Martin Wilford Poulson

21 Nov 1884 - 26 Jan 1969

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Martin Wilford Poulson

21 Nov 1884 - 26 Jan 1969
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Grave site information of Martin Wilford Poulson (21 Nov 1884 - 26 Jan 1969) at Provo City Cemetery in Provo, Utah, Utah, United States from BillionGraves
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Life Information

Martin Wilford Poulson

Born:
Died:

Provo City Cemetery

610 S State St
Provo, Utah, Utah
United States
Transcriber

SouthPawPhilly

June 26, 2011
Photographer

Kody

June 24, 2011

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Memories

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Life Story as told by Ardis Poulson Soulier

Contributor: SouthPawPhilly Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

(As transcribed from a cassette tape she made prior to her death with added information from histories written by her) Hi! I’m Ardis Soulier and this is May, 1986. For the past several years, I’ve been promising myself that I was going to record my personal history and this last New Year’s Eve, I made a promise to myself that this was the year I was going to do it. I was born on May the 20th, 1920 in Provo, Utah at 632 W 4th North. My mother was Estelle Mecham Poulson and my father was Prof. M. (Martin) Wilford Poulson. I was their fifth child. Marie was the oldest. Then Marion, then Earle, then Helen and then me. And four years later, my mother's sixth and last child was born - Robert Lewis. I was blessed on the 4th of July 1920 in the Provo 3rd Ward. My father was the first child of his family that was born in the United States. His parents, Maria and Niels Poulson, had joined the church in Sweden and they had four children at the time they immigrated to the United States. Dad's only sister, Josephine, and brothers Ludwig (Lud), Otto and Charles were all born in Sweden. He had a younger brother, Edwin who was also born in the United States. My parents often talked about a memorable event when I was a baby - that being the fact that my mother had an emergency operation when I was about 6 months old for gall stones and had to be rushed away to the hospital. I hadn’t been weaned yet and up until that time they called me their baby with the pink corner smile because my crib was in the corner of a pink bedroom and they had seldom seen me when I wasn’t smiling, and they said I just never cried. But with my mother gone, I screamed and cried all the time and my dad would walk the floor with me and try to coax me to eat or drink something and for three days I refused - absolutely refused - until it was getting to be a serious situation. After the third day, my dad was eating an apple and I reached out to grab the apple and so he scraped off some of the apple with a knife and made it, I guess, like baby food (would have to be because I didn’t have any teeth), and offered it to me and that was my first food in three days. Then he got worried and phoned the doctor and asked him if he’d done right and the doctor told him, "Yes, anything you can get her to eat would be the right thing." So for three more days, I ate nothing but apples and I did take some water then. Apples and water for the next three days and then I started taking a bottle of milk. I’ve heard this story many, many times because, well for one reason, my dad used to relate this in his psychology class, not especially that part of the story to make his point, but the fact that for five years, until I was five years old, I would wake up at 2 AM and instead of my two o'clock feeding, I would have an apple in the middle of the night. When I was two years old, we moved from 632 W 4th North to 866 N 2nd East which was right at the foot of upper campus where the BYU (Brigham Young University) tennis courts are at the present time. This was an older house that we moved into and we had just gotten moved in and were spending our first night when different members of the family were calling out that something was biting them. My parents turned on the light and tried to find out what it was and they found bedbugs crawling out between the cracks in the wallpaper. So in the middle of the night, we all moved outside and my parents (who) had just moved all the furniture in the house, they moved it all outside where we camped for several days in the yard, while they steamed off the wallpaper, got everything in the house fumigated, every room fumigated and calcimined on all the walls. They used to tell a story about me, because they thought it was a cute story, but since I was only two years old at the time, they said that after about the second day of camping out, I used to go up to my mother and say, "Take me home now, Mommy, we’ve been here long enough". I lived at 866 N 2nd East until I was married when I was 20 years old. When I was three years old, my mother decided to take her three daughters and go to Chicago to travel home with my father who had been attending summer school at the University of Chicago. The train trip to Chicago was quite exciting. I think it was in Omaha where one of the cars of the train caught fire and we had to evacuate the train. I remember some Negro porters helped my mother by carrying Helen and I off the train. These same Negro porters had been very friendly also and helpful in the dining car. They would get books or something for a booster seat so that Helen and I could reach the table. While we were in Chicago, Helen celebrated her 5th birthday on the 30th of August, 1923. We also had an exciting trip up to the top of the Wrigley Building which was the tallest building in Chicago at the time. After I went home, my brothers and different ones used to ask me what I remembered about Chicago and about the trip and I would tell them that was where I had a whole stick of gum, of course they gave away free gum in the Wrigley Building. Since my father had been going to summer school, eventually he went there a total of seven summers in a row and he was earning at the time $1800 a year at BYU and it cost him $1200 each summer to go to Chicago for the train fare, for his board and room and tuition. So the family had to exist on $600 a year for house payments, food, clothing, etc. Of course, we raised a lot of our own food. Our home there at 866 N 2nd East was on a very large lot, almost an acre, and we had a large vegetable garden which we all worked on and we also raised some of our own fruit. Our home was very lovely. It was surrounded by big lawns beautifully landscaped with a large rose garden, any varieties of flowers and shrubs including eleven varieties of Lilacs. So I’m sure the sticks of gum and any other treats were very few and far between for those many years Dad was going to school in Chicago. When I was 6 years old, I had quite an exciting first year of school. A lot of things happened during that year in 1926. I loved my first grade teacher, who was Macy Hammond, but I missed my older sister Marie who was teaching school down in Beaver, and that year on the 18th of May, the last day of her school, she got married to Nolan Hollingshead. The next summer, the summer of 1926, I saved my little brother's life. We had a swimming hole where the neighborhood kids had dug out rocks in the canal and made it deeper right up above our place along the BYU "Lover's Lane". All the neighbor kids went swimming up there and someone had brought Robert along to watch. He was two years old at the time and he happened to step out on some weeds that were leaning down into the water that had no ground underneath them to support them, and of course he started rolling fast under the water. There were a lot of neighbor kids as well as my older brothers and sisters (my two older brothers and my sister Helen), and they just froze and started screaming and I started running as fast as I could, leaping through the water to get to him as fast as I could, and grabbed him out of the water and then my two older brothers went into action and gave him artificial respiration, but everyone said that I was the one that saved his life because everyone froze when he fell in. This summer was the summer that our folks decided to remodel the house and so as soon as they got that underway, probably in July, the family kind of conned my sister and I into going up to our cabin in Hobblecreek Canyon, we had 10 acres where the Hobblecreek Golf Course is now, and we had a cabin up there and Helen and I stayed up there all summer without going down to Provo. We were the only ones in the family that did not know that they were remodeling the house that summer, and when we came back in time for school to start, the house had been completely changed - every room. The dimensions of every room had been changed. It had all been redecorated, the old bricks had been covered with a beautiful stucco, the front porch had been cemented in (it had been a wooden porch before that). It had been cemented in with a cement railing around and there was a porch swing hanging at one end of the porch. The living room had been enlarged to 15 x 23 and had a beautiful coved ceiling. In fact the ceilings were dropped all over the house 3 feet which gave us very good insulation for warmth in the winter time and coolness in the summer. Best of all, the kitchen had been changed to an all-electric kitchen, it had been enlarged to a larger room and we had an electric stove, electric refrigerator, and electric water heater. We were told that it was one of the very first all-electric kitchens in Provo. So we were really, really surprised by all this. Earlier that year, before the remodeling took place, we got our first new car. We had had a Model T Ford for a year or two but Marion bought that and took the top off and had that to run around in and we bought a brand new Ford with Isinglass windows that we could snap in if the weather was cold or if it started to rain. And we were really excited about the new car. The next year (1927), my second grade year at the B.Y. (Brigham Young) Lab (or Training) school (which I attended for all but three years of my schooling before graduating from the B.Y. High School at the age of fifteen), I was really excited to find that my favorite first grade teacher, Macy Hammond, had transferred to second and was my teacher for the second year, and I used to think that she transferred for this one year only, because that was the last time she left first grade, for one reason only, that she loved me so much. And I really loved her. One of the things I really liked was the fact that she read poetry every day and two of my very favorite poems came from a book that she read out of quite often called, "SILVER PENNIES". The one poem was called "The Elf and the Door Mouse" and the other was about a nymph and a goblin which was called "Overheard on a Salt Marsh". When I got a chance to choose the poems, I quite often chose one of those for her to read and of course I had them memorized; I’ve never forgotten them. I’ve always been able to recite these two poems and I used them a lot when I was teaching school. In 1928, the following year, I was thinking I should be baptized, but my Dad was very determined that I was going to make up my mind without any pressure from the family. Whenever I would mention it, he would say it was up to me. So on the 23rd of September 1928, I walked down to the Stake Center all by myself and got baptized. Of course my dad did confirm me the next day but I’ve always remembered that I went down there all alone, I walked down to the Stake Center which was about on 1st West and 1st North and back home by myself. In fourth grade, - well, third and fourth grade, I went to the B.Y. Lab school, and in fourth grade I was among about 10 students who were chosen to come an hour early each morning to learn French, and Professor Joseph F. Cummings from the University would come there and we got our French lessons. We also were accelerated in Math so that we learned fractions and did some of the things that the fifth grade students were doing. My folks thought they were grooming me to get a special promotion, because they brought this up a few times, so the next year they transferred me to a public school, down to the Parker School, where Susan P. Whitaker, was my fifth grade teacher. During that year, one of the things that I really remember was the fact that she sprung a test on us, a spelling test, 100 spelling demons, and we weren’t given the words to study in advance, she just sprung it on us, and when we were through, she corrected the test and she thought sure that I would get 100. Well I missed the word "grammar" (I spelled it "er" instead of "ar") and she made an example out of me even though I received the best score. She had me come up in front of the class and she wrote "grammar" clear across my arm in red pencil. That really bothered me because some of the kids had been scribbling on their own hands with red pencil and she had been telling them that red lead might poison them and here she was writing in great big letters across my arm "grammar" and then she made me stay after school to take the test over. Well, I was sort of emotionally upset to be held after school as well as upset about having that word written across my arm after she had been telling us not to do that. So the second time I took the test after school, I missed three words and I sort of went home by myself thinking, "Well it serves her right", but at the end of that school year she surprised us all, my folks and myself, by giving me a special promotion to the seventh grade without having discussed it with my parents or anything. They didn’t know what to do, they let it go and so I was caught up in school with my older sister which wasn’t too good of a situation. Every summer after we got our new Ford car, my mother planned outings, and special trips. We went to Zion and Bryce and Grand Canyon (when I