbing them with the moist underbody of a frog, while goitre (known as thick-neck) could be dealt with by wrapping a garter snake around the part, and then releasing the remedy. Sometimes, unfortunately, mistakes were made, as in steaming a fever patient, by loading him down with heavy blankets, and then seating him over a tub of hot water. Land was cheap and there were few roads. Oxen were in general used for work in the woods and for clearing the land for farm use. For fencing the newly-won fields, brush might be used. This material gave rise to the expression "homely as a brush fence". Stumps, laid sideways in a row were also used. They made a durable fence and an effective one, no farm animal being able to get through the roots that barred the way. Primitive implements served for woods work, land cultivation and harvesting. The "cradle" was very useful for the harvesting of grain. It was a scythe with curved wooden fingers above the blade, which laid the grain in a neat row. This made binding possible, done with bands deftly made from the grain itself. Se€eding was done by hand. This required skill, if patchy growth was lo be avoided. The sower's every step and swing of hand had to be in unison, otherwise critical neighbors, the summer trough, could see€ a pattern of his unskillful work. Our forebears would not fare too badly as to foodstuffs. Available would be pork and beef (the latter rather rarely); milk and eggs; potatoes, cabbage, corn, beans, and peas; wild fruits, eaten fresh or dried; coffee, made with scorched grain; and, of course, wheat, ground by hand or in small water-powered mills, then coming into use. Very special products were maple sugar and syrup, from "sugar" maple trees, "boiled down" in big iron kettles, hung over out-door fires. There were few sources of income. One was potash, produced from forest trees, cut down, chopped or sawed into logs, which were hauled into heaps and burned. The ashes were then leached, and the lye evaporated over fire, in iron kettles. A market for the potash so produced was found in Montreal. Evidently potash money was hard-earned money. Yet the writer's grandfather, Alexander (12-3), and his family, by a supreme effort, earned in one summer four hundred dollars to pay off a mortgage. A powerful cleanser, soft soap, was also made by boiling down lye, with fat or beef or pork. This product was not good for shaving, which may help to explain the prevalence of full beards. Tallow candles shed what light they could in the homes when night came down upon the land. Education comprised little more than the three'R's", and schools were very primitive. Teachers were called "masters", because their rule was strict and enforced with rods from neighboring woods. These instruments of punishment might be of birch, maple or beech, but all were equally effective. Social events were promoted by visits, and what were called "bees", or gatherings of neighbors to help a neighbor clear a piece of land, raise his barn, or, in the feminine sphere, piece a quilt. Toward the end of, the very early pioneer period, apple-paring and corn-husking bees were common. These, it must be confessed, often resulted in more play than work. Roads being bad, or non-existent, vehicles scarce and uncomfortable, oxen slow, and horses not in general use, walking was the usual way of getting from place to place. The writer has heard of children walking seven miles on a Sunday morning to attend Church, To save their shoes they went barefoot, but put them on before entering the Church. Stone bruises and stubbed toes were common troubles of children in those days. But the journey on Sunday morning brought the children into full view of the great St. Lawrence River, no small part of their reward. The people's religious interests were served by the Lutheran Evangelical Church, the Church of England, the Dutch Reformed Church, and the Methodist Episcopal Church. All these, except the Church of England, were transplants from the United States. The Lutherans built the first Church in Williamsburg, in 1787. The first Dutch Reformed pastor was John Ludwig Broeffle, who had married Catharine (5-2), a daughter of John Beckstead. Methodist preachers were very active, riding far and wide on horseback, and holding meetings in schools, homes, barns, and the open air. As a result of this intense activity Methodism progressed more rapidly than any other cause. Very little information is available concerning history of John's daughters. However, records reflect that Elizabeth Beckstead (1-2) became the wife of Peter Zimmer. Upon the death of her hushand, 1797, their son John Volkman Zimmer was reared by Elizabeth's brother, John L. Beckstead (6-2); Nellie (Helena) Beckstead (2-2) married Charles Schumacher; Dorothea (Dollie) Beckstead (3-2) married Johan Nicholas Matthews. These three daughters of John remained in New York, and did not move to Canada. Alexander Beckstead (4-2) (see details later) Catharine Beckstead (5-2): ln 1789 she became a member of the Dutch reformed Church, her name being entered on the roll as "Catharine Begstedt. In 1795 she was married to the local pastor, Rev. Ludwig Broeffle. In the same year they moved to Williamsburg, where Rev. Broeffle took charge of Dutch Reformed people in an extensive district, with headquarters at Mariatown on the St. Lawrence River. So began 20 years of labor, which laid the foundations for much of the Christian way of life, so evident today in Williamsburg and adjoining Townships. (see details 5-2) John L. Beckstead (6-2): As far as is known he did not leave New York, but his sons Joseph and Jacob J. came to Williamsburg in 1829. Their descendants have made a creditable contribution to the industrial and cultural life of the community. It is interesting to note that at the christening of his son Joseph, 1801, John L. had his name, as father, entered on Church registers in the form "Johannes Beckstedt". Francis Beckstead (7-2) (see details later) Jacob Beckstead (8-2): The only information on file is that he was born 17 May 1776 in Berne, Albany County, New York. His wife was Margaret Hennis. Maurice Beckstead (5-2): Born in 1778, he was christened Moritz, the German form of Maurice in French and English. Maurice moved to Williamsburg in the 1800's, and acquired land bordering on the St. Lawrence River. His property later became the site of the town of Morrisburg, which brought him and his family into close contact with the growing community. Joseph Beckstead (10-2): It is regretted that there is so little information on younger sons of John; we have no data regarding Joseph. Henry Beckstead (11-2): Was the youngest of the family and married Elizabeth Shaver. Beyond these particulars, concerning Jacob, Joseph and Henry, we have no data. However, their names often reappear in later generations, showing that they were respected and esteemed by those who knew them. Alexander Beckstead (4-2), and Francis Beckstead (7-2): From the information assembled it is quite evident these brothers were very close to each other. And, it is likely that their sister, Catharine (5-2) may have had something to do with their moving to Canada in 1807. These brothers procured 200-acre farms near the town of Williamsbutg, then only known