Mary Ann Mangum (Adair)

5 Jul 1824 - 5 May 1892

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Mary Ann Mangum (Adair)

5 Jul 1824 - 5 May 1892
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JOHN MANGUM AND MARY ANN ADAIR Copied from 'John Mangum - American Revolutionary War Soldier - and Descendents' By Delta Ivie Mangum Hale. Typed by Mona Martin Rogers John, the son of John Mangum and Rebecca Canida Knowles, was born 10 June 1817 in Springfield, St. Clair County, Alabama. He married

Life Information

Mary Ann Mangum (Adair)

Born:
Died:

Georgetown Cemetery

about 3 miles south of Cannonville on Kodacrome Way (a few hundred yards to the west)
Cannonville, Garfield, Utah
United States

Epitaph

Father; Mother; Their children, He Saved Soles, In His Will Is Our Peace, Married Sep 14, 1935; sealed Sept 27, 1952, Wife of Seth Johnson Peace Perfect Peace A Loving Wife, A Mother Dear, A friend to all, Lies Buried Here, Sons of Geo. W & Henrietta G Johnson, married June 29, 1956; children Clara S, A. True, Marilyn K., Richard W., Joyce F, A Devoted Husband and a Loving Father a True Latter Day Saint, Beloved Father

Headstone Description

Father - Joseph Edward
Mother - Susan J
Children: Joseph E, Alfred D, Karma J, US ARMY WORLD WAR II, says and Baby, Children: Saundra, Ronald Lee, Sheila, Nila, Sue Ellen, Children: Billy, Sherman, Gwen, Deane, David, Dimion, Karen, Rebecca, Mother
Father, Sealed Sept 27, 1952
Children: Larry W - Ladona - Myrna L - Alma D - Ramona J - Joseph D, Son of Adelbert & Mary J Heaps, Children of Nephi & Zina Johnson, Children of Irving A & Daisie C Johnson, Utah
Cpl 12 Infantry
World War II BSM-PH, Married Irving A Johnson Sept 5, 1923, A loving wife & mother...
A friend to all..., Sons of Geo. W & Henrietta C. Johnson, Wife: Shana
Daughter: Kori Lee, Sealed June 28, 1939, US ARMY
WORLD WAR II, DEAN: US ARMY WORLD WAR II, UTAH CPL 1050 BASE UNIT AAF
WORLD WAR II, PFC US ARMY
WORLD WAR I, Children: Clara S - A True - Marilyn K - Richard W - Joyce F, Wife of Cyrus Mangum, Daugh of Marion..., Son of R. W. & Clara E Pinney, Magleby Mortuary, Husband of Sarah A Dutton, Daughter of Richard C & Susanah D. Pinney
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JOHN MANGUM AND

Contributor: R and N Englestead Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

JOHN MANGUM AND MARY ANN ADAIR Copied from "John Mangum - American Revolutionary War Soldier - and Descendents" By Delta Ivie Mangum Hale. Typed by Mona Martin Rogers John, the son of John Mangum and Rebecca Canida Knowles, was born 10 June 1817 in Springfield, St. Clair County, Alabama. He married Mary Ann Adair, the daughter of Thomas Jefferson Adair and Rebecca Brown. She was born 5 July 1822 at Pickins County, Alabama and died May 1892 in Georgetown, Kane County, Utah. John died 23 May 1885 in Alpine, Apache County, Arizona. It is difficult to follow the movements of this family from the time of John's birth until the time we find them in Itawamba County, Mississippi. John's father died at Fulton, Itawamba County, Mississippi in 1843. John and Mary Ann were married in January 1841 in Itawamba County, Mississippi. Their first two children were born here, and the third was born in Chickasaw County, Mississippi. John and Mary Ann became converts to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Chickasaw County in 1845, through the missionary efforts in Nauvoo, Illinois. They arrived in Nauvoo as the Saints were preparing to leave their homes and travel to the unknown West. John and Mary Ann Mangum arrived in Utah on 18 October 1852, with the Jacob Bigler Company. They were with the Saints when they left Nauvoo and of course endured the trials and hardships incident to that trek to Utah. However, they with many others remained in the Pottawattomie section of Iowa from 1846 to 1852, and then journeyed to Utah to make their home with the Latter-Day Saints. Pottawattomie County, Iowa was a temporary gathering place for the Saints waiting an opportunity to travel westward to the Rocky Mountains. The settlement was name Mount Pisgah and at one time numbered more than 2,000 inhabitants. They kept busy in their fields or tending their little flocks and herds on the hillsides. In 1852 President Brigham Young issued a call for the last of the members of the Church at Mount Pispah to make the journey to the Rocky Mountains, at which time they abandoned their possessions and moved westward to the Great Basin. Nothing now remained of the little settlement except a little cemetery on the summit of a rounded knoll where approximately 200 of the Saints were laid to rest. In 1888 a number of the descendents of these worthy people contributed the means and purchased the little cemetery, erecting a monument to honor their dead. (Noah Rogers, Denvon's great great grandpa's name is on this monument). The names of two of John and Mary Ann's children are on this monument, William Perry and Laney Ann Mangum. The name of John's sister, Gemima Mangum Adair, also appears. John Wesley Mangum, their sixth child, was a little baby when they left Mount Pisgah to make that long wearisome journey across the plains. John Mangum was baptized on 10 November 1845 in Mississippi He was ordained a Seventy 28 May 1854 by Joseph Young and was in the 21st Quorum of Seventies He was given a Patriarchal Blessing on 20 January 1876 at Kanab, Utah John and his family with several other families were called to Washington, Utah to help settle the area and raise cotton John was put in charge of farming operations at Pipe Springs, a section of land across the line into Arizona. It was said that he seemed to be the right man in the right place He had a very patient and kind disposition and was very industrious They cleared the land and planted ten acres of wheat They also planted beans, corn, and potatoes. John was also in charge of ten young Indian hunters who were being taught to farm. Mary Ann helped pull a handcart across the plains She was adept at caring for the sick and relieved much suffering in the camps President Young gave her a special blessing and set her apart as a nurse and midwife She helped bring hundreds of babies into the world. A short time after they reached the Valley, they were sent on to Nephi, Juab County to help in the settlement of the area around Washington, Utah. This area is also known as Utah's Dixie. He told the presiding authorities that this was a good place to raise cotton Consequently, in the spring of 1857 President Young called 36 families under the direction of Samuel Jefferson Adair to settle this country John and William Mangum and their families were part of this group Their sister, Gemima, was also skilled in the cording, spinning, and weaving of cotton into cloth Mary Ann made clothes for her family from the cloth she corded, spun, and wove Brigham Young, seeing her integrity, gave her twelve head of sheep ready to be shorn She had them sheared, then she washed, corded, spun, and wove this wool into cloth from which she made warm clothing and stockings for her family. After awhile President Young had a factory built to manufacture the cotton into cloth. These same Mangum families were called in 1876 to help settle the town of Kanab, Kane County, Utah. In 1879 they were called to help settle the towns of St. Johns and Nutrioso in Apache County, Arizona. The St. Johns Ward was organized in the spring of 1880, and Mary Ann Mangum was made first counselor in the first Relief Society. Her daughter, Lucinda Mangum Richey, was made president. John Mangum died at Alpine, Arizona a short distance from the town of Nutrioso After his death, Mary Ann came back to Utah with Cyrus and Eunity Alexander Mangum and others of the Mangum family. Mary Ann lived with them until her death which occurred m the spring of 1892. She is buried in the little Georgetown cemetery, an abandoned town about five miles south of Cannonville, Kane County, Utah. John Mangum and Mary Ann Adair had fourteen children: 1. William Perry, born in October 1841 at Itawamba County, Mississippi and died between 1846 and 1852 in Mt. Pisgah, Iowa. Rebecca Frances, born on 10 October 1843 at Itawamba County Mississippi and died 13 April 1928 in Duncan, Greenlee County, Arizona; 3. Laney Ann born in 1845 at Chickasaw County, Mississippi and died between 1846 and 1852 in Mt Pisgah, Iowa as a child; 4. Martha Elizabeth, born in 1847 in Pottawattomie County Iowa; 5. Joseph Eslen, born on 12 December 1850 in Bonou, Pottawattomie County, Iowa; 6. John Wesley, born on 31 May 1852 at Bonou, Iowa; 7. Lucinda, born on 8 July 14 at Nephi, Juab County, Utah; 8. Cyrus and 9. Harvey were twins born on 29 June 16 at Nephi, Utah. Harvey died on 13 March 1862 in Washington, Utah as a child, 10 Mary Abigail, born on 2 June 1858 at Nephi, Utah; 11. Amy Caroline, born on 13 February 1860 at Washington, Utah; 12. Julia, born in 1861 at Washington County, Utah and died in 1861 in Washington as an infant; 13. David Newton, born on 13 October 1862 at Santa Clara, Washington County, Utah; and 14. Sarah Ellen, born on 17 November 1864 at Washington, Utah.