was 8 years old) and Yellowstone (in 1934 where I caught my limit of fish in one hour on Yellowstone Lake) and the Arches (it wasn’t a National Park yet then) but we went to all of these beautiful places that we had heard of in Utah and also visited Mesa Verde National Park and in 1939 to the World’s Fair in San Francisco. Also she liked to surprise us all by having a picnic fixed, and when my dad would come home from the office she would say, "Well, we’re going to eat in one of the canyons", or "we’re going to have a picnic down at the Utah Lake", or something like this. One time when we went on a picnic to Utah Lake, we invited two widows who lived across the road, Sister Cox and Sister Erickson, and LaRue Erickson, and we went down to Utah Lake where they used to have a beautiful, clean sandy beach and the water used to be beautiful and clean and really pleasant to go swimming in, and we went for a swim before we ate our picnic supper. That time, since there were extra people, Marion had come along with his Model T Ford jalopy, and all the kids were in the car with him and the grownups with my Mom and Dad. This time, in order to get a private beach, we had left the main road and traveled about two or three miles through what we used to call the bull rushes. I don't know if that was the right name for them, but they were plants that grew very, very close together and straight up, about three or four feet tall. There was a one way trail through the bull rushes to this white sand beach that the cars had worn down. Just two tracks, and in between the tire tracks, the cars had worn down the bull rushes so the car could go one way only. Soon after we got on the way to go back to the main road, a skunk came out of a little tiny clearing and started trotting along in front of Marion's Model T jalopy, and my folks were traveling along behind. Marion started driving really slow so that he wouldn’t frighten the skunk, because you know what skunks do when they’re frightened, they spray on you and it stinks! And it stinks worse than anything that I’ve every smelled so he just went slow and my dad kept honking at him to try to get him to speed up a little bit and he just kept going slow and my dad kept honking and the skunk was just trotting along not very fast and there wasn’t any kind of a place to escape into the bull rushes, they were all growing so close together. I don't think hardly a mouse could get between where they were growing so close together. And so we were all telling Marion to go slow and not to scare the skunk and finally he got so disgusted that he said, "Well, in five more minutes, I’m going to run over that skunk if it doesn’t get out of the way". And we said, "Don't - Don't do it, don't do it", because we’d smelled skunk that had been run over before and it smelled just like the skunk had sprayed you. And so anyway, the skunk seemed to be just taking its own time and my dad kept honking and so finally Marion said, "I’m going to run over it" and he did. And did it stink! And the bad thing about it was there was no way that my dad could avoid running over it too, so we traveled from Utah Lake through Provo just stinking. We’d see people holding their noses as we’d go by and when we got home, why my Mother wouldn’t let Marion pull into our lot. We entered our lot - our drive way entered from the rear of the lot and between there and the hill there was a right of way in the pasture for the BYU football team to go up to their practice field. Well she made him park the cars, the two cars, as far up into the pasture as she could, as far away from any of the neighbors, right up close to the hill, and then she made him take a scrubbing brush and all kinds of different kinds of cleaners and try to clean the wheels of the two cars on the side where they ran over the skunk. Well, it took several days of scrubbing and trying different kinds of solutions before the stink went away from the car tires and that is something that we will never ever forget - the smell of that skunk -"PU". On August 5th, 1930, the whole family was very, very excited because my mom and dad became grandparents for the first time, and my brothers and sisters and I became aunts and uncles. Marie and Nolan had a baby girl that they named Nola Marie. And we were all congratulating each other and having a good time over this and I remember how much my mother was thrilled about having a grandchild, and she used to make little dresses and bibs and all kinds of baby clothes and things and shower this little Nola Marie with presents. I remember one dress when she was old enough to walk, that was black and white. It was white with little tiny, tiny black dots and it was bound with black and had some little bunnies, bunny rabbits, appliqued around the bottom of the skirt, and my mother figured it would look really cute with her curly red hair. And it did. We used to love it when they used to come to visit us. In 1932, my dad was a delegate representing BYU to the American Psychological Association Meeting to be held at Ithaca, New York, at Cornell University and he decided to leave a few weeks early and take the family. We planned to go the route of the Mormon's (Utah Pioneers) and visit as many places of Church History interest as we could. But at the last minute, though, we changed our minds about going on the route of the Pioneers because my mother decided she would like to go down to Oklahoma and visit a cousin that she had been writing to for years and had only seen once or twice. This was her cousin Winnie Burkett and she lived in Noble, Oklahoma. So we planned to take the route the same direction the pioneers came from, east to west, on the way back. My brother, Marion, stayed home to take care of the place and take care of the dog and besides he didn’t want to leave his girlfriend, Reva, and so Earle, and Helen and Robert and I went with our parents on this trip. And we left on the 23rd of July, 1932 and went to Colorado for the first night and were really surprised that next day, on the 24th of July, to find that no one was celebrating the 24th of July. We just thought that everybody in the world ought to celebrate July 24th. We stayed around Denver for several days while dad visited several of his friends including Ardis Young McCarty, the lady that I was named after. In Denver we also went to the zoo and to the museum and dad drove up to Boulder to visit with some friends up there at the college, and then we went on toward Noble, Oklahoma through Kansas. In Noble, Oklahoma, the relatives down there were so thrilled to see us that they insisted we stay several days, and they planned a big family reunion and while we were there we saw cotton growing and peanuts growing. I remember how surprised Robert was. He was eight years old at the time, and was so surprised to see that peanuts grew underground and you had to dig them as you dig potatoes. It was nice to be on their farm; it was really like a big plantation. It was fun staying there for a few days and having all the relatives that we’d never seen meet with us. And then we went up through Kansas where dad had former students and other friends that were scattered here and there along the route that we were going, and he loved to look up these acquaintances and friends of his. When we got to Kansas City, my dad headed for the part of town where they had used book stores. He had this hobby of collecting early Americana and early Utah and early Mormon History books for quite a few years. Books were really his hobby and he had quite a list of books that he was looking for that were out of print. We were all waiting in the car in Kansas City in a rather bad section of town, and it was terribly hot but a Kansas City policeman came and warned us to be careful. He said, "If I were you, I’d roll up those windows and lock your doors while you’re in this part of town". My dad had several relatives in Missouri and we went to look all of them up and we stayed overnight with his great aunt Mary. Then our next destination was to go to St. Louis where we saw my dad's cousin, Carl and his wife Margaret, and they invited us to go to a show and to stay overnight with them, and this was a really good treat for us. They also took us to Shaw's Garden the next day before we left and headed toward Springfield, Illinois where we visited Lincoln's home, his tomb and his monument and the state capitol. Then we headed towards Quincy, Illinois where we saw Mark Twain's home, and the cave, Tom Sawyer's cave, and the next day we went on to Nauvoo where we, of course, saw Joseph Smith's home and the Hotel. We also went swimming in the Mississippi and picked up shells along the shores of the lake (river) that had been punched out to make pearl buttons and then the rest of shell was just left there with the round holes in. We stayed at Nauvoo and while we were still nearby there, why, we decided to take a ferry ride across the Mississippi into Iowa and then we returned right back, and then drove down to Carthage Jail to see where Joseph Smith and Hyrum Smith were martyred. Then the next day we headed toward Chicago and got there about noon and dad visited with some of his friends at the University. We couldn’t find a place to stay in Chicago that night so we went to Hammond, Indiana. The next day we went back to Chicago and went through the Field's Museum and Aquarium, and the Art Institute and the Wrigley's building, and of course the Wrigley Building was the tallest building in Chicago at the time and we went to the top. While we were there I got a big kick out of being the only one of those in the family that had been there before, that remembered that the elevator didn’t go clear to the top. There was a spiral staircase, a rod-iron staircase, the last floor up. We got off the elevator and then had to climb one flight up on this spiral staircase and I kept telling them that, and my mother and dad and my sister, Helen, were all telling that me how could I possibly remember that - I was only three years old when I had been there, and that just wasn’t right. And when we got there, sure enough I was the one that had remembered correctly. That night we stayed near Gary, Indiana and the next day we enjoyed seeing many, many little lakes and the Indiana sand dunes. That night we stayed at a Tourist Home and we were really excited because there was a little girl about six years old whose name was Betsy Ross and she had dark hair and ringlets and she was just as cute as she could be. These people were very nice to us. We found out that a lot of the homes in the east were very wealthy homes like this one (and) that they were renting out rooms - putting out a sign that said "Tourist Home" and they were renting out rooms. They would, to get people to stay overnight, they would share their kitchen; they would let us cook our meals in their kitchen. They would let us use their washing machine. It was no more expensive than staying in a motel. So we took this opportunity, every chance we got from then on, to stay in Tourist Homes. And we were never disappointed. The next day we went to Detroit and went through the Ford factory which, at that time, covered a space of 1100 acres and it was very interesting for us to see the Ford cars manufactured on the assembly line production method. Then we went on toward Ohio and when we got to Kirtland, we found out that the Reorganized Church was having a convention and, of course, they own the Kirtland Temple and they were having their convention or conference (I think they called it convention) in the Temple. We went in to the morning service and heard them talking in tongues and that was so interesting. We found out that they were going to be convening there for several days, so we found a very nice Tourist Home in Kirtland and we stayed there four or five days while we attended some of these services. While we were there, once when we were getting into our brand new car with Utah license plates before leaving, dad had parked our 1932 V-8 ford car - and these V-8s were not very ....they were not very plentiful since the V-8 engine wasn’t put into very many of the 1932 models. In fact, we found that in 1932 people weren’t seeing brand new cars very often especially with a license plate showing that we were so far from home, so just about any place we parked were there people assembling like they were there at the Kirtland Temple, people would come up to us and talk to us about the car and about where we were from and so on. While my dad was talking to a group of people about the car one day, some elderly ladies who looked like they were twins came up to Helen and I, who were also dressed as twins, and started talking to us, asking if we were Mormons and we said, "Yes", and they actually put their hands - feeling our skull, our scalp - and they were saying, "Well, if you're Utah Mormons, where are your horns?" They seemed to be serious about it and we were really amused but we understand that there were people who actually thought that Utah Mormons had horns. We stayed at this Tourist Home in Kirtland for several days while dad was scouting around the area for early Mormon History and memorabilia and books and he stayed until he thought he’d run out of clues as to who to go see who might have something for him. Since we were very nicely situated there at this Tourist Home in Kirtland and the landlady was very nice, she was taking us to the lake, Lake Erie I think it was, on picnics and was very, very kind to us, dad did a little traveling back and forth to Cleveland to check out the book stores there so we didn’t have to wait in the car in front of the book store in the heat. It was August the 20th by then. When we left Kirtland we headed towards Niagara Falls and our first glimpse of the falls was really, really exciting. The falls were just beautiful, and at that time, they had on the United States side, they had an elevator that went to