as the 'Corners'. Their farms were about one mile apart. Alexander's lot was a crown grant, half of which was owned by Christopher Reddick, a U. E. Loyalist, father-in-law of Alexander. This half was transferred to Sarah, the daughter, while the other half was procured by a 'Bargain and Sale' transaction. On the prope€rty of Alexander's was a small frame dwelling, in which the family must have been uncomfortably crowded. The writer's grandfather, Alexander, Jr. (12-3) was at that time 14 years old, and not by any means an only child. However, by 1810, a roomy stone house had been built, which at the time, was probably the best farm home in the Township. It is still standing, in 1962, its a-feet thick walls and foundations as sound as the day Alexander and family proudly moved into it 150 years ago. This old homestead is now owned and occupied by a fine Dutch family, who take great pride in it, and, are making it young again with children, with improvements and up to date equipment. Francis (7-2) also made great progress on his farm. Two Canadian families now occupy it. A young wife in one family is a descendant, in the 6th generation of Francis. In 1812, War broke out between the United States and England. Canada, of course, could not avoid involvement. American forces invaded the country along the St. Lawrence and Lakes Erie and Ontario. One battle, that of Crysler's Farm, was fought within a few miles of Alexander's homestead. He probably took part in the fighting, as he had enlisted for service in the War. The battle resulted in a victory for the Canadians. Contributing to their success, so it is reported, was over-indulgence in honey, found in Matilda Township by the invaders, not long before the battle. The Canadians had also Indians fighting with them, whose terrifying War cries and savage tactics helped to unnerve the enemy. This must have been a distressing period to our Beckstead families, who had so lately come from the United States to Canada. Francis' farm, located not far from that of Alexander, was a beautiful piece of property, having good well-drained soil, while its elevation afforded a pleasing view in every direction. This farm, too, had been a Government land grant. It is recorded that Francis purchased the 200 acres for 150 pounds, about $700.00 in later currency. Here, aided by a diligent family, he built up one of the best farm homes in Dundas County. On the whole€, it was probably a more valuable property than that of Alexander. In 1837-38 a great change took place in the lives of these two brothers and their families. They were brought under the influence of three Mormon missionaries of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. It is known that Francis, and most of his children and grandchildren became converts during that period. However, it is not known if members of Alexander's family were likewise converts. It is recorded, however, that members of the LDS Church were anxious to Join the main body of the church, then in Missouri, and later in Nauvoo, Illinois. Therefore, this move called for preparations by the families of Francis. One necessary step was the sale of the farms the prop€ertes being good ones, sales were soon mad€e. There followed other preparations for the great adventure€ of faith, the journey to Missouri. Wagons, ox€en and provisions were need€ed. The company, also, had to b€e organized and put under responsible leaders. This need was met by appointing Christopher Mekley, who, with his family, had joined the movement, as first, and Francis Beckstead, second in command, with assistants. All told, it is believed the party could not have numbered more than 30 or 35, its size being reduced by the decision of Alexander (4-2) and his family, with the exception of Maria (Mary), not to make the journey at that time. There were present, howaver, three Mormon missionaries returning to their homes from their missionary work in Canada. lt is also to be kept in mind that not only were grown-up members of Francis Sr.'s family with the expedition, but a considerable number of his grandchildren as well. It may be noted here that some of Francis' children did not join the movement at that time, and remained in Canada; those remaining in Canada were sons -- Jacob L., Moses, Henry, Mathew and Charles; and daughters -- Maria, Hannah, Nellie, Helena and Betsy. It is reported that after two or three days with the expedition, Charles, a younger son of Francis, Sr., lost heart, and at night left the camp and set out for Williamsburg, where he arrived safely in due course. He had been helped by an older sister, who supplied him with food and a bit of money. And so Francis, Sr., (7-2) and members of the group moved away from Wlliamsburg, which must have been a tremendous sacrifice to them, to leave their homes, which were well established, and other members of the family. As they traveled on, it is known that they encountered great difficulties, with sickness and other hardships, from day to day. It was a long journey moving by oxen, and among other things, it is reported they encountered a serious peril at one time, when they were attacked by armed enemies of the Mormons, who threatened them with destruction. They were camped near a stream, and it is told that it was impossible for anyone to go to the stream for water, as the enemies would fire on them. However, a torrential rain came and dispersed their attackers, and early the next day they were rescued by friends, under the leadership of the Prophet Joseph Smith. After a journey lasting almost three months, the company reached DeWitt, Missouri, in the latter part of September 1838. The "Historical Record", edited and published by Andrew Jenson in 1886, records, pages 603-4, "About the 25th of September, 1838, Elder John E. Page arrived in DeWitt with about fifty wagons and several hundred Saints from Canada, and a few days later a small company arrived from the same province under the direction of Christopher Merkley, Zenos H. Gurley and Francis and Alexander Beckstead, from Williamsburgh (now Morrisburgh), Upper Canada." This was the beginning of a ten-year period during which they suffered and were severely persecuted, as were all the Saints, from mob violence in this and other areas. The "Historical Record" continues:"... About the 20th of the month a mob of about 100, perhaps 150 men rode into the settlement (DeWitt), and threatened the Saints with violence and death if they did not agree at once to leave the place and move out of the county. They finally gave the Saints until the 1st of October (1838) to take their departure. They threatened further that if the "Mormons" were not gone by that time they would exterminate them without regard to age or sex, and destroy their chattels by throwing them into the river." About this time the Prophet Joseph Smith learned of the difficulties being encountered by the Saints in DeWit, and he immediately tried to make his way to that location, but was only successful in reaching them by traveling unfrequented roads, as the principle roads were strongly guarded by the mob, who refused to ingress as well as egress. The Prophet reported: "I found my brethren, who were only a handful in comparison to the mob by which they were