Mary Ann Adair

Contributor: R and N Englestead Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Mary Ann was born in Pickens, Alabama, 5 July 1822. She married John Mangum in October 1840 in Itawamba, Mississippi. They were the parents of 14 children. They were baptized in November 1845. After the birth of a baby in January 1846, they left Mississippi to join with other members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, including many extended family. By then many of the pioneers had already left Nauvoo so they also joined them, as they were gathering in Iowa and Nebraska. During the bitter winter of 1846-1847, two of Mary Ann’s children, as well as her mother, died at Mt. Pisgah, Iowa. By the time the family left for Salt Lake in June 1852, they had 3 children born in Mississippi and 3 born in Iowa. Their pioneer company was stricken with cholera a few days into the trek and 14 members of the group died. Two others were shot by Indians as they journeyed west. Mary Ann first settled in Nephi, Utah where four more children were born. They were with the first group of pioneers to settle Washington County Utah. There was a great deal of sickness and it was a very harsh time and place for the pioneers that settled in the area. Mary Ann was adept at caring for the sick and had been set apart as a midwife by Brigham Young soon after arriving in Utah. She was skilled in cording, spinning, and weaving of both wool and cotton to make clothing for her large family. The family lived for a short time in Kanab, Utah before being sent to settle in Alpine, Arizona. After her husband died in 1885, Mary Ann returned to Utah with one of her sons. She died 9 May 1892 in Georgetown, Utah. By Yvonne Jarvis Rootsweb, Nauvoo Land and Records, lds.org Overland Pioneer Travel *Variants for many of the earlier dates–marriage, baptism, etc–depending on the source

John Mangum and Mary Ann Adair

Contributor: R and N Englestead Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

JOHN MANGUM AND MARY ANN ADAIR Copied from "John Mangum - American Revolutionary War Soldier - and Descendents" By Delta Ivie Mangum Hale. Typed by Mona Martin Rogers John, the son of John Mangum and Rebecca Canida Knowles, was born 10 June 1817 in Springfield, St. Clair County, Alabama. He married Mary Ann Adair, the daughter of Thomas Jefferson Adair and Rebecca Brown. She was born 5 July 1822 at Pickins County, Alabama and died May 1892 in Georgetown, Kane County, Utah. John died 23 May 1885 in Alpine, Apache County, Arizona. It is difficult to follow the movements of this family from the time of John's birth until the time we find them in Itawamba County, Mississippi. John's father died at Fulton, Itawamba County, Mississippi in 1843. John and Mary Ann were married in January 1841 in Itawamba County, Mississippi. Their first two children were born here, and the third was born in Chickasaw County, Mississippi. John and Mary Ann became converts to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Chickasaw County in 1845, through the missionary efforts in Nauvoo, Illinois. They arrived in Nauvoo as the Saints were preparing to leave their homes and travel to the unknown West. John and Mary Ann Mangum arrived in Utah on 18 October 1852, with the Jacob Bigler Company. They were with the Saints when they left Nauvoo and of course endured the trials and hardships incident to that trek to Utah. However, they with many others remained in the Pottawattomie section of Iowa from 1846 to 1852, then journeyed to Utah to make their home with the Latter-Day Saints. Pottawattomie County, Iowa was a temporary gathering place for the Saints waiting an opportunity to travel westward to the Rocky Mountains. The settlement was name Mount Pisgah and at one time numbered more than 2,000 inhabitants. They kept busy in their fields or tending their little flocks and herds on the hillsides. In 1852 President Brigham Young issued a call for the last of the members of the Church at Mount Pispah to make the journey to the Rocky Mountains, at which time they abandoned their possessions and moved westward to the Great Basin. Nothing now remained of the little settlement except a little cemetery on the summit of a rounded knoll where approximately 200 of the Saints were laid to rest. In 1888 a number of the descendents of these worthy people contributed the means and purchased the little cemetery, erecting a monument to honor their dead. (Noah Rogers, Denvon's great great grandpa's name is on this monument). The names of two of John and Mary Ann's children are on this monument, William Perry and Laney Ann Mangum. The name of John's sister, Gemima Mangum Adair, also appears. John Wesley Mangum, their sixth child, was a little baby when they left Mount Pisgah to make that long wearisome journey across the plains. John Mangum was baptized on 10 November 1845 in Mississippi He was ordained a Seventy 28 May 1854 by Joseph Young and was in the 21st Quorum of Seventies He was given a Patriarchal Blessing on 20 January 1876 at Kanab, Utah John and his family with several other families were called to Washington, Utah to help settle the area and raise cotton John was put in charge of farming operations at Pipe Springs, a section of land across the line into Arizona. It was said that he seemed to be the right man in the right place He had a very patient and kind disposition and was very industrious They cleared the land and planted ten acres of wheat They also planted beans, corn, and potatoes. John was also in charge of ten young Indian hunters who were being taught to farm. Mary Ann helped pull a handcart across the plains She was adept at caring for the sick and relieved much suffering in the camps President Young gave her a special blessing and set her apart as a nurse and midwife She helped bring hundreds of babies into the world. A short time after they reached the Valley, they were sent on to Nephi, Juab County to help in the settlement of the area around Washington, Utah. this area is also known as Utah's Dixie. He told the presiding authorities that this was a good place to raise cotton Consequently, in the spring of 1857 President Young called 36 families under the direction of Samuel Jefferson Adair to settle this country John and William Mangum and their families were part of this group Their sister, Gemima, was also skilled in the cording, spinning, and weaving of cotton into cloth Mary Ann made clothes for her family from the cloth she corded, spun, and wove Brigham Young, seeing her integrity, gave her twelve head of sheep ready to be shorn She had them sheared, then she washed, corded, spun, and wove this wool into cloth from which she made warm clothing and stockings for her family. After awhile President Young had a factory built to manufacture the cotton into cloth. These same Mangum families were called in 1876 to help settle the town of Kanab, Kane County, Utah. In 1879 they were called to help settle the towns of St. Johns and Nutrioso in Apache County, Arizona. The St. Johns Ward was organized in the spring of 1880, and Mary Ann Mangum was made first counselor in the first Relief Society. Her daughter, Lucinda Mangum Richey, was made president. John Mangum died at Alpine, Arizona a short distance from the town of Nutrioso After his death, Mary Ann came back to Utah with Cyrus and Eunity Alexander Mangum and others of the Mangum family. Mary Ann lived with them until her death which occurred m the spring of 1892. She is buried in the little Georgetown cemetery, an abandoned town about five miles south of Cannonville, Kane County, Utah. John Mangum and Mary Ann Adair had fourteen children: 1. William Perry, born in October 1841 at Itawamba County, Mississippi and died between 1846 and 1852 in Mt. Pisgah, Iowa. Rebecca Frances, born on 10 October 1843 at Itawamba County Mississippi and died 13 April 1928 in Duncan, Greenlee County, Arizona; 3. Laney Ann born in 1845 at Chickasaw County, Mississippi and died between 1846 and 1852 in Mt Pisgah, Iowa as a child; 4. Martha Elizabeth, born in 1847 in Pottawattomie County Iowa; 5. Joseph Eslen, born on 12 December 1850 in Bonou, Pottawattomie County, Iowa; 6. John Wesley, born on 31 May 1852 at Bonou, Iowa; 7. Lucinda, born on 8 July 14 at Nephi, Juab County, Utah; 8. Cyrus and 9. Harvey were twins born on 29 June 16 at Nephi, Utah. Harvey died on 13 March 1862 in Washington, Utah as a child, 10 Mary Abigail, born on 2 June 1858 at Nephi, Utah; 11. Amy Caroline, born on 13 February 1860 at Washington, Utah; 12. Julia, born in 1861 at Washington County, Utah and died in 1861 in Washington as an infant; 13. David Newton, born on 13 October 1862 at Santa Clara, Washington County, Utah; and 14. Sarah Ellen, born on 17 November 1864 at Washington, Utah.