the bottom and you could also ride a tour boat under the spray, under the falls, so that it was a really exciting ride. A few years, well, I don't know how many years later, a big piece of the rock fell off so all of this was ruined, they couldn't do that anymore. While I was walking down the path that they used to have built over the Niagara River down close to the falls for a good view of the falls from the United States side, I happened to spy a shining brand new penny in the river and I tried to reach it from the path and I couldn’t so I took off my shoes and stockings and went wading in the river about, well, they tell me later that I was only about 15 feet above the falls. But there was a big boulder in front of me so the water wasn't running swift where I was but there was about three or four guards that came running to get me back on the sidewalk and the right side of the fence. But I got myself out before they got there luckily. The next day we went to the Hill Cumorah and the Sacred Grove, and since my dad knew Willard Bean who was the caretaker at the Joseph Smith home across the road from the Sacred Grove, we stayed there for four nights and took turns - they let us sleep in the Joseph Smith home and my sister and I and my two brothers and my mom and dad, took turns rotating in the different bedrooms upstairs so that we would all be sure that we had slept in Joseph Smith's bedroom. While we were there, my mother suggested that all of us walk over to the Sacred Grove by ourselves to get the very quiet feeling of being there in that sacred place, all alone, and we also walked from the Joseph Smith home a distance of three miles over to the Hill Cumorah and climbed the hill and explored around to see if we could get a feeling of where the golden plates might have been found. After we left this area, we drove on to Vermont, to Joseph Smith's birthplace, and found that it was beautifully landscaped around the house and they had a monument to Joseph Smith that was 32 feet high (1 foot for every year of Joseph Smith's life). While we were there we celebrated Helen's birthday on August the 30th. The next day, on the 31st of August, we had heard that there was going to be a total eclipse of the sun and the best place to view it would be in Topsfield, Massachusetts, so we headed for Topsfield in bumper to bumper traffic cause it looked like everybody on the east coast was traveling to Topsfield, Massachusetts and while we were in this bumper to bumper traffic, we had a rear-end collision and the trunk of our new car was mashed in and we had to spend a little time getting that fixed before we could go on. It was a wonderful experience to see the total eclipse of the sun. We happened to be parked near a farm and I remember that the animals seemed very excited and the rooster was crowing and my little brother, Robert, who was 8 years old at this time, kept saying after the eclipse was over, "I couldn’t believe my eyes, it got so dark." And it really did get dark and the stars were out and it was really a once in a lifetime experience that we were all very happy that we got to experience. Then after this we made our way towards Cambridge, Massachusetts, where dad had friends, the Nate Whittens, and the family stayed there while dad and his friend went to Boston and then after, later on that day, they all took us to the Bunker Hill monument and the Navy Yards and we stayed with the Whittens that night. The next day we went into Boston again and saw the old state house, the old North church, the old South church, the Paul Revere house and the new state house and in Boston we happened to get into a terrific rain storm - thunderstorm. Earle was driving and my mother was kind of worried because the lightning seemed to be striking really close by and she mentioned to Earle that maybe he ought to step on the gas and get out of those tall trees that were lining each side of the road. He did so and right after he stepped on the gas and started to go faster, the lightning struck one of the tall trees and it crashed down right in back of our car and we had scratches on the back of the car. We didn’t know whether it was from the tree or from the rear-end collision that we’d experienced a day or two before. We also had a swim in the Atlantic Ocean near Plymouth Rock. After we left Boston, we went to New Haven, Connecticut and went to the Yale Library and we enjoyed seeing inside the Library as well as the outside of the building which is considered one of the most beautiful buildings in the world and at New Haven we stayed with my dad's Uncle Walter. Then the next day we saw Sleepy Hollow and came down along the Hudson River and saw the beautiful homes along the Hudson. The next day we saw the Trenton Monument and the Liberty Bell and Declaration Hall in Philadelphia, and then Preston University, and then we went through Delaware and on to Washington D.C. for the night. In Washington D.C., of course, we saw the Lincoln Monument, the Capitol Building, the White House, the Treasury, and went on to see Mt. Vernon and then we stayed in Maryland that night. The following day, on September 7th, we went to New Jersey and got on the subway and went under the Hudson River to New York City and we enjoyed seeing Wall Street and Broadway and went to see the Statue of Liberty, and my dad got the person in charge, since there were very, very few tourists out there, he threw his weight around a little bit and got them to unlock the door to this staircase that went up in the arm, so we had the rare privilege of going up in the arm and seeing the New York skyline from the windows in the torch. And of course this was very, very impressive. The next day we reached Ithaca, where my dad was going to have the convention and we found a suitable motel for us to stay for a few days and while we were there, some of dad's friends took us around to see some of the sights around Ithaca, New York - to the park, and a lake and to see a waterfall. We stayed there for about three or four days and while we were there we had seen so many lobsters that we decided that we’d get brave and see if we could taste one. But we couldn’t bring ourselves to buy a live lobster and cook it, so we bought a can of lobster and opened up and took a look at it and it all looked so strange to all of us that none of us could bring ourselves to taste it and we ended up feeding the lobster to a cat that was hanging around the motel. On September 11th we started for home and we knew that school was going to be starting and so we just hurried every day. We did try to follow the route of the Pioneers as much as we could and we ended up in Vernal where Marie and Nolan and Nola Marie lived on the 14th of September. Marie figured out places for all of us to sleep that night and so after supper we went to bed early to see if we could get up early and get a really early start towards home. None of us could get to sleep; we were all thinking about home and so we all got up and started to go towards home. When we were out in the middle of nowhere, I guess it was close to the great divide between Vernal and Roosevelt, we had our first flat tire of the whole trip and that's pretty good traveling so many miles and being gone for eight weeks but we were out there in the middle of nowhere in a dark, dark night without any lights except a flashlight and had to change a tire. I wouldn't be surprised if what we had to mend the inner-tube, because it seems like it was a long time getting the tire back on the wheel and we could hear coyotes howling and it was kind of an eerie feeling to be out where we saw no other car lights or lights from houses and changing a tire in the middle of the night. When we got home that morning finally at 6 AM we said AHi@ to my brother and then said, "Where's Smike? Where's Smike? We want to see Smike", and since Smike was a favorite dog of all of us including my brother, Marion, he was really unhappy to have to tell us that someone had poisoned our pet the day before and he’d had the unhappy job of burying him that very day, and we all felt bad about that, but then we had to tell Marion that we had sort of dreamed this up as sort of a joke to make a fuss over the dog before talking to him and it turned out to be kind of an unhappy joke that we had planned. We were also excited about telling Marion about our trip, the things we hadn’t told him in our letters, that we decided there was no way we could get to sleep that night and so we had breakfast and talked about our trip and then went to school that day and this was our very first day and it was my eight grade year down at Fairer Junior High School. We were really excited to talk with our friends about this long trip that we had been on for eight weeks and had been into 32 states and all these many places of Church History interest and University campuses along the way. We really went to every place that was marked on the map that we knew about as being of Church History interest. I hadn’t mentioned that we had been to Far West, and Adam ondi-Ahman, and Fayette, New York, and we’d been to the place where the church was organized and we had really had a wonderful trip that all of us who went would remember all of our lives. In 1933 we decided to go to the BY Junior High Lab (Training) School which was held in the bottom floor of the Art building on the Lower Campus. And there was a walkway on the third floor of the building over into the Education Building where dad had his office and one day soon after school started I was standing at the foot of the stairway and one of the girls in my grade walked up behind me and grabbed my dress by the collar and pulled it out and dropped something down and it didn’t take me very long to figure out that she had dropped a snake down my neck. And at that time I was very, very immature about snakes, I had been told different snake stories that just had given me an irrational fear of snakes and to have one crawling down my back next to my skin just made me go berserk and I started screaming to the top of my lungs and running up the stairs, I suppose to go over to my dad's office. The Junior High and High School only occupied the lower floor of this building and college classes were on the second and third floor and I can vaguely remember as I’d go screaming up the stairs to see all the doors open and all the students and the professors that were teaching the classes all crowd to the door to see what was going on. And of course this "friend of mine", quote and unquote, Ruth Miller, who had played this dirty trick on me, was running as fast as she could to see if she could catch up with me and get the snake out. She had no idea that I would, you know, totally go berserk. Well, I don't think I got to my dad's office, in fact I think that when she stopped me, I think I fainted because I don't remember one thing after seeing these doors opening on the second floor of the building and the next thing I knew I was home laying on the couch and my mother was trying to calm me down and finally she said, "Well, I’ll tell you what we’ll do, we’ll get rid of that feeling" (I kept telling her, "I can still feel it"), and so she said, "we’ll get you in the bathtub in a nice warm bath and I’ll take a wash cloth and scrub your back and scrub your back until you can’t feel it any more". And that’s what she did and I finally calmed down. But the next morning when I got to school, why, they were waiting for me and I was to go to the Principal's office along with Ruth Miller, and she was to apologize to me in front of the faculty that were all in the Principal's office. And I told her then that I forgave her but I really felt a little bit sheepish that I was kind of that immature that it would send me into a frenzy like it did and I decided that I had better sort of try to work on my immature feelings about snakes. Later that fall on November 7th, 1933, my brother Earle died. He had spent a very busy day. He was a Sophomore at BYU and he had walked up the campus from the Lower Campus to the Upper Campus which he didn’t usually do (my folks usually loaned him the car so that when he had a class on Upper Campus he could drive it) and he got to the top of the hill right by the Library doors and had a heart attack and died there within a few minutes. He had had a bad heart, an enlarged heart, left from having red measles when he was five years old and this happening the way it did was a real shock to the faculty, and the student body and I remember when we went to the funeral we found out that the whole high school, all the classes had been dismissed to go to the funeral and it was really kind of a traumatic thing for our family. Earlier that year, Marion and Reva had got married, Marion was ready to graduate from college in June of 1933 and they got married on the 22nd of May and lived in an apartment nearby where we lived and it was really fun to have a married brother and sister-in-law who lived close because Marie and Nolan and Nola Marie had always lived a long ways away so that we didn’t get to see them very often. In 1934 my dad got really, really sick and he had rheumatic fever and arthritis. He was in bed for six or seven months and dropped down to less than 100 pounds and my mother was nursing him day and night. She wouldn’t go anywhere; she didn’t want to leave even for a few minutes to go shopping or anything. She had us kids do all the shopping and she just tended to his needs. She set up two beds in the south end of our living room by the big south window so it would be sunny and pleasant and she would sleep (or try to sleep) in one bed. If he was sleeping, she would doze off a little bit and then she also used two beds because he would have night sweats and his sheets would be all wet and so she would change the sheets of her bed and lift him over into the other bed while she got his bed all nice and dry and changed again, so we were