surrounded, in this situation, and their provisions nearly exhausted, and no prospect of obtaining any more. The Saints were forbidden to go out of town, under the pain of death, and were shot at when they attempted to go out to get food, of which they were d€estitute. As fast as their cattle, horses or other property got where the mob could get hold of it, it was taken as spoil. By these outrages the brethren were€ obliged, most of them, to live in wagons or tents.... Some of the brethren died for the common necessities of life and perished from starvation ... many houses of the Saints we€re burned, their ca€ttle driven away, and a great quantity of their property was destroyed by the mob.... The militia having mutinied, and the€ greater part of them being re€ady to join the mob, the brethren cam€e to the conclusion that they would leave the place and seek shelter elsewhere; and gathering up as many wagons as they could get ready, which was about 70, with a remnant of the property they had been able to save from their matchless foes, they left Dewitt and started for Caldwell and Far West on the afternoon of Thursday, October 11, 1838. Many were sick and weak, and that evening a woman who had a short time before given birth to a child, died from exposure, and was buried in the€ grove without a coffin. During our journey we were continually harassed and threaten€d by the mob, who shot at us several times, while several of our brethren died from fatigue and privations which they had to endure, and we had to inter them by the wayside, and under circumstances the most distressing. We arrived in Caldwell on we had stances the most October 12, 1838." Some of the Saints settled in Caldwell, while others went to Far West, for the winter of 1838. Francis Beckstead (7-2) with his children and grandchildren, was in the midst of those trying times. lt is not known at which location they settled during the winter of 1838, however, from our records we believe it was at Far West, Missouri, inasmuch as a daughter of Alexander Beckstead (36-3), Sarah Elizabeth Beckstead (108-4) was born at Far West, Missouri, 31 December 1838. Sometime in the spring of 1839, Francis and his group, with many hundreds of the Saints, began their movement towards the Mississippi River, and up the River towards Ouincy, Adams County, Illinois, a distance of more than 200 miles. The weather was cold and the roads generally muddy and bad. Scores of Saints died from exposure and fatigue on that memorable journey. They traveled in organized companies, so they could help each other. It is believed that Francis Beckstead settled in Lima, Illinois, while others of his families settled in Warsaw, and area, near Nauvoo. (From information noted in Journal of Christopher Merkley.) It should be noted, at this point, that although Alexander Beckstead (4-2) sold his 200-acre farm, at about the same time as his brother Francis (7-2), it is not known for certain if he and his family were influenced by the Mormon missionaries, to the extent of becoming members of the LDS Church. At least, neither Alexander nor any of his family left Williamsburg, Canada, with Francis and his group. It is recorded, however, that all of his family left Williamsburg in 1840, and moved to Fulton County, Illinois, with the exception of Elizabeth (11-3); Alexander (12-3); Francis L. (14-3); and Adam (17-3). These four children remained in Williamsburg, Canada, and vicinity. The families going to Fulton County settled in the rich farming areas. Their descendants have made a worthy contribution to the business and cultural life of the communities where they have lived. Unfortunately, what befell Alexander Beckstead (4-2) after 1840 is not known. There is nothing to show that he went to Illinois, neither is it known where or with whom he lived, or when he died, and the location of his grave remains undisclosed. In 1840 he was 73 years old, and his life span may not have extended much beyond that date. Our ancestors did not leave many records for the period 1838, when they moved to the area near Nauvoo, Illinois. In 1846 we find them in Pottawettamie County, Iowa. Their records indicate however, the birth of some grandchildren to Francis from 1840-1845 in Warsaw and Carthage, so we can be sure they lived in that are a until the Saints were driven out of Nauvoo. It is recorded that Francis Be€ckstead (7-2) died in 1841 in Adams County; further, that some of the children were in the vicinity of the Calthage Jail when the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum Smith were killed by the mob. A granddaughter of Alexander Beckstead (36-3) related the following item of interest: "Grandma Jenkins said that she could remember her Grandfather, Alexander Beckstead (36-3), telling of the occasion when they came and asked him to help guard Joseph Smith. He (Alexander) said he witnessed the shooting and killing of Joseph and Hyrum, and saw Joseph fall from the jail window after ho was shot. While Grandfather was on this duty, two ugly men rode up to the house end told Grandmother they wanted her husband, and asked where he was. She told them and they said, 'Oh, he is out guarding Ole Joe Smith.' There were about 30 families in that little village where the Saints had stopped, end these men told her they would give her until morning, and if she wasn't gone by then, they would burn the place down, and kill the children. She pleaded with them, saying she had a very sick little boy, but that made no difference. They rode away saying they would be back" The little boy who was sick at that time was Thomas Wesley Beckstead (105-4), Lydia Ann Beckstead, Jenkin's father, who related this story to her granddaughter Letha,Hair. This story reflects the truth that our ancestors lived in constant fear for their lives, and never knew, from one hour to the next if they would be attacked by the mobs. After the death of Francis Beckstead (7-2) in 1841, the great responsibility of keeping the families of our ancestors together, rested upon the shoulders of his two sons, Alexander (36-3), and Francis, Jr, (36-3). History tells us that during the latter part of 1845 and the beginning of 1846, all of the Saints were busy preparing for the journey they were soon to begin -- even the children were busily assisting in those preparations. For example, they parched quantities of corn, which was taken to the mill and ground up. This parched corn could be eaten with further cooking, during stormy days, or at times when they could not stop to make a fire to cook their food. It can be assumed that our ancestors were among this group. lt is not known just how, or the exact date, they crossed the Mississippi River, but it is believed they were among the first parties. Some of the parties crossed the River by way of old watercrafts, which were in use day and night to convey the exiled Saints and their belongings to the opposite shore of the River. It is also recorded that on 25th of February 1846, some walked across the River on ice and the next few days witnessed the strangest sight of all, long caravans streaking out across the mighty river over a solid floor of ice which stretched from bank to bank a distance of one mile.... A few days later this unique roadway was broken, and