John Mangum and Mary Ann Adair

Contributor: R and N Englestead Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

JOHN MANGUM AND Contributed By BetsyMartinMitchell · 2013-06-17 22:21:04 GMT+0000 (UTC) · 0 Comments JOHN MANGUM AND MARY ANN ADAIR Copied from "John Mangum - American Revolutionary War Soldier - and Descendents" By Delta Ivie Mangum Hale. Typed by Mona Martin Rogers John, the son of John Mangum and Rebecca Canida Knowles, was born 10 June 1817 in Springfield, St. Clair County, Alabama. He married Mary Ann Adair, the daughter of Thomas Jefferson Adair and Rebecca Brown. She was born 5 July 1822 at Pickins County, Alabama and died May 1892 in Georgetown, Kane County, Utah. John died 23 May 1885 in Alpine, Apache County, Arizona. It is difficult to follow the movements of this family from the time of John's birth until the time we find them in Itawamba County, Mississippi. John's father died at Fulton, Itawamba County, Mississippi in 1843. John and Mary Ann were married in January 1841 in Itawamba County, Mississippi. Their first two children were born here, and the third was born in Chickasaw County, Mississippi. John and Mary Ann became converts to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Chickasaw County in 1845, through the missionary efforts in Nauvoo, Illinois. They arrived in Nauvoo as the Saints were preparing to leave their homes and travel to the unknown West. John and Mary Ann Mangum arrived in Utah on 18 October 1852, with the Jacob Bigler Company. They were with the Saints when they left Nauvoo and of course endured the trials and hardships incident to that trek to Utah. However, they with many others remained in the Pottawattomie section of Iowa from 1846 to 1852, and then journeyed to Utah to make their home with the Latter-Day Saints. Pottawattomie County, Iowa was a temporary gathering place for the Saints waiting an opportunity to travel westward to the Rocky Mountains. The settlement was name Mount Pisgah and at one time numbered more than 2,000 inhabitants. They kept busy in their fields or tending their little flocks and herds on the hillsides. In 1852 President Brigham Young issued a call for the last of the members of the Church at Mount Pispah to make the journey to the Rocky Mountains, at which time they abandoned their possessions and moved westward to the Great Basin. Nothing now remained of the little settlement except a little cemetery on the summit of a rounded knoll where approximately 200 of the Saints were laid to rest. In 1888 a number of the descendents of these worthy people contributed the means and purchased the little cemetery, erecting a monument to honor their dead. (Noah Rogers, Denvon's great great grandpa's name is on this monument). The names of two of John and Mary Ann's children are on this monument, William Perry and Laney Ann Mangum. The name of John's sister, Gemima Mangum Adair, also appears. John Wesley Mangum, their sixth child, was a little baby when they left Mount Pisgah to make that long wearisome journey across the plains. John Mangum was baptized on 10 November 1845 in Mississippi He was ordained a Seventy 28 May 1854 by Joseph Young and was in the 21st Quorum of Seventies He was given a Patriarchal Blessing on 20 January 1876 at Kanab, Utah John and his family with several other families were called to Washington, Utah to help settle the area and raise cotton John was put in charge of farming operations at Pipe Springs, a section of land across the line into Arizona. It was said that he seemed to be the right man in the right place He had a very patient and kind disposition and was very industrious They cleared the land and planted ten acres of wheat They also planted beans, corn, and potatoes. John was also in charge of ten young Indian hunters who were being taught to farm. Mary Ann helped pull a handcart across the plains She was adept at caring for the sick and relieved much suffering in the camps President Young gave her a special blessing and set her apart as a nurse and midwife She helped bring hundreds of babies into the world. A short time after they reached the Valley, they were sent on to Nephi, Juab County to help in the settlement of the area around Washington, Utah. This area is also known as Utah's Dixie. He told the presiding authorities that this was a good place to raise cotton Consequently, in the spring of 1857 President Young called 36 families under the direction of Samuel Jefferson Adair to settle this country John and William Mangum and their families were part of this group Their sister, Gemima, was also skilled in the cording, spinning, and weaving of cotton into cloth Mary Ann made clothes for her family from the cloth she corded, spun, and wove Brigham Young, seeing her integrity, gave her twelve head of sheep ready to be shorn She had them sheared, then she washed, corded, spun, and wove this wool into cloth from which she made warm clothing and stockings for her family. After awhile President Young had a factory built to manufacture the cotton into cloth. These same Mangum families were called in 1876 to help settle the town of Kanab, Kane County, Utah. In 1879 they were called to help settle the towns of St. Johns and Nutrioso in Apache County, Arizona. The St. Johns Ward was organized in the spring of 1880, and Mary Ann Mangum was made first counselor in the first Relief Society. Her daughter, Lucinda Mangum Richey, was made president. John Mangum died at Alpine, Arizona a short distance from the town of Nutrioso After his death, Mary Ann came back to Utah with Cyrus and Eunity Alexander Mangum and others of the Mangum family. Mary Ann lived with them until her death which occurred m the spring of 1892. She is buried in the little Georgetown cemetery, an abandoned town about five miles south of Cannonville, Kane County, Utah. John Mangum and Mary Ann Adair had fourteen children: 1. William Perry, born in October 1841 at Itawamba County, Mississippi and died between 1846 and 1852 in Mt. Pisgah, Iowa. Rebecca Frances, born on 10 October 1843 at Itawamba County Mississippi and died 13 April 1928 in Duncan, Greenlee County, Arizona; 3. Laney Ann born in 1845 at Chickasaw County, Mississippi and died between 1846 and 1852 in Mt Pisgah, Iowa as a child; 4. Martha Elizabeth, born in 1847 in Pottawattomie County Iowa; 5. Joseph Eslen, born on 12 December 1850 in Bonou, Pottawattomie County, Iowa; 6. John Wesley, born on 31 May 