constantly doing laundry and doing everything that we could to help out and I remember when his fever really got bad and he was in a really critical stage we, the family, and the Manavu Ward and the faculty, all of us, held a two day fast and we prayed that he would get better and it was very, very soon after we fasted and prayed that his fever broke and he did start to get better. Actually, this was in the fall of 1933 and part of the winter of 1934. On January 25th, 1934, Marie had another baby. She came to our home to have the baby because she had a terrible time with the birth of her baby out in Vernal, the birth of her first baby. And she wanted to be where she considered we had better doctors. She said that the doctor that she had for Nola Marie was a drinker and he was the only doctor in town and so she wanted to have Dr. Cullimore deliver the second baby. At that time, 1934, we had no hospitals in Provo, so my dad had stilts made on the bed to raise it up like a hospital bed and my mother sterilized the room, the sheets and everything where the birth was going to take place in. She let Helen and I stay home from school to see if there’s anything we could do to help and course we were not to get anywhere near the bedroom. There was two closed doors between us and Marie and the Doctor and my mother. But when the baby was born, the doctor came out of the bedroom and into the living room and handed this little baby boy, wrapped up in a blanket, to me and he says, "Now you go over there and sit there by the stove and keep him warm". This was a really big thrill to think that the doctor entrusted this brand new born baby to me. And so my nephew Earl was always rather special to me after this had happened. I was 14 at the time, well, I hadn’t turned 14 yet, I was 13 and 3/4. And Helen was very, very jealous that the doctor hadn’t handed the baby to her cause she felt she should have had him because she was older than me. On the next month, on February 9th, Marion and Reva had their first baby, a girl who they named Erlene. This was kind of a premature birth; the baby was tiny as could be. It’s head looked about the size of large orange and my brother said he could put his ring over her hand for a bracelet, she was so tiny. She had been born at Reva's home after they called them and told them to come quick that Reva's brother had a ruptured appendix and they were afraid he was going to die, and he did die. They got to American Fork to her parents’ home, and by that time, when they heard the news, she just more or less went into shock and went into labor at the same time, and so the baby was born at her mother's home. Then the next year, on August 19th, 1935, my mother had an operation for, well a hysterectomy operation and she died during the surgery. The doctor said that she had cancer of the uterus and this was a really, really traumatic experience. I just couldn’t believe it. When she left that morning she walked to the car and she had asked me if I would make her another bed jacket like one I had made for her a few months before and so I had just finished the bed jacket when the phone rang and Marion told us on the phone that she didn’t make it through the surgery - that she had died. And I just couldn’t believe it until I saw Marion and dad come home and dad just more or less collapsed; he was really shook up. My mother's funeral was a lovely funeral; everyone spoke so highly of her. Of course, everyone always has spoken highly of her because she was really a wonderful person. She was always the first in the neighborhood to bring a meal to anybody that was ill. She’d bring them some hot soup and some homemade bread or other treats. She was always helping out people; sharing her flowers. She had many, many varieties of roses; huge rose garden, eleven varieties of lilacs including a huge hedge on the north of our property and she would share these. I remember once the committee for one of the student body dances came and asked her if they could have lilacs to decorate for a dance at the Ladies Gym and she told them to help their selves and they picked several tubs full of lilacs from the hedge. She had many varieties of iris and other flowers that she used to make lovely bouquets all the time to take to people, and take to the cemetery, and to decorate her house with. She was always willing to share starts with anybody that wanted them and was just a person that everyone loved. The following year, in 1936, Helen and I both finished high school at the BY High and started college that fall at the BYU which I attended for three years. That summer, dad had remarried. He married Jenny Jorgenson Smith and she had two young boys, they were about 7 and 8 at the time, so our family was five children at home again. My parents provided me with many cultural opportunities. I took piano and violin lessons. I attended many wonderful lyceums at BYU including Helen Jeppson, Paul Robson, Rubinoff and many others. I started working at the Heber J. Grant Library to earn my tuition and I remember we got paid 25 cents an hour and I was working at the circulation desk and was feeling very, very lucky to have the job and the opportunity to earn my tuition. The tuition for the year in 1936, and in fact all my years of college, was $86 a year, not a quarter but a year. But, of course the pay was very small, 25 cents an hour. While working at the Library, the Heber J. Grant Library, I used to notice a real handsome young man through the glass doors in the reading room and very often, if I had a moment between getting books out of the stacks for people or I would be filing cards and happened to look up, I’d see this handsome, tall, dark, young man with beautiful, big, brown eyes looking straight at me and it sort of made me nervous. But I began noticing him around campus and I also began to notice that quite often as I picked up my purse from the shelf behind the desk to leave work at a certain time each day, he would get up from the table at the reading room and leave the Library the same time I did and we’d actually be walking down the steps of the Library together, but we hadn’t been introduced, so we didn’t speak and I didn’t look his way. Then I began to notice that he talked sometimes to a cousin of mine, Ina, and in talking with her later, I found out what his name was and that he had graduated from the Lincoln High School, the same high school where she had graduated. So, one day as I was leaving work and he was also going down the steps at the same time, Ina was coming up the steps and I stopped to talk with her and he stopped too, and so she had to introduce us because there we were. She told me later that she hadn’t wanted to introduce him cause she thought he’d make a pretty nice boyfriend for her. But that was really kind of exciting to be introduced. From then on we started to walk together when I got off work and he would leave, and we’d walk down the hill together as far as my corner then he’d walk on by himself. Pretty soon, he’d coax me into walking as far as the Lower Campus with him and then he would invite me into an ice cream store called "Calders", just across the street from the Lower Campus on University Avenue and he’d treat me to a toasted tuna fish sandwich and a frosty. This became sort of a regular date quite often that he would invite me to walk down as far as Calders with him and then he had about another mile and a half to walk to his home which was at his sister, Ione' s, place. He was staying there during the week and then he’d go back to his home over in Grandview, it’s now Orem. He used to coax me to telephone him and we would talk on the phone quite a bit when he was home for the weekend and of course sometimes we’d have dates on the weekend and go to hear some of the Lyceum numbers or we would go on a picnic----(tape runs out) The following is from another history written by Ardis: In 1939-40, I taught second grade at the Franklin School in Provo. On September 30, 1940, I married Glen E. Soulier in the Salt Lake Temple. Glen was born March 31, 1919, at Provo, Utah, the youngest child of Henry and Elisa Long Soulier. His older brothers and sister were Ernest (who died in infancy), Iona, Clarence, Wesley and Paul. Glen attended elementary school at Grand View and Lincoln High School in Orem from where he graduated. He attended the Brigham Young University for two years prior to our marriage. After our marriage, we moved to Logan where Glen attended Utah State Agricultural College (now Utah State University) and graduated from there in 1943. On April 5, 1943, he left with the Enlisted Reserve Corps for Camp Barkley near Abilene, Texas, where he took his basic training in the Army Medical Corps. I was teaching second grade at the Wilson School in Logan at the time and I followed him to Abilene the day that school was out. At the end of his basic training he was assigned to a Medical Hospital Ship Platoon, where he served as a clerk and was sent to Brisbane, Australia. He was in charge of the enlisted men in his platoon as he was the highest non-commissioned rank; the only commissioned officers being the Doctor and the Dentist. His job was to bring back sick and wounded from the battlefields. He later made a trip to Sidney, Australia. He made twelve trips across the Pacific with the Hospital Ship Platoon. He made three trips to the Hawaiian Islands and one to the Philippines. He was in Manilla, Philippines for one year and celebrated the end of the war there. Between trips overseas, I went to the coast to be with Glen several times. I was with him at his Port of Embarkation at Pittsburg, California on three different occasions. I spent several months working at the PX (Army Exchange System also known as Post Exchange) at Fort Mason when he was stationed there. I spent 6 weeks with him in Seattle, Washington when he was stationed at Fort Lawton. Glen was discharged from the Army on January 29, 1946, at Fort Douglas, UT. We moved to Logan again where Glen took some post-graduate courses at the college necessary to teach Vocational Agriculture. In July of that same year, Glen and I both signed contracts to teach in the Jordan School District; Glen to teach Vo.Ag. and I to teach at Bingham Elementary which I did for one year and then at Union Elementary for one year and then I resigned. In January of 1947, we purchased our home at 163 So. Roosevelt St. in Midvale, Utah. Our only daughter Jacqueline, was born at the L.D.S. Hospital in Salt Lake City on November 13, 1949 and was blessed by her grandfather, M. Wilford Poulson on December 3rd. We really welcomed and appreciated her after nine years of hoping for a child. Our only son, Scott Martin Soulier, was also born at the L.D.S. Hospital on June 13, 1951 and was blessed by his grandfather Poulson on Aug. 5th. In September 1951, Glen took his state winning Dairy cattle judging team to Waterloo, Iowa where they participated in a national judging contest and won top honors in the Future Farmers of America. In 1952 Glen was elected president of the Mid-Flora Garden Club. Glen taught at Jordan High School from August 1946 until 1962 and then was transferred to the new Hillcrest High School where he was made Chairman of the Science Department. During these years he worked at several interest summer jobs including being a Ranger Naturalist at Zion National Park. He also spent several summers going to school. He was fortunate enough to be the recipient of three National Science Foundation Scholarships, one to go to the University of Wyoming at Laramie for one summer, and two Summer Institutes at Colorado State University at Fort Collins, where he received his Master’s Degree in August, 1964. On April 16, 1965, the Utah Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters conferred an award for Meritorious Teaching in Biological Sciences upon Glen at their annual Banquet. He was the first High School teacher to receive this honor. That same year, on May 21, the National Association of Biology Teachers, presented Glen an honors Award as the Outstanding Biology Teacher in Utah. In 1965 Glen was selected by the State Board of Education to be co-director of a Science Workshop in Outdoor Education for teachers to be conducted in Ephriam Canyon. He served in this capacity for several summers. In 1968 he was promoted to Science Coordinator for Jordan School District. During the summer of 1959, I attended summer school at Brigham Young University and completed requirements to renew my Teaching Certificate. Since the fall of 1959, I have taught school at Sandy Elementary, Sandy, Utah. In the summers since that time I have studied to finish all the new requirements to graduate from Brigham Young University. I finally accomplished this on May 31 1968 when I graduated. As a family we have enjoyed many trips to more than a dozen National Parks in the western states, and several of the National Parks I Colorado. We also enjoy the sport of skiing as a family. (end of her written history) Additional information In May of 1981. Ardis and Glen retired from the Jordan School District. She had completed 22 years of dedicated, outstanding teaching of First Grade, which she dearly loved and Glen after 35 years of teaching and administrative work. After retiring they travelled to the East coast from Nova Scotia to Georgia before returning home; took a cruise to the Bahamas, and a trip to Alaska and went camping at their favorite places like Zion, Arches, Wasatch State Park, Spruces Campground and Payson Lakes to name a few. They later received a call to serve in the Washington, Seattle L.D.S.Mission which they fulfilled from November 1983 to November 1984 after which they continued to serve in church callings and to camp or travel until January 1986 when Ardis was diagnosed with Leukemia from which she died on Friday, August 15, 1986 and her funeral was on Tuesday, August 19, 1986 and she is buried in the Midvale City Cemetery.