the line of caravans was halted as great blocks of ice choked the river. As they crossed the Mississippi River, there is no doubt their hearts were sad, with not knowing where they were going nor what the future would bring them. It is not known the exact date our ancestors arrived in the area of Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, Iowa, a distance of about 400 miles from Nauvoo; however, the main body of the Saints re€ached there by the middle of June, 1846. Shortly after our ancestors arrived in the area of Council Bluffs, Iowa, the family sustained another setback. In July 1846, President Brigham Young was asked by the President of the United States to furnish 500 volunteers, from the Mormon ranks to serve in the War against Mexico. This group was known as the Mormon Battalion. Three Beckstead boys were among the first to respond to this call, just at a time when their service€s were needed by their families - they were William Ezra Beckstead (48-3); Gordon Silas Beckstead (101-4); and Orrin Mortimer Beckstead (148-4). The hardships encountered by this group of volunteers are described hereinafter (148-4), in a story written for a Carson City, Nevada newspaper, by Orrin Mortimer Beckstead, dated October 20, 21, 1909. During the period 1846-1848 it appears the families were making preparations for their journey to the Rocky Mountains. Suddenly another tragedy occurred which was a severe loss to them. They had not traveled far when Francis, Jr. (38-3) was stricken with Cholera and died after a few hours of illness. He was buried on the banks of the Missouri River. Alexander Beckstead (36-3) now had the full responsibility for the movement of the families to the Salt Lake Valley. He had a large family of young children to look after, as well as helping his younger brothers and sisters with their families. Tragedy and sadness continue€d with the families as they journeyed westward. As they neared Wood River, Nebraska, Alexander's sister, Sarah Louisa Beckstead Forbush (44-3€) was stricken with Cholera and died almost immediately, leaving four little children. The families were determined in their efforts, however, and finally arrived in Salt Lake Valley, September 15, 1849. Upon their arrival in the Valley, they settled near relatives or close friends in the Cottonwood area, east of Murray. They helped one another in providing food for the families. In the spring of 1850 Alexander Beckstead (36-3) moved to the west side of Jordan River, He purchased 160 acres of land which extended from where the D&RG Railroad is now located, southward along the river to Riverton. A number of the group located along the river because it was their only source of water supply. They were obliged to live in "Dugouts" for a short time, until they could haul timber from the mountains to build log houses. They immediately provided a meetinghouse for worship, and a schoolhouse. Later they built the "Beckstead Ditch", and were able to get water from the river on to their lands. As they prospered they built better homes. Some families located in Weber County, where Henry Beckstead was the first sheriff. Others moved into Utah County, and some to Arizona. A few years later Henry Beckstead moved along the Jordan River, and later Thomas Wesley Beckstead moved to the Whitney-Preston area of southern Idaho, where they settled permanently. As the children of these groups were married, some moved to other States where they could secure better employment, or had greater opportunities for the future. Becksteads have engaged in all types of business endeavors and work. It is interesting to note they have served more than 320 years in law enforcement work, in such position as Sheriffs, Police Officers, Constables, Justice of the Peace, and State and Federal Officers. From the Beckstead families who came to Utah, a majority still remain in the area of Utah and Idaho.

ORIGIN OF BECKSTEAD NAME

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(REFERENCE: E-MAIL FROM STEVEN S. BECKSTEAD TO LINDA LARTER, FRIDAY JANUARY 14, 2000) The Family name of Beckstead originated in Germany where it was sp€elled Bechstadt. They have researched the family beck to Saxony, Germany back into the early 1700's where the church burned down that contained the earlier family records. Jahn Volckman Bechstadt left Germany and migrated to England where he joine€d the armed forces. Later he saw service in Canada, In the closing period of the "Seve€n Years War", which ended with the cession of Canada by France to English in 1763. At tho close of the war, disbanded soldiers, who wished to settle in America, were landed in ports of entry in Philadelphia and New York. It is believed he settled first in Pennsylvania, moving later to the colony of N€ew York, where he became a blacksmith in the Albany district, New York. In the 1790, when the first U. S. Census was taken John Bechsted shows as a resident of Rensselaerville, Albany, New York. In the colonial Records of N€ew York state - vol. 2 p 823 John BEADSTEAD 1767 Capt. Daniel Campbells Co. Muster Roll of David campbell's co. of Militia schenectady the 12 MAY 1767. Daniel Campbell capt. the date of his Commission 5th JAN 1758 Lieutenants both dead. Hammans Peters Ensign date of his Commission 30th MAR 1758. John Beadstead) Cherles Deniston) Sergents Charles Dayall) Wllism Culberson) Some of Jahn Volcman Bechstadt children moved to Canada and were given land grant in Ontario, Canada as well as a number of his grandsons were also given land grant in Williamsburg and Matilda, Ontario, Canada. Then in 1837-1838 Mormon missionaries from the Church Of Jesus Christ Of Latter-Day Saints converted some of Jahn's family to the Mormon faith. These families were encouraged to join the rest of the members of the Church Of Jesus Christ Of Latter-Day Saints in Nauvoo, Illinois. So they left Canada traveling to Nauvoo. From there they were driven out by mob and migrated with the Mormon Pioneers arriving in Salt Lake City, Utah in 1849. They settled in the southern part of the Salt Lake Valley, in the area that now covers West Jordan, South Jordan, Riverton, and Bluffdale, Utah. Where many of the family still remains. From there€ they have spread all over the western United States. Plus there are still many of the family living in Ontario, Canada. The name Beckstead has had many different spellings throughout the years, Bechstadt, Beadstead, Bexstead, Beste€de, Betstad, Bedstadt, Bedstrad, Bechsted, Beckstedt, Becksded, Begstedt, Bedsteed, Bexstead, Bekstead, B€edsetd. There€ are still family in Gemany that have the spelling of Bechstadt. Some of their famlly genelogy goes back into the 1300's. With spelling as Bechstadt, Bechstadt, Buchstadt, Buckstadt, Bachsatt, Bechstatt. But so far they haven't been able to connect the two lines. In 1850 the family settled on the name spelling of Beckstead. But in Canada they spell it Becksted. The family has grown and I am the 10th generation of a German emigrate named Jahn Volckman Bechstadt. My family moved from Utah, to Billings, Montana in 1975, then to Laurel, Montana, then to Joliet, Montana, then to Havre, Montana in 1984. So I am a Montana Beckstead, being born in Billings, Montana end raised in the Big Sky of Montana.

