Melvin F Cutler

1 Oct 1898 - 9 Feb 1986

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Melvin F Cutler

1 Oct 1898 - 9 Feb 1986
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I, Melvin Cutler was born on the first day of October, 1898, in McCammon, Bannock, Idaho. I am the oldest child of fifteen, seven boys and eight girls born to Ida Ella Lish and Ethan Freeman Cutler. Freedom was the name of my great=great-grandmother on my father's parental side. My great grandparent
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Melvin F Cutler

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Sunset Memorial Park Cemetery

2296 Kimberly Rd
Twin Falls, Twin Falls, Idaho
United States

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Life Story of MELVIN FREEMAN CUTLER

Contributor: tatreanor Created : 3 months ago Updated : 3 months ago

I, Melvin Cutler was born on the first day of October, 1898, in McCammon, Bannock, Idaho. I am the oldest child of fifteen, seven boys and eight girls born to Ida Ella Lish and Ethan Freeman Cutler. Freedom was the name of my great=great-grandmother on my father's parental side. My great grandparents on parental and maternal lines were the original pioneer stock of the church that came to Utah. In 1902, the Indian lands were opened for settlement. My father, grandfather, and two of my sister's husband s, each homesteaded 160 acres on a section of land joining each other. This land was located 8 miles north of McCammon, Idaho, 5 miles south of Inkom, near a railroad sighting at Onyx, Idaho. When we moved to this homestead, I was 4 years old and spent the next 20 years on this farm and other lands that our family acquired. I learned early in life, rugged work and the responsibility of farming and stock raising. This was open cattle country and our ranch was the central location of the big semi-annual round-up for branding cattle in the spring and rounding up cattle to return to the ranches in the fall. How i wanted to be a real cowboy and in the years ahead, I did have quite a part in that type of life. Carving out a home in the wilderness is not an easy task. The man-high sage brush and the back brush had to be cleared from the land before the earth could be plowed and planted. The canal had to be made, fences erected, a house and barn built, but this was very futile land under cultivation. Raising crops of grain, hay, beef, potatoes, and there were cattle, sheep, pigs to herd, cows to milk, stock to feed, and many other things. When i was five years old, I had my own saddle pony and began herding cattle, milking cows and other responsibilities that i could handle as i grew older. Each of the family as they grew older had responsibilities and assignments. We learned to work hard and learned to appreciate what we had and enjoy life. Father was a kind man but quite strict and demanded obedience. I would like to relate now one of the early tragedies of a farm life. The first spring after father had finished building our two room log house with a dirt roof and a rock hard floor, three windows and a door; father did what he had to do. He left us there and went away to work, and earned money for us to live on. I was in my fourth year, and Ella was about two and a half, and baby brother, George, was two months old.Mother's younger sister; Aunt May, was staying with us. It was on the 12th of may 1902. My mother was planting a garden, and Aunt May was taking care of baby George. I was watching Ella. Without asking my mother, i decided we would go and visit my Aunt Sarah, who lived up the road and eighth of a mile and around a little hill. The place could not be seen from our house.When we got there they were not at home. The house was not locked, so we went in, as we were used to doing. Then i decided to be helpful and go and gather the eggs for Aunt Sarah, like i had done before. While i was gone, Ella was playing with matches and set her dress on fire. She ran screaming out of the house, and by this time mother was coming to find us. When Ella saw this she started running to mother. This only fanned the flames more, and before mother could reach her and tear her clothing off, she was burned. Mothers hands and arms were severely burned. There was no damage to the house or property.Mother carried her home and gave all of the first aid she could. I ran one half mile to grandfathers house to get him. My uncle was sent to Pocatello to get help.( Remember there is no telephone and the roads were in poor condition.) With a team and buggy we returned four hours later with the doctor. The doctor said that mother had done all that could be done and that Ella could not possibly live. She died 7 hours after being burned and grandfather had gone about fifty miles to get father. He arrived before she passed away. But life goes on and time heals wounded hearts. Eight more children were born on this farm and of course a new home had been built and over the years it was increased to a seven room home, with laundry, shade trees, orchards, all topped with berries and flowers. Three of our family died in this home also. Inez Lucena, died at the age of ten months on April 3, 1907; Gene Caroline died at the age of eight months on January 28, 1919, and Alvin Dean died at 16 years old in August of 1923. These were tragic events in our lives. We shared these sorrows and the joys that had come to us, together. When I was eight year old, I had begun attending school in Inkom which was five miles away. I rode horseback everyday during the school season for several years. How i remember those cold winter mornings, deep snow and blizzards. But we dressed warm and made it most of the time.Sometimes it was necessary to take some of the younger children in a sleigh in bad weather until a school was built at Onyx, where I finished the seventh and eighth grades, and then I went back and forth to Inkom again for two years of high school. I remember some of the faithful horses i rode to school were Eagle and Snow. Winter had its good times also. Sleigh riding, skating on a hand sleigh and taking toboggans down those wood crested hills. Running over the tops of fences for as much as two miles. Going rabbit and coyote hunting were other good sports. As I grew older there was basketball, baseball, dances, parties and many other things that were enjoyable.Sometimes, with all the hard work, to be young and haft to grow up, there was still time for recreation. Fishing and swimming in the old Portnuf River. We had our own rodeo quite often. We learned regularly to ride calf's, and cow's, and bull's and bucking horse's. We didn't always stay on them but we kept trying. I am sure some of us would have been considered quite professional in our way, in those days. The 4th of July and the 24th of July was vacations when we had big celebrations. There were great circuses that came to Pocatello about twice a year. Matter of fact, anything to keep people happy. One event i would like to relate. We had mine to swim in the Portnuf River which was just a quarter of a