Martin Wilford Poulson

Contributor: SouthPawPhilly Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Compiled from his diary, written when he was a young man, and from histories written by his daughters. Martin Wilford Poulson was born November 21, 1884 at 8am in Pleasant Grove, UT, the first child to be born to Niels and Maria W. Poulson after they moved to Utah from Sweden. He was given a Patriarchal Blessing on November, 1886 by a Swedish-born Patriarch who lived in Hyrum, Cache County. Later in his life he wrote: I copied it in my boyhood diary and was influenced for good by reading it occasionally. His own diary tells of the events of his early life and the beginnings of his lifelong friendships and his love of books. At one time he wrote: Junius J. Hayes became my playmate at least as early as 1896 and was my best chum and close friend for more than 50 years. I was very fortunate to have him and other excellent friends during my youth. .... My diary for 1900 and on includes mentions of enjoyable trips with Junius, Othello Clark, William King Driggs, Donald Noble, and others when we went fishing, boating, canyon and mountain climbing, etc. How lucky I was to have so many chums who helped make my boyhood days both valuable and very happy. Also my school and church teachers were very good. The home training of my parents was excellent. My sister and brothers, by their good examples radiated excellent influence. His interest in books and reading was awakened at an early age by his Sunday School and school teachers, who gave him books for perfect attendance and other achievements and family members who gave him books for birthdays. When he or Junius Hayes had any money to spend they would walk to American Fork and browse through the books for sale. This was the beginning of a lifelong habit. DIARY OF MARTIN WILFORD POULSON: Copied from his own beautifully hand written record. 1884 - I was born on the twenty-first of November in the year of our Lord, 1884, at Pleasant Grove Utah. It was on Friday morning at 8:30 O Clock. 1885 - Thursday, February 5, 1885, I was blessed and given the name of Martin Wilford Poulson by Canute Swenson. (John Brown)? Mother said she named me after her, that our initials were to be the same. She hoped that I would keep my name as clear as she had hers. 1886 - In November of this year I had my patriarchal blessing. It is as follows: A PATRIARCHAL BLESSING Given by O.N. Lilienquest upon the head of Martin Wilford Poulson, son of Niels Poulson and Maria Whalstrom, born Nov. 21, 1884 at Pleasant Grove Utah. "Martin Wilford in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, I place my hands upon your head and seal upon you a patriarchal blessing, with Abraham's, Issac's and Jacob's blessings, that they may rest upon you from your childhood, that you may be saved from all the evils that are in this world and grow up under the influence of the Holy Ghost; and under the protection of His Holy Angels; and embrace the holy Gospel with the holy Melchizedek Priesthood in full, and bear your testimony of Jesus and be a mighty man of God; and work in the Lord's vineyard, and bring many souls to our Lord and be a blessing to thousands of both the living and the dead, and stand as a Savior on Mount Zion. I seal upon you the Gift of Faith that you may have power over sin, sickness, pestilence, and death. I seal upon you the Gift of Healing the sick. You are of Ephriam, the heir to the Holy Priesthood, with all the blessings belonging to the new and everlasting covenant. You shall be blest all your days on earth spiritual and temporal; have deal in the first resurrection and the thousand years of glory and be crowned with the crown of Life. All these blessings I seal upon you with the power of my calling; through your faithfulness; and seal upon you Eternal Life in the name of Jesus. Amen May the Lord help me to remain faithful to the end, that I may be worthy of these blessings. 1886 -- December 1, I was with my parents in Logan Temple and was sealed to the for time and eternity. 1887 - 1890 -- Got into mischief and came very near setting the place on fire several times because of my being so fond of meddling with matches. I also came near drowning when i was about three or four years old. I fell in the ditch just ahead of a dam and mother heard me gasp for breath while she was down in the cellar and came out in time to pull me out. I also remember a trip I took with Jossephine up to Cache Valley and tipping her table of dishes over while staying at Draper. 1890-1896 1890 --Began going to Sunday School. Ole Anderson was my first teacher. Aug 3 received my first S. S. reward for regular attendance. Nettie Robinson was my first teacher in the day school. 1892 --Went on a trip with mother and Edwin to see Josephine in Rockville,, Washington County, Utah. 1893 --April 3. Was baptized by Jacob Carlson and confirmed a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints by Fredrick Richards. 1896 --Dec. 18. Paid .25 tithing. Junius Hayes was my playmate and we were always making little toy ships and going for strolls down to the lake or over to the foothills. 1897-1898 1897--June 4. Was promoted to the fifth grade. School began in September and Henry Jeppson was my teacher. I liked him better than any other teacher I had ever had. The Spanish American War caused Junius and I to take a deep interest in battleships etc. and we made mimic torpedo boats and planned all kinds of ships, cannons etc. as well as a little lake where we could have our sport. Was always drawing pictures. Nov. 21. --Sister gave me a story book. 1898--Jan 9. It happened that both June and I got the same kind of book "Sunny Hours" as rewards for regular attendance at Sunday School. We were then rivals as to who could read his book through first and indeed such a lively interest in books was thereby aroused that we began to rival each other in seeing who could accumulate the most books by Xmas. My school teacher (Henry Jeppson) presented me with "Nicholas Nickelby" for regular attendance. Mother game me a Bible. I was promoted to the 6th grade and was presented with "The Pathfinder" by my teacher. Bought a book entitled "Great Americans" for $1.00 and "Church Chronology" for $1.75 Nov 21 --Mother gave me a Doctrine and Covenants. Dec 31 --Paid $1.00 in tithing. 1899 (Jan. 1, all the books were listed that he owned that have been mentioned before making seven books.) The 8th book I received was Robinson Crusoe. I received "Uncle Tom's Cabin" as a Sunday School reward and immediately began reading it. Apr 14--Was promoted to the 7th grade. June 11--Having enlisted with a lot of other boys to go to Grand Junction, Colo. to thin sugar beets I boarded the train at Lehi about nine o'clock in the morning. Crossed a large dry desert country, went through the canyon of the Grand. I enjoyed the trip very much. Was surprised to find Grand Jct. to be quite a large city. The next day we began work. July 2--Went to Sunday School of different churches about 10 miles north of Grand Jct. Walked in to Grand Jct. to get mail. Took a trip to the Grand and Gunnison Rivers and gathered a few stone specimens to take home. The river bridge was 305 steps across. Bought some views and scenes near Grand Jct. and a book called "Uncle Sam's Ships." This is my 11th book. July 19--Returned home having earned over twenty dollars. Dec -- Began reading "The Pathfinder". Dec. 31--Paid $3.00 tithing Jan. 2--Went to school renewing my efforts to get an education. Went to a show. Jan 7--At Sunday School I was awarded "Black Beauty" for regular attendance. Fasted. Went to sacrament meeting and conjoint. Jan. 13--Finished reading "The Pathfinder" Jan 21 --In the afternoon I drew a picture of King Oscar of Sweden. Feb. 12--Went to the show (Santiago) given by the Home Dramatic Company. Enjoyed it better than any I have ever seen. Mar 1 --Bought a book called "The Twentieth Century Speaker" for $1.75 Mar 11--Went to Sunday School as usual, also an entertainment given for the benefit of Jas. Fugal and Jas. Thorne who wer going on missions. Contributed $.25 Mar 20-- Weighed 99 pounds and measured five feet one inch. Apr. 7--Began reading "Uncle Sam's Ships". Apr 15--Othello Clark and I rode bicycles to the mouth of American Fork Canyon and back. Had a fine time.