EXCERPT FROM SOUTH JORDAN CITY HISTORY

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(REFERENCE: http;//www/ci.south-jordan.ut.us/history.cfm) South Jordan was settled in 1857 by Alexander and Catherine Lince Beckstead. Like many of the first settlers in the Salt Lake Valley, their first home was a cave dug in the river bank. Their first homes were a "good sized room" (fourteen feet square) dug into the hill, with large sun-dried adobe bricks on the front wall. Large logs covered with plants, willows, and mud and dirt formed the roof. With bricks and shovels, the Beckstead family dug and built the Beckstead Ditch, which still exists today from 12600 South to 10600 South. The ditch diverted water from the Jordan River to irrigate crops as early as June of 1857. Later, the ditch was used as a mill race for the White Faun Flour Mill, the first mill in South Jordan, built by Robert in 1895. In 1902 the mill burned down but was later rebuilt. Flour mills were very important when people grew their own food. Farmers would take their wheat, oats and barley to the mill and trade for sacks of flour, cracked cereal or breakfast mush, and "bran and shorts" to feed the animals. Water from the Beckstead Ditch powered the mill until electricity was discovered and became a more convenient source of power. South Jordan was primarily a rural farming community when it was incorporated as a town in 1935. In 1860 the population was 1,354 and by 1970 the population had more than doubled to 2,942. Housing gradually started to replace farmland as the population once again more than doubled by 1990 to 13,106. South Jordan's exponential growth since the early 1970s has brought all the challenges and opportunities of growth. The current population is estimated to be 37,070. Today South Jordan's most distinctive and recognized landmark, visible from miles around is the LDS Jordan River Temple overlooking the open space and protected green belts of the Jordan River Parkway. Though residential development in the Salt Lake Valley has mushroomed, South Jordan is committed to preserving the natural beauty. Along the banks of the Jordan River, South Jordan City is cooperating with other government, non-profit and private groups to set aside a significant area for the South Jordan Riverway Wildlife Enhancement Project.

JOHN BECKSTEAD (FROM I.W. BECKSTEAD)

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NOTES ON JOHN BECKSTEAD 1738-1808 (Excerpts from a letter by I.W. Beckstead 502 Melbourne Avenue Ottawa, Canada (date not known) Born 1738 in Germany. As a young man, he migrated to England, where he joined the army, and later served in the War between England and France, which ended in the conquest by the English in 1759. Later he arrived in Pennsylvania, then a British Colony, with his wife Elizabeth McDonald, a Scottish woman. It may be noted that many Germans sought homes in this colony, being attracted by the friendly welcome they received there. Not many years after John's arrival in Pennsylvania, the war of Independence broke out. Canadian descendants of John believed that he remained loyal to Britain. They base their view on the fact that all of his sons eventually settled in Williamsburg, Canada and the further circumstance instead of remaining in Pennsylvania he moved to New York, where Sir William Johnson and later his son, Sir John Johnson maintained a strong resistance to the revolution. On the other hand, there is no direct evidence came to Canada with the Loyalists following the war. What we do know is that he lived the last 20 or more years of his life at Schoharie in New York, where he followed blacksmithing and farming, In 1808 he was killed in an accident with horses. Whether or not our ancestor was a U.S. Loyalist, he must have passed through trying times during the War for Independence. Both sides had Indian allies who scalped, burned, and destroyed, adding greatly to the horrors of the conflict. Schoharie, where John eventually settled, was originally a large Indian encampment named "Charnjorie". It was in the near neighborhood of the "Johnson Settlement", a district that saw some of the bloodiest fighting of the war, and held out to the very last against the Revolution. FURTHER NOTES Out ancestor's German name probably was Johann Backstedt In 1856, a postmaster was appointed to Dunbar in Williamsburg, Canada. He was William Beckstedt. Evidently he used the German form of surname. Regarding John's migration to England, it appears that other Beckstead's made the same migration. A veteran of World War I told this writer that he had visited the Beckstead homes in England. Some years ago a book was published in England in which a place called Beckstead Hall formed a part of the story. These Germans may have been attracted to England by the enthronement, in 1714 by George, elector of Hanover, as George I, King of England. This raises the question of John's home in Germany. The writer's father said that he came from Hanover, others understand that his native province was Saxony. So did John come to Canada with the Loyalists following the War of Independence? Those appointed to settle on the North shore of the St. Lawrence numbered 600 souls, and were distributed east and west on the river, the Scotch being sent to what afterwards became known as Glengarry, the English and Germans to storm out Dundas Iranville. At this time, the whole district was known simply as the Eastern Division, no surveys into counties and townships having been made. The head of each family received a grant of 200 acres and certain tools and utensils. Each son on coming of age was also awarded 200 acres and each daughter 200 acres, on the occasion of her marriage. The Loyalists did not receive at once regular deeds to these properties, but "script" bearing their names, and the number and location of their lots. This arrangement was due to the pressure of numbers and the lack of recording facilities. The intention was that without any great delay all outstanding "script" would be converted into regularly recorded deeds. However, the work proceeded slowly. The Loyalists came in 1784, yet in 1797 the authorities found it necessary to make a special effort to get temporary titles converted into deeds. In the meantime, some titles had been lost, others sold or traded. This confusion and delay accounts for the difficulty that has been experiensed in forming a clear picture of the period. It is therefore quite possible that John Beckstead did come to Canada as a Loyalist and later disposed of the temporary title to a land grant, and returned to New York. If this did happen there would be no record of his having been in the country. So far as his children were concerned, none of them was old enough to qualify for a grant, consequently there is no record of them either. But our ancestor must have had some tie with Williamsburg in Canada as all his sons, with the possible exception of one, settled in the Canadian township in the early 1800's. A registered record, dated 1807 , shows that John Beckstead became owner of land in the 5th concession of Williamsburg by purchase of a Crown Grant from Christopher Reddick and Thomas Ulman. This John, was probably John L., one of our ancestor's sons. A few years later, the property came into the possession of Alexander Beckstead and his wife Sarah Reddick. This Alexander was John L.'s brother. As early as 1830, Maurice Beckstead, another son of John, owned a tract of land on the River Front, which included the site of the present town of Morrisburg. In the absence of churches, traveling Methodist preachers held services in Maurice's home. In 1835, Joseph another of our ancestor's sons received a deed for land in exchange for a crown grant which he held. Two years later, in 1837, Francis B., another son of John Sr. also procured a deed for farmland in Williamsburg, Canada. This too appears to have been the conversion of a temporary title held by Francis to a regularly recorded deed. ________________________________ There is a record in the registry office of Morrisburg that in 1837 Francis Beckstead received a title to a lot of land in Williamsburg township. This may have been our ancestor, Francis. There is a tradition here in Canada that Charles made a start, but became discouraged and turned back instead of continuing to Illinois. I have also heard that when Francis set out on the journey he had for transportation, a covered wagon pulled by a team of Oxen. Regarding this Charles, Francis' son who remained behind when the family moved to Illinois, I knew him very well some 60 years ago. He was a farmer and stonemason. He had a strong heavy voice, a square-build, sturdy body, medium complexion, and was very out spoken. One of his daughters, is still living, at the age of 87, about 40 miles from Ottawa FURTHER GENEALOGICAL DATA Some of Alexander (Francis's brother): Levi, John, Adam, Simon, Michael (he never married). I have the names of John L.'s descendants and a few lines about the man himself; something on Maurice and his descendants; some spotty information on Jacob and Joseph, but nothing definite about Henry. I had an Uncle named Alexander (a second cousin of George Wesley), a brother Alexander and a cousin Isaiah. My great-grandfather was Alexander, a son of John 1st. His wife Sarah Reddick and their children: John, George, Francis, Maria, Elizabeth, William, Alexander, Adam, Anne, Simeon (or Simon), Levi. Most of this family moved to Illinois and died there. I also believe this to be true of George, John, Francis, William, Anne, Simon and Levi. My grandfather Alexander, Adam, Maria, and Elizabeth remained in Canada. Last summer we had a surprise visit by Mary Beckstead Whitehead and daughter Francis of Illinois. They are descended from John B. named above. They new nothing concerning Simon and Levi. I found the sketch by Henry Byrum very interesting. He visited Witliamsburg relatives in 1893, but I did not meet him, being away at High School. People have spoken highly of him.