mile from our home. My brothers, George and Vivian, and some of my cousins all went swimming together. Sometimes we had family swimming, but the real place for swimming was under the old railroad bridge at Inkom. Over the river, it was about three feet above the water. An Indian friend taught me how to dive off the bridge. One time after diving, I got too far down stream. The water was swift and i became exhausted. I was going down for the third time when these Indian boys came to my rescue. They pulled me onto the bank and revived me. I was soon okay and had no bad effects from that bad experience. Their names were Pete Looney and Nasty Jackson. They were all cousins to each other. They left Inkom and moved to Fort Hall on to the Indian Reservation. After about 20 years, i saw Pete in Pocatello. He was then a big fat Indian back-ass, we called him. He came up to me and said, "You don't remember, we saved your life from drowning." He couldn't understand why I had forgotten him. They never forget you and they are always our loyal friends. Of course I have always been grateful to them. The years rolled by and in 1914 we purchased our first automobile; A Model T Ford. She was a real beauty. We could travel at least 25 miles per hour. I was sixteen now and life took on a new meaning. With this kind of transportation we could really go places. Sixteen miles to Pocatello to start a union, take a trip to Lave Hot Springs to take a swim, twenty-five miles away.take a picnic to American falls and enjoy the beach, It was Great! Father was always reasonable about my taking the car with my friends. There were rules and regulations which i must comply with.It was during this period that i began to take seriously the girl that I married some three years later.My parents we always active members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Father served in the Bishopric for 15 years, eleven years as the councilor and eight years as the Bishop in the Inkom Ward and mother served in the auxiliary organizations. Saturday afternoons and Sundays were our days off of work. Father expected me to attend church every Sunday but never forced. But, if i didn't i probably would not be able to use the car that day and get other restrictions. We had to take our turn with paddles and water on Sunday, but most of the time everyone pitched in to help to get the work done quickly. I held all of the offices of the Aaronic Priesthood and then back to doing farm work. In 1915, I was made secretary of the Y.M.M. I.A. , then councilor, and next superintendent of the M.I.A. I helped serve and organize the scout troop which was the beginning of my career in scouting. On the 4th day of April, 1917, I married Lucy Carolyn French, in the Salt Lake City Temple. She was 17 years old and i was nearly 19 years old. Just like school kids, she was the best girl in the whole town or in any other town. She was intelligent, talented, and active in all of her church organizations. She had many friends in school and always at the top of the group of the things that she was engaged in. Her parents came from Virginia and North Carolina. They had lots of pride and southern hospitality. Some of her progenitors were plantation owners before the Civil War. Carolyn was born three months after they arrived in Utah. She was born in Hunter, Utah on March 20, 1900. Her mother, her mother's twin brother and her grandmother joined the church having been converted in North Carolina. Carolyn's father died when she was nine years old. One month after her father died, her youngest sister Virginia was born. There were now five children in her family. She had the responsibility of taking care of the home and the children because she was the oldest child. Her mother had to work in order to support them. This she did for the next five years until her mother re-married again. They lived by the Inkom school house and Carolyn attended school during this period. Carolyn went to work for other people after her mother remarried to help support herself. Her mother had taught her to cook, to sew, to take care of a house, and all of the things that qualified her for a good mother and wife. She loved children and she cared for many in the families of other people. Carolyn was born with a great musical talent which she developed. She also excelled as a seamstress and made baby cloths, wedding gowns, coats, suits and all types of other clothing or anything she wished too. She and our daughters were always dressed very well because she made all their cloths. Carolyn loved beautiful things. Music, art, flowers, and her home was always kept immaculate. Her untiring hand has done so much for so many. After our marriage she plunged into the work of farm wife, milking cows, driving teams in the fields, and she became quite a cowgirl, riding the range with the cattle. When Norma, our first child was born, two and a half years after we were married, the baby and the home took a lot of attention. Two years later, Ruth was born. In May of 1920 I was ordained a Seventy and i served a mission in the Pocatello Stale, Inkom Ward for one year. In 1921, I was called to be the ward Clerk. October, 1922, we gave up stock raising and farming and moved to Pocatello, Idaho where i entered the employ of the Union Pacific Railroad. I enrolled in mechanical and commercial courses which advanced me in the service of the company. Then for a few years my wife and i operated a grocery store in addition to my railroad work. We sold the store and moved in 1929. In 1923 we purchased our first new home which was built for us where we lived for 13 years. While there, we continued building and improving the home which was located at 129 Wayne Avenue. 1924 was a trying year for us. In July, I had surgery for an erupted appendix and was off work for three months. A month of that time was spent in the hospital. Through the efforts of my faithful wife, the prayers of the saints, and the administration of the Priesthood, I recovered, which the doctors said i couldn't do because of severe complications and poisons in my body. November 24, 1924, Elsie June, our third child was born. She died on December 11, 1924. On June 26, 1926 we had a baby boy which was stillborn, and he was not named. Both infants are buried in Pocatello. Then Carolyn entered the hospital later that year for surgery and was quite ill for several months. In the fourteen years we spent in Pocatello, we both engaged in church activities. Carolyn was a teacher in the Sunday School and a ward and stake organist. She played the piano, the organ, and the accordion. She occasionally played in the dances and took part in many civic and church opportunities. She had been organist in the auxiliary organization of the church in the ward since she was eleven years old. While in Pocatello, I held Priesthood, M.I.A. and scouting assignments in the ward and stake. I was then once president of the 76th quorum of the seventies. I was on the genealogy board and assistant scout master. From 1927 to 1936 I was a member of troop B, 116 Calvary, Idaho national Guard advancing from private to Top Sargent and also completing courses in related fields. They considered me an expert horseman and i won several trophies for horsemanship in the field of competition. We took part in parades, fairs, and many other events, I also became quite expert with a rifle and a pistol. I attended nine guard summer camps, most of them being in Boise, Idaho. On the 9th of April, 1936, I was transferred to Twin Falls, Idaho, by the Union Pacific Railroad, to take over a newly created position at this time. I was a district traveling commodity and car inspector, and later on car conductor which positions i held until retirement. August 3, 1967, with over 45 years in railroad service. Let me say here that it was a difficult transition for my family to move to twin Falls.Our two girls were now in high school with all their activities. Norma was in her junior year and Save Cancel she did stay in Pocatello until she finished high school. Ruth adjusted herself to conditions in Twin Falls and graduated from high school and business college here. Life began to take on a new meaning in Twin Falls. Carolyn became ward organist, then stake organist.She also taught music in grade school for two years. Because music has always been a part of her life with the strains of her organ in our home has meant much to her family and to others. I was immediately called into the M.I.A. Scout Committeeman and M-Leader and councilor in the M>I>A>, Superintendent of the Y.M.M..I.A., which made me responsible for the ten wards of the Stake. On July 11, 1943, I was ordained a High Priest and set apart as a High Councilman of the twin Falls Stake. My assignment was as adviser to the Young Men and Young Women Mutual Improvement Association and in charge of scouting, which position i had for 17 years. The Stake Presidency referred to me as Mr. M.I.A. I was released from that position in 1960 at the change of the Stake Presidency. I had served under three Stake Presidents. From 1938 to 1944, I was District Committeeman and for two years, A Neighborhood Commissioner of Scouting, and in 1944, I was elected to the Executive Board of the Snake River Area Council., Boy Scouts of America. In 1952, I was elected national Representative for our Council and served for twelve years until 1964. In 1974, I represented our Council at the Church Boy Scout Encampment of Salt Lake City for 5000 boys from Mexico, Canada, and the United states, and i helped in an overall activity in this great event. I have attended seven national and annual Boy Scout meetings in New York, Chicago, St. Louis, Los Angeles, Portland, Seattle, and San Francisco, and attended nearly all of the Admiral Regional meetings and was National Representative in Oregon, Washington and Idaho. In 1952, i received a Silver Beaver Award, and in 1955, I received an honorary M-Men award; In 1957, the Scouter Award, the International Wood Badge Award and Deed. I am a Brotherhood Member of the Order of the Arrow, National Campers Association; and in 1960, I served as Boy Scout Leader to the national Boy Scout Jamboree at Colorado Springs, Colorado. In 1968, I attended I attended National Camping School at Camp Blade in Washington. Then I served as sports director, rifle instructor, and also chaplain at Camp Blade. Also in 1968, as a Council of the _________, I made a trip down the River of No Return and the Snake River, a six day trip. I was then 70 years old. Yes, I loved scouting. The many experiences I had in scout camps, on the trails at night under the stars, around the campfires, living close to boys and men, and just being in the great outdoors. It has been my privilege to rub shoulders with the finest men in America, on regional councils and on national levels. How grateful I am for it and how i feel for the privileged allegiance to them and when you pledge allegiance tot he flag and to smooth out these colors. Scouting has made me appreciate this land, my heritage, the beauties of national dominion, are the life stream and the happenings of our life. I say God Bless America, God Bless Scouting. Just a few more statements about scouting. Since 1916, the congress of the United States has granted the church, the national Boy Scouts of America under which it operates. This year, the Chief Scouts of America Executive of the U.S.A. must compile an annual report for the Speaker of the House of Representatives at Washington D.C.. This report includes all the ways of Scouting, Activities, Local Council, Regional and National. This report to the congressman is comprised of about 350 pages. It is filed in the records of the congress of the United states and the record is approved and accepted. Then another yearly charted is granted. In 1952, my name was listed among these pages as one who received the Silver Beaver award, and for twelve years, I am listed among the papers as the council representative of the Boy Scouts of America. I was called to do all this from the Twin Falls third ward, Twin Falls stake in August of 1960. I was the 62 years old. When I suggested to President Tate, there were several young men in our ward that i was sure would be a better Bishop than I could ever be. They said, "The Lord didn't call these men. Only after a long and thoughtful preparation, with humble prayer, had they been inspired to call you." I surely knew that the 5th Article of faith was applied and then manifested to me at that time. Elder Alma Sonny ordained me Bishop and set me apart to preside over the 3rd Ward, September 4, 1960. When he laid his hands upon my head the stake presidency had reconded that i needed the promise and all was fulfilled on my behalf by serving in the most important calling. I had fasted and prayed for more than 24 hours to be ready for this special mission. Many of the blessings promised are very sacred to me, and the spirit has born record to me many times while Bishop and even to this day as how we can be blessed and guided if we only remain humble in accomplishing the work which is assigned to us. This was a grand experience being Bishop came glorious opportunities and responsibility and firm obligation. During the six years i served, it gave me much joy, and at time great concern and sorrow as we shared with others, their life's problems. This page in my life is well recorded in the records of the church and also in the life of those in whom I was privileged to serve. Only my Father in Heaven knows how well my work was done. Since being released as Bishop, I had been High Priest Leader in the 3rd ward and since the boundaries of the ward had changed, I was High Priest Group Leader in the 21st Ward. During my life time i have had various offices in the Stake, and became president of the Scout brotherhood, Lodge 94, President of the Railroad Old Timers Club, President of the I.V. Postmaster Club, and many others. The past few years i have become more interested in my genealogy and Temple work and i am putting forth effort to accomplish more in this most important responsibility of searching out the records of our dead and performing Temple work for them. Just a few more facts for the record before this is finished to bring you up to date. Carolyn and i had been married 52 years as of April 4, 1970. Besides our own children which i have already related, the following are our grandchildren. Norma Elaine cutler married Eldon H. Hill on September 4, 1937. Norma gave birth to our first grandchild, Sandra Michelle on September 17, 1938 in Pocatello, Idaho. Norma was divorced and married Charles Russell Birdman. They had a son, Rodger Kent Birdman, November 16, 1948 in Ogden, Utah. He died on March 8, 1949 and Buried in Saint Falls, Idaho. Craig Steven Birdman, born 25, in 1950 in Ogden, Utah. Norma is now divorced. Ruth Alice Cutler married Ruban J. Stevens, April 30, 1944. She gave birth to twin boys, Ronald christian and Donald Robin. They died after only living five hours and are buried in Saint Falls, Idaho. On October 19, 1949, Andrew J. Stevens was born in St. Falls, Idaho. We have at the present time, one great grand daughter, Erma Kay. She is the daughter of Norma's girl, Sandra D. and Lincoln K. who were married December the 24th, 1962. I am nearly 72 years old and in good health and have done many things in my life. I am employed at the bank and trust in Twin Falls, Idaho. Thus i conclude the written pages of this thesis. I have been reflecting into my life many times, but it is because of the lack of the power of expression to all differently. I do not want to appear egotistical because on the contrary. I have humble thoughts to express these facts. As years flew by stretching over the years of life, it would probably appear that only the good was portrayed. Naturally, this should be said, and because we do not want to hear about the ugly things of life. Perhaps not so active in the things i should have been. Some detours, some returning, some failures and successes, a lot of praying and a lot of repenting. Through it all, i have been striving for improvements and progression. This is an eternal quest for salvation, exaltation and eternal life. I am grateful to my Father in Heaven for the great experiences of life. Thanks for my goodly parents and for my progenitors, for my family and loved ones., for friends and for friendship, for this choice land of America., for the constitution of the United states, for the flag of my country and for all that it stands for. I am thankful for all those who have preserved our freedom and liberty. Who have gane their sweat, blood, and tears. For our great national dominion and for all that is good and beautiful in this land which is my heritage. Now, above all of these, i give thanks to my Father in heaven for the Restoration of the Gospel, for the Priesthood, for the organization of this great church and for the blessings that have come to us who serve it. I am most thankful for good men and good women of the church that i have been please to know and associate with and love for their influence in my life. I bear my witness before God and all men that the spirit has born record to me through the Holy Ghost that the gospel of Jesus Christ as it is restored in these latter -days through the Prophet Joseph Smith, is true. I know with the power of the Priesthood in which this perfect organization is His church. I have a testimony of the glorious temple work of the living and the dead, that the Spirit of Elijah is a miracle through out the world. From turning the hearts of the children to their fathers and of their fathers to the children in this great genealogy program. When Elijah came to the Kirkland temple on April 3, 1836, and restored this power and priesthood, a new light began to dawn upon the world. It is my humble desire to be faithful to the standards and the covenants of the gospel. That me, and mine might be found worthy of our heritage and our blessings, etc., etc...

Life Story of MELVIN FREEMAN CUTLER

Contributor: tatreanor Created : 3 months ago Updated : 3 months ago

I, Melvin Cutler was born on the first day of October, 1898, in McCammon, Bannock, Idaho. I am the oldest child of fifteen, seven boys and eight girls born to Ida Ella Lish and Ethan Freeman Cutler. Freedom was the name of my great=great-grandmother on my father's parental side. My great grandparents on parental and maternal lines were the original pioneer stock of the church that came to Utah. In 1902, the Indian lands were opened for settlement. My father, grandfather, and two of my sister's husband s, each homesteaded 160 acres on a section of land joining each other. This land was located 8 miles north of McCammon, Idaho, 5 miles south of Inkom, near a railroad sighting at Onyx, Idaho. When we moved to this homestead, I was 4 years old and spent the next 20 years on this farm and other lands that our family acquired. I learned early in life, rugged work and the responsibility of farming and stock raising. This was open cattle country and our ranch was the central location of the big semi-annual round-up for branding cattle in the spring and rounding up cattle to return to the ranches in the fall. How i wanted to be a real cowboy and in the years ahead, I did have quite a part in that type of life. Carving out a home in the wilderness is not an easy task. The man-high sage brush and the back brush had to be cleared from the land before the earth could be plowed and planted. The canal had to be made, fences erected, a house and barn built, but this was very futile land under cultivation. Raising crops of grain, hay, beef, potatoes, and there were cattle, sheep, pigs to herd, cows to milk, stock to feed, and many other things. When i was five years old, I had my own saddle pony and began herding cattle, milking cows and other responsibilities that i could handle as i grew older. Each of the family as they grew older had responsibilities and assignments. We learned to work hard and learned to appreciate what we had and enjoy life. Father was a kind man but quite strict and demanded obedience. I would like to relate now one of the early tragedies of a farm life. The first spring after father had finished building our two room log house with a dirt roof and a rock hard floor, three windows and a door; father did what he had to do. He left us there and went away to work, and earned money for us to live on. I was in my fourth year, and Ella was about two and a half, and baby brother, George, was two months old.Mother's younger sister; Aunt May, was staying with us. It was on the 12th of may 1902. My mother was planting a garden, and Aunt May was taking care of baby George. I was watching Ella. Without asking my mother, i decided we would go and visit my Aunt Sarah, who lived up the road and eighth of a mile and around a little hill. The place could not be seen from our house.When we got there they were not at home. The house was not locked, so we went in, as we were used to doing. Then i decided to be helpful and go and gather the eggs for Aunt Sarah, like i had done before. While i was gone, Ella was playing with matches and set her dress on fire. She ran screaming out of the house, and by this time mother was coming to find us. When Ella saw this she started running to mother. This only fanned the flames more, and before mother could reach her and tear her clothing off, she was burned. Mothers hands and arms were severely burned. There was no damage to the house or property.Mother carried her home and gave all of the first aid she could. I ran one half mile to grandfathers house to get him. My uncle was sent to Pocatello to get help.( Remember there is no telephone and the roads were in poor condition.) With a team and buggy we returned four hours later with the doctor. The doctor said that mother had done all that could be done and that Ella could not possibly live. She died 7 hours after being burned and grandfather had gone about fifty miles to get father. He arrived before she passed away. But life goes on and time heals wounded hearts. Eight more children were born on this farm and of course a new home had been built and over the years it was increased to a seven room home, with laundry, shade trees, orchards, all topped with berries and flowers. Three of our family died in this home also. Inez Lucena, died at the age of ten months on April 3, 1907; Gene Caroline died at the age of eight months on January 28, 1919, and Alvin Dean died at 16 years old in August of 1923. These were tragic events in our lives. We shared these sorrows and the joys that had come to us, together. When I was eight year old, I had begun attending school in Inkom which was five miles away. I rode horseback everyday during the school season for several years. How i remember those cold winter mornings, deep snow and blizzards. But we dressed warm and made it most of the time.Sometimes it was necessary to take some of the younger children in a sleigh in bad weather until a school was built at Onyx, where I finished the seventh and eighth grades, and then I went back and forth to Inkom again for two years of high school. I remember some of the faithful horses i rode to school were Eagle and Snow. Winter had its good times also. Sleigh riding, skating on a hand sleigh and taking toboggans down those wood crested hills. Running over the tops of fences for as much as two miles. Going rabbit and coyote hunting were other good sports. As I grew older there was basketball, baseball, dances, parties and many other things that were enjoyable.Sometimes, with all the hard work, to be young and haft to grow up, there was still time for recreation. Fishing and swimming in the old Portnuf River. We had our own rodeo quite often. We learned regularly to ride calf's, and cow's, and bull's and bucking horse's. We didn't always stay on them but we kept trying. I am sure some of us would have been considered quite professional in our way, in those days. The 4th of July and the 24th of July was vacations when we had big celebrations. There were great circuses that came to Pocatello about twice a year. Matter of fact, anything to keep people happy. One event i would like to relate. We had mine to swim in the Portnuf River which was just a quarter of a mile from our home. My brothers, George and Vivian, and some of my cousins all went swimming together. Sometimes we had family swimming, but the real place for swimming was under the old railroad bridge at Inkom. Over the river, it was about three feet above the water. An Indian friend taught me how to dive off the bridge. One time after diving, I got too far down stream. The water was swift and i became exhausted. I was going down for the third time when these Indian boys came to my rescue. They pulled me onto the bank and revived me. I was soon okay and had no bad effects from that bad experience. Their names were Pete Looney and Nasty Jackson. They were all cousins to each other. They left Inkom and moved to Fort Hall on to the Indian Reservation. After about 20 years, i saw Pete in Pocatello. He was then a big fat Indian back-ass, we called him. He came up to me and said, "You don't remember, we saved your life from drowning." He couldn't understand why I had forgotten him. They never forget you and they are always our loyal friends. Of course I have always been grateful to them. The years rolled by and in 1914 we purchased our first automobile; A Model T Ford. She was a real beauty. We could travel at least 25 miles per hour. I was sixteen now and life took on a new meaning. With this kind of transportation we could really go places. Sixteen miles to Pocatello to start a union, take a trip to Lave Hot Springs to take a swim, twenty-five miles away.take a picnic to American falls and enjoy the beach, It was Great! Father was always reasonable about my taking the car with my friends. There were rules and regulations which i must comply with.It was during this period that i began to take seriously the girl that I married some three years later.My parents we always active members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Father served in the Bishopric for 15 years, eleven years as the councilor and eight years as the Bishop in the Inkom Ward and mother served in the auxiliary organizations. Saturday afternoons and Sundays were our days off of work. Father expected me to attend church every Sunday but never forced. But, if i didn't i probably would not be able to use the car that day and get other restrictions. We had to take our turn with paddles and water on Sunday, but most of the time everyone pitched in to help to get the work done quickly. I held all of the offices of the Aaronic Priesthood and then back to doing farm work. In 1915, I was made secretary of the Y.M.M. I.A. , then councilor, and next superintendent of the M.I.A. I helped serve and organize the scout troop which was the beginning of my career in scouting. On the 4th day of April, 1917, I married Lucy Carolyn French, in the Salt Lake City Temple. She was 17 years old and i was nearly 19 years old. Just like school kids, she was the best girl in the whole town or in any other town. She was intelligent, talented, and active in all of her church organizations. She had many friends in school and always at the top of the group of the things that she was engaged in. Her parents came from Virginia and North Carolina. They had lots of pride and southern hospitality. Some of her progenitors were plantation owners before the Civil War. Carolyn was born three months after they arrived in Utah. She was born in Hunter, Utah on March 20, 1900. Her mother, her mother's twin brother and her grandmother joined the church having been converted in North Carolina. Carolyn's father died when she was nine years old. One month after her father died, her youngest sister Virginia was born. There were now five children in her family. She had the responsibility of taking care of the home and the children because she was the oldest child. Her mother had to work in order to support them. This she did for the next five years until her mother re-married again. They lived by the Inkom school house and Carolyn attended school during this period. Carolyn went to work for other people after her mother remarried to help support herself. Her mother had taught her to cook, to sew, to take care of a house, and all of the things that qualified her for a good mother and wife. She loved children and she cared for many in the families of other people. Carolyn was born with a great musical talent which she developed. She also excelled as a seamstress and made baby cloths, wedding gowns, coats, suits and all types of other clothing or anything she wished too. She and our daughters were always dressed very well because she made all their cloths. Carolyn loved beautiful things. Music, art, flowers, and her home was always kept immaculate. Her untiring hand has done so much for so many. After our marriage she plunged into the work of farm wife, milking cows, driving teams in the fields, and she became quite a cowgirl, riding the range with the cattle. When Norma, our first child was born, two and a half years after we were married, the baby and the home took a lot of attention. Two years later, Ruth was born. In May of 1920 I was ordained a Seventy and i served a mission in the Pocatello Stale, Inkom Ward for one year. In 1921, I was called to be the ward Clerk. October, 1922, we gave up stock raising and farming and moved to Pocatello, Idaho where i entered the employ of the Union Pacific Railroad. I enrolled in mechanical and commercial courses which advanced me in the service of the company. Then for a few years my wife and i operated a grocery store in addition to my railroad work. We sold the store and moved in 1929. In 1923 we purchased our first new home which was built for us where we lived for 13 years. While there, we continued building and improving the home which was located at 129 Wayne Avenue. 1924 was a trying year for us. In July, I had surgery for an erupted appendix and was off work for three months. A month of that time was spent in the hospital. Through the efforts of my faithful wife, the prayers of the saints, and the administration of the Priesthood, I recovered, which the doctors said i couldn't do because of severe complications and poisons in my body. November 24, 1924, Elsie June, our third child was born. She died on December 11, 1924. On June 26, 1926 we had a baby boy which was stillborn, and he was not named. Both infants are buried in Pocatello. Then Carolyn entered the hospital later that year for surgery and was quite ill for several months. In the fourteen years we spent in Pocatello, we both engaged in church activities. Carolyn was a teacher in the Sunday School and a ward and stake organist. She played the piano, the organ, and the accordion. She occasionally played in the dances and took part in many civic and church opportunities. She had been organist in the auxiliary organization of the church in the ward since she was eleven years old. While in Pocatello, I held Priesthood, M.I.A. and scouting assignments in the ward and stake. I was then once president of the 76th quorum of the seventies. I was on the genealogy board and assistant scout master. From 1927 to 1936 I was a member of troop B, 116 Calvary, Idaho national Guard advancing from private to Top Sargent and also completing courses in related fields. They considered me an expert horseman and i won several trophies for horsemanship in the field of competition. We took part in parades, fairs, and many other events, I also became quite expert with a rifle and a pistol. I attended nine guard summer camps, most of them being in Boise, Idaho. On the 9th of April, 1936, I was transferred to Twin Falls, Idaho, by the Union Pacific Railroad, to take over a newly created position at this time. I was a district traveling commodity and car inspector, and later on car conductor which positions i held until retirement. August 3, 1967, with over 45 years in railroad service. Let me say here that it was a difficult transition for my family to move to twin Falls.Our two girls were now in high school with all their activities. Norma was in her junior year and Save Cancel she did stay in Pocatello until she finished high school. Ruth adjusted herself to conditions in Twin Falls and graduated from high school and business college here. Life began to take on a new meaning in Twin Falls. Carolyn became ward organist, then stake organist.She also taught music in grade school for two years. Because music has always been a part of her life with the strains of her organ in our home has meant much to her family and to others. I was immediately called into the M.I.A. Scout Committeeman and M-Leader and councilor in the M>I>A>, Superintendent of the Y.M.M..I.A., which made me responsible for the ten wards of the Stake. On July 11, 1943, I was ordained a High Priest and set apart as a High Councilman of the twin Falls Stake. My assignment was as adviser to the Young Men and Young Women Mutual Improvement Association and in charge of scouting, which position i had for 17 years. The Stake Presidency referred to me as Mr. M.I.A. I was released from that position in 1960 at the change of the Stake Presidency. I had served under three Stake Presidents. From 1938 to 1944, I was District Committeeman and for two years, A Neighborhood Commissioner of Scouting, and in 1944, I was elected to the Executive Board of the Snake River Area Council., Boy Scouts of America. In 1952, I was elected national Representative for our Council and served for twelve years until 1964. In 1974, I represented our Council at the Church Boy Scout Encampment of Salt Lake City for 5000 boys from Mexico, Canada, and the United states, and i helped in an overall activity in this great event. I have attended seven national and annual Boy Scout meetings in New York, Chicago, St. Louis, Los Angeles, Portland, Seattle, and San Francisco, and attended nearly all of the Admiral Regional meetings and was National Representative in Oregon, Washington and Idaho. In 1952, i received a Silver Beaver Award, and in 1955, I received an honorary M-Men award; In 1957, the Scouter Award, the International Wood Badge Award and Deed. I am a Brotherhood Member of the Order of the Arrow, National Campers Association; and in 1960, I served as Boy Scout Leader to the national Boy Scout Jamboree at Colorado Springs, Colorado. In 1968, I attended I attended National Camping School at Camp Blade in Washington. Then I served as sports director, rifle instructor, and also chaplain at Camp Blade. Also in 1968, as a Council of the _________, I made a trip down the River of No Return and the Snake River, a six day trip. I was then 70 years old. Yes, I loved scouting. The many experiences I had in scout camps, on the trails at night under the stars, around the campfires, living close to boys and men, and just being in the great outdoors. It has been my privilege to rub shoulders with the finest men in America, on regional councils and on national levels. How grateful I am for it and how i feel for the privileged allegiance to them and when you pledge allegiance tot he flag and to smooth out these colors. Scouting has made me appreciate this land, my heritage, the beauties of national dominion, are the life stream and the happenings of our life. I say God Bless America, God Bless Scouting. Just a few more statements about scouting. Since 1916, the congress of the United States has granted the church, the national Boy Scouts of America under which it operates. This year, the Chief Scouts of America Executive of the U.S.A. must compile an annual report for the Speaker of the House of Representatives at Washington D.C.. This report includes all the ways of Scouting, Activities, Local Council, Regional and National. This report to the congressman is comprised of about 350 pages. It is filed in the records of the congress of the United states and the record is approved and accepted. Then another yearly charted is granted. In 1952, my name was listed among these pages as one who received the Silver Beaver award, and for twelve years, I am listed among the papers as the council representative of the Boy Scouts of America. I was called to do all this from the Twin Falls third ward, Twin Falls stake in August of 1960. I was the 62 years old. When I suggested to President Tate, there were several young men in our ward that i was sure would be a better Bishop than I could ever be. They said, "The Lord didn't call these men. Only after a long and thoughtful preparation, with humble prayer, had they been inspired to call you." I surely knew that the 5th Article of faith was applied and then manifested to me at that time. Elder Alma Sonny ordained me Bishop and set me apart to preside over the 3rd Ward, September 4, 1960. When he laid his hands upon my head the stake presidency had reconded that i needed the promise and all was fulfilled on my behalf by serving in the most important calling. I had fasted and prayed for more than 24 hours to be ready for this special mission. Many of the blessings promised are very sacred to me, and the spirit has born record to me many times while Bishop and even to this day as how we can be blessed and guided if we only remain humble in accomplishing the work which is assigned to us. This was a grand experience being Bishop came glorious opportunities and responsibility and firm obligation. During the six years i served, it gave me much joy, and at time great concern and sorrow as we shared with others, their life's problems. This page in my life is well recorded in the records of the church and also in the life of those in whom I was privileged to serve. Only my Father in Heaven knows how well my work was done. Since being released as Bishop, I had been High Priest Leader in the 3rd ward and since the boundaries of the ward had changed, I was High Priest Group Leader in the 21st Ward. During my life time i have had various offices in the Stake, and became president of the Scout brotherhood, Lodge 94, President of the Railroad Old Timers Club, President of the I.V. Postmaster Club, and many others. The past few years i have become more interested in my genealogy and Temple work and i am putting forth effort to accomplish more in this most important responsibility of searching out the records of our dead and performing Temple work for them. Just a few more facts for the record before this is finished to bring you up to date. Carolyn and i had been married 52 years as of April 4, 1970. Besides our own children which i have already related, the following are our grandchildren. Norma Elaine cutler married Eldon H. Hill on September 4, 1937. Norma gave birth to our first grandchild, Sandra Michelle on September 17, 1938 in Pocatello, Idaho. Norma was divorced and married Charles Russell Birdman. They had a son, Rodger Kent Birdman, November 16, 1948 in Ogden, Utah. He died on March 8, 1949 and Buried in Saint Falls, Idaho. Craig Steven Birdman, born 25, in 1950 in Ogden, Utah. Norma is now divorced. Ruth Alice Cutler married Ruban J. Stevens, April 30, 1944. She gave birth to twin boys, Ronald christian and Donald Robin. They died after only living five hours and are buried in Saint Falls, Idaho. On October 19, 1949, Andrew J. Stevens was born in St. Falls, Idaho. We have at the present time, one great grand daughter, Erma Kay. She is the daughter of Norma's girl, Sandra D. and Lincoln K. who were married December the 24th, 1962. I am nearly 72 years old and in good health and have done many things in my life. I am employed at the bank and trust in Twin Falls, Idaho. Thus i conclude the written pages of this thesis. I have been reflecting into my life many times, but it is because of the lack of the power of expression to all differently. I do not want to appear egotistical because on the contrary. I have humble thoughts to express these facts. As years flew by stretching over the years of life, it would probably appear that only the good was portrayed. Naturally, this should be said, and because we do not want to hear about the ugly things of life. Perhaps not so active in the things i should have been. Some detours, some returning, some failures and successes, a lot of praying and a lot of repenting. Through it all, i have been striving for improvements and progression. This is an eternal quest for salvation, exaltation and eternal life. I am grateful to my Father in Heaven for the great experiences of life. Thanks for my goodly parents and for my progenitors, for my family and loved ones., for friends and for friendship, for this choice land of America., for the constitution of the United states, for the flag of my country and for all that it stands for. I am thankful for all those who have preserved our freedom and liberty. Who have gane their sweat, blood, and tears. For our great national dominion and for all that is good and beautiful in this land which is my heritage. Now, above all of these, i give thanks to my Father in heaven for the Restoration of the Gospel, for the Priesthood, for the organization of this great church and for the blessings that have come to us who serve it. I am most thankful for good men and good women of the church that i have been please to know and associate with and love for their influence in my life. I bear my witness before God and all men that the spirit has born record to me through the Holy Ghost that the gospel of Jesus Christ as it is restored in these latter -days through the Prophet Joseph Smith, is true. I know with the power of the Priesthood in which this perfect organization is His church. I have a testimony of the glorious temple work of the living and the dead, that the Spirit of Elijah is a miracle through out the world. From turning the hearts of the children to their fathers and of their fathers to the children in this great genealogy program. When Elijah came to the Kirkland temple on April 3, 1836, and restored this power and priesthood, a new light began to dawn upon the world. It is my humble desire to be faithful to the standards and the covenants of the gospel. That me, and mine might be found worthy of our heritage and our blessings, etc., etc...

Life timeline of Melvin F Cutler

Melvin F Cutler was born on 1 Oct 1898
Melvin F Cutler was 5 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
Melvin F Cutler was 18 years old when Tsar Nicholas II of Russia was forced to abdicate in the February Revolution, ending three centuries of Romanov rule. Nicholas II or Nikolai II, known as Saint Nicholas in the Russian Orthodox Church, was the last Emperor of Russia, ruling from 1 November 1894 until his forced abdication on 15 March 1917. His reign saw the fall of the Russian Empire from one of the foremost great powers of the world to economic and military collapse. He was given the nickname Nicholas the Bloody or Vile Nicholas by his political adversaries due to the Khodynka Tragedy, anti-Semitic pogroms, Bloody Sunday, the violent suppression of the 1905 Russian Revolution, the executions of political opponents, and his perceived responsibility for the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905). Soviet historians portray Nicholas as a weak and incompetent leader whose decisions led to military defeats and the deaths of millions of his subjects.
Melvin F Cutler was 30 years old when Walt Disney character Mickey Mouse premieres in his first cartoon, "Plane Crazy". Walter Elias Disney was an American entrepreneur, animator, voice actor and film producer. A pioneer of the American animation industry, he introduced several developments in the production of cartoons. As a film producer, Disney holds the record for most Academy Awards earned by an individual, having won 22 Oscars from 59 nominations. He was presented with two Golden Globe Special Achievement Awards and an Emmy Award, among other honors. Several of his films are included in the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress.
Melvin F Cutler was 41 years old when Adolf Hitler signs an order to begin the systematic euthanasia of mentally ill and disabled people. Adolf Hitler was a German politician, demagogue, and Pan-German revolutionary, who was the leader of the Nazi Party, Chancellor of Germany from 1933 to 1945 and Führer ("Leader") of Nazi Germany from 1934 to 1945. As dictator, Hitler initiated World War II in Europe with the invasion of Poland in September 1939, and was central to the Holocaust.
Melvin F Cutler was 46 years old when World War II: The Allied invasion of Normandy—codenamed Operation Overlord—begins with the execution of Operation Neptune (commonly referred to as D-Day), the landing of 155,000 Allied troops on the beaches of Normandy in France. The Allied soldiers quickly break through the Atlantic Wall and push inland in the largest amphibious military operation in history. The Allies of World War II, called the United Nations from the 1 January 1942 declaration, were the countries that together opposed the Axis powers during the Second World War (1939–1945). The Allies promoted the alliance as a means to control German, Japanese and Italian aggression.
Melvin F Cutler was 59 years old when Space Race: Launch of Sputnik 1, the first artificial satellite to orbit the Earth. The Space Race refers to the 20th-century competition between two Cold War rivals, the Soviet Union (USSR) and the United States (US), for dominance in spaceflight capability. It had its origins in the missile-based nuclear arms race between the two nations that occurred following World War II, aided by captured German missile technology and personnel from the Aggregat program. The technological superiority required for such dominance was seen as necessary for national security, and symbolic of ideological superiority. The Space Race spawned pioneering efforts to launch artificial satellites, uncrewed space probes of the Moon, Venus, and Mars, and human spaceflight in low Earth orbit and to the Moon.
Melvin F Cutler was 65 years old when John F. Kennedy was assassinated by Lee Harvey Oswald in Dallas, Texas; hours later, Lyndon B. Johnson was sworn in aboard Air Force One as the 36th President of the United States. John Fitzgerald Kennedy, commonly referred to by his initials JFK, was an American politician who served as the 35th President of the United States from January 1961 until his assassination in November 1963. He served at the height of the Cold War, and the majority of his presidency dealt with managing relations with the Soviet Union. As a member of the Democratic Party, Kennedy represented the state of Massachusetts in the United States House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate prior to becoming president.
1977
Melvin F Cutler was 79 years old when Star Wars is released in theaters. Star Wars is a 1977 American epic space opera film written and directed by George Lucas. It is the first film in the original Star Wars trilogy and the beginning of the Star Wars franchise. Starring Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford, Carrie Fisher, Peter Cushing, Alec Guinness, David Prowse, James Earl Jones, Anthony Daniels, Kenny Baker, and Peter Mayhew, the film focuses on the Rebel Alliance, led by Princess Leia (Fisher), and its attempt to destroy the Galactic Empire's space station, the Death Star.
Melvin F Cutler died on 9 Feb 1986 at the age of 87
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Melvin F Cutler (1 Oct 1898 - 9 Feb 1986), BillionGraves Record 53985479 Twin Falls, Twin Falls, Idaho, United States

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