Wilford M Poulson (part 2)

Contributor: SouthPawPhilly Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Taken from his personal diary contin. Apr. 16--Mothr went to Hinckley to visit Josphine. Apr. 28--Helped plant potatoes. Apr.29--Attended a lecture by Judge Powers on "The Old Fashioned Women". May 9--Donated $0.10 to Scofield relief fund. May 14--Went to a show (Nashville Students) May 15--Went over to Lehi to get a job. May 17--Promoted to the 7th grade A. May 18--Went up Battle Creek Canyon with the school. Helped with the farm at night. May 19--Was hurt in a run away over at the Lehi Jct. May 26--Edwin, Don and I went down to the lake. We fished a while and then had a fine time rowing and swimming. May 28--Mother came home from Hinckley and brought me a silk handkerchief, a memorandum and a collar. Went over to Lehi to begin work for Charley Karren for $0.50 per day and board. Earned a ticket and went to a show. June 3--Went to the S.S. and also out to Otto's. Father took me back to Lehi. June9--Mr. Karren paid me $2.00 and as i was walking home I bought "The Battles for Independence" in American Fork. June 10--Went to S. S. Returned to Lehi and read in "Uncle Sam's Ships". June 16--Mr. Karren paid me $2.00 and I quit work to help my father. Bought a suit of clothes for $5.00 June 17--S.S. as usual. Began reading "Battles for Independence.". Jun 19--Had a good time at S.S. celebration and dance in the evening (S.S. stands for Sunday School) June 25--Earned$0.40 picking cherries for Dan Smith. July 4--Went over to Saratoga Springs and had a fine time. Went boating and bathing. July 24--Went over to American Fork Lake Resort and had a fine time. Spent $0.45. Helped get the hay up. Aug. 6--Went out to Ott's to do chores while he and Emma went to SLC. Aug. 7&8--Read in the Book of Mormon. Aug. 10--Otto came home. Went swimming in Provo River. Aug. 14--Went to circus. Spent $0.60 Aug 21--Picked peaches. Father and I started for Salt Lake City to peddle. Aug 27--Threshed. Sept 10--Began school Sept 25--Began reading "True Manhood". Oct. 9--Bought "Modern Europe" for $0.65 Nov--Attended the religion class that was just being started. Nov 21--Mother gave me a Book of Mormon and Josephine gave me a dollar. Read the book of "Titus: A Comrad of the Cross". It was fine. Dec 7--Paid $1.05 tithing. Dec. 10--Mother left for Nevada on a visit to Ludwig. Dec. 15--Bought "Benefactors of the World", with the dollar Josephine gave me on my birthday. 1901 Jan 1--Junius and I sat up and to pass the time we began talking of the benefits of club or association of us boys wherein we could pursue such special studies as we desired such as literature, nature, drawing, etc. Accordingly we organized the Knowledge Seekers Club of which I was chosen to be the first president. My library has been increased with 12. Black Beauty; 13. The Twentieth Century Speaker; 14. Battles for Independence; 15. Modern Europe; 16. Book of Mormon; 17. History of England; 18. Benefactors of the World. Jan 3--Finsihed reading "True Manhood". Went to S.S. Juvenile Dance. Jan 6--In Sunday School I was presented with "Swiss Family Robinson" for regular attendance. In Conjoint the minutes of July 5, 1877 were read and also the first "Advocate" dated June 7, 1877. A historical sketch of the M.I.A. in Pleasant Grove was given. Andrew Jensen, the first President of the M.I.A. of P.G (Pleasant Grove) made some fine remarks emphasizing the importance of keeping a record. Jan. 13--Sunday School. Spent evening at Donald Nobles. Jan 14--Went tot he K.S.C. and gave the lesson on Rocks and Stones Jan. 15--Bought "American Neighbors". Went to a M.I.A. dance. Jan 16--Attended Religion Class and M.I.A. meetings. Jas. L. Brown gave an interesting talk on his visit to Kirtland Temple. Jan. 18--Wrote a sketch of the Life of Benjamin Franklin. Jan. 19--had a good time in the hills with Donald Jan. 21--Went to the K.S.C. and read its little paper called the "Benefactor". Jan 23--In Mutual I gave the topic on the life of David W. Patten. Jan 26--Junius, Donald and I went for a trip up Grove Creek Canyon. Had a hard climb to the top of the Little Mt. in the snow up to our waists. Got home at five o'clock. Mother got back from Nevada Jan 27--S.S. In the morning I attended a lecture on Palestine or The Holy Land by Apostle A.H. Lund. Jan. 30--Went to Religion Class and Mutual. Sister Walker told of her experiences at the Haun's Mill Massacre. Feb. 2-8--Made a little cupboard for my books. Feb 13--Went to Charles and Lucy's wedding. Was badly hurt on my knees and elbow by falling over some boards, Feb. 19--In Mutual Howard Driggs read a statement by Bro. J.S. Gleason regarding the Destruction of the Nauvoo Expositor. I borrowed and copied it. Feb. 23--Attended Deacons meeting. Feb. 26--In Young Men's meeting, Orlando Herron gave an interesting account of the Battle of Nauvoo. Mar. 3 --After Sunday School King Driggs and I went to the Reorganize S.S. and the Presbyterian S.S. and meeting. Mar. 5--In Y.M.M.I.A. I gave the topic on Winter Quarters. We also heard a statement of Geo. Clark of the Mormon Battalion. Mar. 6--Wrote a piece entitled, "Knowledge" for the club which was now known as the "Boys Industrial Club." Mar. 18--Began school with John H. Cooms as teacher. Mar 19--Went to Religion Class. In Mutual Bro. Henson Walker spoke on his experiences as a pioneer. Apr--Some other boys and I went fishing at Provo River and had an enjoyable time. May 23--School went up to Battlecreek canyon. June 23--Attended a lecture by Judge Alfred Saxey who told of his experiences in the Civil War. June 27--Went over to Lehi and got a chance to go to Colorado and work in the beets. the train left at 5:10pm On the train were a lot of soldiers returning from the Philippines. June 28--The sun rose before we entered the Canyon of the grand so we enjoyed the rugged mountain scenery. Arrived at Loma, Colorado, earl in the morning. Ate breakfast and walked about two miles to work. Jun 30--We had pictures taken in front of the cook house. Some boys and i walked to Fruita about eight miles away. Returned, but too late for supper. By the beginning of the year 1902, I had acquired as many as 30 books for my personal library. Junius Hayes, King Driggs and I had organized a small group we called "Young Folks Literary Class" in which we were now studying the Conquest of Peru. Jan 1--After doing my chores which consisted in milking two cows, going to the depot with milk and watering the cows and horses, Junius, King and I started for the lake with our skates. The ice was fine and we were undecided whether to skate over to Pelican Point or to the American Fork Lake resort. The other boys went to the latter place but Junius and I remained at Geneva and skated around observing the various beautiful formations in the ice. Chased some blue cranes. Returned home. In the evening I read a few chapters in the "California and Oregan Trail". During the past year I had added to my library: 19. Swiss Family Robinson; 20. History of the Church; 21. Ready Reference; 22. Battles for the Union; 23. Webster's Dictionary; 24. History of the United States; 25. Conquest of Peru; 26. Encyclopedia Britanica; 27. The Deerslayer; 28. The Last of the Mohicans; 29. The Pioneers; 30. The Prairie. Jan 2--Mother and Edwin arrived home from Hinckley where they had spent Christmas. Josephine sent me a tie and a shirt. Jan 3--Edwin and I chopped wood and then went skating. In the evening I went up to Junius' and studied the "Conquest of Peru". Jan 4-- Chopped wood and went skating down in the fields. Attended the Young Folks Literary Class meeting. Jan 5--Attended S.S. and Fast meeting. Charles and Lucy's baby was named Emma Rhoda. Dense fog all day. Went to Priesthood meeting and repeated the blessing on the water. Fog continued all day. Jan 6--School. Went to deacons meeting and repeated the blessing on the water. Fog continued all day. Jan 7--Went tot school as usual and Mutual in the evening. Jan 8--Attended Religion class Jan 9--Attended a special meeting called by the Bishopric fo the purpose of calling a lot of us boys to act as ward teachers. Jan 11--Went to a lecture by Mrs. Margaret Barry on Physical Culture and Expression. --"In reading make the words your own. Think of, and picture the characters and then paint the picture with the voice. In correct poise the ears, shoulders, hips and ankles should be in a straight line with each other". In the evening I attended a recital given by her. Cut wood. Jan 12--Attended S. S. meeting and conjoint. the Amateur Artists met at W.K.D. We had organized some three weeks before for the purpose of studying art. Jan 13--Went to Y.F.L.C. where we were studying the "Conquest of Peru" New officers were elected Jan 15--Finished reading the "Last of the Mohicans". Attended Religion Class. Jan 16--Went to teachers meeting in the evening where I was ordained by Bro. Alex Bullock and Christian Nielson, the latter being mouth. Bro. Fredrick Thorne and I were assigned as partners. Jan 18--Cut wood, studied. Received a letter from Leona containing an Indian arrow head that was found in the Ruby Range, Nev Jan 19--After Sunday School I spent part of the afternoon up to W.K.D. Read the "Life of Wm. Hogarth". Attended a lecture by Prof. Allen and Stewart of the U of U. Jan 20--Went tot he Y.F.L.C.and gave the Class Prognostication. Jan 23--After school Junius and i went for a walk up to the mouth of Battlecreek Canyon. In the evening I went out teaching with Bro. Thorne. Though I didn't have much to say I enjoyed our visits very much. Jan 24--it snowed about two inches. Jan 25--It being very cold and snowing I spend the day indoors. Drew a picture of an elephant and its young. Jan. 26 --The Amateur Artists met at our place. We did some sketching. Jan. 27--Went to Y.F.L.C. Jan. 28--In Mutual I gave the topic, "One blind from birth". Jan 29--Gave a topic in Religion Class Jan 30--Went to teachers meeting. Jan 31--We learned that Bro. Coombs had been offered the position as principal of the Lincoln School in Salt Lake City and that he would leave us in a week. he was a very good teacher and we all hated to lose him. Feb. 2--Went to S.S. The Amateur Artists club was dissolved on account of a disagreement between Junius and Donald and King and I. Attended Fast Meeting and Priesthood Meeting in the evening. Elder Christensen spoke of his experience among the Indians. Feb. 3--Copied my Patriarchal Blessing. called at Clarence Jacob's and Gertrude Brown's to get their essays for the Contributor. Attended the Y.F.L.C. Feb 6--Went to a party in Beers Hall in honor of Bro. Cooms. Feb 8-- Sawed wood. Y.F.L.C. was held at our place. Feb 9-- S.S. as usual. Received "The Sketch Book" and "How to Draw and Paint" that I had sent for. Feb 10--O.K. Nielson took Bro. Coombs place as principal of the school. Attended the organization of the teachers quorum. Began reading "Oscar of Africa". Feb. 11--Finished reading it. I had read "Two Ways of Becoming a Hunter" and "Camp in the Foothills" by the same author, H. Castlemon, and I thought them to be an interesting set of books.