FRANCIS BECKSTEAD AND HIS DESCENDANTS

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FRANCIS BECKSTEAD AND HIS DESCENDANTS They left Canada, the land of their birth, in the year 1836. The first L.D.S. came to their homes in Williamsburg, Canada and taught the gospel of Jesus Christ. The family became converted in the Spring of 1837. They joined the Latter-Day Saint Church and at once commenced preparing to move to the head of the Church in Adams County, Illinois, on the 4th of July 1837. They crossed the St. Lawrence River 81 years ago from the 4th of July this year (1918). This was the first company of Latter-Day Saints to leave this part of Canada. The company was organized with Christopher Morley, Captain and Francis Beckstead as Assistant Captain. The names of the Elders were: John Goodson, Isaac Russell and John Snider. The journey was a long, lonesome road. Many hardships they endured while within one day's journey of Adams County, Illinois. They were confronted by a mob of about 50 men on Crooked River. They were held about 3 days. While the mob was gathering help, the women would go for water and the men would shoot at them. The day before the attack was to take place, a cloud came up in the west and in about 20 minutes the rain was pouring down. The mob was compelled to leave as the water filled the creek to overflowing and the mob barely saved their own lives from drowning the next morning. The prophet with 50 volunteers came to their relief and they moved out of that dreadful scene to safety in September of the next month. Their trials continued after reaching Illinois and Hancock County. Their moves were from place to place as they were driven with the L.D.S. Saints. They were within sight of the Carthage Jail when Joseph Smith and Hyrum Smith were murdered and they saw them remove the bodies of the martyrs from the jail. Their homes were broken up once more. They then settled in Warsaw and once again they were driven out of their homes by the mob. They made a short stay in Bluff City, Pottawatomie County, Iowa. They never saw what a home was or how long they would enjoy it as the mob was continually after them. In 1841, in the state of Illinois, Francis Beckstead died. He was the main guide of the whole family. In 1846 the family sustained the loss of William E. Beckstead, Gordon Silas Beckstead, and Orrin Mortimer Beckstead enlisting in the Mormon Battalion and marching against Mexico. After 15 years the last one returned to meet his relatives now settled in Salt Lake City, Utah, While on the banks of the Missouri River, getting ready to cross the plains in 1848. Francis Beckstead Jr" was stricken with Cholera and died. He was buried in about 7 hours. This caused his family to remain in North Pebyon, Missouri. The journey on the plains was filled with hardship, sorrow and fatigue. They reached Utah in Sept. 1849 and settled in West Jordan in March 1850. The trying hardships which had accompanied their journeys the past 12 years had finally ended. I have written only 1/100 part of this history for the benefit of our children to look upon. I am the son of Henry Bcekstead, the grandson of Alexander Beckstead and my mother was Luceen Bird Bybee. My thoughts have been upon this history of our pioneer ancestors and I have studies for the benefit of the genealogists. Henry Byrum Beckstead

SKETCH OF BECKSTEAD FAMILY HISTORY

Contributor: ajq46 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

BACKWARD GLANCES It is believed that nearly all, if not all, of the Becksteads of Williamsburg Township in Eastern Ontario, are descended from John Beckstead, born in Saxony, Germany, 1738. We offer a sketch of his life based partly on tradition and in part on established facts. Also included are some biographical notes on his descendants of the second generation, and genealogical lists showing the position of many younger off shoots on the "tree". As a young man, John is said to have migrated to England, following the example of other German Nationals of the period. It is possible that relatives of John, or people of his name, were also in this migration. It is known that there are Becksteads in England at the present time. The writer met a returned soldier who had visited at the Beckstead home there. Then some years ago a book was published in England in which a place called "Beckstead Hall" was featured. This movement of Germans to England may have had some connections with the accession earlier in the century of a German line of sovereigns to England's throne, beginning with George, Elector of Hanover, in 1714. More likely freedom from religious persecution was the motive. In England, John is said to have become a soldier serving with the forces in the Canadian theater of the Seven Years' War. This war resulted in the defeat of France and the cession of Canada to the British in 1759. After the war, John now disbanded from the army, sought a home in the British Colony of Pennsylvania, famous for its friendliness to the people from Europe, and as the home of political and religious freedom. However. Our ancestor did not stay permanently in this colony, but after a short residence moved to the adjoining colony of New York. The first reference of him in New York comes from the State Historian's Report, 1897, in which it is reported that a muster of David Campbell's Company of Militia was held at Schenectady, May 12, 1767. Among those present was our ancestor, who held the rank of sergeant. A further reference is dated 1790.In that year the first U.S. census was taken. In the return from New York the name John Beckstead was listed. His family consisted of three sons over 16 years of age, two under 16 and one female. The female was probably John's wife. At that time John was living in the township of Rensselaerville, Albany County, N. Y. Old resords preserved by Lutheran and Dutch Reformed Churches in the Albany area give interesting information about John and his family. We learn that to John and Helena, his wife, was born January 24, 1769, a son Alexander; sons Hans and Johannes were baptized June 20, 1773; Jacob born May 17, 1776; Moritz born August 22, 1778. We learn, too, the names of daughters - Nelli, Dorothea, Elizabeth and Catherine. Neither birth or baptismal dates for these daughters have been found but the indications are that they were older than most of their brothers. By the time of the census of 1790, they appear to have married, while their brothers were still at home. A feature of the rites of the Lutheran and Dutch Reformed Churches was the presence of Sponsors at baptisms. John and Helena themselves acted as Sponsors for their little grandson, Johannes, Volkman Zimmer in 1791, and for granddaughter, Helena, born to Francis and Margaretta, 1798. Aunt Catherina and Egbert Schumacher sponsored the baptism of baby Egbert, son of Nelly and her husbord, Charles Schumacher. The names of many other sponsors appear in the old records - Eps. Ball, Contriman, Schneider, Flecher, Bekker - friendly neighbors who assisted at the baptisms of the children and grandchildren of John and Helena. The War of Independence between the British and American Colonies broke out in 1776 and lasted for six long and bitter years. The Albany District, where John lived saw much destructive warfare. It was near hear that Sir William Johnson had assembled strong Loyalist forces, centered on the "Johnson Settlement". Sir William died early in the conflict and was succeeded by his son, Sir John Johnson. The latter was a strong and aggressive fighter, and held his ground with the greatest tenacity. Indians added to the horrors of the war with scalping knife, raids on settlements, and murderous ambuscades. The tide of the battle ebbed and flowed, victory now inclining to one side, now to the other. But at least Johnson settlement, like many other centers of resistance, large and small had to admit defeat. Sir John's mansion was burned to the ground, his people killed and scattered, and all his resources exhausted. Escaping to Canada, he there began a new life. In later years, towns and townships were named after him and his father, in recognition of what they had done and suffered in the British cause. Many thrilling tales have come out of the War of Independence. One is the story of Jean McCrea, daughter of a Presbyterian Clergyman, and David Jones, a young officer of the British army commanded by Sir John Burgoyne. Jean and David met and fell desperately in love. For political reasons, Jean's people were strongly opposed to any engagement, but Jean continued faithful to her lover, and became David's promised bride. So arrangements were made for a marriage ceremony to be held within the British lines and conducted by an army chaplain. Distinguished ladies and officers were to be present at the wedding. Meanwhile, Jean was staying with Mrs. McNeil, waiting for an escort to take her to the place appointed for the marriage. At this juncture there came by the McNeils a band of Indians returning from the pursuit of some American scouts. The leader, a savage named LeLoup, took both women captive, but at this moment the escort sent by David arrived and demanded that Jean be delivered into his charge. As the quarrel proceeded, Leloup became furiously angry, and shot Jean through the heart. He then cut and tore the scalp from her head and carried it away as a trophy to the British camp. So instead of lovely Jean, there arrived at the scene of the marriage this frightful token of tragedy. When it came under David's eyes, heart and hope died within him. Soon he sought refuge from the cruelty of war in what was then a wilderness. There David lived out the remainder of his days, a lone and broken man. He never married, but remained true to the memory of his lost love until he died. His grave may be seen in a secluded part of the Blue Church Cemetery, near Prescott, Ontario on Highway 2, The grave is marked by a small gray stone, with the name of David and Jean still legible on it's warn surface after than more than a century of years. What part John took in the war is not clear. When fighting began in 1775, he had a wife and a number of young children to support. We may conjecture that, like many other men with dependent families, he was unable to take an active part on either side. So it will be safe to assume that, as far as conditions permitted, he followed his work as a blacksmith during the great conflict. And at this point it may be recorded that John died in 1808 in an accident with horses. We speak of the United Empire Loyalists, the people who, following the War of Independence, sought new homes in Canada rather than except citizenship in the States. Though many of these moved to the Niagara District and to Nova Scotia and New Brunswick down by the Atlantic, the movement that concerns us most was the arrival in 1784 of English, German and Scotch Loyalists to the "Eastern Division of Upper Canada". Much of the territory bordered on the St. Lawrence River which afforded transportation east and west for prospective settlers. The authorities the western section to the English, the eastern to the Scottish and planted the Germans in the middle, a section now known as the counties of Dundas and Storment. Grants of land were made to the Loyalists, 200 acres to heads of families, grants to sons as they came of age, and to daughters when they married. At first titles were in the form of scrip, there being no provision for issuance of regular deeds. In 1794, 10 years after the arrival of the Loyalists, the authorities made a special effort to have all the script brought in and exchanged for registered deeds. Further efforts were made at later dates. But it was many years before the last of these insecure titles passed out of use. There is no satisfactory evidence that our ancestor, John, came to Canada with the Loyalists. But it is interesting to learn that in 1807 John Beckstead procured from the owners. The W. 1/2 of Lot 24, in the 5th concession of Williamsburg. This was part of a crown grant received by Christopher Reddick and Henry Ulman in 1797. Then the record shows that later. Christopher Reddick transferred to his daughter Sarah, wife of Alexander Beckstead, the W. 1/2 of Lot 24. It may be assumed that at this time Alexander came to Canada from New York. Reader, do not understand that Alexander and Sarah were newlyweds. No, they had been married for some years, and had children when above property arrangements were made. Other sons of John came to Canada in these early years, and set up homes in Williamsburg. Why did they come? Perhaps to be near friends and fellow countrymen they had known in New York. Again, sheep land may have been an inducement. It is known that grants were often sold at surprisingly low prices. It is also possible that some of John's sons may have received grants of land as second-generation Loyalists. In the registry office for Dundas County, under date of 1839, there is a notation that Joseph Beckstead received a grand of the N. 1/2 of Lot 21, in the 2nd concession of Williamsburg. A few notes on John's family may be of interest to readers. His daughters, Nelly, Elizabeth, Dorothea and Catherine married and settled in New York, their husbands in order of names being Charles Schumacker, Peter Zimmer, John Nicholas Mathews, and Egbert Schumacker. When Dorothy's marriage was registered, April 5, 1785. Her name was entered as "Dolly". Evidently she was a lively popular girl around the Lutheran Church in Schoharie so long ago. ALEXANDER: Eldest Son, either he or his son, Alexander, served in the War of 1812-1815, against invading Americans. His wife was Sarah Reddick. FRANCIS: Came to Williamsburg in the early 1800's. Was married (1) to Margaret Barkley, and (2) to Catherine Lang. In 1837 Francis became an adherent to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. A company made up of members of his family, including grandchildren, a Merkley group and three Latter-Day Saint Missionaries - 40 in all-was organized and set out for Illinois. Great hardships and dangers marked the journey, which is said to have been made in wagons drawn by oxen. Near the Illinois border, they were