Mary Robinson (Smith)

2 Dec 1810 - 2 Sep 1844

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Mary Robinson (Smith)

2 Dec 1810 - 2 Sep 1844
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By Myrtle Robinson Seastrand [NOTE: This is NOT an actual diary written by Mary Smith Robinson; rather, it is a biography written by one of Mary’s descendants. Dennis Drake, a Robinson family researcher, concluded that this document is “a first-person presentation penned by [Mary’s] great-gran
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Life Information

Mary Robinson (Smith)

Born:
Died:

American Fork City Cemetery

601-699 Alpine Hwy
American Fork, Utah, Utah
United States

Epitaph

"Rocket"
The First Railroad Conductor in the World
Liverpool to Manchester
1830-1842

Headstone Description

Margaret - wife of E. Robinson, born in Hereforshire, England, died in American Fork., Mary Smith wife of Edward Robinson Born in England Died in NauvooAnn Wootton and Margaret Grovener died in American Fork., Mary: Born in England, Died in Illinois Edward: Born in England Died in American Fork
Transcriber

Chynna67

July 27, 2011
Transcriber

michellezearing@gmail.com

August 1, 2011
Transcriber

Jane Little

July 28, 2011
Transcriber

Keirgan

July 24, 2011
Transcriber

matchprint

May 9, 2012
Transcriber

jlholl

May 11, 2012
Transcriber

Celique

February 16, 2019
Photographer

PapaMoose

June 26, 2011

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“Diary of Mary Smith”

Contributor: michellezearing@gmail.com Created: 3 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

By Myrtle Robinson Seastrand [NOTE: This is NOT an actual diary written by Mary Smith Robinson; rather, it is a biography written by one of Mary’s descendants. Dennis Drake, a Robinson family researcher, concluded that this document is “a first-person presentation penned by [Mary’s] great-grand-daughter Myrtle Robinson Seastrand”. Drake found a statement within Myrtle’s papers that "The 'Diary of Mary Smith' is based on research, and attempts to pertray [sic] her characteristics and emotions as revealed by events in her life." (Robinson Family History, Section II, p. 88). It is also important to note that the information contained in this biography was considered accurate when it was originally written. Further research in the 40+ years since then has simply superceded outdated information. The following are a few of the inconsistencies to be aware of while reading this document: – As of this writing, FamilySearch states that Mary Smith had two younger sisters, not six. – The railway line for the Rocket was built in 1829-1830, not 1840. – Mary and Edward were married in St. Thomas, Liverpool, not Manchester. – Brigham Young was not in England during July 1841 (His mission places him in England from 6 April 1840 to 20 April 1841). – Mary Jane was born in England, not on the ship on the way to America. – The Robinson family did not reach Nauvoo until 1843. The earliest Relief Society meeting that Mary could have attended was on June 16, 1843. By that point the Relief Society had over 1,000 members. – Mary did not die in childbirth in 1844. She committed suicide one year later in 1845. – Etc. While there are some obvious errors in this “diary”, it is worth posting to FamilySearch because: 1) Some may still find it an entertaining read. 2) Posting it here with this explanation can help us stop the spread of some of the outdated information contained in the diary.] May 1 (May Day) 1828: Mum gave me a diary because I am 18 and I promised to write in it faithfully. It was a beautiful spring day. Elizabeth, Maria and I went to the Fair to buy new ribbons for our bonnets. My silly 6 little sisters were giggling and I looked up and saw the handsomest stranger staring at me. He was even bold enough to wink at me. May 7, 1828: Today I saw him again. How did he know where I lived? He stopped at our gate and petted Rex. His name is Edward Robinson. Every Sunday Edward has walked over from Little Sutton to Great Neston to “walk out with me.” June: last night Edward proposed and I said “Yes.” July: We have posted our bans and we took a large ( ) over to Manchester to the old Cathedral and were married. The new ribbons came in handy to tie on my new bonnet. I am the happiest girl in the world. July 15: We rented a tiny cottage in Upton near our families. I have been hanging curtains, cleaning and cooking for Edward. Nov 25, 1830: Today I was put to bed with a fine son, Richard. May 1831: Edward and I decided to move to Liverpool to find work. 10 Mar 1832: I was put to bed with our second son, John. July 1832: Liverpool is big and dirty and full of strange people from all over the world because it is such a big seaport town. We are not very happy here. June 1832: Yesterday we bundled up our belongings and went by boat down to Manchester. Manchester is the center of the cotton industry. We heard cotton workers we needed badly. They are paid such high wages they ride to work in cabs. People are coming from all over Great Britain. July 1833: We make more money here but everything is so dear. The air is so smoky. The factory chimneys pour our black smoke everywhere. I wash and wash things all the time, but everything is still dingy and dirty. Our babies are coughing and choking most of the time. 3 Feb 1834: Last night Edward said: “Mary, we have to get out of here. I am going to find something else to do.” Mar 25 1834: Today Edward came home early. He was all excited and shouted: “Mary, Mary guess what? I have found a job as a footman on a big manor, right out of Manchester.” Dear Diary: At last we are settled and I hope it will be for a long time. Our little cottage they gave us is clean and neat, and we can breathe! You should see my Edward in his livery. His broad shoulders and fine walk make him look like a prince. He really is a prince to me. July 1839: It has been a long time since I wrote in my diary. Into our Paradise, sadness came--our two new sweet little girls Mary and Margaret were with us for such a short time. Oh, the nights I have cried and cried when I think of the tiny graves in the Parish Churchyard. Dear God, help me! Aug 1840: God heard my prayers for comfort and has sent two more boys, Edward and William. I have been too busy and happy and have forgotten to write in my book. Sep 1840: The lord of the manor has asked Edward to help build the new-fangled railroad to run from Manchester to Liverpool, then he will be hired as a “gard” or conductor. Edward loves this new adventure. Dec 1840: The train jumped the tracks again because of the snow. My smart Edward told the owners to put some sand on the tracks, which has helped. Sunday, May 1841: We had our usual ride to Liverpool and back. We felt as if we were flying--sometimes we went as fast as 29 miles an hour. How the children love the ride on the “Rocket” with their pappy. June 1841: Something happened today that has made me excited but thoughtful. two me, Hiram Clard and William Clayton, came by our cottage with a message about a new religion. I knew they spoke the truth. My whole being was filled with excitement, but Edward was reluctant to accept them. July 1841: William became very, very ill today. I cried out toe Edward, “We need help for our baby.” The memory of our two little girls came back upon me and I was scared. Something whispered what I should do. I sent Edward for the missionaries. He was not too convinced, but I insisted. As I rocked little William, I pleaded with the Lord to spare his life until Edward could return. He finally came and with him was a handsome man with piercing eyes, who spoke gently to me and told me not to be afraid. He was Brigham Young and he and his companion took my feverish baby and said a prayer that is still in my heart. William was blessed that he would be made well and live to a ripe old age. Aug 29 1841: I pray every day that Edward will be baptized and I can be also. He is a good man. He pays the fare for the missionaries on the train and sometimes even takes them to my father’s tailor shop and buys new clothes for them. Jan 18 1842: My prayers have been answered. Today Edward was baptized and we are already making plans to go to ZION. It has taken great courage for Edward to give up his position and to leave our little cottage, where he has planted so many beautiful flowers and shrubs, but we have turned our backs on it all and we sailed from Liverpool for New Orleans, with our five children and another one traveling with me. Before we left the Railroad presented a beautiful silver watch to Edward in appreciation of his services. Mar 6 1842: Today aboard the Ship “Henry”, I was put to bed with another baby. The seas were angry and Edward tried to calm our five little sick ones and help me when he could. Finally the ship’s doctor reached the little corner of the deck where Edward had hung a quilt for privacy and to keep out the cold north wind. The doctor was brusque, but kind, but I am sure the children were frightened at the screams of their mother. Dear Diary, when little Mary Jane was laid in my arms, it was worth it all. Aug 1842: We have reached Nauvoo, the City Beautiful. My dram has come true. Such a welcome by the Saints. I shall never forget my first glimpse of the Prophet…the feeling of greatness about him…and his eyes that seem to see the depths of your soul. We have bought a small farm just out of Nauvoo. Edward has planted the flower seeds and little starts he carefully tended on the long journey. Sep 1842: I have heard about a new society for women that was organized by the Prophet on the 17th of March, 1842. His wife, Emma was made President. Emma was actually chosen by the Lord as the elect lady to expound and teach the scriptures. The women in our little settlement have been talking about It and I knew that I must find out about this new event in our lives. The Society first met in the Masonry Hall above Joseph Smith’s Store, but it has outgrown that room and is now meeting in four groups in the little groves. Today I told Edward I was going into Nauvoo for a meeting of some women. He was a little upset. “You mean you are going to take the younguns to a meeting al the way into Nauvoo? Don’t they have enough meetings around here without trotting all over the country?” I didn’t back down. I said: “Mr. Robinson, this is something special and I have made up my mind to go. The younguns are going over to the Taylors and your dinner is in the warming oven. Goodbye.” I felt guilty as I drove the horse and buggy down the road to Nauvoo, but something told me I was doing the right thing. I found the meeting. It was so different, with the women presiding and doing the talking. They have found out that we can do things without the men taking charge. Emma Smith told us how the Lord has revealed the way this organization should be started--orderly and under the Priesthood. We had a lesson on gospel principles, the Eliza R. Snow read to us the purpose of the Female Relief Society of Nauvoo: “To provoke the brethren to good works in looking to the wants of the poor, searching after objects of charity, and in administering to their wants, to assist, by correcting the morals and strengthening the virtues of the community, and save the Elders the trouble of rebuking that they may give their time to other duties in their public teaching.” The Prophet told the ladies at the first meeting: “You will receive instructions trough the order of the Priesthood and I now turn the key in your behalf in the name of the Lord. This Society shall rejoice, and knowledge and intelligence shall flow down from this time henceforth; this is the beginning of better days to the poor and needy, who shall be made to rejoice and pour forth blessings on your head.” The Treasurer discussed funds which started with a $5 gold piece the Prophet had given Emma. Many women stood up and told of what they were doing, such as sewing, cooking, cleaning and other things to help build the Temple. We were told to visit our neighbors and report back of anyone in need. We were cautioned not to spread gossip, but I am afraid that is wishful thinking. How could we have a women’s society without gossip? We sang a song by Eliza R. Snow. The spirit of the Lord was there and I loved the women and our new Female Relief Society of Nauvoo. Sep 1844: I was put to bed again with another little boy. I knew his name should be Joseph, after the beloved Prophet. Edward and I are so happy being in Zion. Sep 2 1844: I must write in my diary today and tell my feelings for this Church that I love so much and for my family and the dear sisters of the Relief Society. My hand is trembling so I can scarcely write. I feel very hot and sick. Dear Sister Wootton is helping me, but I will be glad when Edward comes in from the brickyard. That was the last entry, because on that day, one day after the birth of little Joseph, Mary was called home, leaving five little boys and two daughters and her beloved Edward. When Joseph was about three, he joined his mother and his two sisters, Mary and Margaret In our Heavenly Father’s Kingdom. Edward wept, no doubt, when he visited Mary’s grave for the last time, and gently laid some of his beautiful flowers over he head. Then he and his family followed the trail, which led to the west.

“Diary of Mary Smith”

Contributor: matchprint Created: 3 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

By Myrtle Robinson Seastrand [NOTE: This is NOT an actual diary written by Mary Smith Robinson; rather, it is a biography written by one of Mary’s descendants. Dennis Drake, a Robinson family researcher, concluded that this document is “a first-person presentation penned by [Mary’s] great-grand-daughter Myrtle Robinson Seastrand”. Drake found a statement within Myrtle’s papers that "The 'Diary of Mary Smith' is based on research, and attempts to pertray [sic] her characteristics and emotions as revealed by events in her life." (Robinson Family History, Section II, p. 88). It is also important to note that the information contained in this biography was considered accurate when it was originally written. Further research in the 40+ years since then has simply superceded outdated information. The following are a few of the inconsistencies to be aware of while reading this document: – As of this writing, FamilySearch states that Mary Smith had two younger sisters, not six. – The railway line for the Rocket was built in 1829-1830, not 1840. – Mary and Edward were married in St. Thomas, Liverpool, not Manchester. – Brigham Young was not in England during July 1841 (His mission places him in England from 6 April 1840 to 20 April 1841). – Mary Jane was born in England, not on the ship on the way to America. – The Robinson family did not reach Nauvoo until 1843. The earliest Relief Society meeting that Mary could have attended was on June 16, 1843. By that point the Relief Society had over 1,000 members. – Mary did not die in childbirth in 1844. She committed suicide one year later in 1845. – Etc. While there are some obvious errors in this “diary”, it is worth posting to FamilySearch because: 1) Some may still find it an entertaining read. 2) Posting it here with this explanation can help us stop the spread of some of the outdated information contained in the diary.] May 1 (May Day) 1828: Mum gave me a diary because I am 18 and I promised to write in it faithfully. It was a beautiful spring day. Elizabeth, Maria and I went to the Fair to buy new ribbons for our bonnets. My silly 6 little sisters were giggling and I looked up and saw the handsomest stranger staring at me. He was even bold enough to wink at me. May 7, 1828: Today I saw him again. How did he know where I lived? He stopped at our gate and petted Rex. His name is Edward Robinson. Every Sunday Edward has walked over from Little Sutton to Great Neston to “walk out with me.” June: last night Edward proposed and I said “Yes.” July: We have posted our bans and we took a large ( ) over to Manchester to the old Cathedral and were married. The new ribbons came in handy to tie on my new bonnet. I am the happiest girl in the world. July 15: We rented a tiny cottage in Upton near our families. I have been hanging curtains, cleaning and cooking for Edward. Nov 25, 1830: Today I was put to bed with a fine son, Richard. May 1831: Edward and I decided to move to Liverpool to find work. 10 Mar 1832: I was put to bed with our second son, John. July 1832: Liverpool is big and dirty and full of strange people from all over the world because it is such a big seaport town. We are not very happy here. June 1832: Yesterday we bundled up our belongings and went by boat down to Manchester. Manchester is the center of the cotton industry. We heard cotton workers we needed badly. They are paid such high wages they ride to work in cabs. People are coming from all over Great Britain. July 1833: We make more money here but everything is so dear. The air is so smoky. The factory chimneys pour our black smoke everywhere. I wash and wash things all the time, but everything is still dingy and dirty. Our babies are coughing and choking most of the time. 3 Feb 1834: Last night Edward said: “Mary, we have to get out of here. I am going to find something else to do.” Mar 25 1834: Today Edward came home early. He was all excited and shouted: “Mary, Mary guess what? I have found a job as a footman on a big manor, right out of Manchester.” Dear Diary: At last we are settled and I hope it will be for a long time. Our little cottage they gave us is clean and neat, and we can breathe! You should see my Edward in his livery. His broad shoulders and fine walk make him look like a prince. He really is a prince to me. July 1839: It has been a long time since I wrote in my diary. Into our Paradise, sadness came--our two new sweet little girls Mary and Margaret were with us for such a short time. Oh, the nights I have cried and cried when I think of the tiny graves in the Parish Churchyard. Dear God, help me! Aug 1840: God heard my prayers for comfort and has sent two more boys, Edward and William. I have been too busy and happy and have forgotten to write in my book. Sep 1840: The lord of the manor has asked Edward to help build the new-fangled railroad to run from Manchester to Liverpool, then he will be hired as a “gard” or conductor. Edward loves this new adventure. Dec 1840: The train jumped the tracks again because of the snow. My smart Edward told the owners to put some sand on the tracks, which has helped. Sunday, May 1841: We had our usual ride to Liverpool and back. We felt as if we were flying--sometimes we went as fast as 29 miles an hour. How the children love the ride on the “Rocket” with their pappy. June 1841: Something happened today that has made me excited but thoughtful. two me, Hiram Clard and William Clayton, came by our cottage with a message about a new religion. I knew they spoke the truth. My whole being was filled with excitement, but Edward was reluctant to accept them. July 1841: William became very, very ill today. I cried out toe Edward, “We need help for our baby.” The memory of our two little girls came back upon me and I was scared. Something whispered what I should do. I sent Edward for the missionaries. He was not too convinced, but I insisted. As I rocked little William, I pleaded with the Lord to spare his life until Edward could return. He finally came and with him was a handsome man with piercing eyes, who spoke gently to me and told me not to be afraid. He was Brigham Young and he and his companion took my feverish baby and said a prayer that is still in my heart. William was blessed that he would be made well and live to a ripe old age. Aug 29 1841: I pray every day that Edward will be baptized and I can be also. He is a good man. He pays the fare for the missionaries on the train and sometimes even takes them to my father’s tailor shop and buys new clothes for them. Jan 18 1842: My prayers have been answered. Today Edward was baptized and we are already making plans to go to ZION. It has taken great courage for Edward to give up his position and to leave our little cottage, where he has planted so many beautiful flowers and shrubs, but we have turned our backs on it all and we sailed from Liverpool for New Orleans, with our five children and another one traveling with me. Before we left the Railroad presented a beautiful silver watch to Edward in appreciation of his services. Mar 6 1842: Today aboard the Ship “Henry”, I was put to bed with another baby. The seas were angry and Edward tried to calm our five little sick ones and help me when he could. Finally the ship’s doctor reached the little corner of the deck where Edward had hung a quilt for privacy and to keep out the cold north wind. The doctor was brusque, but kind, but I am sure the children were frightened at the screams of their mother. Dear Diary, when little Mary Jane was laid in my arms, it was worth it all. Aug 1842: We have reached Nauvoo, the City Beautiful. My dram has come true. Such a welcome by the Saints. I shall never forget my first glimpse of the Prophet…the feeling of greatness about him…and his eyes that seem to see the depths of your soul. We have bought a small farm just out of Nauvoo. Edward has planted the flower seeds and little starts he carefully tended on the long journey. Sep 1842: I have heard about a new society for women that was organized by the Prophet on the 17th of March, 1842. His wife, Emma was made President. Emma was actually chosen by the Lord as the elect lady to expound and teach the scriptures. The women in our little settlement have been talking about It and I knew that I must find out about this new event in our lives. The Society first met in the Masonry Hall above Joseph Smith’s Store, but it has outgrown that room and is now meeting in four groups in the little groves. Today I told Edward I was going into Nauvoo for a meeting of some women. He was a little upset. “You mean you are going to take the younguns to a meeting al the way into Nauvoo? Don’t they have enough meetings around here without trotting all over the country?” I didn’t back down. I said: “Mr. Robinson, this is something special and I have made up my mind to go. The younguns are going over to the Taylors and your dinner is in the warming oven. Goodbye.” I felt guilty as I drove the horse and buggy down the road to Nauvoo, but something told me I was doing the right thing. I found the meeting. It was so different, with the women presiding and doing the talking. They have found out that we can do things without the men taking charge. Emma Smith told us how the Lord has revealed the way this organization should be started--orderly and under the Priesthood. We had a lesson on gospel principles, the Eliza R. Snow read to us the purpose of the Female Relief Society of Nauvoo: “To provoke the brethren to good works in looking to the wants of the poor, searching after objects of charity, and in administering to their wants, to assist, by correcting the morals and strengthening the virtues of the community, and save the Elders the trouble of rebuking that they may give their time to other duties in their public teaching.” The Prophet told the ladies at the first meeting: “You will receive instructions trough the order of the Priesthood and I now turn the key in your behalf in the name of the Lord. This Society shall rejoice, and knowledge and intelligence shall flow down from this time henceforth; this is the beginning of better days to the poor and needy, who shall be made to rejoice and pour forth blessings on your head.” The Treasurer discussed funds which started with a $5 gold piece the Prophet had given Emma. Many women stood up and told of what they were doing, such as sewing, cooking, cleaning and other things to help build the Temple. We were told to visit our neighbors and report back of anyone in need. We were cautioned not to spread gossip, but I am afraid that is wishful thinking. How could we have a women’s society without gossip? We sang a song by Eliza R. Snow. The spirit of the Lord was there and I loved the women and our new Female Relief Society of Nauvoo. Sep 1844: I was put to bed again with another little boy. I knew his name should be Joseph, after the beloved Prophet. Edward and I are so happy being in Zion. Sep 2 1844: I must write in my diary today and tell my feelings for this Church that I love so much and for my family and the dear sisters of the Relief Society. My hand is trembling so I can scarcely write. I feel very hot and sick. Dear Sister Wootton is helping me, but I will be glad when Edward comes in from the brickyard. That was the last entry, because on that day, one day after the birth of little Joseph, Mary was called home, leaving five little boys and two daughters and her beloved Edward. When Joseph was about three, he joined his mother and his two sisters, Mary and Margaret In our Heavenly Father’s Kingdom. Edward wept, no doubt, when he visited Mary’s grave for the last time, and gently laid some of his beautiful flowers over he head. Then he and his family followed the trail, which led to the west.

“Diary of Mary Smith”

Contributor: Celique Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

By Myrtle Robinson Seastrand [NOTE: This is NOT an actual diary written by Mary Smith Robinson; rather, it is a biography written by one of Mary’s descendants. Dennis Drake, a Robinson family researcher, concluded that this document is “a first-person presentation penned by [Mary’s] great-grand-daughter Myrtle Robinson Seastrand”. Drake found a statement within Myrtle’s papers that "The 'Diary of Mary Smith' is based on research, and attempts to pertray [sic] her characteristics and emotions as revealed by events in her life." (Robinson Family History, Section II, p. 88). It is also important to note that the information contained in this biography was considered accurate when it was originally written. Further research in the 40+ years since then has simply superceded outdated information. The following are a few of the inconsistencies to be aware of while reading this document: – As of this writing, FamilySearch states that Mary Smith had two younger sisters, not six. – The railway line for the Rocket was built in 1829-1830, not 1840. – Mary and Edward were married in St. Thomas, Liverpool, not Manchester. – Brigham Young was not in England during July 1841 (His mission places him in England from 6 April 1840 to 20 April 1841). – Mary Jane was born in England, not on the ship on the way to America. – The Robinson family did not reach Nauvoo until 1843. The earliest Relief Society meeting that Mary could have attended was on June 16, 1843. By that point the Relief Society had over 1,000 members. – Mary did not die in childbirth in 1844. She committed suicide one year later in 1845. – Etc. While there are some obvious errors in this “diary”, it is worth posting to FamilySearch because: 1) Some may still find it an entertaining read. 2) Posting it here with this explanation can help us stop the spread of some of the outdated information contained in the diary.] May 1 (May Day) 1828: Mum gave me a diary because I am 18 and I promised to write in it faithfully. It was a beautiful spring day. Elizabeth, Maria and I went to the Fair to buy new ribbons for our bonnets. My silly 6 little sisters were giggling and I looked up and saw the handsomest stranger staring at me. He was even bold enough to wink at me. May 7, 1828: Today I saw him again. How did he know where I lived? He stopped at our gate and petted Rex. His name is Edward Robinson. Every Sunday Edward has walked over from Little Sutton to Great Neston to “walk out with me.” June: last night Edward proposed and I said “Yes.” July: We have posted our bans and we took a large ( ) over to Manchester to the old Cathedral and were married. The new ribbons came in handy to tie on my new bonnet. I am the happiest girl in the world. July 15: We rented a tiny cottage in Upton near our families. I have been hanging curtains, cleaning and cooking for Edward. Nov 25, 1830: Today I was put to bed with a fine son, Richard. May 1831: Edward and I decided to move to Liverpool to find work. 10 Mar 1832: I was put to bed with our second son, John. July 1832: Liverpool is big and dirty and full of strange people from all over the world because it is such a big seaport town. We are not very happy here. June 1832: Yesterday we bundled up our belongings and went by boat down to Manchester. Manchester is the center of the cotton industry. We heard cotton workers we needed badly. They are paid such high wages they ride to work in cabs. People are coming from all over Great Britain. July 1833: We make more money here but everything is so dear. The air is so smoky. The factory chimneys pour our black smoke everywhere. I wash and wash things all the time, but everything is still dingy and dirty. Our babies are coughing and choking most of the time. 3 Feb 1834: Last night Edward said: “Mary, we have to get out of here. I am going to find something else to do.” Mar 25 1834: Today Edward came home early. He was all excited and shouted: “Mary, Mary guess what? I have found a job as a footman on a big manor, right out of Manchester.” Dear Diary: At last we are settled and I hope it will be for a long time. Our little cottage they gave us is clean and neat, and we can breathe! You should see my Edward in his livery. His broad shoulders and fine walk make him look like a prince. He really is a prince to me. July 1839: It has been a long time since I wrote in my diary. Into our Paradise, sadness came--our two new sweet little girls Mary and Margaret were with us for such a short time. Oh, the nights I have cried and cried when I think of the tiny graves in the Parish Churchyard. Dear God, help me! Aug 1840: God heard my prayers for comfort and has sent two more boys, Edward and William. I have been too busy and happy and have forgotten to write in my book. Sep 1840: The lord of the manor has asked Edward to help build the new-fangled railroad to run from Manchester to Liverpool, then he will be hired as a “gard” or conductor. Edward loves this new adventure. Dec 1840: The train jumped the tracks again because of the snow. My smart Edward told the owners to put some sand on the tracks, which has helped. Sunday, May 1841: We had our usual ride to Liverpool and back. We felt as if we were flying--sometimes we went as fast as 29 miles an hour. How the children love the ride on the “Rocket” with their pappy. June 1841: Something happened today that has made me excited but thoughtful. two me, Hiram Clard and William Clayton, came by our cottage with a message about a new religion. I knew they spoke the truth. My whole being was filled with excitement, but Edward was reluctant to accept them. July 1841: William became very, very ill today. I cried out toe Edward, “We need help for our baby.” The memory of our two little girls came back upon me and I was scared. Something whispered what I should do. I sent Edward for the