Martin Wilford Poulson Life Story

Contributor: SouthPawPhilly Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Compiled from his diary, written when he was a young man, and from histories written by his daughters. (Taken from Poulson Genealogy Book in possession of Scott Soulier from Martin Wilford Poulson.) Martin Wilford Poulson was born November 21, 1884 at 8 a.m. in Pleasant Grove, Utah, the first child to be born to Niels and Maria W. Poulson after they moved to Utah from Sweden. He was given a Patriarchal Blessing in November, l886 by a Swedish- born Patriarch who lived in Hyrum, Cache County. Later in his life he wrote: "I copied it in my boyhood diary and was influenced for good by reading it occasionally." His own diary tells of the events of his early life and the beginnings of his lifelong friendships and his love of books. At one time he wrote: "Junius J. Hayes became my playmate at least as early as 1896 and was my best chum and close friend for more than 50 years. I was very fortunate to have him and other excellent friends during my youth. My diary for 1900 and on includes mentions of enjoyable trips with Junius, Othello Clark, William King Driggs, Donald Noble, and others when we went fishing, boating, canyon and mountain climbing, etc. How lucky I was to have so many chums who helped make my boyhood days both valuable and very happy. Also my school and church teachers were very good. The home training of my parents was excellent. My sister and brothers, by their good examples radiated excellent influence." His interest in books and reading was awakened at an early age by his Sunday School and school teachers, who gave him books for perfect attendance and other achievements and family members who gave him books for birthdays. When he or Junius Hayes had any money to spend they would walk to American Fork and browse through the books for sale. This was the beginning of a lifelong habit. DIARY OF MARTIN WILFORD POULSON Copied from his own beautifully hand written record. 1884 - I was born on the twenty-first of November in the year of our Lord, 1884, at Pleasant Grove, Utah. It was on Friday morning at 8:30 o'clock. 1885 -Thursday, February 5, 1885 - I was blessed and given the name of Martin Wilford Poulson by Canute Swenson. (John Brown)? Mother said she named me after her, that is our initials were to be the same. She hoped that I would keep my name as clear as she had hers. 1886 - In November of this year I had my patriarchal blessing. It is as follows: A PATRIARCHAL BLESSING Given by O. N. Lillienquist upon the head of Martin Wilford Poulson, son of Niels Poulson and Maria Wahlstrom, born Nov. 21, 1884 at Pleasant Grove, Utah. "Martin Wilford in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, I place my hands upon your head and seal upon you a patriarchal blessing, with Abraham's, Isaac’s and Jacob's blessings, that they may rest upon you from your childhood, that you may be saved from all the evils that are in this world and grow up under the influence of the Holy Ghost; and under the protection of His Holy Angels; and embrace the holy Gospel with the holy Melchezedek Priesthood in full, and bear your testimony of Jesus and be a mighty man of God; and work in the Lord's vineyard, and bring many souls to our Lord and be a blessing to thousands of both the living and the dead, and stand as a Savior on Mount Zion. I seal upon you the Gift of Faith that you may have power over sin, sickness, pestilence, and death. I seal upon you the Gift of Healing the sick. You are of Ephriam, the heir to the Holy Priesthood, with all the blessings belonging to the new and everlasting covenant. You shall be blest all your days on earth spiritual and temporal; have deal in the first resurrection and the thousand years of glory and be crowned with the crown of Life. All these blessings I seal upon you with the power of my calling; through your faithfulness; and seal upon you Eternal Life in the name of Jesus. Amen May the Lord help me to remain faithful to the end, that I may be worthy of these blessings. 1886 - December 1, I was with my parents in Logan Temple and was sealed to them for time and eternity. 1887 – 1890 - Got into mischief and came very near setting the place on fire several times because of my being so fond of meddling with matches. I also came near drowning when I was about three or four years old. I fell in the ditch just ahead of a dam and mother heard me gasp for breath while she was down the cellar and came out in time to pull me out. I also remember a trip I took with Josephine up to Cache Valley and tipping her table of dishes over while staying at Draper. 1890-1896 1890 - Began going to Sunday School. Ole Anderson was my first teacher. Aug.3 received my first S.S. reward for regular attendance. Nettie Robinson was my first teacher in the day school. 1892 - Went on a trip with mother and Edwin to see Josephine in Rockville, Washington County, Utah. 1893 - April 3 - Was baptized by Jacob Carlson and confirmed a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by Fredrick Richards. 1896 - Dec. 18 - Paid 25 cents tithing. Junius Hayes was my playmate and we were always making little toy ships and going for strolls down to the lake or over to the foothills. 1897-1898 1897 - June 4 - Was promoted to the fifth grade. School began in September and Henry Jeppson was my teacher. I liked him better than any other teacher I had ever had. The Spanish American War caused Junius and I to take a deep interest in battleships etc. and we made mimic torpedo boats and planned all kinds of ships, cannons etc. as well as a little lake where we could have our sport. Was always drawing pictures. Nov. 21. Sister gave me a story book. 1898 - Jan. 9 - It happened that both June and I got the same kind of book "Sunny Hours" as rewards for regular attendance at Sunday School. We were then rivals as to who could read his book through first and indeed such a lively interest in books was thereby aroused that we began to rival each other in seeing who could accumulate the most books by Xmas. My school teacher (Henry Jeppson) presented me with "Nicholas Nickelby" for regular attendance. Mother gave me a Bible. I was promoted to the 6th grade and was presented with "The Pathfinder" by my teacher. Bought a book entitled "Great Americans" for $1.00 and "Church Chronology" for $1.75. Nov. 21 - Mother gave me a Doctrine and Covenants. Dec. 31 - Paid $1.00 tithing. 1899 Jan. 1st – The list of my books were as follow. No. 1 - Sunny Hours No. 2 - Nicholas Nickelby No. 3 - Holy Bible No. 4 - The Pathfinder No. 5 - Great Americans No. 6 - Church Chronology No. 7 – Doctrine and Covenants No. 8 – Robinson Crusoe -Got "Uncle Tom's Cabin" as a Sunday School reward and immediately began reading it. Apr. 14 - Was promoted to the 7th grade. June 11 - Having enlisted with a lot of other boys to go to Grand Junction, Colo. to thin sugar beets I boarded the train at Lehi about nine o'clock in the morning. Crossed a large dry desert country, went through the canyon of the Grand. I enjoyed the trip very much. Was surprised to find Grand Jct. to be quite a large city. The next day we began to work. July 2 - Went to Sunday School of different churches about 10 miles north of Grand Jct. Walked in to Grand Jct. to get mail. Took a trip to the Grand and Gunnison Rivers and gathered a few stone specimens to take home. The river bridge was 305 steps across. Bought some views and scenes near Grand Jct. and a book called "Uncle Sam's Ships." This is my 11th book. July 19 - Returned home having earned over twenty dollars. Dec. - Began reading "The Pathfinder." Dec. 31 - Paid $3.00 tithing. 1900 Jan. 2 - Went to school renewing my efforts to get an education. Went to a show. Jan. 7 - At Sunday School I was awarded "Black Beauty" for regular attendance. Fasted. Went to sacrament meeting and conjoint. Jan. 13 - Finished reading "The Pathfinder." Jan. 21 - In the afternoon I drew a picture of King Oscar of Sweden. Feb. 12 - Went to a show (Santiago) given by the Home Dramatic Company. Enjoyed it better than any I have ever seen. Mar. 1 - Bought a book called "The Twentieth Century Speaker" for $1.75. Mar. 11 - Went to Sunday School as usual, also an entertainment given for the benefit of Jas. Fugal and Jas. Thorne who were going on missions. Contributed 25 cents. Mar. 20 - Weighed 99 pounds and measured five feet one inch. Apr. 7 - Began reading "Uncle Sam's Ships." Apr. 15 - Othello Clark and I rode bicycles to the mouth of American Fork Canyon and back. Had a fine time. Apr. 16 - Mother went to Hinckley to visit Josephine. Apr. 28 - Helped plant potatoes. Apr. 29 - Attended a lecture by Judge Powers on "The Old Fashioned Women." May 9 - Donated 10 cents to the Scofield relief fund. May 14 - Went to a show (Nashville Students.) May 15 - Went over to Lehi to get a job. May 17 - Promoted to the 7th grade A. May 18 - Went up Battle Creek Canyon with the school. Helped with the farm at night. May 19 - Was hurt in a run away over at the Lehi Jct. May 26 - Edwin, Don and I went down to the lake. We fished a while and then had a fine time rowing and swimming. May 28 - Mother came home from Hinckley and brought me a silk handkerchief, a memorandum and a collar. Went over to Lehi to begin work for Charley Karren for 50 cents per day and board. Earned a ticket and went to a show. June 3 - Went to S.S. and also out to Otto's. Father took me back to Lehi, June 9 - Mr. Karren paid me $2.00 and as I was walking home I bought "The Battles for Independence" in American Fork. June 10 - Went to S.S. Returned to Lehi and read in "Uncle Sam's Ships." June 16 - Mr. Karren paid me $2.00 and I quit work to help father. Bought a suit of clothes for $5.00. June 17 - S.S. as usual. Began reading "Battles for Independence." June 19 - Had a good time at S.S. celebration and dance in the evening. June 25 - Earned 40 cents picking cherries for Dan Smith July 4 - Went over to Saratoga Springs and had a fine time. Went boating and bathing. July 24 - Went over to American Fork Lake Resort and had a fine time. Spent 45 cents. Helped get the hay up Aug. 6 - Went out to Otto's to do chores while he and Emma went to S.L.C. Aug. 7 - 8 - Read in the Book of Mormon. Aug. 10 - Otto came home. Went swimming in Provo River. Aug. 14 - Went to circus. Spent 60 cents. Aug. 21 - Picked peaches. Father and I started for Salt Lake City to peddle. Aug. 27 - Threshed. Sept. 10 - Began school. Sept. 25 - Began reading "True Manhood." Oct. 9 - Bought "Modern Europe" for 65 cents. Nov. - Attended the Religion Class that was just being started. Nov. 21 - Mother gave me a Book of Mormon and Josephine gave me a dollar. Read the book of "Titus: A comrad of the Cross," It was fine. Dec. 7 - Paid $1.05 tithing. Dec. 10 - Mother left for Nevada on a visit to Ludwig, Dec. 15 - Bought "Benefactors of the World," with the dollar Josephine gave me on my birthday. 1901 Jan. 1 - Junius and I sat up and to pass the time we began talking of the benefits of club or association of us boys wherein we could pursue such special studies as we desired such as literature, nature, drawing, etc. Accordingly we organized the Knowledge Seekers Club (K.S.C.) of which I was chosen to be the first president. My library has been increased with: 12. Black Beauty; 13. The Twentieth Century Speaker; 14. Battles for Independence; 15. Modern Europe; 16. Book of Mormon; 17. History of England; 18. Benefactors of the World. Jan. 3 - Finished reading "True Manhood." Went to a S.S. Juvenile Dance. Jan. 6 - In Sunday School I was presented with "Swiss Family Robinson" for regular attendance. In Conjoint the minutes of July 5, 1877 were read and also the first "Advocate" dated June 7, 1877. A historical sketch of the M.I.A. in Pleasant Grove was given. Andrew Jensen, the first President of the M.I.A. of P.G. made some fine remarks emphasizing the importance of keeping a record. Jan. 13 - Sunday School. Spent evening at Donald Nobles. Jan. 14 - Went to the K.S.C. and gave the lesson on Rocks and Stones. Jan. 15 - Bought "American Neighbors." Went to a M.I.A. dance. Jan. 16 - Attended Religion Class and M.I.A. meetings. Jas. L. Brown gave an interesting talk on his visit to Kirtland Temple. Jan. 18 - Wrote a sketch of the Life of Benjamin Franklin. Jan. 19 - Had a good time in the hills with Donald. Jan. 21 - Went to the K.S.C. and read its little paper called the "Benefactor." Jan. 23 - In Mutual I gave the topic on the life of David W. Patten. Jan. 26 - Junius, Donald and I went for a trip up Grove Creek Canyon. Had a hard climb to the top of the Little Mt. in the snow up to our waists. Got home at five o'clock. Mother got back from Nevada. Jan. 27 - S.S. In the morning I attended a lecture on Palestine or The Holy Land by Apostle A. H. Lund, Jan. 30 - Went to Religion Class and Mutual. Sister Walker told of her experiences at the Haun's Mill Massacre. Feb. 2-8 - Made a little cupboard for my books. Feb. 13 - Went to Charles and Lucy's wedding. Was badly hurt on my knees and elbow by falling over some boards. Feb. 19 - In Mutual Howard Driggs read a statement by Bro. J. S. Gleason regarding the Destruction of the Nauvoo Expositor. I borrowed and copied it. Feb. 23 - Attended Deacons meeting. Feb. 26 - In Young Men's meeting. Orlando Herron gave an interesting account of the Battle of Nauvoo. Mar. 3 - After Sunday School King Driggs and I went to the Reorganite S.S. and the Presbyterian S.S. and meeting. Mar. 5 - In Y.M.M.I.A. I gave the topic on Winter Quarters. We also heard a statement of Geo. Clark of the Mormon Battalion. Mar. 6 - Wrote a piece entitled, "Knowledge" for the club which was now known as the "Boys Industrial Club." Mar. 18 - Began school with John H. Coombs as teacher. Mar. 19 - Went to Religion Class. In Mutual Bro. Henson Walker spoke on his experiences as a pioneer. Apr. - Some other boys and I went fishing at Provo River and had an enjoyable time. May 23 - School went up to Battlecreek canyon. June 23 - Attended a lecture by Judge Alfred Saxey who told of his experiences in the Civil War. June 27 - Went over to Lehi and got a chance to go to Colorado and work in the beets. The train left at 5:10 p.m. On the train were a lot of soldiers returning from the Philippines. June 28 - The sun rose before we entered the Canyon of the Grand so we enjoyed the rugged mountain scenery. Arrived at Loma, Colorado, early in the morning. Ate breakfast and walked about two miles to work. June 30 - We had pictures taken in front of the cook house. Some boys and I walked to Fruita about eight miles away. Returned, but too late for supper. 1902 By the beginning of the year 1902, I had acquired as many as 30 books for my personal library. Junius Hayes, King Driggs and I had organized a small group we called "Amateur Artists" and we also belonged to a group we called "Young Folks Literary Class"(Y.F.L.C.) in which we were now studying the Conquest of Peru. Jan. 1 - After doing my chores which consisted in milking two cows, going to the depot with milk and watering the cows and horses, Junius, King and I started for the lake with our skates. The ice was fine and we were undecided whether to skate over to Pelican Point or to the American Fork Lake resort. The other boys went to the latter place but Junius and I remained at Geneva and skated around observing the various beautiful formations in the ice. Chased some blue cranes. Returned home. In the evening I read a few chapters in the "California and Oregon Trail." During the past year I had added to my library: 19. Swiss Family Robinson; 20. History of the Church; 21. Ready Reference; 22. Battles for the Union; 23. Webster's Dictionary; 24. History of the United States; 25. Conquest of Peru; 26. Encyclopedia Britannica; 27. The Deerslayer; 28. The Last of the Mohicans; 29, The Pioneers; 30. The Prairie. Jan. 2 - Mother and Edwin arrived home from Hinckley where they had spent Christmas. Josephine sent me a tie and a shirt. Jan. 3 - Edwin and I chopped wood and then went skating. In the evening I went up to Junius' and studied the "Conquest of Peru." Jan. 4 - Chopped wood and went skating down in the fields. Attended the Young Folks Literary Class meeting. Jan. 5 - Attended S.S. and Fast meeting. Charles and Lucy's baby was named Emma Rhoda. Dense fog all day. Went to Priesthood meeting and repeated the blessing on the water. Fog continued all day. Jan. 6 - School. Went to deacons meeting and repeated the blessing on the water. Fog continued all day. Jan. 7 - Went to school as usual and Mutual in the evening. Jan. 8 - Attended Religion Class. Jan. 9 - Attended a special meeting called by the Bishopric for the purpose of calling a lot of us boys to act as ward teachers. Jan. 11 - Went to a lecture by Mrs. Margaret Barry on Physical Culture and Expression.-"In reading make the words your own, Think of, and picture the characters and then paint the picture with the voice. In correct poise the ears, shoulders, hips and ankles should be in a straight line with each other." In the evening I attended a recital given by her. Cut wood. Jan. 12 - Attended S.S. meeting and conjoint. The Amateur Artists met at W.K.D. (William King Driggs?) We had organized some three weeks before for the purpose of studying art. Jan. 13 - Went to Y.F.L.C. where we were studying the "Conquest of Peru." New officers were elected. Jan. 15 - Finished reading the "Last of the Mohicans." Attended Religion Class. Jan. 16 - Went to teachers meeting in the evening where I was ordained by Bro. Alex Bullock and Christian Nielson, the latter being mouth, Bro. Frederick Thorne and I were assigned as partners. Jan. 18 - Cut wood, studied. Received a letter from Leona containing an Indian arrow head that was found in the Ruby Range, Nev. Jan. 19 - After Sunday School I spent part of the afternoon up to W.K.D. Read the "Life of Wm. Hogarth." Attended a lecture by Prof. Allen and Stewart of the U. of U. Jan. 20 - Went to the Y.F.L.C. and gave the Class Prognostication. Jan. 23 - After school Junius and I went for a walk up to the mouth of Battlecreek canyon. In the evening I went out teaching with Bro. Thorne. Though I didn't have much to say I enjoyed our visits very much. Jan, 24 - It snowed about two inches. Jan. 25 - It being very cold and snowing I spent the day indoors. Drew a picture of an elephant and its young. Jan. 26 - The Amateur Artists met at our place. We did some sketching. Jan. 27 - Went to Y.F.L.C. Jan. 28 - In Mutual I gave the topic, "One Blind from Birth." Jan. 29 - Gave a topic in Religion Class. Jan. 30 - Went to teachers meeting. Jan. 31 - We learned that Bro. Coombs had been offered the position as principal of the Lincoln School in Salt Lake City and that he would leave us in a week. He was a very good teacher and we all hated to lose him. Feb. 2 - Went to S.S. The Amateur Artists club was dissolved on account of a disagreement between Junius and Donald and King and I. Attended Fast Meeting and Priesthood meeting in the evening. Elder Christensen spoke of his experiences among the Indians. Feb. 3 - Copied my Patriarchal Blessing. Called at Clarence Jacobs' and Gertrude Brown's to get their essays for the Contributor. Attended the Y.F.L.C. Feb. 6 - Went to a party in Beers Hall in honor of Bro. Coombs. Feb. 8 - Sawed wood. Y.F.L.C. was held at our place. Feb. 9 - S.S. as usual. Received "The Sketch Book" and "How to Draw and Paint" that I had sent for. Feb. 10 - N. K. Nielson took Bro. Coombs place as principal of the school. Attended the organization of the teachers’ quorum. Began reading "Oscar of Africa." Feb. 11 - Finished reading it. I had read "Two Ways of Becoming a Hunter" and "Camp in the Foothills" by the same author, H. Castleman, and I thought them to be an interesting set of books. Feb. 13 - Bro. Henson Walker, one of the original Pioneers gave us a talk at school on his experiences. We were studying Bancroft's History of Utah. Went teaching in the evening. Feb. 14 - Was out serenading until after eleven o'clock. Feb. 15 - Junius and I went on horseback to the west mountains to look for a good place to get cedar posts. Feb. 16 - Attended S.S. and M.I.A. conference in the afternoon and evening. Feb. 18 - School. Attended mutual. Feb. 19 - School. Attended Religion Class. Feb. 20 - Had a toothache as a result of cutting my wisdom teeth. Feb. 22 - Studied. Read in The Pioneers. Our class met Mr. Coombs in the District School Office. He explained to us several things that would be required for graduation. Y.F.L.C. Feb. 23 - S.S. It being Mercy Sunday, appropriate exercises were held. Went to a lecture of Central America, by Prof. Wolfe of the B.Y.A. Expedition. Feb. 24 - Attended teachers’ meeting. Feb. 26 - Went to a lecture on "Character Building and Secret Vices" by Dr. Miller. SUMMARY OF THE PAST TWO MONTHS The past two months have been mild and attended with but little snow. Measles have prevailed and caused several deaths in P.G. I have read "The Oregon Trail," "Last of the Mohicans," "Oscar in Africa," and "The Pioneers." My library has increased by two volumes. The Amateur Art Class was organized and dissolved. The Y.P.L.C. made fair headway and girl members were admitted. The teachers’ quorum was organized. Mr. Coombs left for S.L.C. At school we studied Bancroft's History of Utah. Mar. 1 - Cut wood. Attended Y.F.L.C. Began reading the "Cabin in the Clearing" by E. S. Ellis. Mar. 2 - Went to S.S. and it being fast day I bore my testimony. Mar. 4 - School as usual. Attended Mutual and finished reading, "Cabin in the Clearing." Mar. 7 - Began reading, "Battles for the Union." Mar. 8 - