Mary E Conrad

12 Sep 1856 - 11 Dec 1935

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Mary E Conrad

12 Sep 1856 - 11 Dec 1935
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Mary Elizabeth Holdaway by Grandson, Grant Tell Muhlestein Mary Elizabeth Holdaway, born 12 Sept. 1856 to SHEDRICK HOLDAWAY and LUCINDA HAWS, was reared in a large pioneer family where work and austerity gave demands to all family members. Mary Elizabeth carried the attributes of a true pioneer thro

Life Information

Mary E Conrad

Born:
Died:

Provo City Cemetery

610 S State St
Provo, Utah, Utah
United States

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Mother- LEONA
FATHER- LEWIS
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Mary Elizabeth Holdaway by her Grandson Tell

Contributor: dswright Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

Mary Elizabeth Holdaway by Grandson, Grant Tell Muhlestein Mary Elizabeth Holdaway, born 12 Sept. 1856 to SHEDRICK HOLDAWAY and LUCINDA HAWS, was reared in a large pioneer family where work and austerity gave demands to all family members. Mary Elizabeth carried the attributes of a true pioneer throughout her life. She was frugal, but generous, and no visitor ever left her garden (after her family was raised) without taking along a bouquet of flowers, or something from the fruit and vegetable garden. She was a great lover of all kinds of plants, and learned the art of grafting so that the seedling fruits could be grafted with better varieties if they did not produce a better kind than anything in the fruit orchard. Grandfather Charles Conrad, born 12 Nov. 1831 to Charles Ferdinand Conrad and Sarah Adams Bitely, saw this Mary Elizabeth Holdaway as a child --- attractive, brown eyes, curley dark hair, and winsome smile --- and vowed that be would wait until she grew to womanhood at which time he would marry her. When this young lady reached seventeen years and ten months, they were married the 10 Nov. 1873 in the Salt Lake Endowment House. My mother, their first child, was born 21 March 1875 and, like her mother.. learning, as well, to care for their food and clothing needs. Grandfather was a self-made veterinarian and often cared for sick animals through a full night. His clients promised grains or fruits at harvest time and often this fell through, so grandmother was compelled to grow and produce most of their food needs. Grandfather had acquired considerable land in the NorthEast part of Provo. They built their home on the corner of 7th East and 8th North --- a large one-story, double-brick home with a small fruit-and vegetable cellar. This was a double-brick construction and the lumber came from the Shedrick Holdaway Lumber Mill in South Fork of Provo Canyon- --a very hard and sturdy native pine almost impossible to drive nails into or to cut with a saw once cured, as we found later when the ceilings were lowered and rooms built in the attic area. This high-ceiling home was cool both in summer and winter. Good home-produced foods seemed to keep the family in health. There was plenty of milk and cream and home-churned butter. The grains were taken to the Mill and used in their natural state. Grandmother was an excellent cook and seamstress--providing wholesome food for the family and clothing for all. The landmark for the Ccnrad hcme was a huge cottonwood tree which was planted by nature long before the white man made inroads to the West. This tree provided the Conrad home with shade and comfort in the summertime. When the home was finished, one of the first things planted near the large cottonwood tree were some black walnut seeds. One grew vigorous and tall and provided the family with much enjoyment each year. As the grandchildren came to visit grandmother, they would ask to crack nuts under the Cottonwood --- sitting on a large stone bench that surrounded it. The soil near the home was quite rocky--being the residue of streams that once came over the area. In fact, my father-in-law, Gordon Phillips, sold land and gravel from an area which he purchased from the Conrad estate just north of the Conrad home. They had seeds of select cantaloupe and watermelon brought from Kentucky. Grandmother would save seeds from the cantaloupe with the smallest centers and the most meat, and the thin-rinded melons with the best:flavor. As a child I remember the strong and pleasant odor of the melons as grandmother cut them open to serve to her guests or relatives. The sweetness and perfume of those days seems to be missing in the melons we purchase at the markets today. They kept both beef and dairy cattle and, of necessity, a herd bull--one of which was notoriously mean. On one occasion grandmother had to cross the pasture where the bull was kept and he was aroused and came at her loudly bellowing. When he got too close, she fell to the ground, lying on her back, and, as the bull charged her, she would kick him in the mouth and continue. to push herself toward the barn area where the hog pen offered some kind of retreat. She reached the pig stye at a moment when the bull had stopped to appraise this strange woman's actions, and she was able to get over the wall and fall to the ground and gratefully rningle with the hogs. When their sixth child, Angus, died at the age of eight months, grandfather brought home a buck fawn deer which grandmother breast fed until it was weaned. This fawn grew to maturity and loved grandmother, of course, but he was hard to control since few fences would hold him and he was mean with strangers --- and especially with the boys who came by and threw rocks and sticks at him. One day some boys up on the "university" property threw stones and one struck him in the head and he fell to the ground dead, thus he provided meat for the Conrad family for some time. Grandmother loved to share plants with anyone who showed an interest in them. She grew many kinds of perennials and always had colorful annuals. She was able to plant sweet peas in the late fall and give them winter protection and have them grow and blossom for Memorial Day. Often the hundreds of peony plants she grew would not quite make their blooming coincide with Memorial Day and, if they were early, she would cut the buds and put them in cold storage at the "Ice Plant. But she could usually provide her "customers" with some flowers for this occasion. Any money she received for flowers, roots, vegetables or fruit was put into a jar in the kitchen to pay her taxes in the fall. Grandmother gave her five sons, Charles, Warren, Arthur, Milton, and Lewis their "inheritance" as young men who wished to establish themselves in a new land in Canada (Taber, Alberta). She gave her daughter, Eva a like stipened so she and Uncle John Walker could purchase a home in Provo. Aunt Alice Bertin was given a piece of ground west of the home which land was now too much for grandmother to care for --- this land was mostly pasture-land, yet, as the city drained it to put in streets,, Alice was able to sell lots to private individuals as well as Brigham Young University. Grandmother had a flare for words and was a natural born poetess. She would get an inspiration in the night (in her later life) get up and write these thoughts. She wrote a poem based on her experiences through the early years of her life and entitled it "The Pioneers" which describes their simple pleasures, entertainment, dress, customs, and dancing (beneath the.drip of candles). When my mother and I came out to Utah in the fall of 1.935 so I might attend the university, she was still working on and revising this bit of prose. Grandmother was invited to recite this poem, to the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers and went to Salt Lake City to give it but was disappointed by another taking too much time and they had to delete her from the program. She was beginning to ail and when mother and I arrived in the fall of 1935 she was unable to care for her garden and home, yet she taught me how to irrigate, and we were able to harvest the fall crops and enjoy the "fruits" of her labor. Mother was her constant nurse during her terminal illness and, although she was suffering, she never complained. Mother and I had prayer at her bedside every night. We, her descendents, appreciate the faith and love of the Gospel of Jesus Christ which she instilled in all her family, whom she dearly loved, and her every effort was expended in their behalf and for their happiness. A great and monumental heritage.