missionaries. He was not too convinced, but I insisted. As I rocked little William, I pleaded with the Lord to spare his life until Edward could return. He finally came and with him was a handsome man with piercing eyes, who spoke gently to me and told me not to be afraid. He was Brigham Young and he and his companion took my feverish baby and said a prayer that is still in my heart. William was blessed that he would be made well and live to a ripe old age. Aug 29 1841: I pray every day that Edward will be baptized and I can be also. He is a good man. He pays the fare for the missionaries on the train and sometimes even takes them to my father’s tailor shop and buys new clothes for them. Jan 18 1842: My prayers have been answered. Today Edward was baptized and we are already making plans to go to ZION. It has taken great courage for Edward to give up his position and to leave our little cottage, where he has planted so many beautiful flowers and shrubs, but we have turned our backs on it all and we sailed from Liverpool for New Orleans, with our five children and another one traveling with me. Before we left the Railroad presented a beautiful silver watch to Edward in appreciation of his services. Mar 6 1842: Today aboard the Ship “Henry”, I was put to bed with another baby. The seas were angry and Edward tried to calm our five little sick ones and help me when he could. Finally the ship’s doctor reached the little corner of the deck where Edward had hung a quilt for privacy and to keep out the cold north wind. The doctor was brusque, but kind, but I am sure the children were frightened at the screams of their mother. Dear Diary, when little Mary Jane was laid in my arms, it was worth it all. Aug 1842: We have reached Nauvoo, the City Beautiful. My dram has come true. Such a welcome by the Saints. I shall never forget my first glimpse of the Prophet…the feeling of greatness about him…and his eyes that seem to see the depths of your soul. We have bought a small farm just out of Nauvoo. Edward has planted the flower seeds and little starts he carefully tended on the long journey. Sep 1842: I have heard about a new society for women that was organized by the Prophet on the 17th of March, 1842. His wife, Emma was made President. Emma was actually chosen by the Lord as the elect lady to expound and teach the scriptures. The women in our little settlement have been talking about It and I knew that I must find out about this new event in our lives. The Society first met in the Masonry Hall above Joseph Smith’s Store, but it has outgrown that room and is now meeting in four groups in the little groves. Today I told Edward I was going into Nauvoo for a meeting of some women. He was a little upset. “You mean you are going to take the younguns to a meeting al the way into Nauvoo? Don’t they have enough meetings around here without trotting all over the country?” I didn’t back down. I said: “Mr. Robinson, this is something special and I have made up my mind to go. The younguns are going over to the Taylors and your dinner is in the warming oven. Goodbye.” I felt guilty as I drove the horse and buggy down the road to Nauvoo, but something told me I was doing the right thing. I found the meeting. It was so different, with the women presiding and doing the talking. They have found out that we can do things without the men taking charge. Emma Smith told us how the Lord has revealed the way this organization should be started--orderly and under the Priesthood. We had a lesson on gospel principles, the Eliza R. Snow read to us the purpose of the Female Relief Society of Nauvoo: “To provoke the brethren to good works in looking to the wants of the poor, searching after objects of charity, and in administering to their wants, to assist, by correcting the morals and strengthening the virtues of the community, and save the Elders the trouble of rebuking that they may give their time to other duties in their public teaching.” The Prophet told the ladies at the first meeting: “You will receive instructions trough the order of the Priesthood and I now turn the key in your behalf in the name of the Lord. This Society shall rejoice, and knowledge and intelligence shall flow down from this time henceforth; this is the beginning of better days to the poor and needy, who shall be made to rejoice and pour forth blessings on your head.” The Treasurer discussed funds which started with a $5 gold piece the Prophet had given Emma. Many women stood up and told of what they were doing, such as sewing, cooking, cleaning and other things to help build the Temple. We were told to visit our neighbors and report back of anyone in need. We were cautioned not to spread gossip, but I am afraid that is wishful thinking. How could we have a women’s society without gossip? We sang a song by Eliza R. Snow. The spirit of the Lord was there and I loved the women and our new Female Relief Society of Nauvoo. Sep 1844: I was put to bed again with another little boy. I knew his name should be Joseph, after the beloved Prophet. Edward and I are so happy being in Zion. Sep 2 1844: I must write in my diary today and tell my feelings for this Church that I love so much and for my family and the dear sisters of the Relief Society. My hand is trembling so I can scarcely write. I feel very hot and sick. Dear Sister Wootton is helping me, but I will be glad when Edward comes in from the brickyard. That was the last entry, because on that day, one day after the birth of little Joseph, Mary was called home, leaving five little boys and two daughters and her beloved Edward. When Joseph was about three, he joined his mother and his two sisters, Mary and Margaret In our Heavenly Father’s Kingdom. Edward wept, no doubt, when he visited Mary’s grave for the last time, and gently laid some of his beautiful flowers over he head. Then he and his family followed the trail, which led to the west.

Mary Smith Robinson (2 December 1810 – 1 September 1845)

Contributor: Celique Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Daughter of John Smith and Elizabeth Married: Edward Robinson, 1828, Manchester, Lancastershire, England Children - Richard Smith Robinson, John Robinson, Mary Robinson, Elizabeth Robinson, Martha Robinson, Margaret Robinson, Edward Robinson, William Smith Robinson, Mary Jane Robinson, Joseph Robinson At the age of 21, in 1828, Edward married a lively, spiritually-minded English girl named Mary Smith, who was, born 2 December 1810, in Manchester, England. Their courtship began while they were working on the same manor. Mary Smith was a tutor to the Lord's children. She was very intellectual and a good teacher. Her picture reveals a rather delicate little face surrounded by a mop of thick curls. During the 16 years of their short life together, nine children were born to them. Edward Robinson, came into manhood at the beginning of the most inventive and important century of the world's history. In 1828, the English Parliament offered a prize for the best model steam engine to run on rails from Manchester to Liverpool. Several men in different parts of the world were experimenting with steam power, but the prize was awarded to George and Robert Stevenson of England, for their prize steam engine the "Rocket." A charter was granted and this engine made its initial run from Manchester to Liverpool in 15 Sep 1830, the same year as the organization of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. This date marked the beginning of great things. A new Era of science and religion. Edward Robinson had the distinction of being the first conductor, or guard, on this train. The English nobleman for whom Edward acted as footman owned a big block of stock in this new enterprise and he gave Edward this position because of the deep trust he had in him. Edward used to like to tell of that first run and how they sprinkled sand on the rails to keep the cars from slipping when they got going so fast as 26 miles per hour. In the American Fork Cemetery on Edward Robinson's tombstone is carved a picture of the engine "The Rocket", under which is engraved "Edward Robinson, First railroad conductor on the World." With a good salary and a thrifty wife, Edward and his little family were very happy, welcoming each child as it came into their lives to bless their home and name, but the grim reaper came and robbed them of two of the children Mary and Martha. In 1840, the same year that Mormonism was first preached in England, Little William, who was one year old, became seriously ill, and Mary, a very religious woman with a great interest in this new religion, sent for the Mormon Missionaries. Brigham Young was then in Manchester and came to their home, anointed and laid his hands upon the sick child's head, and promised the parents that he should be made well and live to a ripe old age. William has been a living testimony of this healing, and always spoke of it with appreciative reverence. Soon after this, Edward also joined the church and he often let the missionaries ride free on the cars. He would say, "Sit still and say nothing." More than once he took them to his tailor and ordered a suit of clothes for them. It took a year or so for Mary Smith to persuade her husband to quit his fine position and leave their native land to join the Mormon Saints, who were then in Illinois, but the prayers of this little woman prevailed and in 1842, Edward and Mary with six children, left their native land for America. Upon leaving, the railroad company presented Edward with a silver watch in which was engraved, "To Edward Robinson in token of regard from the Directors of the Manchester-Liverpool Railroad, 1842." This watch is now in the keeping of the Daughters of the Pioneers of American Fork. They crossed the ocean in an old sailing vessel, the "Henry" in October 1842. It took nine weeks to cross the water. They were delayed by storms and Mary and two of the children lay at death's door during most of the voyage. They were indeed happy to set foot on ground, but as soon as they landed, they changed ships for the steam-propelled flat river boat which sailed up the enchanting Mississippi for Nauvoo. The Saints had built this beautiful city in Illinois on the banks of the Mississippi on swamp lands, thought worthless by others. Edward, believing this to be their permanent home, took their savings and immediately built them a lovely, little red brick two-story home. This was the happiest year of their lives. They were living and learning the gospel of Jesus Christ as taught by the Prophet Joseph Smith and others. In the newly built Nauvoo Temple, the children were sealed to Edward and Mary and were endowed for all eternity. They envisioned only happiness ahead, but as the poet Burns said, "The best laid schemes of mice and men can aft gang agley and leave us naught but grief and pain, for promised joy." Within the next year, 1844, the Prophet and his brother, Hyrum, were martyred. This tragedy brought horror and unrest among the people. Grief came with even more force into the home of Edward Robinson for three months later, in September 1844, his wife, then 33, was taken in death at the birth of her ninth child. The baby, who was named Joseph after the Prophet, was taken care of by the Kirkwood family. Later he died and was buried beside the mother in Nauvoo. Life was discouraging for Edward. He employed Ann Wootton, a widow with four children, two of her own, Attie and John and two adopted one's, Lizzie and Nammie, to care for his household. Ann Wootton was born in Tunstall, Staffordshire, England, 7 November 1810. She made such a good housekeeper that Edward proposed marriage to her and these two plucky parents decided to rear their families together. She made a good stepmother to Edward's children, although a mixed family of ten children was a big job for one woman. Unrest and mobbing in Nauvoo again became rampant. Edward, taking the advice of authorities to seek homes in nearby towns and hoping to get employment, traded his little dream home for a team of horses and moved his family to Burlington, Iowa. Here for four years they struggled, trying to save enough to make their journey with the Saints to Utah. Here two boys were born, Heber and Alfred. At this time Edward and the biggest children would go to the mills and get roughins (bran) for ten cents a bushel. From this Ann would make sack after sack of bread which was dried, in order to take it with them on their journey across the plains. They traveled in the Ezra T. Benson Company, leaving in the spring of 1849. By that time over 5000 Saint's had gone ahead of them, so by then the paths first made by the light tread of the moccasined Indian were trampled into a dust road, by the clumsy hoofs of the oxen and rawhide boots of the men. At one time, Edward, still retaining his jolly humor, said, as he held up his coarse boot, "This old clod cruncher doesn't look much like the fine-polished English boots I wore in the Gentry, but such is the price of pioneering." Edward drove two good yoke of oxen to pull the two wagons and had two good cows; Paddy and Lilly. Lilly was a hard looker, as she had had her tail bitten off by a coyote when she was a calf, but they gave plenty of milk to soak the dried bread they had to eat. With an occasional flapjack or egg from the hens they took with them, they seemed to have a mighty healthy diet. They also had buffalo and deer now and then. There were plenty of these dangerous looking buffalo on the plains. At a distance they looked like a patch of cedar trees. The Indians claimed the buffalo and deer and they didn't like to see so many white men coming onto their hunting grounds. The whites took away the deer from him and robbed him of his food, clothing, needles and thread and other essentials. When Edward and his family finally started down grade into the valley they were indeed thankful. 'Tis true, the land with it's purple sage appeared dry and deserted, compared with the green plains they had left behind, but the streams and the beauty of the lake made up for the land's dryness. The majestic mountains stood like sentinels guarding the people as they proceeded to build their homes once more, happy with the thought they would never be driven again. The first thing Edward did when he arrived in the valley of Salt Lake in October 1849, was to secure land. He rented the John Taylor farm and immediately commenced Fall plowing, using the faithful oxen that had brought them across the plains. The boys helped slip logs to make walls to keep the wolves out of the milk. They cleared the land and broke the sage and skunk brush up for fuel, drove the oxen into the canyons to bring back cottonwood, wild game and berries. Deer and game were plentiful and helped out when bread stuff was so scarce. Most of the grain had to be saved for Spring planting as it was the year before, 1848, that the crickets got away with a big part of the crop when the Lord in his mercy sent the Seagulls to help them out. Much grain was needed in 1849, as well as flour, for that is when the gold rushers came through. They were glad to trade tired animals for food stuff. That is how the pioneers obtained horses, sheep and cattle. (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/11745954/mary-robinson)

Life timeline of Mary Robinson (Smith)

Mary Robinson (Smith) was born on 2 Dec 1810
Mary Robinson (Smith) was 15 years old when The Erie Canal opens: Passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie. The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System. Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.
Mary Robinson (Smith) was 21 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
Mary Robinson (Smith) died on 2 Sep 1844 at the age of 33
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Mary Robinson (Smith) (2 Dec 1810 - 2 Sep 1844), BillionGraves Record 71330 American Fork, Utah, Utah, United States

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