1852 at Bonou, Iowa; 7. Lucinda, born on 8 July 14 at Nephi, Juab County, Utah; 8. Cyrus and 9. Harvey were twins born on 29 June 16 at Nephi, Utah. Harvey died on 13 March 1862 in Washington, Utah as a child, 10 Mary Abigail, born on 2 June 1858 at Nephi, Utah; 11. Amy Caroline, born on 13 February 1860 at Washington, Utah; 12. Julia, born in 1861 at Washington County, Utah and died in 1861 in Washington as an infant; 13. David Newton, born on 13 October 1862 at Santa Clara, Washington County, Utah; and 14. Sarah Ellen, born on 17 November 1864 at Washington, Utah. John and Mary Ann became converts to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Chickasaw County in 1845, through the missionary efforts in Nauvoo, Illinois. They arrived in Nauvoo as the Saints were preparing to leave their homes and travel to the unknown West. John and Mary Ann Mangum arrived in Utah on 18 October 1852, with the Jacob Bigler Company. They were with the Saints when they left Nauvoo and of course endured the trials and hardships incident to that trek to Utah. However, they with many others remained in the Pottawattomie section of Iowa from 1846 to 1852, and then journeyed to Utah to make their home with the Latter-Day Saints. Pottawattomie County, Iowa was a temporary gathering place for the Saints waiting an opportunity to travel westward to the Rocky Mountains. The settlement was name Mount Pisgah and at one time numbered more than 2,000 inhabitants. They kept busy in their fields or tending their little flocks and herds on the hillsides. In 1852 President Brigham Young issued a call for the last of the members of the Church at Mount Pispah to make the journey to the Rocky Mountains, at which time they abandoned their possessions and moved westward to the Great Basin. Nothing now remained of the little settlement except a little cemetery on the summit of a rounded knoll where approximately 200 of the Saints were laid to rest. In 1888 a number of the descendents of these worthy people contributed the means and purchased the little cemetery, erecting a monument to honor their dead. (Noah Rogers, Denvon's great great grandpa's name is on this monument). The names of two of John and Mary Ann's children are on this monument, William Perry and Laney Ann Mangum. The name of John's sister, Gemima Mangum Adair, also appears. John Wesley Mangum, their sixth child, was a little baby when they left Mount Pisgah to make that long wearisome journey across the plains. John Mangum was baptized on 10 November 1845 in Mississippi He was ordained a Seventy 28 May 1854 by Joseph Young and was in the 21st Quorum of Seventies He was given a Patriarchal Blessing on 20 January 1876 at Kanab, Utah John and his family with several other families were called to Washington, Utah to help settle the area and raise cotton John was put in charge of farming operations at Pipe Springs, a section of land across the line into Arizona. It was said that he seemed to be the right man in the right place He had a very patient and kind disposition and was very industrious They cleared the land and planted ten acres of wheat They also planted beans, corn, and potatoes. John was also in charge of ten young Indian hunters who were being taught to farm. Mary Ann helped pull a handcart across the plains She was adept at caring for the sick and relieved much suffering in the camps President Young gave her a special blessing and set her apart as a nurse and midwife She helped bring hundreds of babies into the world. A short time after they reached the Valley, they were sent on to Nephi, Juab County to help in the settlement of the area around Washington, Utah. This area is also known as Utah's Dixie. He told the presiding authorities that this was a good place to raise cotton Consequently, in the spring of 1857 President Young called 36 families under the direction of Samuel Jefferson Adair to settle this country John and William Mangum and their families were part of this group Their sister, Gemima, was also skilled in the cording, spinning, and weaving of cotton into cloth Mary Ann made clothes for her family from the cloth she corded, spun, and wove Brigham Young, seeing her integrity, gave her twelve head of sheep ready to be shorn She had them sheared, then she washed, corded, spun, and wove this wool into cloth from which she made warm clothing and stockings for her family. After awhile President Young had a factory built to manufacture the cotton into cloth. These same Mangum families were called in 1876 to help settle the town of Kanab, Kane County, Utah. In 1879 they were called to help settle the towns of St. Johns and Nutrioso in Apache County, Arizona. The St. Johns Ward was organized in the spring of 1880, and Mary Ann Mangum was made first counselor in the first Relief Society. Her daughter, Lucinda Mangum Richey, was made president. John Mangum died at Alpine, Arizona a short distance from the town of Nutrioso After his death, Mary Ann came back to Utah with Cyrus and Eunity Alexander Mangum and others of the Mangum family. Mary Ann lived with them until her death which occurred m the spring of 1892. She is buried in the little Georgetown cemetery, an abandoned town about five miles south of Cannonville, Kane County, Utah. John Mangum and Mary Ann Adair had fourteen children: 1. William Perry, born in October 1841 at Itawamba County, Mississippi and died between 1846 and 1852 in Mt. Pisgah, Iowa. Rebecca Frances, born on 10 October 1843 at Itawamba County Mississippi and died 13 April 1928 in Duncan, Greenlee County, Arizona; 3. Laney Ann born in 1845 at Chickasaw County, Mississippi and died between 1846 and 1852 in Mt Pisgah, Iowa as a child; 4. Martha Elizabeth, born in 1847 in Pottawattomie County Iowa; 5. Joseph Eslen, born on 12 December 1850 in Bonou, Pottawattomie County, Iowa; 6. John Wesley, born on 31 May 1852 at Bonou, Iowa; 7. Lucinda, born on 8 July 14 at Nephi, Juab County, Utah; 8. Cyrus and 9. Harvey were twins born on 29 June 16 at Nephi, Utah. Harvey died on 13 March 1862 in Washington, Utah as a child, 10 Mary Abigail, born on 2 June 1858 at Nephi, Utah; 11. Amy Caroline, born on 13 February 1860 at Washington, Utah; 12. Julia, born in 1861 at Washington County, Utah and died in 1861 in Washington as an infant; 13. David Newton, born on 13 October 1862 at Santa Clara, Washington County, Utah; and 14. Sarah Ellen, born on 17 November 1864 at Washington, Utah.

Betsy Jane Leavitt Hamblin

Contributor: R and N Englestead Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Betsy Jane Leavitt Hamblin Written by Peggy Tueller 712 East 4200 South Salt Lake City, Utah 84107 (801) 266-6148 July 1995 Information from family genealogy of Arrilla Hamblin and Susie Hamblin Clawson Born in Hancock County, Illinois, to parents who were already deeply committed to the religion their hearts exulted in, she was seven years old when her parents, Jeremiah and Sarah Sturdevant Leavitt, were forced to flee from their home near Nauvoo with few provisions. Depositing his family at Mt. Pisgah, her father took Dudley, her sixteen year old brother, to Bonaparte to work for supplies so they could complete their trek West with the Saints come springtime. Dudley returned a few weeks later with the devastating news that their father was dead. He had been stricken with an illness soon after reaching Bonaparte. The family was stranded for three years in Iowa trying to gather enough provisions for the journey. One day Dudley found a purse with $150.00 in it. On advice from one good brother, they used the unclaimed money to buy their supplies for the three month trek to Utah. On the 31st day of August, 1850, Sarah's family reached the Salt Lake Valley from a trip eleven year old Betsy Jane would later describe as an unending adventure. Betsy said, “We played with other children, at camp time racing among the wagons in games of tag or hide and seek. We hunted flowers and pretty rocks, waded the creeks and even improvised dolls out of knotted sticks or bleached bones.” Settling in Tooele, Utah, their life took on the uneventful tasks that are so necessary to survival. Betsy's older sister Mary had married William Haynes Hamblin soon after coming to the Valley and because he was away much of the time, Betsy stayed with her, and fit into the family comfortably. After a few years, Betsy's mother and Mary agreed with William that Betsy would make a fine plural wife. So at fifteen years of age she married William. Betsy and Mary were left with the responsibility of their home and raising their families because of the many business ventures and exploring trips of William. During one of his absences, nineteen year old Betsy showed her courage and common sense. Indian warriors came through the small settlement of six families directly to Betsy's cabin. (She had gone to stay near her brother, Thomas Leavitt, and his wife, Ann, while William was absent. Thomas went out to meet the Indians. Mimicking every gesture and out yelling Thomas, the Chief gave Thomas a huge bear hug and said he was too brave to kill. The Chief said that if Thomas would give him all the food, warm clothing and cattle that was there, he would spare the cabin, women and children. Thomas stepped inside to talk to Betsy. She figured if they were indeed not yet dead, they would be by the time they tried to make it into Salt Lake with no food, coats or animals for milk or riding. Betsy had a plan which they agreed upon. Thomas returned to the Chief telling him those inside the cabin had a rifle trained on the Chief's heart and, though they might die, so would the Chief. If they would take the two white oxen Betsy had brought from Salt Lake, because they were fit for a chief, they could go in peace. And so they did. William was away in San Francisco, vowing to rebuild the finances that had been stolen from him by a partner who had been left in charge of a farm and its crops while William was on an exploration trip up the Colorado with his brother, Jacob Hamblin, and some other men. The man, named Henderson, had sold all the crops and the farm and left the country. For two years the two women heard nothing from him and thought him dead. One day a message came that William was coming home! He brought three wagons filled with clothing, shoes, linens, food, and all the things they were so sorely in need of. They moved to Gunlock, Utah, a community named for William because of his expertise with a gun. Because of her husband’s absences, Betsy spent some time at Mountain Meadows with Jacob Hamblin, her brother-in-law. After a few years, William moved his family to Clover Valley, Nevada, where he and a partner, Rone Stone, claimed the Pioche mine [Nevada], but the ownership was in dispute with another group of investors. In April 1872, William had gone to Carson City, Nevada, to attend the court hearing concerning the ownership of the mine, taking a doctor friend and a lawyer with him. Despite both Mary and Betsy's warning to eat or drink nothing in a public place, in his nervousness he sipped the coffee that had been automatically poured at the table. Standing he gasped "I've been poisoned and fell to the floor. The doctor rushed him to a room and began to treat him immediately. When he came around, the men waited until he was well enough to travel and loaded him into a wagon and took him home. Dr. Ivans, his friend, could not stay for a long time to treat William, so when it was safe to leave, he had to go. William was recuperating when an unknown man came to the home saying he was the new doctor coming to see how William was doing, and gave him some new medicine which harmed him further and William died. Sarah Priscilla Leavitt was born to Betsy December 27, 1872, seven and a half months after her father’s death. The horrible circumstances, the pregnancy, and grief caused Betsy to come down with "Brain Fever" and she was ill for months. During her illness the strong box given to her care because she had the eldest son, was broken into and the legal papers proving ownership of the mine, the business holdings and the titles to extensive property in California, and money loaned were all stolen. Despite the evidence the family found that Rone Stone, the partner, had hired a man to poison William and steal the papers, the women were too sick to fight him. He later claimed all rights to everything. The responsibility for the family fell onto sixteen year old Billy Hamblin. He injured his leg severely while riding after cattle one day so Jane, the next child became the rancher of the family, doing such a good job that she continued after Billy recovered. In 1873, the Betsy and Mary, along with several other families, moved to Pahreah, Kane County, Utah, and lived with the John Mangum family until they could get their own small farm. There is where Billy met, fell in love with and married Abigail Mangum in a double wedding. Bill Hamblin married Abigail Mangum and Jane Hamblin married George Mangum. Five years were spent on the Pahreah and then the John Mangum family, Billy Hamblin, Duane Hamblin and George Mangum were called to a farming mission in Arizona. Lacking funds to get enough supplies together for many months survival, Billy set out with his uncle Jacob Hamblin to obtain money for them. They came to a fork in the road, trying to choose which road to take, Jacob decided on the right fork. They rode not a long way when they came upon Apostle George Albert Smith who exclaimed a greeting and the fact that "for a time he had wanted to see Billy and give him the two thousand dollars William had loaned him. Shortly after this incident Brother Heber C. Kimball came forward and said he owed William one thousand dollars. Thus they were able to buy supplies to go to Arizona and begin a new life. They met Jane at Lee's Ferry where she had preceded them by a few weeks and had her baby there. Then they stopped and built a cabin by the Colorado River six weeks into the journey to spend a time and let Almira, another daughter, give birth to her first child, and two months more in Springerville, Arizona, before reaching Bush Valley, (Alpine) Arizona. They lived in a cellar while the boys built a cabin large enough for all of them, plus a small fort had to be built because of the Indians. Scarlet fever caused the death of the two new babies of Almira and Jane. Billy took a contract from Brigham Young's son, W.W. Young, to build the rail road from Old Fort Wingate (San Rapheal, New Mexico) to Flaqstaff, Arizona. Hiring his brothers, brother-in-law and four Adair brothers, they worked many months on the job, finishing the contract, but was never paid. Every time W.W. Young was approached for money, the excuses were many. No wages were ever drawn, but the Union Pacific Railroad allowed them to draw from the commissary to help them out. In the spring of 1882, they moved further up the mountain. The warm climates of Southern Utah and Nevada made the cold winters doubly hard to bear. So Fred Hamblin, William's younger brother, talked them into moving to peaceful, beautiful Nutrioso, where they lived without fear of the Indians and could sleep soundly at night until Geronimo and his band of Indians stampeded them all away one day when two of the boys were guarding them. The angry men were gathering to go after the Indians and get their horses back when Betsy said that more horses could be gotten, but if the Indians captured the men, they would be tortured to death and the women and children could never get them back, never! So the men listened and let the Indians go. Because the men, if finances were needed, had to find work where ever they could, they were gone many weeks at a time. Of course, the women had to take over all the raising of the children, the cattle, the crops, illnesses, Indians, parties, romances, births and deaths by themselves. Betsy did work for a family one time when she was older. She cooked for a wealthy family and enjoyed it but deciding it was not to her liking to mop their floor on her hands and knees, she quit. When asked how she could let a job go that paid such good money, she replied she didn't care that much about money. She lived with Billy and Abby most of her widowhood and they moved many times. After the birth of Abby's seventh child, her health seemed to fade and Billy sold his crops and cattle and just walked away from the house and land he had acquired in Alpine, declaring that Abby's health meant more to him than all the ranches in the world. Betsy’s last years were spent with her youngest child, Sarah Priscilla, in southern Arizona. She died at 78 years of age. After resting in bed two days she announced to her family, "I have seen your father," He wants me to come to him." She seemed to sleep again and in a very short time she passed from this life. Betsy was a woman of spunk and love who gave all the strength she had to her children.

Life Sketch of John Wesley Mangum

Contributor: R and N Englestead Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Life Sketch of John Wesley Mangum - Written by himself and his son Ernest Mangum - copy found in the DUP library in SLC: John Wesley Mangum was born May 31, 1852 in the state of Iowa on what was then known as the Little Berhya Riber. He was the son of John and MaryAnn Adair Mangum who crossed the plains when John Wesley was a small boy. On arriving in Utah they settled at Payson, then moved to Nephi where they lived about four years. It was while at Nephi that this father received a call from President Brigham Young to go and help settle Utah's Dixie. The family responded to the call being among the first to go there. John Mangum Sr. put out the first fruit trees in that country and for years helped in the settlement of that region. In 1867, John Mangum Sr., Hyrum Judd, Thales Haskell, James Wilkins, and George Adair were called by Jacob Hamblin to Kanab where they with Ammon Tenney, Johiel McConnell, Charles Riggs, Brigham McMullin, George Ross, Jacob Hamblin and others built the Old Fort. This fort was erected between 1867 and 1870. Abe Stratton of Springdale was called to Kanab to stand guard while the fort was being built. John and James Mangum were first called to Kanab to scout for Indians,receiving the call from President Young through Jacob Hamblin. Levi Bristol Hancock who was also from Dixie was here at this time also. They all remained and were in Kanab when President Young designated and laid out the town. September 10, 1870, John Mangum Sr. fenced the first lot and later built on it. John Wesley and his son chopped timber which was used for building some of the first homes, fences and head gates in Kanab. When 18 years of age John Wesley Mangum and George Ross Sr. were sent to Pahreah to show the Indians how to raise corn and other crops and also to keep peace with them. In relating the history of Kanab he says: "The first house ever built in Kanab outside the fort was the guard house. It was northeast of the fort--about halfway between the stockade and the fort. It was of rock with a port hole. Every night two men stood on guard to watch the cattle. If Indians came near the mean on guard would give two yells to warn the men at the fort." He also relates that when George Ross brought his family here two of the children had measles and so the family was not allowed to enter the fort. The old guard house was given to him and he and his family lived there until he died. Mr. Ross helped to build some of the houses at Kanab and also several wells. Levi Bristol Hancock assisted him. While digging a well on the lot where Levi Stewart built his home, he met with an accident when down about 20 feet which cost him his life. Mr. Hancock struck his foot against a piece of board which fell down the well and struck Mr. Ross above the eye. He never recovered from this accident. John Wesley Mangum waited on him and cared for him during his last days on this earth and after he died Mr. Mangum laid him out alone. He says: "George Ross is buried on the north side of Kanab just above the ditch in the old cemetery." He further relates that Ross and he piloted President Young and his party down the Pahreah Creek at an early date. He says, "We had to dig the banks so they could get down. To do this we went ahead on horseback." As a tribute to this friend he said: "George Ross was always willing to help in anything he was called to do." A little before the Levi Stewart company arrived in Kanab, 75 Navajos rode into the fort one day and talked insultingly. It looked as if there would be trouble so Jacob Hamblin and Ira Hatch finally succeeded in getting them in a circle where they preached to them and asked them what they wanted. The Indians said that they wanted something to eat--meat and bread and all they could eat. They were given everything they asked for. However recruits were called from Long Valley and it was not until they arrived that the Navajos left. The men were called to stand guard and watch for Indians all the time. Once John Wesley Mangum and others did this off and on for ten months under Captain Ammon Tenney. On talking with him on a recent visit to Kanab he said: "My father, John Mangum, Joseph Mangum and myself, were out nearly all the time assisting with the Indians." On one occasion father, Joseph and myself were called to go with Ammon Tenney to look for some Indians who were scouting around Kanab. After we got several miles away we met them and it was just after dark. Captain Tenney directed that we turn back toward town as he knew of a large tree that was close to the trail. We returned to this place and hid behind the tree until the Indians came up. They suspicioned us being there and so fired several shots into the tree. Pine boughs fell down on us but we remained still. They decided we were gone and went on toward Kanab. After they got out of hearing distance, Captain Tenney directed us to follow and when we could we slipped around them and beat them to town. When they came up we were in waiting but they became frightened and left. My older brother Joseph and myself were sent to Rockville on the Virgin to bring in church provisions (tithing) at one time, such as flour, bacon, cornmeal, sugar, salt and dried fruit to feed the Indians that were clearing land to farm. My father, John Mangum, was selected to handle the distribution. There were around 200 Indians at Kanab and other places that we were feeding. The following white men were in Kanab at this time--Jacob Hamblin, John Mangum, Ira Hatch, Hyrum Judd, Thales Haskel, Johiel McConnell, and Charles Riggs. In 1870 Jacob Hamblin, Ira Hatch, James Smith, Nephi Smithson and Joseph Mangum went among the Navajos on the reservation to make peace with them. While there one of the boys took a severe pain over his eye. One of the Navajos wanted to know the trouble. My father told him and the old Indian took an arrow head and placed it between a split stick forming a hatchet like knife. He placed this over the place where the pain was and thumped it with his finger priving it in thereby releasing stagnated blood that was causing the pain. The old Navajo said, "Now soon be well." When this peace mission was fulfilled, they returned and brought with them and old Indian and his wife who joined the church and went through the temple. These Indians wove blankets and sold them to the whites for a living. In 1871-72 under Captain Wilkins, he with others, made a settlement at the old Rock House place where Peter Shurtz made his holdout. John Wesley Mangum says: "The following were among the first settlers at Pahreah--John Mangum, Sr., James Wilkins, James Mangum, Thomas Smith, Robert Smith and others." John Wesley Mangum married Martha Ann Smith in 1872. Their children were Martha Ann, Mary Francis, John William, Marion, Winnie and Joseph. In 1874 John Wesley Mangum with his family was called to help in the order at Kanab under L. John Nuttal where he worked until 1879. He then returned to the Pahreah and later that year went to St. Johns, Arizona where he farmed two years. In 1882, he moved to Walnut Grove where he bought 160 acres of land. He cut their land up into lots and sold most of it to people to build on. This was later the town site of Walnut Grove. He stayed here two years and then moved to Nutrioso, Arizona and bought a home. Here he also took up 160 acres of land and put the water to irrigate it. In the fall of 1887 he again returned to Pahreah were he lived for seven years off and on. In 1891 his wife died when their child Joseph was born. The child also died. In 1893, he married Edith Chynoweth from which union he raised the following children: Ernest W., Arthur W., Mary E., and Grace Irene. In 1896 he moved with the second family to Escalante where he farmed. In1897 he moved back to the Pahreah to what is known now as Georgetown. Here he bought a home. He later moved to Cannonville in 1899, where he stayed until he went north in 1900. In 1901, he went into Jackson Hole, Wyoming where he again took to farming. While there he was called to act as second counselor in the ward bishopric. In the fall of 1903 he left Jackson Hole and went into Idaho where he stayed until 1906 then he ______________________________(unreadable)returned to Cannonville. He ____________________________________ Pahreah in 1893-97 he was presiding Elder of the _____ at the Church. He has the distinction of piloting President Young on several trips down the Pahreah and Kanab countries and traveling with him in other parties. At present Mr. Mangum is still living at Cannonville, Utah and is 85years of age. Although not robust he has made two trips to Kanab in the last six months to visit his children here and a few months ago he visited relatives in Salt Lake City.

John Wesley Mangum by Laton J. Ott

Contributor: R and N Englestead Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

John was born May 31 1852 at Bonou, Pottawattamoie, Iowa, the son of John Mangum and Mary Ann Adair - His second wife was Edith Pearl Chynoweth, born July 4, 1868, at Cornwall, England. John was born on the Little Bewie River, Pottawottamie Co, Iowa. His family with others had remained in Iowa until 1852 at which time President Young sent word for all the Saints remaining there to come to Utah. This they did under the leadership of Heber C. Kimball. The church leaders sent them to Payson in Utah County where they settled for a time before moving to Nephi. In the spring of 1857, they were called with about 28 other families help in the settlement of Washington, Utah. Their first home was a log cabin with a dirt roof. They made their own lights from tallow. Pine and cottonwood logs constituted their fuel. It took two days to bring a load of wood out of the mountains, so they sometimes burned cottonwood that the flood waters had washed down. Their main foods were corn bread and wild game. In the early days of Dixie wild mountain sheep and trout were plentiful. Wild plant life, such as wild hay, sego lily and thistle were growing in abundance. The price of flour, wheat and butter was very high. If President Young had not donated 70,000 pounds of flour for distribution among the people, they would have suffered. While the family lived in Washington, they raised cotton, cane, corn, beans, cabbage and carrots, etc. Those who had farms raised nearly everything they needed to eat. At the age of ten, John helped his father with the making of molasses. He and his neighbors made their own plows and any other implements they used. President Young had a factory built to manufacture the cotton they raised into cloth and warm blankets. This was the first industry in the community. There was a mine in Dixie called the Silver Reef where they mined a high grade silver. The ore was almost pure silver, but it was only a small deposit, so it didn't last long. The roads, if they could be called such, were almost impassable. When the family moved to Dixie, they came to a steep mountain called Peter's Leap'. They took their wagons apart and let part of them down at a time. The next morning they had to put additional cattle on to pull the wagons up the other side. John's family, along with Jacob Hamblin and others was called from Dixie to Kanab and kept on the frontier to protect the inhabitants from Indian attacks. The Navajos were hostile at that time and killed three people at Pipe Springs. While the Mangums were living in St. George a band of hostile Indians came on the feeding grounds and stole a band of horses. The men of the town went after them and found some of the horses with arrows shot into them. They took the horses and the Indians and decided to give the red men their choice of a beating or having their throats cut. They all preferred the beating, each getting twenty strips with a whip. When the third was brought forth, an old Indian asked to do the whipping, so he was given the whip. Every time the old Indian struck him he said "Now will you steal any more horses?" They never did.

A Short History 0f John Mangum III and Mary Ann Adair - Written by Effie M. Graff

Contributor: R and N Englestead Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

A Short History 0f John Mangum III and Mary Ann Adair John Mangum and Mary Ann Adair were with the Saints when they left Nauvoo, and of course endured the trials and hardships incident to that trek across the Plains. They also must have had some very difficult times during the years they were encamped with the Saints in the Pottawattomee section of Iowa. Between the years 1846 and1852, when they came to Utah, three of their 14 children were born there. Martha Eliz abeth in 1847, Joseph in 1850 and John Wesley in 1852, he being a baby when they came across the Plains, and arrived in Salt Lake Valley. What faith they must have had to start on that long, hard journey over barren wastes, with tiny babies to care for along with everything else. They had 5 other children older than Uncle John. Two of their children died at Mt. Pisgah, their names are on the monument erected there. The little girl, Martha Elizabeth who was born there in 1847, we have no record of her death, but we do know that she died as a child. Mary Ann Adair was blessed with the gift of caring for the sick; she relieved much suffering in the camps of the Latter-day Saints, and President Brigham Young gave her a special blessing and set her apart as a nurse and midwife. She helped bring many babies into the world, In fact hundreds of them. She and her eldest daughter, Rebecca Francis pulled a handcart across the Plains. Incidentally, my oldest sister remembers grandmother Mangum and her wonderful gift, she would be at grandmother's side when anything was wrong, and she inherited a large share of that gift. In short time after they reached Salt Lake Valley they, with others were sent on to Nephi, Utah to help in the settlement of that place. Four of their children were born there, my father, Cyrus Mangum and twin brother Harvey being among those born there. Harvey died in St. George, Utah at the age of 7. Going back a little, our John Mangum, a[?] father John Mangum and Rebecca Canida Knowles, his wife, were converted and baptized into the church at Futton, Itawamba County, Mississippi, by James Richey, who afterwards married one of their daughters, Lucinda Mangum. Great-great-grandfather Mangum died there and not long after that our people left there and went to Nauvoo, Illinois. They arrived there just a short time before the Saints started leaving Nauvoo. Rebecca Canida Knowles was with her children when they went to Nauvoo and traveled with them till they reached Winter Quarters, Nebraska, where she died 23 February, l847. Her daughter, Lucinda Mangum, tells in her own autobiography of her Mother's death. She says, "They burried my mother without a coffin, as they did so many others. They stripped the bark from large trees, made apiece large enough to put under her, and another large enough to cover her with and fastened each end together. They put her in a deep grave to protect her body from being digged up by the wolves. She died with cholera, was taken sick at night and died the following morning." In June of 1858 President Brigham Young called 28 families to settle Washington, in Utah's Dixie. Among those called were John and Mary Ann Mangum, William Mangum and family, my grandfather's brother and Samuel Adair and wife, Gemima Mangum, my grandfather's sister. Samuel Adair was in charge of the first group to leave for Dixie. This group of people was chosen to go to Dixie to raise cotton, as they had been cotton raisers when they lived in the Southern States. A factory was built there where they manufactured doth from the cotton they raised. Grandmother, Mary Ann made yarn from cotton, and wool if she could get it, that was woven into cloth at the factory, and then she made it into clothes for her large family. She even wove some cloth herself on her old loom, which she made into clothing. President Young seeing her integrity gave her twelve head of sheep ready to be shorn. They were sheered, then she washed and corded the wool, spun it into yarn from which she made warm stockings and clothes for her family. They were later called to help settle Kanab, Utah and from there they were called to help in the settlement of St. Johns and Nutrioso, Arizona. When the St. Johns ward was organized, Mary Ann was made first Counselor in the first Relief Society organized there. My grandfather, John Mangum III, died in Bush valley (now Alpine), Arizona. My grandmother, Mary Ann came back to Utah with my parents and lived with them until her death, which occurred in May 1892, a short time before my advent into the world. My own dear mother told me she felt she could not go through with her confinement without grandma Mangum. I wish she could have loved a few more years, so I could have known her. Written by Effie M. Graff

Short Sketch of Mangum Family by Mariah Lucinda Heath Mangum

Contributor: R and N Englestead Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Short Sketch of Mangum Family Mariah Lucinda Heath Mangum: Written from memory of hearing my husband’s father tell about them, as what little genealogy they had got burned up when John Mangum, Jr.’s house burned up. This is May the 20th, 1927. The first Mangum emigrated from England. Two brothers and they settled in the Southern states and reared families. There was two brothers of my husband’s grandfather, him and an older brother. When the Revolutionary War was on these two brothers was in it. The older brother enlisted in the U. S. Army then after a time he then turned what was termed Tory. He left the U. S. Army and went over and joined the English side. My husband, Joseph E. Mangum’s grandfather enlisted in the U. S. service and fought the last five years of the Revolutionary War, ending 1783. I think his name was William (John, Sr). While he was in the service he was permitted to go home on a furlough, him and others. When they was returning back to their regiment, all of them was taken prisoners by the English Army and was kept for some time. Then finally they took them to a log that was lying on the ground and put part of them on one side of the log and the rest on the other side and chained them there. The commanding officer came up and took his sword and raked some two or three of them across the head and told the captain to turn them loose. Then he took his sword and split the other’s heads wide open and they left there and took those whose lives they had spared, with them. After they had been with them for sometime he got to speak to the officer that had had him turned loose. He ask him what he turned him and others loose for. The officer remarked that he knew his brother and he was a (pretty good damd sun of a bitch) and he thought he would be. So by his brother being a Tory was what saved his life and the first opportunity he got to make his get away, he did so and went back to the U. S. Army. He enlisted in the service at the age of 15 years, he fought five years and after the war was over and he was old enough, he married a wife. She had a child and in a year or so she died and then after that then he married another wife and later on she died leaving one child, a boy. When the boy was grown, he married and went to Texas and there is where the Mangum’s in Texas came from. His name was Cyrus Mangum and then his father married the third wife and raised a family of six children to be grown. Them is the ones that joined the church and came to Utah. My husband’s grandfather had red hair and blue eyes. His grandmother had black hair and black eyes. Now the ones that joined the church, their names was William Mangum, he died in Circleville, Utah. John Mangum, Jr., my husband’s father died in Bush Valley, Arizona. His brother, Joseph Mangum died back in the states. James Mangum, a brother, died at Nutrioso, Arizona. His sister’s name was Rebecca Adair and the other sister was named Lucinda Richey, she lived in St. Johns, Arizona and died in Arizona at last account. My husband’s father, John Mangum and his wife Mary Ann Adair Mangum embraced the Gospel in the Southern States. I have forgotten the state. And received the Gift of Tongues soon after baptism. They came to Nauvoo sometime after the Martyrdom of the Prophet Joseph and Hyrum Smith. The Saints were leaving Nauvoo and moving out into Iowa (Ioway) and making temporary villages until they could collect means enough to immigrate to Utah. So the John Mangum Family came on until they got to the place they called Mount Pisgah. There they stayed over one season and raised crops. Then they went to the place they called the Bonow, Pottawattamee, Ioway, this is where my husband was born. They then went from there to Council Bluffs and stayed in Kanesville for a while.

A short sketch of the Mangum Family

Contributor: R and N Englestead Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

A short sketch of the Mangum Family from memory of hearing my husband’s father tell it to the family. What little Genealogy they had got burned up when John Mangum,Jr’s house burned. The first Mangums emigrated from England, They were two brothers and they settled in the Southern States and reared families there. My husband’s grandfather and his brother came from one family. When the Revolutionary War started these two brothers joined to fight. The older brother enlisted in the US Army then after a time, he became a Tory and joined the English. My husband’s grandfather, Joseph E. Mangum’s grandfather joined the Patriots and fought for five years, he was fifteen years old. While he was in the service, he was permitted to go home on a furlough. On the way back to their regiment he and other soldiers were taken prisoners by the English and was kept for sometime. They were finally taken to a log that was lying on the ground; they made part of the prisoners lay on one side and the others on the other side. They were chained in that position. The commanding officer took his sword and raked it across the heads of the prisoners on one side and told the captain to let them go. He then took his sword and split the others heads wide open. The officer ordered the ones who were spared to come with them. Later he was able to ask the officer why he was spared. The officer said that he knew his brother and he was a pretty good “son of a _____” and he thought he would be too. So his brother being a Tory saved his life. The first opportunity he got to make his getaway, he did so and went back to his unit. After the war was over, he married and had a child. His wife died. He married again and had a son, Cyrus Mangum then this wife died. When Cyrus grew he married and moved to Texas. So his posterity became the Mangum Branch of the family in Texas. His father married a third time and raised a family of six children; they joined the church and came to Utah. They were William Mangum who died in Circleville, Utah. John Mangum, Jr, my husband’s father, he died in Bush Valley, Arizona, another brother, Joseph Mangum died before they went West. James Mangum was also a brother and he died in Nutrioso, Arizona. His sisters were Rebecca Adair, who died in Arizona and Lucinda Richey who lived in St. Johns, Arizona last we knew. My husband’s father John Mangum, Jr. and his wife, Mary Ann Adair joined the Church, Mary Ann received the Gift of Tongues shortly after baptism. They were living in the Southern States and went from there to Nauvoo, sometime after the martyrdom of Joseph and Hyrum Smith. The saints in Nauvoo were leaving and moving out to Iowa in temporary settlements until they could collect the means to immigrate to Utah. So John and his family moved to a place called Mount Pisgah and stayed over one season to raise a crop. They then moved on to Bonou, Pottawattamie, Iowa. That is where my husband, Joseph Eslen was born. They moved from there to Council Bluffs, Iowa but stayed in Kanesville, Iowa for a while. My husband’s grandfather had red hair and blue eyes, his grandmother had black hair and black eyes From the memory of Lucinda Mangum, wife of Joseph Eslen Mangum. This is May 20, 1927. Copy in possession of Gladys B. Owens.

Life timeline of Mary Ann Mangum (Adair)

Mary Ann Mangum (Adair) was born on 5 Jul 1824
Mary Ann Mangum (Adair) was 7 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
Mary Ann Mangum (Adair) was 16 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
Mary Ann Mangum (Adair) was 35 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
Mary Ann Mangum (Adair) was 38 years old when U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring the freedom of all slaves in Confederate territory by January 1, 1863. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
Mary Ann Mangum (Adair) was 56 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Mary Ann Mangum (Adair) was 65 years old when The Eiffel Tower is officially opened. The Eiffel Tower is a wrought iron lattice tower on the Champ de Mars in Paris, France. It is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower.
Mary Ann Mangum (Adair) died on 5 May 1892 at the age of 67
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Mary Ann Mangum (Adair) (5 Jul 1824 - 5 May 1892), BillionGraves Record 30760502 Cannonville, Garfield, Utah, United States

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