Charles Conrad

Contributor: dswright Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

CHARLES CONRAD Charles Conrad came to Utah from Detroit Michigan, in 1864 and has given this country the benefit of his experience gained in other places. Born in Brownstownship, Wayne Co. Michigan, 20 November 1831. He was the son of Charles Ferdinand Conrad & Sarah Adams Bitely Conrad. Charles Ferdinand, his father was a native of Newton Penn. where he was born 15 Sept. 1808 and married 18 Feb. 1830 Seneca Ontario Co. New York, immigrating to Mich, the year Charles was born, and settling on a farm he bought from the government, consisting of a quarter section of land, mostly covered with timber. He cleared land, cultivated and made a good farm of it, becoming one of the prominent men of his community and holding the office of Justice of the Peace, etc. He also owned an 80 acre farm at Trenton Michigan. Charles Ferdinand died in 1884. Charles grew to manhood in Michigan and received an education there. He also spent some time on his Father=s place at Trenton, remaining at home until he started for Utah in 1864. His mother, Sarah, was the mother of 11 children. She joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in 1841 and came to Provo, Utah in 1863. Four children came with their mother. They were; Charles, George, Serrine, (named for the Elder who brought them the Gospel) and Elizabeth. Sarah died in Provo on 24 Dec 1879. In 1864, Charles followed his mother to Utah, in company with his brothers George, Serrine, his Uncle Frederick Schott Conrad and his brother-in-law James Hooks. They had but one wagon between them and left Iowa 12 May 1864. Traveled as far as Julesburg before they caught up with any other immigrants. There they crossed the Platte river 13 times, making boats of their wagon beds, with which to ferry their goods across and swimming their cattle and them- selves. Although the Indians were out on the war path, none of the party were molested and they reached Salt Lake City in safety, 12 Aug. 1864. They tarried 11 days in that place, then came direct to Provo. Charles bought a home in the center of Provo and there for three years followed gardening. He also rented other land, and during the time of the Black Hawk War rented the farm of J.A. Bean. In 1870 he bought a farm in eastern part of town, which was at that time a mile further out than any other place. First he bought 8 acres, then added to it from time to time, (uncultivated land) until he finally had a good farm of 27 acres within the city limits, well improved, all fenced, and built a comfortable brick home there on. He also preempted 160 acres on the south fork of Provo Canyon, in 1880 and there built a home and began keeping stock following that for several years and at this time has part of this land under cultivation. Mr Conrad was the first man to open up land in the canyon. For 6 years he acted as Police of Provo under instruction of A.O.Smoot. He also did considerable lumbering in the mts. and furnished the material for the old Tabernacle building. He also took active part in building many of the canals, & was a director of the upper east union. He was a member of Provo Canyon Read Go. and has done much towards making and keeping the road thru the canyon in good repair. Charles Conrad married 10 Nov. 1873, Mary E. Holdaway, daughter of Shadrach Holdaway and Lucinda Haws Holdaway. They have 9 children, Mary Elizabeth, Charles S.,Warren N., Arthur M., Milton W., Eva L., Lewis A., Alice, and Angus, who died in infancy. In political belief Mr Conrad is a Democrat and for many years has been in public office. Has seen jury duty, trying a number of prominent cases under Judge Emerson. Charles Conrad joined the church in 1866. He was ordained an Elder and set apart as lst Coun. to Pres. Kemp, of Provo; Ordained a Seventy 26 January 1869; Ordained a High Priest in 1891 and set apart as lst. Counselor. to Bishop Alexander Glllispie, of the Pleasant View Ward, Provo, which position he resigned eight years later on account of failing health. Charles Conrad began at the foot of the ladder and has climbed step by step, until he is now in position of affluence, enjoying the confidence and esteem of his friends and associates, being numbered among the influential and substantial men of Utah County. The above copied from: Portrait and Gen. and Biographical record of the State of Utah ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Charles Conrad was born in Browntownship, Wayne Co., Michigan in 1831 where his father, Charles Ferdinand Conrad, and his mother, Sarah Adams Bitely, were prosperous and comfortably settled down...until they were taught about the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. His mother was convinced it was true, and was baptized in 1841. His father never did join the church. Charles followed his father's example and was not baptized at the time. His mother remained faithful, however, and after her children were grown, she followed the saints to Utah in 1863. A year later, Charles, two other brothers, a brother-in-law, and an uncle joined her at Provo. Two years after arriving, Charles, too, was convinced, and was baptized into the church at age 35. Once baptized, he became very active in the Pleasant View Ward, and became a counselor to Bishop Gillespie in 1891. When Charles was 33 years old, he noticed an eight-year-old dark-eyed girl playing in his neighbor's front room. Her name was Mary Elizabeth, and she was the only girl in the Holdaway family. She was bright and loquacious, and Charles, admiring her charming ways, rubbed her mass of dark curls and announced that he was going to wait for her to grow up so he could marry her. Nine years later, on Nov 10th 1873, he did just that! They were married when he was 42 and his bride, seventeen. Charles Conrad knew he was a fortunate man to get her, not only for her beauty, but also because of her great desire for a family and the many skills she had acquired with which she could care for one. Charles Conrad had worked for six years as a policeman to earn money for land, had done a lot of lumbering in the mountains, and had taken part in building many of the irrigation canals, and had accumulated many acres of land in the northeast section of town. The couple settled down in a new brick home Charles built on the corner of his 27 acres of land, all within city limits, well-improved, and fenced. They also preempted 160 acres on the South Fork of Provo Canyon, and in 1880 built another home there. They began keeping cattle in South Fork, and put part of the land under cultivation as well. Charles was the first man to open up land in the South Fork of Provo Canyon. On 21 Mar 1875 there was born a beautiful little replica of Mary Elizabeth to Charles and Mary, whom they named Mary Elizabeth, also. She became known as Lizzie, a beautiful little girl with dark brown eyes and heavy dark hair that curled more gently than her mother's tight curls. Next came a son whom they named Charles after his father. By Joyce Muhlestein Great Granddaughter In Law

Letter from Charles Conrad to his wife Mary

Contributor: dswright Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

In January 1910, Mary took a train from Provo, Utah to Somerset, Colorado to attend the wedding of her daughter Eva. This was only weeks before Charles passed away on February 7th. She needed a large trunk to take a set of china dishes and a feather bed tick as a wedding present with her on the train. This letter/poem was written on January 17th by Charles for this occasion to his sweet wife Mary. My wife who got in a terrible fret, to go to Somerset And she asked me, “won’t you go too?” Said I, “I’d like well to go, But I’m not well enough you know.” “Well then,” says she, “I will go.” “Go then,” said I “and go you may and we will find the pay.” So she began to work and fret to fix for Somerset. So I got her a grip sack. Says she, “That is too big for me to pack.” So I took it back. And now, says she, “My trunk is too small. I must have one that’s big enough to hold all.” So in she went without Art’s consent Took his big trunk, turned out his junk and says, “Without a doubt, that will hold, if I turn his all out.” So out they went by her consent And hers went in with a laugh and a grin. But when she got her things all in tack She complained much about her lame back. “Now,” says she, “as I’m about to start, I will to you a kiss impart.” I gave her a kiss and a smack Wished her a safe come back. So away to the depot she went And for a ticket to Somerset her money she spent And while on the road to Somerset the groom and bride she met. “Now,” says the groom, “to Somerset we’ll take a stride.” So in the train for Somerset they took their seat. When there, their friend they greet. Although the train was late they found, the Walker gate. And when once inside, hand in hand went the groom and bride, And were welcomed at the Walker fireside.

Charley loves Mary (Charles Conrad and Mary Elizabeth Holdaway story)

Contributor: dswright Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

Chapter One --Charley Little Charley was born on the 20th of November 1831 on an eighty acre farm in Brownstown, Michigan. Their farm was bordered to the east by Mud Street, which ran along the Detroit River and was a well-traveled road for people who traveled between Detroit, Michigan and Chicago, Illinois. Charley’s father’s name was also Charles, Charles Ferdinand and his mother was Sarah Adams Bitely. His father was a prominent figure in the area and served as a Justice of the Peace for the town of Trenton. Charley grew up in the American Frontier with plenty of trees, wild animals and room to hunt and explore as a young man. He especially enjoyed finding the flint heads and old muskets left behind from the battles fought in the War of 1812. A crudely marked stone remained on their property marking the names of the men who died there in the battle. He wondered about what it was like thirty years ago. This made his life very exciting to him.   When Charley was ten years old, a Mormon missionary named Elder Sirrine came to the area. His mother and sister readily accepted their message and were baptized. Charley and his father were not. For twenty-two years his mother stayed in Michigan, but in 1863 she decided to take her family to Utah to live with the Saints. The next year Charley decided to follow. He intended to go all the way to California, however once in Utah he decided to stay.   Chapter Two -- Mary Elizabeth Mary Elizabeth was born September 12, 1856 in Provo, Utah to Shadrach Holdaway and Lucinda Haws. Her father had marched with the Mormon Battalion and had prospected for gold in California finding about three-thousand dollars worth. Family stories say that he was the first man to pay his tithing with gold. Shadrach and Lucinda took their money and traveled back east to purchase items to start the Utah Woolen Mills. Their first home was on the north side of Center Street and 500 West. Eventually, they settled an area along the Provo River in an area called Vineyard. The shores of Utah Lake were to the west. They were a prosperous family and had another home up the south fork of Provo Canyon, where they logged trees for buildings and homes. Shadrach and Cindy’s life was not always perfect. Their first two boys died in infancy. Then they had four strong boys. When Mary Elizabeth was born her mother was so happy. But when Mary was only three months old she took sick and one day stopped breathing. Mary’s father was away and her mother was determined that she was not going to lose another baby. She got the consecrated oil and kept rubbing it all over Mary’s body and prayed. Mary began breathing again and color returned to her face. Following Mary came two more healthy brothers, who were followed by two girls that also died. One last boy came to the family, and last but not least, what Mary always wanted a little sister, Amanda. As Mary grew she became was a charming girl with big brown eyes and curly brown hair.   Chapter Three --Homesteading Charley purchased a home near the Woolen Mills. It was favorably located in town, however the water from the Woolen Mills would flood his yard. Eventually, Brother Young purchased the land and Charley started looking for a place to homestead. It was during this time that Charley happened to see a young girl playing in a yard nearby. She had big brown eyes and curly brown hair. He half-jokingly said, “I think I’ll wait for that one to grow up.” Over the years Charley worked hard as a policeman and used his money to buy twenty-seven acres on the northeast corner of Provo at 800 North and 700 East. It was a good place to build a home with an irrigation canal running through it and large cottonwood trees. He built a comfortable home with logs from Provo Canyon. It had tall ceilings to keep the house cool in the summer and a vegetable cellar to store food in. He invited his mother Sarah and brother to come and live there. In the meantime, at the age of 35, Charley was baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. He received the priesthood and actively participated in the Pleasant View Ward. Chapter Four --Married Life On November 10th, 1873, Charley and Mary were married in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. He was forty-two and she was seventeen. He had worked hard to provide everything that his bride would need. He had waited nine years and was going to make sure that she was the happiest bride in the world. And she was. Mary was educated and articulate. She busied herself with the joy of homemaking. She planted a garden with vegetables, melons and flowers. They had fruit and walnut trees. They raised chickens and horses and cattle and cows; all the necessities of life. Mary felt her life was full and happy. Charles was a self-made veterinarian and would trade with the other farmers his expertise for food. Children were born to Charles and Mary. First born was a girl. She had soft curly brown hair like her mother and they named her Mary Elizabeth. Next a boy was born whom they named for both grandfathers, Charles Shadrach. Eventually, they had five more boys; Warren, Arthur, Milton, Angus, Louis and two more girls Eva and Alice. Charles (as he was now called) and Mary lived many happy years together in the Pleasant View Ward. In 1891 Charles was called to be a counselor to Bishop Gillespie and he served for eight years until his health failed and he had to be released. As their children grew, most of them moved away from Provo. First Lizzie and then Eva moved to Colorado. The boys wanted to try homesteading in Canada, but Alice stayed in Provo. Mary loved being at her home in Provo, but would go and visit her children wherever they were. After Charles died she loved keeping her garden growing and sharing with anyone who came to visit her. Her grandchildren especially loved the sweet melons that she grew from seeds.   Charles passed away February 7, 1910 at the age of 79. Mary Elizabeth lived another twenty-five years and joined her eternal sweetheart Charles, December 11, 1935. They are both buried in the Provo Cemetery.

A Short Biography of Mary Elizabeth "Lizzie" Conrad Muhlestein

Contributor: dswright Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

A Short Biography of Mary Elizabeth "Lizzie" Conrad Muhlestein My mother was born 21 March 1875, on the 21 acre farm her father had bought in 1870. While within the city limits, it was still further out than any other place in Provo, Utah. She was blessed and named Mary Elizabeth, 14 May 1885 (1875?) by her father Charles Conrad, in the Pleasant View Ward, Utah Stake, Provo, Utah. [She was] named for her mother Mary Elizabeth Holdaway. "Lizzie" as she came to be known, was the eldest of nine children and to her fell the responsibility of helping to care for all the younger children. She was a beautiful girl, a good and obedient daughter, and lived her life in a way to be a credit to her parents. She learned all the skills that accompanied the family living of that day. [She] could cord and spin wool, knit socks, stockings, or sweaters. [She] could make butter, cheese, breads, cake, head-cheese, bottle and dry fruits, [she] could milk cows, ride horses, and in fact do any of the tasks required on the farm. However, having six brothers, she was relieved of much of the heavy farm work, but learned to cook, sew, and keep house properly. [Lizzie] attended elementary school in Provo, later attending the Brigham Young Academy. [She] had classes from Karl G. Maeser, and some of her class-mates were: George H. Brimhall, Amanda Mangum (who later married Jesse Knight), Alice Fausett, George Ekins, and Harvey Cluff (who often dated her). When in her teens she worked for Startup Candy Co. [She] told me many times how she pulled taffy there and dipped chocolates. Lizzie developed into a lovely dignified young woman. She was a power for good among her friends and associates, many times holding out when the group wanted to do wrong things and usually won them over to her way of thinking. [She] was active and deeply interested in the Church. She was secretary and later counselor in the Y.L.M.I.A. [Young Ladies Mutual Improvement Association], [and] acted on important committees. One in particular [was the] "Grand Celebration of Pioneer Day" held on Monday 25 July 1892, in the New Meeting House, by the citizens of Pleasant View Ward, Provo, Utah. She became acquainted with my father Hyrum Muhlestein, when he was a young man attending meetings in the Pleasant View Ward. With her cousin Clara Holdaway she hiked up to the Muhlestein fruit and grain farm on the foot hills east of Provo. Hyrum brought them home in a cart drawn by oxen. Hyrum was wearing a brand-new pair of white leather gauntlets. He has told me how proud of them he was and displayed them to advantage as he drove the oxen to take the girls home. After that he would watch the Conrad home through field glasses every chance he had, hoping to catch a glimpse of her, for he had become "smitten" on Lizzie Conrad. Another time Lizzie's boyfriend took her horseback riding up towards the Muhlestein farm. They chanced to meet up with Hyrum and some of his brothers, who were practicing shooting their guns. The boyfriend wanted to shoot Hyrum's gun, which he did but when the gun went off it scared the horse Lizzie was riding and threw her off in a pile of rocks, it's lucky she wasn't badly hurt. My mother had three lovely cousins all near her age, Ruby Holdaway, Jane Clara Holdaway, and her mother's sister Amanda (also near the same age). They had great times together. [They] had their picture taken together in 1894. Lizzie went along when her mother took the family and joined with the Holdaways in celebrations by Utah Lake, the mouth of Provo river, or in Provo Canyon. Of course these get-togethers were always attended by Lucinda Haws Holdaway, her grandmother. Riding on the float as "Miss Provo" was Miss Lizzie Conrad, a fairer nor more beautiful girl could not be found. [A note here by the author, Grace M. Williams states that her father Hyrum told her: "On the 4th of July, on the float stood Miss Lizzie Conrad, a more dignified and beautiful young girl could not be found. I kissed her hand, she looked at me with her sweet face and loving eyes that told more than words can speak, 'she loved me!'"] In 1891 when Hyrum was 21, he was called on a mission to Switzerland. His folks were anxious to send him, hoping he would meet and fall in love with a Swiss girl. When Hyrum's folks were taking him to the station to catch his train for Salt Lake City, instead of staying on the best main road that went by the Conrad home they detoured so Hyrum could not even wave goodbye to Lizzie. Her father saw them take the other road, so he quickly harnessed the horse to the buggy, took a shortcut and beat the Muhlesteins to the station. [He then] bought a ticket to the next town so he could sit by and and say goodbye to Hyrum for himself and [his] daughter. Hyrum's mother had taught him German, but he had not been to school and could not read nor write English. When a letter would come from Lizzie, his companion had to read the letter to him and write the letter in answer also. By copying Lizzie's letters and reading them so many times, he soon learned to read and write English. [He then could take] care of his correspondence himself. While Hyrum was away, [Lizzie] loved to sing this song and would think of Hyrum all the time she sang it. I (Grace) have heard her sing this song many times: When the Curtains of Night Are Pinned Back by the Stars When the curtains of night were pinned back by the stars, And the beautiful moon mounts the sky, And the dew drops of heaven are kissing the rose, It is then that my thoughts swiftly fly, As if on the wings of some pure snow white dove, In haste with the message she bears, To bring you a kiss of affection, and say, I'll remember you love, in my prayers. Chorus: Then go where you may, on land or on sea, I'll share all your sorrows and cares, And each night, when I kneel by my bedside to pray, I'll remember you love, in my prayers. When heavenly angels are guarding the good, As God has ordained them to do, In answer to prayers I have whispered to him, I know there is one watching you. Oh, may its’ sweet spirit be with you thru life, To guide you up heaven's bright stairs, May you there meet the one who has loved you so true, And remembered you love, in her pray'rs. Repeat chorus When Hyrum returned from his mission in 1894, (the year after the Salt Lake Temple was dedicated), their friendship was renewed and although Hyrum went up to the Winter Quarters mine to work, their friendship continued and ripened into love. He made numerous trips to Provo, and Lizzie made one trip to Winter Quarters during the next two years. Lizzie and Hyrum were married in the Salt Lake Temple on 1 January 1896 (a great way to celebrate the New Year). They went to Winter Quarters to live, where he was employed. Hyrum was a counselor to Bishop Parmley [probably Thomas J. Parmley who was mine superintendent and was bishop of the Pleasant Valley Ward for quite a number of years] in the ward there. How well I remember the little home we lived in while there. Built so close to the hill that a cellar was dug into the hillside and connected to the kitchen by a little short passageway. Winter Quarters is just a ghost town now. In the summer of 1963 my sister Rachel (Mrs. Fay Piatt), myself (Grace), and our husbands visited there. We spent the night in sleeping bags just a few yards from where our home had stood. While the homes are all gone now, we still found the passageway and doorway to the cellar. It was then that I realized we were standing on the ground where I was born. Three girls, Eva, Fona, and myself, were born to Lizzie in this town, Rachel having been born in Provo in the Conrad house. Hyrum put up a huge swing in the yard for us from which Rachel fell into some rocks. Before Lizzie had children of her own, her youngest brother Louis, then four years old, came to stay with them for a while. Lizzie had been used to a large family which she missed since her marriage. Hyrum made Louis a wooden gun which he then used to shoot a Finnlander one day [There were numerous miners from Finland who had come to the coals mines in Carbon County to work]. The man dropped to the ground as though dead. Little Louis ran into the house and told Lizzie, “I shot a Finnlander with a nanny goat bullet.” On the 30th of May 1900 [Actual date was May 1], six weeks before I was born, there was a terrible explosion in the mine. My father was in the mine at the time but managed to come out alive. He then helped search for and bring out the dead. It was a very dangerous work, because of the black-damp gasses [A toxic mixture of coal dust, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen gasses caused by the explosion. Many of the 200 who died in the disaster had succumbed due to these gasses] in the “pit”. My mother waited at the south of the mine with the other women for their husbands and sons to come or be brought out. Some women had three or four sons as well as a husband in this disaster. Hyrum became a notary public in Winter Quarters. He also taught night school to foreigners how they could get their naturalization papers and become citizens. Lizzie helped him prepare and correct test papers. My mother was an influence for good in this small community. She was president of the Young Ladies Mutual, she took an active part in civic affairs, and set an example worthy of emulation. Lizzie’s brothers Warren and Milton, and at one time, Charlie, found employment there and boarded with us when I was small. It was at this time that my father started making cylinder phonograph records of my mother’s readings, the children singing, my father playing a drum solo, the train coming up the canyon, and of Uncle Milton Conrad singing, “If I was a Farmer a Farmer’s Boy”. I remember one of my mother’s readings about a woman who had to be taken to jail. When Mama said: “Well, take me to jail!”, it was so real that we children all cried, “Oh, please don’t take my Mama to jail!”. The record recorded this also. I’ve heard my mother read “The First Settlers Story” many times and cried real tears each time. My mother was sympathetic and helpful in all my father’s ventures, and she was proud of his accomplishments. He had not been privileged to attend school. He was so eager to learn and took a correspondence course after he was married. His wife Lizzie was a constant help through all his endeavors in learning. She was his dictionary, speller, reader, and advisor. She constantly encouraged him in his self-improvement program. When he was reading (always out loud) if he could not pronounce a word, he would spell it and no matter where she was in the house she would call out the pronunciation to him. When I was seven we moved to Provo, Utah. We purchased a little brick home on 5th North and 6th East. My father bought the motion picture theater on University Avenue. Lizzie sold tickets. For several very good reasons this proved a losing game. He lost everything and had to give up the venture all he got out of it was a vast experience and a piano. It was here [in Provo] I turned eight years old and was baptized in the Provo baptismal font. Hyrum now went to Somerset, Colorado where be had secured a good job. Lizzie and children remained in Provo until he could get a home for them in the neighboring state and sell the home in Provo. My mother was wonderful through all this. She never complained or blamed him but began to help him make another start. The move to Somerset was made by train. We were greeted by our father, taken to our new rented home and were all very happy and thankful. There were at this time only six or eight families of Latter-day Saints in Somerset. Hyrum was made branch president a few years later, and Lizzie was set apart as president of the Relief Society, when it was organized. Three boys were born in Somerset. The first one was stillborn and Lizzie had peritonitis and almost lost her life. The doctor admitted he could do nothing more for her and suggested to my father that he should order a casket, which had to be shipped quite a distance. He left something to ease her out of this life, but Sr. Farrish, mama’s wonderful [SIC, uncertain what this means, or who it is] L.D.S. nurse talked papa into not following the doctor’s orders. She said she knew what that would do [the drug the doctor gave?]. Mama seemed to be resting a little, the nurse had gone home to bathe and put on clean clothing. Mama had been administered to and prayed for so much that my father on bended knee finally talked to the Lord saying: “Why is it dear Father that it seems you have no respect for our petition?”. Like an almost audible answer came, “Your petition will be considered in it’s order”. While mama was resting easier, papa reclined on the couch. He was worn out with the long vigil, and while not intending to, he fell asleep. He was awakened by my mother sitting up in bed singing softly, “O, My Father”. She was on the 3rd verse her voice so weak he had not heard her. She was healed! She then demanded to put her clothes on and go through the snow to see her sister, who had given birth to a baby boy, and also see her mother who had come out from Provo, [to be with mama] because she was so ill. [See Hyrum’s account of this in his autobiographical writings in his Family Search que] The doctor had said she would not live until morning. The next morning when he called she met him at the door. He was shocked, stunned, he told her she was one in a million and that he took not credit for her recovery. Lizzie never was in excellent health after this illness, but she forged ahead doing far more than she should. The doctor had said she would never be able to have more children. But Grandfather Muhlestein sent papa the message, “Lizzie shall yet live to have sons”. Lizzie did live to have two sons, Grant Tell, and Herrick Tune, and they adopted one more, Charles (the last entry in her diary concerned Charles and his welfare). When Rachel was 16, Lizzie cast and directed a three-act play, “It’s All in the Pay Streak”. Rachel and Samuel Swalen played the leading roles. It was a huge success and they took it down and played in Bowie [Colorado] also. My mother did a lot of practical nursing here in Somerset. She was ready at any time to help where she could. while my father’s patriarchal blessing promised that he would feed many at his table, which he did, it was my mother upon whom all the work fell. Lizzie was expert in making clothing for her children, they were always well dressed. While I was attending school at the B.Y.U., she made and sent me a lovely yellow and black party dress. This must have taken weeks to make. When in 1935, her mother’s health was failing, Lizzie came out from Colorado to care tenderly for her, during her last days. Hyrum and Lizzie received part of the Conrad estate at her mother’s passing. They bought the rest from other heirs. Lizzie’s mother wanted her to have the home. My father retired his position as foreman of the Utah Fuel Co. mine, also as branch president of the [branch] in Somerset, and came to Provo to spend his last days. He had courted my mother in this home where both were to spend their last moments. They were so happy here. Hyrum would call to Lizzie from any part of the house, “Happy Dearie?”, and Lizzie would answer, “Yes I am, are you happy dear?”. My father and mother went to Tabor (Alberta), Canada in 1930. They took Rachel, Donna Mae, little four year old Dorleen, and myself with them. Rachel and I had been away from our parents for many years and we thoroughly enjoyed the wonderful trip with them. Oh, the great fun we had together as sisters! And two sisters together with their mother and father, what joy! In 1937 my mother became very ill with cancer in her bowels. It was impossible for her to get well. She was operated on and lingered on until February 1938, when I was summoned to her bedside. I arrived there late at night. She had been in a coma for days. The next morning when they told her I was there she knew me her lips formed the word Grace. My mother passed away and went to her reward, in a few hours after I arrived at her bedside, on 27 February 1938. She always had sweet dignity and marvelous self-control. Truly a noble hand maiden of the Lord. She faced life’s tasks with true courage. Even her memory will be an inspiration to all of us. This biography is a gift to my mother for Mother’s Day, 8 May 1964 Written by Grace Muhlestein Williams I Remember Mamma Yes, I do remember mamma. When I was 17 and dating Harold Wallard (who was the son of a contractor building many homes and other buildings in Somerset for the Utah Fuel Co), I went with him all Summer and Fall. When Christmas time came and the building program was completed, he and his father were leaving for their home in Walsenburg, Colorado. Harold came to spend a last evening with me. My mother (the thoughtful genius that she was) sat with us all evening embroidering an H on a linen handkerchief that she had hand hemstitched to give him. She had no intention of allowing any last- minute intimacies except a brief good night at the door as he left. Looking back on this scene I can appreciate her concern and actions. Harold was not L.D.S. and my mother’s hopes and aspirations extended to greater heights for me than to wed a transit contractor who had “been around” and soiled his soul, so to speak. When I went on my mission my mother would answer letters that came from my old boyfriends, Harold included. Yes, I have much to thank her for. Mamma came out to attend conference in October 1926. She visited with us several days up on the Reynolds Ranch (Springville Canyon). I was expecting my third child [near] the last of November and Mamma insisted that I return to Somerset with her, that she might care for LaRue, Melvin (who was only 18 months old), myself, and baby. We were there until the last of February 1927. We must have been a real care and constant worry for her. When we returned home, Mamma had Papa take us down to Grand Junction and put us on the train so we could make the trip without changing trains. I visited with Mama in Provo, one time, she was in very poor health but so willing and anxious to do for others. The black English currants were ripe and we took our chairs out to the currant row, Mama sat on one side and I on the other as we picked currants for me to take home and bottle. I enjoyed a good quiet visit with her at the same time. She gave me full instructions how to wash, put in a large kettle, cover with water, bring to good boil, pour off liquid and make into delicious jelly, then bottle the fruit for pies (I had eight or nine quarts, they were so very good). Rachel remembers her telling her about some boyfriend who took her out to some party. When they returned, the fellow started to make advances, but our Mama knew how to put him in his place. She said, “here, give me your hand and I will put it in a softer place. He gladly gave her his hand, which Mama proceeded to put on his own head. ________________ Elizabeth Conrad was set apart as secretary of the Y.L.M.I.A. of the Pleasant View Ward, in March 1891 and held this position for four years. She then was set apart as second counselor, and did this for another year. Then she was set apart as president of the association, which she held until getting married. On January 1, 1896 I moved to Winter Quarters, Utah, and became secretary and treasurer of the Y.L.M.I.A. later called [as] counselor, then president for 6 years prior to 1908, when we moved to Provo. I was assistant class leader there for about four months when we moved to Somerset, Colorado in 1908. Here I became teacher of [the] First Intermediate Department of the Sunday School for two years when a very severe sickness in October 1910 made it impossible for me to teach. But I attended as member of parents class. The Somerset Relief Society was organized in 1917 (Spring) [and] I was set apart as president with Eva Walker, and Amelia McDermott as counselors. We made articles, sold them, and raised 48 dollars, which we sent to help on the chapel in Denver, which was under construction. During the war, we knit sweaters [and] socks for [the] soldiers and took turns caring for Mrs. Sanborn the winter of 1917. Also nursed and took care of Mrs. Wm. Payne who was confined November 29, and Harriet Godding confined in November. Both [women’s] husbands were in the service. Mr. Payne was with the Watch on the Rhine and didn’t return for nine months after his baby was born. Mrs. Godding gave birth to twins. The ladies donated material and made a layette for them. Mrs. Muhlestein nursed Mrs. Payne. We closed our meetings for the summer on account of Scarlet Fever, until January 1925. Anna Matthews was my first counselor and Mrs. Cowan my second counselor starting again on January 8, 1925. [This story was transcribed from Grace Muhlestein Williams by Kim C Averett a great, great-grandson of Elizabeth. The text is from a copy in the author's possession with limited corrections to spelling and punctuation. One or two dates were altered after verifying actual dates with other sources.]

Mary Elizabeth Holdaway by her Grandson Tell

Contributor: William Herron Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Mary Elizabeth Holdaway by Grandson, Grant Tell Muhlestein Mary Elizabeth Holdaway, born 12 Sept. 1856 to SHEDRICK HOLDAWAY and LUCINDA HAWS, was reared in a large pioneer family where work and austerity gave demands to all family members. Mary Elizabeth carried the attributes of a true pioneer throughout her life. She was frugal, but generous, and no visitor ever left her garden (after her family was raised) without taking along a bouquet of flowers, or something from the fruit and vegetable garden. She was a great lover of all kinds of plants, and learned the art of grafting so that the seedling fruits could be grafted with better varieties if they did not produce a better kind than anything in the fruit orchard. Grandfather Charles Conrad, born 12 Nov. 1831 to Charles Ferdinand Conrad and Sarah Adams Bitely, saw this Mary Elizabeth Holdaway as a child --- attractive, brown eyes, curley dark hair, and winsome smile --- and vowed that be would wait until she grew to womanhood at which time he would marry her. When this young lady reached seventeen years and ten months, they were married the 10 Nov. 1873 in the Salt Lake Endowment House. My mother, their first child, was born 21 March 1875 and, like her mother.. learning, as well, to care for their food and clothing needs. Grandfather was a self-made veterinarian and often cared for sick animals through a full night. His clients promised grains or fruits at harvest time and often this fell through, so grandmother was compelled to grow and produce most of their food needs. Grandfather had acquired considerable land in the NorthEast part of Provo. They built their home on the corner of 7th East and 8th North --- a large one-story, double-brick home with a small fruit-and vegetable cellar. This was a double-brick construction and the lumber came from the Shedrick Holdaway Lumber Mill in South Fork of Provo Canyon- --a very hard and sturdy native pine almost impossible to drive nails into or to cut with a saw once cured, as we found later when the ceilings were lowered and rooms built in the attic area. This high-ceiling home was cool both in summer and winter. Good home-produced foods seemed to keep the family in health. There was plenty of milk and cream and home-churned butter. The grains were taken to the Mill and used in their natural state. Grandmother was an excellent cook and seamstress--providing wholesome food for the family and clothing for all. The landmark for the Ccnrad hcme was a huge cottonwood tree which was planted by nature long before the white man made inroads to the West. This tree provided the Conrad home with shade and comfort in the summertime. When the home was finished, one of the first things planted near the large cottonwood tree were some black walnut seeds. One grew vigorous and tall and provided the family with much enjoyment each year. As the grandchildren came to visit grandmother, they would ask to crack nuts under the Cottonwood --- sitting on a large stone bench that surrounded it. The soil near the home was quite rocky--being the residue of streams that once came over the area. In fact, my father-in-law, Gordon Phillips, sold land and gravel from an area which he purchased from the Conrad estate just north of the Conrad home. They had seeds of select cantaloupe and watermelon brought from Kentucky. Grandmother would save seeds from the cantaloupe with the smallest centers and the most meat, and the thin-rinded melons with the best:flavor. As a child I remember the strong and pleasant odor of the melons as grandmother cut them open to serve to her guests or relatives. The sweetness and perfume of those days seems to be missing in the melons we purchase at the markets today. They kept both beef and dairy cattle and, of necessity, a herd bull--one of which was notoriously mean. On one occasion grandmother had to cross the pasture where the bull was kept and he was aroused and came at her loudly bellowing. When he got too close, she fell to the ground, lying on her back, and, as the bull charged her, she would kick him in the mouth and continue. to push herself toward the barn area where the hog pen offered some kind of retreat. She reached the pig stye at a moment when the bull had stopped to appraise this strange woman's actions, and she was able to get over the wall and fall to the ground and gratefully rningle with the hogs. When their sixth child, Angus, died at the age of eight months, grandfather brought home a buck fawn deer which grandmother breast fed until it was weaned. This fawn grew to maturity and loved grandmother, of course, but he was hard to control since few fences would hold him and he was mean with strangers --- and especially with the boys who came by and threw rocks and sticks at him. One day some boys up on the "university" property threw stones and one struck him in the head and he fell to the ground dead, thus he provided meat for the Conrad family for some time. Grandmother loved to share plants with anyone who showed an interest in them. She grew many kinds of perennials and always had colorful annuals. She was able to plant sweet peas in the late fall and give them winter protection and have them grow and blossom for Memorial Day. Often the hundreds of peony plants she grew would not quite make their blooming coincide with Memorial Day and, if they were early, she would cut the buds and put them in cold storage at the "Ice Plant. But she could usually provide her "customers" with some flowers for this occasion. Any money she received for flowers, roots, vegetables or fruit was put into a jar in the kitchen to pay her taxes in the fall. Grandmother gave her five sons, Charles, Warren, Arthur, Milton, and Lewis their "inheritance" as young men who wished to establish themselves in a new land in Canada (Taber, Alberta). She gave her daughter, Eva a like stipened so she and Uncle John Walker could purchase a home in Provo. Aunt Alice Bertin was given a piece of ground west of the home which land was now too much for grandmother to care for --- this land was mostly pasture-land, yet, as the city drained it to put in streets,, Alice was able to sell lots to private individuals as well as Brigham Young University. Grandmother had a flare for words and was a natural born poetess. She would get an inspiration in the night (in her later life) get up and write these thoughts. She wrote a poem based on her experiences through the early years of her life and entitled it "The Pioneers" which describes their simple pleasures, entertainment, dress, customs, and dancing (beneath the.drip of candles). When my mother and I came out to Utah in the fall of 1.935 so I might attend the university, she was still working on and revising this bit of prose. Grandmother was invited to recite this poem, to the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers and went to Salt Lake City to give it but was disappointed by another taking too much time and they had to delete her from the program. She was beginning to ail and when mother and I arrived in the fall of 1935 she was unable to care for her garden and home, yet she taught me how to irrigate, and we were able to harvest the fall crops and enjoy the "fruits" of her labor. Mother was her constant nurse during her terminal illness and, although she was suffering, she never complained. Mother and I had prayer at her bedside every night. We, her descendents, appreciate the faith and love of the Gospel of Jesus Christ which she instilled in all her family, whom she dearly loved, and her every effort was expended in their behalf and for their happiness. A great and monumental heritage.

Charles Conrad

Contributor: William Herron Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

CHARLES CONRAD Charles Conrad came to Utah from Detroit Michigan, in 1864 and has given this country the benefit of his experience gained in other places. Born in Brownstownship, Wayne Co. Michigan, 20 November 1831. He was the son of Charles Ferdinand Conrad & Sarah Adams Bitely Conrad. Charles Ferdinand, his father was a native of Newton Penn. where he was born 15 Sept. 1808 and married 18 Feb. 1830 Seneca Ontario Co. New York, immigrating to Mich, the year Charles was born, and settling on a farm he bought from the government, consisting of a quarter section of land, mostly covered with timber. He cleared land, cultivated and made a good farm of it, becoming one of the prominent men of his community and holding the office of Justice of the Peace, etc. He also owned an 80 acre farm at Trenton Michigan. Charles Ferdinand died in 1884. Charles grew to manhood in Michigan and received an education there. He also spent some time on his Father=s place at Trenton, remaining at home until he started for Utah in 1864. His mother, Sarah, was the mother of 11 children. She joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in 1841 and came to Provo, Utah in 1863. Four children came with their mother. They were; Charles, George, Serrine, (named for the Elder who brought them the Gospel) and Elizabeth. Sarah died in Provo on 24 Dec 1879. In 1864, Charles followed his mother to Utah, in company with his brothers George, Serrine, his Uncle Frederick Schott Conrad and his brother-in-law James Hooks. They had but one wagon between them and left Iowa 12 May 1864. Traveled as far as Julesburg before they caught up with any other immigrants. There they crossed the Platte river 13 times, making boats of their wagon beds, with which to ferry their goods across and swimming their cattle and them- selves. Although the Indians were out on the war path, none of the party were molested and they reached Salt Lake City in safety, 12 Aug. 1864. They tarried 11 days in that place, then came direct to Provo. Charles bought a home in the center of Provo and there for three years followed gardening. He also rented other land, and during the time of the Black Hawk War rented the farm of J.A. Bean. In 1870 he bought a farm in eastern part of town, which was at that time a mile further out than any other place. First he bought 8 acres, then added to it from time to time, (uncultivated land) until he finally had a good farm of 27 acres within the city limits, well improved, all fenced, and built a comfortable brick home there on. He also preempted 160 acres on the south fork of Provo Canyon, in 1880 and there built a home and began keeping stock following that for several years and at this time has part of this land under cultivation. Mr Conrad was the first man to open up land in the canyon. For 6 years he acted as Police of Provo under instruction of A.O.Smoot. He also did considerable lumbering in the mts. and furnished the material for the old Tabernacle building. He also took active part in building many of the canals, & was a director of the upper east union. He was a member of Provo Canyon Read Go. and has done much towards making and keeping the road thru the canyon in good repair. Charles Conrad married 10 Nov. 1873, Mary E. Holdaway, daughter of Shadrach Holdaway and Lucinda Haws Holdaway. They have 9 children, Mary Elizabeth, Charles S.,Warren N., Arthur M., Milton W., Eva L., Lewis A., Alice, and Angus, who died in infancy. In political belief Mr Conrad is a Democrat and for many years has been in public office. Has seen jury duty, trying a number of prominent cases under Judge Emerson. Charles Conrad joined the church in 1866. He was ordained an Elder and set apart as lst Coun. to Pres. Kemp, of Provo; Ordained a Seventy 26 January 1869; Ordained a High Priest in 1891 and set apart as lst. Counselor. to Bishop Alexander Glllispie, of the Pleasant View Ward, Provo, which position he resigned eight years later on account of failing health. Charles Conrad began at the foot of the ladder and has climbed step by step, until he is now in position of affluence, enjoying the confidence and esteem of his friends and associates, being numbered among the influential and substantial men of Utah County. The above copied from: Portrait and Gen. and Biographical record of the State of Utah ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Charles Conrad was born in Browntownship, Wayne Co., Michigan in 1831 where his father, Charles Ferdinand Conrad, and his mother, Sarah Adams Bitely, were prosperous and comfortably settled down...until they were taught about the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. His mother was convinced it was true, and was baptized in 1841. His father never did join the church. Charles followed his father's example and was not baptized at the time. His mother remained faithful, however, and after her children were grown, she followed the saints to Utah in 1863. A year later, Charles, two other brothers, a brother-in-law, and an uncle joined her at Provo. Two years after arriving, Charles, too, was convinced, and was baptized into the church at age 35. Once baptized, he became very active in the Pleasant View Ward, and became a counselor to Bishop Gillespie in 1891. When Charles was 33 years old, he noticed an eight-year-old dark-eyed girl playing in his neighbor's front room. Her name was Mary Elizabeth, and she was the only girl in the Holdaway family. She was bright and loquacious, and Charles, admiring her charming ways, rubbed her mass of dark curls and announced that he was going to wait for her to grow up so he could marry her. Nine years later, on Nov 10th 1873, he did just that! They were married when he was 42 and his bride, seventeen. Charles Conrad knew he was a fortunate man to get her, not only for her beauty, but also because of her great desire for a family and the many skills she had acquired with which she could care for one. Charles Conrad had worked for six years as a policeman to earn money for land, had done a lot of lumbering in the mountains, and had taken part in building many of the irrigation canals, and had accumulated many acres of land in the northeast section of town. The couple settled down in a new brick home Charles built on the corner of his 27 acres of land, all within city limits, well-improved, and fenced. They also preempted 160 acres on the South Fork of Provo Canyon, and in 1880 built another home there. They began keeping cattle in South Fork, and put part of the land under cultivation as well. Charles was the first man to open up land in the South Fork of Provo Canyon. On 21 Mar 1875 there was born a beautiful little replica of Mary Elizabeth to Charles and Mary, whom they named Mary Elizabeth, also. She became known as Lizzie, a beautiful little girl with dark brown eyes and heavy dark hair that curled more gently than her mother's tight curls. Next came a son whom they named Charles after his father. By Joyce Muhlestein Great Granddaughter In Law

Letter from Charles Conrad to his wife Mary

Contributor: William Herron Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

In January 1910, Mary took a train from Provo, Utah to Somerset, Colorado to attend the wedding of her daughter Eva. This was only weeks before Charles passed away on February 7th. She needed a large trunk to take a set of china dishes and a feather bed tick as a wedding present with her on the train. This letter/poem was written on January 17th by Charles for this occasion to his sweet wife Mary. My wife who got in a terrible fret, to go to Somerset And she asked me, “won’t you go too?” Said I, “I’d like well to go, But I’m not well enough you know.” “Well then,” says she, “I will go.” “Go then,” said I “and go you may and we will find the pay.” So she began to work and fret to fix for Somerset. So I got her a grip sack. Says she, “That is too big for me to pack.” So I took it back. And now, says she, “My trunk is too small. I must have one that’s big enough to hold all.” So in she went without Art’s consent Took his big trunk, turned out his junk and says, “Without a doubt, that will hold, if I turn his all out.” So out they went by her consent And hers went in with a laugh and a grin. But when she got her things all in tack She complained much about her lame back. “Now,” says she, “as I’m about to start, I will to you a kiss impart.” I gave her a kiss and a smack Wished her a safe come back. So away to the depot she went And for a ticket to Somerset her money she spent And while on the road to Somerset the groom and bride she met. “Now,” says the groom, “to Somerset we’ll take a stride.” So in the train for Somerset they took their seat. When there, their friend they greet. Although the train was late they found, the Walker gate. And when once inside, hand in hand went the groom and bride, And were welcomed at the Walker fireside.

Charley loves Mary (Charles Conrad and Mary Elizabeth Holdaway story)

Contributor: William Herron Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Chapter One --Charley Little Charley was born on the 20th of November 1831 on an eighty acre farm in Brownstown, Michigan. Their farm was bordered to the east by Mud Street, which ran along the Detroit River and was a well-traveled road for people who traveled between Detroit, Michigan and Chicago, Illinois. Charley’s father’s name was also Charles, Charles Ferdinand and his mother was Sarah Adams Bitely. His father was a prominent figure in the area and served as a Justice of the Peace for the town of Trenton. Charley grew up in the American Frontier with plenty of trees, wild animals and room to hunt and explore as a young man. He especially enjoyed finding the flint heads and old muskets left behind from the battles fought in the War of 1812. A crudely marked stone remained on their property marking the names of the men who died there in the battle. He wondered about what it was like thirty years ago. This made his life very exciting to him.   When Charley was ten years old, a Mormon missionary named Elder Sirrine came to the area. His mother and sister readily accepted their message and were baptized. Charley and his father were not. For twenty-two years his mother stayed in Michigan, but in 1863 she decided to take her family to Utah to live with the Saints. The next year Charley decided to follow. He intended to go all the way to California, however once in Utah he decided to stay.   Chapter Two -- Mary Elizabeth Mary Elizabeth was born September 12, 1856 in Provo, Utah to Shadrach Holdaway and Lucinda Haws. Her father had marched with the Mormon Battalion and had prospected for gold in California finding about three-thousand dollars worth. Family stories say that he was the first man to pay his tithing with gold. Shadrach and Lucinda took their money and traveled back east to purchase items to start the Utah Woolen Mills. Their first home was on the north side of Center Street and 500 West. Eventually, they settled an area along the Provo River in an area called Vineyard. The shores of Utah Lake were to the west. They were a prosperous family and had another home up the south fork of Provo Canyon, where they logged trees for buildings and homes. Shadrach and Cindy’s life was not always perfect. Their first two boys died in infancy. Then they had four strong boys. When Mary Elizabeth was born her mother was so happy. But when Mary was only three months old she took sick and one day stopped breathing. Mary’s father was away and her mother was determined that she was not going to lose another baby. She got the consecrated oil and kept rubbing it all over Mary’s body and prayed. Mary began breathing again and color returned to her face. Following Mary came two more healthy brothers, who were followed by two girls that also died. One last boy came to the family, and last but not least, what Mary always wanted a little sister, Amanda. As Mary grew she became was a charming girl with big brown eyes and curly brown hair.   Chapter Three --Homesteading Charley purchased a home near the Woolen Mills. It was favorably located in town, however the water from the Woolen Mills would flood his yard. Eventually, Brother Young purchased the land and Charley started looking for a place to homestead. It was during this time that Charley happened to see a young girl playing in a yard nearby. She had big brown eyes and curly brown hair. He half-jokingly said, “I think I’ll wait for that one to grow up.” Over the years Charley worked hard as a policeman and used his money to buy twenty-seven acres on the northeast corner of Provo at 800 North and 700 East. It was a good place to build a home with an irrigation canal running through it and large cottonwood trees. He built a comfortable home with logs from Provo Canyon. It had tall ceilings to keep the house cool in the summer and a vegetable cellar to store food in. He invited his mother Sarah and brother to come and live there. In the meantime, at the age of 35, Charley was baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. He received the priesthood and actively participated in the Pleasant View Ward. Chapter Four --Married Life On November 10th, 1873, Charley and Mary were married in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. He was forty-two and she was seventeen. He had worked hard to provide everything that his bride would need. He had waited nine years and was going to make sure that she was the happiest bride in the world. And she was. Mary was educated and articulate. She busied herself with the joy of homemaking. She planted a garden with vegetables, melons and flowers. They had fruit and walnut trees. They raised chickens and horses and cattle and cows; all the necessities of life. Mary felt her life was full and happy. Charles was a self-made veterinarian and would trade with the other farmers his expertise for food. Children were born to Charles and Mary. First born was a girl. She had soft curly brown hair like her mother and they named her Mary Elizabeth. Next a boy was born whom they named for both grandfathers, Charles Shadrach. Eventually, they had five more boys; Warren, Arthur, Milton, Angus, Louis and two more girls Eva and Alice. Charles (as he was now called) and Mary lived many happy years together in the Pleasant View Ward. In 1891 Charles was called to be a counselor to Bishop Gillespie and he served for eight years until his health failed and he had to be released. As their children grew, most of them moved away from Provo. First Lizzie and then Eva moved to Colorado. The boys wanted to try homesteading in Canada, but Alice stayed in Provo. Mary loved being at her home in Provo, but would go and visit her children wherever they were. After Charles died she loved keeping her garden growing and sharing with anyone who came to visit her. Her grandchildren especially loved the sweet melons that she grew from seeds.   Charles passed away February 7, 1910 at the age of 79. Mary Elizabeth lived another twenty-five years and joined her eternal sweetheart Charles, December 11, 1935. They are both buried in the Provo Cemetery.

A Short Biography of Mary Elizabeth "Lizzie" Conrad Muhlestein

Contributor: William Herron Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

A Short Biography of Mary Elizabeth "Lizzie" Conrad Muhlestein My mother was born 21 March 1875, on the 21 acre farm her father had bought in 1870. While within the city limits, it was still further out than any other place in Provo, Utah. She was blessed and named Mary Elizabeth, 14 May 1885 (1875?) by her father Charles Conrad, in the Pleasant View Ward, Utah Stake, Provo, Utah. [She was] named for her mother Mary Elizabeth Holdaway. "Lizzie" as she came to be known, was the eldest of nine children and to her fell the responsibility of helping to care for all the younger children. She was a beautiful girl, a good and obedient daughter, and lived her life in a way to be a credit to her parents. She learned all the skills that accompanied the family living of that day. [She] could cord and spin wool, knit socks, stockings, or sweaters. [She] could make butter, cheese, breads, cake, head-cheese, bottle and dry fruits, [she] could milk cows, ride horses, and in fact do any of the tasks required on the farm. However, having six brothers, she was relieved of much of the heavy farm work, but learned to cook, sew, and keep house properly. [Lizzie] attended elementary school in Provo, later attending the Brigham Young Academy. [She] had classes from Karl G. Maeser, and some of her class-mates were: George H. Brimhall, Amanda Mangum (who later married Jesse Knight), Alice Fausett, George Ekins, and Harvey Cluff (who often dated her). When in her teens she worked for Startup Candy Co. [She] told me many times how she pulled taffy there and dipped chocolates. Lizzie developed into a lovely dignified young woman. She was a power for good among her friends and associates, many times holding out when the group wanted to do wrong things and usually won them over to her way of thinking. [She] was active and deeply interested in the Church. She was secretary and later counselor in the Y.L.M.I.A. [Young Ladies Mutual Improvement Association], [and] acted on important committees. One in particular [was the] "Grand Celebration of Pioneer Day" held on Monday 25 July 1892, in the New Meeting House, by the citizens of Pleasant View Ward, Provo, Utah. She became acquainted with my father Hyrum Muhlestein, when he was a young man attending meetings in the Pleasant View Ward. With her cousin Clara Holdaway she hiked up to the Muhlestein fruit and grain farm on the foot hills east of Provo. Hyrum brought them home in a cart drawn by oxen. Hyrum was wearing a brand-new pair of white leather gauntlets. He has told me how proud of them he was and displayed them to advantage as he drove the oxen to take the girls home. After that he would watch the Conrad home through field glasses every chance he had, hoping to catch a glimpse of her, for he had become "smitten" on Lizzie Conrad. Another time Lizzie's boyfriend took her horseback riding up towards the Muhlestein farm. They chanced to meet up with Hyrum and some of his brothers, who were practicing shooting their guns. The boyfriend wanted to shoot Hyrum's gun, which he did but when the gun went off it scared the horse Lizzie was riding and threw her off in a pile of rocks, it's lucky she wasn't badly hurt. My mother had three lovely cousins all near her age, Ruby Holdaway, Jane Clara Holdaway, and her mother's sister Amanda (also near the same age). They had great times together. [They] had their picture taken together in 1894. Lizzie went along when her mother took the family and joined with the Holdaways in celebrations by Utah Lake, the mouth of Provo river, or in Provo Canyon. Of course these get-togethers were always attended by Lucinda Haws Holdaway, her grandmother. Riding on the float as "Miss Provo" was Miss Lizzie Conrad, a fairer nor more beautiful girl could not be found. [A note here by the author, Grace M. Williams states that her father Hyrum told her: "On the 4th of July, on the float stood Miss Lizzie Conrad, a more dignified and beautiful young girl could not be found. I kissed her hand, she looked at me with her sweet face and loving eyes that told more than words can speak, 'she loved me!'"] In 1891 when Hyrum was 21, he was called on a mission to Switzerland. His folks were anxious to send him, hoping he would meet and fall in love with a Swiss girl. When Hyrum's folks were taking him to the station to catch his train for Salt Lake City, instead of staying on the best main road that went by the Conrad home they detoured so Hyrum could not even wave goodbye to Lizzie. Her father saw them take the other road, so he quickly harnessed the horse to the buggy, took a shortcut and beat the Muhlesteins to the station. [He then] bought a ticket to the next town so he could sit by and and say goodbye to Hyrum for himself and [his] daughter. Hyrum's mother had taught him German, but he had not been to school and could not read nor write English. When a letter would come from Lizzie, his companion had to read the letter to him and write the letter in answer also. By copying Lizzie's letters and reading them so many times, he soon learned to read and write English. [He then could take] care of his correspondence himself. While Hyrum was away, [Lizzie] loved to sing this song and would think of Hyrum all the time she sang it. I (Grace) have heard her sing this song many times: When the Curtains of Night Are Pinned Back by the Stars When the curtains of night were pinned back by the stars, And the beautiful moon mounts the sky, And the dew drops of heaven are kissing the rose, It is then that my thoughts swiftly fly, As if on the wings of some pure snow white dove, In haste with the message she bears, To bring you a kiss of affection, and say, I'll remember you love, in my prayers. Chorus: Then go where you may, on land or on sea, I'll share all your sorrows and cares, And each night, when I kneel by my bedside to pray, I'll remember you love, in my prayers. When heavenly angels are guarding the good, As God has ordained them to do, In answer to prayers I have whispered to him, I know there is one watching you. Oh, may its’ sweet spirit be with you thru life, To guide you up heaven's bright stairs, May you there meet the one who has loved you so true, And remembered you love, in her pray'rs. Repeat chorus When Hyrum returned from his mission in 1894, (the year after the Salt Lake Temple was dedicated), their friendship was renewed and although Hyrum went up to the Winter Quarters mine to work, their friendship continued and ripened into love. He made numerous trips to Provo, and Lizzie made one trip to Winter Quarters during the next two years. Lizzie and Hyrum were married in the Salt Lake Temple on 1 January 1896 (a great way to celebrate the New Year). They went to Winter Quarters to live, where he was employed. Hyrum was a counselor to Bishop Parmley [probably Thomas J. Parmley who was mine superintendent and was bishop of the Pleasant Valley Ward for quite a number of years] in the ward there. How well I remember the little home we lived in while there. Built so close to the hill that a cellar was dug into the hillside and connected to the kitchen by a little short passageway. Winter Quarters is just a ghost town now. In the summer of 1963 my sister Rachel (Mrs. Fay Piatt), myself (Grace), and our husbands visited there. We spent the night in sleeping bags just a few yards from where our home had stood. While the homes are all gone now, we still found the passageway and doorway to the cellar. It was then that I realized we were standing on the ground where I was born. Three girls, Eva, Fona, and myself, were born to Lizzie in this town, Rachel having been born in Provo in the Conrad house. Hyrum put up a huge swing in the yard for us from which Rachel fell into some rocks. Before Lizzie had children of her own, her youngest brother Louis, then four years old, came to stay with them for a while. Lizzie had been used to a large family which she missed since her marriage. Hyrum made Louis a wooden gun which he then used to shoot a Finnlander one day [There were numerous miners from Finland who had come to the coals mines in Carbon County to work]. The man dropped to the ground as though dead. Little Louis ran into the house and told Lizzie, “I shot a Finnlander with a nanny goat bullet.” On the 30th of May 1900 [Actual date was May 1], six weeks before I was born, there was a terrible explosion in the mine. My father was in the mine at the time but managed to come out alive. He then helped search for and bring out the dead. It was a very dangerous work, because of the black-damp gasses [A toxic mixture of coal dust, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen gasses caused by the explosion. Many of the 200 who died in the disaster had succumbed due to these gasses] in the “pit”. My mother waited at the south of the mine with the other women for their husbands and sons to come or be brought out. Some women had three or four sons as well as a husband in this disaster. Hyrum became a notary public in Winter Quarters. He also taught night school to foreigners how they could get their naturalization papers and become citizens. Lizzie helped him prepare and correct test papers. My mother was an influence for good in this small community. She was president of the Young Ladies Mutual, she took an active part in civic affairs, and set an example worthy of emulation. Lizzie’s brothers Warren and Milton, and at one time, Charlie, found employment there and boarded with us when I was small. It was at this time that my father started making cylinder phonograph records of my mother’s readings, the children singing, my father playing a drum solo, the train coming up the canyon, and of Uncle Milton Conrad singing, “If I was a Farmer a Farmer’s Boy”. I remember one of my mother’s readings about a woman who had to be taken to jail. When Mama said: “Well, take me to jail!”, it was so real that we children all cried, “Oh, please don’t take my Mama to jail!”. The record recorded this also. I’ve heard my mother read “The First Settlers Story” many times and cried real tears each time. My mother was sympathetic and helpful in all my father’s ventures, and she was proud of his accomplishments. He had not been privileged to attend school. He was so eager to learn and took a correspondence course after he was married. His wife Lizzie was a constant help through all his endeavors in learning. She was his dictionary, speller, reader, and advisor. She constantly encouraged him in his self-improvement program. When he was reading (always out loud) if he could not pronounce a word, he would spell it and no matter where she was in the house she would call out the pronunciation to him. When I was seven we moved to Provo, Utah. We purchased a little brick home on 5th North and 6th East. My father bought the motion picture theater on University Avenue. Lizzie sold tickets. For several very good reasons this proved a losing game. He lost everything and had to give up the venture all he got out of it was a vast experience and a piano. It was here [in Provo] I turned eight years old and was baptized in the Provo baptismal font. Hyrum now went to Somerset, Colorado where be had secured a good job. Lizzie and children remained in Provo until he could get a home for them in the neighboring state and sell the home in Provo. My mother was wonderful through all this. She never complained or blamed him but began to help him make another start. The move to Somerset was made by train. We were greeted by our father, taken to our new rented home and were all very happy and thankful. There were at this time only six or eight families of Latter-day Saints in Somerset. Hyrum was made branch president a few years later, and Lizzie was set apart as president of the Relief Society, when it was organized. Three boys were born in Somerset. The first one was stillborn and Lizzie had peritonitis and almost lost her life. The doctor admitted he could do nothing more for her and suggested to my father that he should order a casket, which had to be shipped quite a distance. He left something to ease her out of this life, but Sr. Farrish, mama’s wonderful [SIC, uncertain what this means, or who it is] L.D.S. nurse talked papa into not following the doctor’s orders. She said she knew what that would do [the drug the doctor gave?]. Mama seemed to be resting a little, the nurse had gone home to bathe and put on clean clothing. Mama had been administered to and prayed for so much that my father on bended knee finally talked to the Lord saying: “Why is it dear Father that it seems you have no respect for our petition?”. Like an almost audible answer came, “Your petition will be considered in it’s order”. While mama was resting easier, papa reclined on the couch. He was worn out with the long vigil, and while not intending to, he fell asleep. He was awakened by my mother sitting up in bed singing softly, “O, My Father”. She was on the 3rd verse her voice so weak he had not heard her. She was healed! She then demanded to put her clothes on and go through the snow to see her sister, who had given birth to a baby boy, and also see her mother who had come out from Provo, [to be with mama] because she was so ill. [See Hyrum’s account of this in his autobiographical writings in his Family Search que] The doctor had said she would not live until morning. The next morning when he called she met him at the door. He was shocked, stunned, he told her she was one in a million and that he took not credit for her recovery. Lizzie never was in excellent health after this illness, but she forged ahead doing far more than she should. The doctor had said she would never be able to have more children. But Grandfather Muhlestein sent papa the message, “Lizzie shall yet live to have sons”. Lizzie did live to have two sons, Grant Tell, and Herrick Tune, and they adopted one more, Charles (the last entry in her diary concerned Charles and his welfare). When Rachel was 16, Lizzie cast and directed a three-act play, “It’s All in the Pay Streak”. Rachel and Samuel Swalen played the leading roles. It was a huge success and they took it down and played in Bowie [Colorado] also. My mother did a lot of practical nursing here in Somerset. She was ready at any time to help where she could. while my father’s patriarchal blessing promised that he would feed many at his table, which he did, it was my mother upon whom all the work fell. Lizzie was expert in making clothing for her children, they were always well dressed. While I was attending school at the B.Y.U., she made and sent me a lovely yellow and black party dress. This must have taken weeks to make. When in 1935, her mother’s health was failing, Lizzie came out from Colorado to care tenderly for her, during her last days. Hyrum and Lizzie received part of the Conrad estate at her mother’s passing. They bought the rest from other heirs. Lizzie’s mother wanted her to have the home. My father retired his position as foreman of the Utah Fuel Co. mine, also as branch president of the [branch] in Somerset, and came to Provo to spend his last days. He had courted my mother in this home where both were to spend their last moments. They were so happy here. Hyrum would call to Lizzie from any part of the house, “Happy Dearie?”, and Lizzie would answer, “Yes I am, are you happy dear?”. My father and mother went to Tabor (Alberta), Canada in 1930. They took Rachel, Donna Mae, little four year old Dorleen, and myself with them. Rachel and I had been away from our parents for many years and we thoroughly enjoyed the wonderful trip with them. Oh, the great fun we had together as sisters! And two sisters together with their mother and father, what joy! In 1937 my mother became very ill with cancer in her bowels. It was impossible for her to get well. She was operated on and lingered on until February 1938, when I was summoned to her bedside. I arrived there late at night. She had been in a coma for days. The next morning when they told her I was there she knew me her lips formed the word Grace. My mother passed away and went to her reward, in a few hours after I arrived at her bedside, on 27 February 1938. She always had sweet dignity and marvelous self-control. Truly a noble hand maiden of the Lord. She faced life’s tasks with true courage. Even her memory will be an inspiration to all of us. This biography is a gift to my mother for Mother’s Day, 8 May 1964 Written by Grace Muhlestein Williams I Remember Mamma Yes, I do remember mamma. When I was 17 and dating Harold Wallard (who was the son of a contractor building many homes and other buildings in Somerset for the Utah Fuel Co), I went with him all Summer and Fall. When Christmas time came and the building program was completed, he and his father were leaving for their home in Walsenburg, Colorado. Harold came to spend a last evening with me. My mother (the thoughtful genius that she was) sat with us all evening embroidering an H on a linen handkerchief that she had hand hemstitched to give him. She had no intention of allowing any last- minute intimacies except a brief good night at the door as he left. Looking back on this scene I can appreciate her concern and actions. Harold was not L.D.S. and my mother’s hopes and aspirations extended to greater heights for me than to wed a transit contractor who had “been around” and soiled his soul, so to speak. When I went on my mission my mother would answer letters that came from my old boyfriends, Harold included. Yes, I have much to thank her for. Mamma came out to attend conference in October 1926. She visited with us several days up on the Reynolds Ranch (Springville Canyon). I was expecting my third child [near] the last of November and Mamma insisted that I return to Somerset with her, that she might care for LaRue, Melvin (who was only 18 months old), myself, and baby. We were there until the last of February 1927. We must have been a real care and constant worry for her. When we returned home, Mamma had Papa take us down to Grand Junction and put us on the train so we could make the trip without changing trains. I visited with Mama in Provo, one time, she was in very poor health but so willing and anxious to do for others. The black English currants were ripe and we took our chairs out to the currant row, Mama sat on one side and I on the other as we picked currants for me to take home and bottle. I enjoyed a good quiet visit with her at the same time. She gave me full instructions how to wash, put in a large kettle, cover with water, bring to good boil, pour off liquid and make into delicious jelly, then bottle the fruit for pies (I had eight or nine quarts, they were so very good). Rachel remembers her telling her about some boyfriend who took her out to some party. When they returned, the fellow started to make advances, but our Mama knew how to put him in his place. She said, “here, give me your hand and I will put it in a softer place. He gladly gave her his hand, which Mama proceeded to put on his own head. ________________ Elizabeth Conrad was set apart as secretary of the Y.L.M.I.A. of the Pleasant View Ward, in March 1891 and held this position for four years. She then was set apart as second counselor, and did this for another year. Then she was set apart as president of the association, which she held until getting married. On January 1, 1896 I moved to Winter Quarters, Utah, and became secretary and treasurer of the Y.L.M.I.A. later called [as] counselor, then president for 6 years prior to 1908, when we moved to Provo. I was assistant class leader there for about four months when we moved to Somerset, Colorado in 1908. Here I became teacher of [the] First Intermediate Department of the Sunday School for two years when a very severe sickness in October 1910 made it impossible for me to teach. But I attended as member of parents class. The Somerset Relief Society was organized in 1917 (Spring) [and] I was set apart as president with Eva Walker, and Amelia McDermott as counselors. We made articles, sold them, and raised 48 dollars, which we sent to help on the chapel in Denver, which was under construction. During the war, we knit sweaters [and] socks for [the] soldiers and took turns caring for Mrs. Sanborn the winter of 1917. Also nursed and took care of Mrs. Wm. Payne who was confined November 29, and Harriet Godding confined in November. Both [women’s] husbands were in the service. Mr. Payne was with the Watch on the Rhine and didn’t return for nine months after his baby was born. Mrs. Godding gave birth to twins. The ladies donated material and made a layette for them. Mrs. Muhlestein nursed Mrs. Payne. We closed our meetings for the summer on account of Scarlet Fever, until January 1925. Anna Matthews was my first counselor and Mrs. Cowan my second counselor starting again on January 8, 1925. [This story was transcribed from Grace Muhlestein Williams by Kim C Averett a great, great-grandson of Elizabeth. The text is from a copy in the author's possession with limited corrections to spelling and punctuation. One or two dates were altered after verifying actual dates with other sources.]

Life timeline of Mary E Conrad

Mary E Conrad was born on 12 Sep 1856
Mary E Conrad was 6 years old when U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring the freedom of all slaves in Confederate territory by January 1, 1863. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
Mary E Conrad was 18 years old when Winston Churchill, English colonel, journalist, and politician, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1965) Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill was a British politician, army officer, and writer, who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. As Prime Minister, Churchill led Britain to victory in the Second World War. Churchill represented five constituencies during his career as Member of Parliament (MP). Ideologically an economic liberal and British imperialist, he began and ended his parliamentary career as a member of the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955, but for twenty years from 1904 he was a prominent member of the Liberal Party.
Mary E Conrad was 28 years old when Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is published in the United States. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a novel by Mark Twain, first published in the United Kingdom in December 1884 and in the United States in February 1885. Commonly named among the Great American Novels, the work is among the first in major American literature to be written throughout in vernacular English, characterized by local color regionalism. It is told in the first person by Huckleberry "Huck" Finn, the narrator of two other Twain novels and a friend of Tom Sawyer. It is a direct sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.
Mary E Conrad was 35 years old when Thomas Edison patents the motion picture camera. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Mary E Conrad was 49 years old when Albert Einstein publishes his first paper on the special theory of relativity. Albert Einstein was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics. His work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. He is best known to the general public for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2, which has been dubbed "the world's most famous equation". He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect", a pivotal step in the development of quantum theory.
Mary E Conrad was 58 years old when Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife, Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, were assassinated by a Yugoslav nationalist named Gavrilo Princip in Sarajevo, sparking the outbreak of World War I. Archduke Franz Ferdinand, Archduke of Austria-Este was a member of the imperial Habsburg dynasty, and from 1896 until his death the heir presumptive (Thronfolger) to the Austro-Hungarian throne. His assassination in Sarajevo precipitated Austria-Hungary's declaration of war against Serbia, which in turn triggered a series of events that resulted in Austria-Hungary's allies and Serbia's declaring war on each other, starting World War I.
Mary E Conrad was 73 years old when The New York Stock Exchange crashes in what will be called the Crash of '29 or "Black Tuesday", ending the Great Bull Market of the 1920s and beginning the Great Depression. The New York Stock Exchange, is an American stock exchange located at 11 Wall Street, Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York. It is by far the world's largest stock exchange by market capitalization of its listed companies at US$21.3 trillion as of June 2017. The average daily trading value was approximately US$169 billion in 2013. The NYSE trading floor is located at 11 Wall Street and is composed of 21 rooms used for the facilitation of trading. A fifth trading room, located at 30 Broad Street, was closed in February 2007. The main building and the 11 Wall Street building were designated National Historic Landmarks in 1978.
Mary E Conrad died on 11 Dec 1935 at the age of 79
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Mary E Conrad (12 Sep 1856 - 11 Dec 1935), BillionGraves Record 32508892 Provo, Utah, Utah, United States

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