attacked by an armed band, and but for the heavy storm of rain that scattered their enemies, might have been destroyed. Next day the Prophet and a force of men, completed their rescue. But their troubles were only beginning. For years they shared in the persecution suffered by people of the Mormon faith. They were driven from place to place, their homes were broken, they were in frequent danger of the violence of mobs. Evidently the purpose of the persecutions was to drive the Mormons out of lllinois, as they had been driven out of New York where the Church was founded. In 1846 Francis' son William and grandsons, Gordon Silas and Orrin Mortimer enlisted in the Mormon Battalion for service in a war against Mexico. Only one returned and that after fifteen years. Meanwhile, in 1841, Francis died, his life perhaps shortened in the trouble and toll he had undergone. In 1849 The Latter-Day Saints moved to Utah. On the journey Francis Jr. was stricken with cholera, died and was buried near the Missouri River. This led his family to remain behind and settle at North, Pebyon, Missouri. The others pressed on over the plains, and after a journey filled with hardship, sorrow and fatigue, reached Utah in September 1849. By March 1850 they had found a home in West Jordan, and their trying journey of the past 12 years were at an end. Not all of Francis' family left Canada with him in 1837. Some adult sons and daughters remained here, among them being Henry, Moses, Jacob, Mathew, Charles and Betsy. Mention should be made of a little son, George Wesley, who was only 2 years old at the time. In 1890 George Wesley visited his relatives in Williamsburg and made a record still preserved in Utah, of their names, families and locations. JOHN L. Wife Maria Schaeffer. Five children were born to them in New York. It appears that they also adopted John Volkman Zimmer,the son of John L.'s sister, Elizabeth, and her husband Peter Zimmer. It is interesting to note that when John L.'s son, Joseph, was christened in 1801, his father's name was registered as Johannes Beckstedt. John L. did not come to Canada, but spent his life as a farmer in Schoharie, New York. MAURICE: Became the owner of extensive property on the St. Lawrence River Front. Rev. John Carrol, a pioneer Methodist itinerant wrote that when there was as yet no Methodist Churches in Williamsburg, Maurice opened his house to traveling preachers for their meetings. His property included the present site of Morrisburg. It is said that Morrisburg was named after him, but the name really came from an army officer -- Capt. or Col. Morris - who served in the war of 1812-1815. However when the canal and locks were located at the site of Morrisburg, and a community began to form, Maurice's property was needed for homes and other requirements. tn this way, he and his family became closely associated with the growing new center. Maurice, at his christening in the Old Dutch Reformed Church at Schohaie, 1778, was registered as Morits. In English and French the name appears as Maurice. This ancestor died a centry ago and was buried in a cemetery of Iroquois which though bordering on the St. Lawrence, will not be disturbed by the great Seaway project. JACOB, JOSEPH, HENRY: It is to be regretted that there is so little information on these brothers. Beyond the fact that Jacob was born May 17, 1776, in Berne, Albany County, New York, his wife was Margaret Hennie and Henry, the youngest of the family, was married to Elizabeth Shaver, we have no data. However their names often reappear in later generations, showing that they were affectionately regarded by those who knew them.

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Life timeline of Moses Beckstead Sr

1857
Moses Beckstead Sr was born on 2 Jan 1857
Moses Beckstead Sr was 4 years old when American Civil War: Fort Sumter surrenders to Confederate forces. The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865. As a result of the long-standing controversy over slavery, war broke out in April 1861, when Confederate forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina, shortly after U.S. President Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated. The nationalists of the Union proclaimed loyalty to the U.S. Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States, who advocated for states' rights to expand slavery.
Moses Beckstead Sr was 23 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Moses Beckstead Sr was 31 years old when The Great Blizzard of 1888 struck the northeastern United States, producing snowdrifts in excess of 50 ft (15 m) and confining some people to their houses for up to a week. The Great Blizzard of 1888 or Great Blizzard of '88 was one of the most severe recorded blizzards in the history of the United States of America. The storm, referred to as the Great White Hurricane, paralyzed the East Coast from the Chesapeake Bay to Maine, as well as the Atlantic provinces of Canada. Snowfalls of 10 to 58 inches fell in parts of New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, and sustained winds of more than 45 miles per hour (72 km/h) produced snowdrifts in excess of 50 feet (15 m). Railroads were shut down, and people were confined to their houses for up to a week. Railway and telegraph lines were disabled, and this provided the impetus to move these pieces of infrastructure underground. Emergency services were also affected.
Moses Beckstead Sr was 38 years old when Mahatma Gandhi forms the Natal Indian Congress (NIC) in order to fight discrimination against Indian traders in Natal. Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was an Indian activist who was the leader of the Indian independence movement against British rule. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The honorific Mahātmā – applied to him first in 1914 in South Africa – is now used worldwide. In India, he is also called Bapu and Gandhi ji, and known as the Father of the Nation.
Moses Beckstead Sr was 52 years old when Ford puts the Model T car on the market at a price of US$825. Ford Motor Company is an American multinational automaker headquartered in Dearborn, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit. It was founded by Henry Ford and incorporated on June 16, 1903. The company sells automobiles and commercial vehicles under the Ford brand and most luxury cars under the Lincoln brand. Ford also owns Brazilian SUV manufacturer Troller, an 8% stake in Aston Martin of the United Kingdom, and a 49% stake in Jiangling Motors of China. It also has joint-ventures in China, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, and Russia. The company is listed on the New York Stock Exchange and is controlled by the Ford family; they have minority ownership but the majority of the voting power.
Moses Beckstead Sr died on 24 Nov 1916 at the age of 59
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Moses Beckstead Sr (2 Jan 1857 - 24 Nov 1916), BillionGraves Record 1369862 Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States

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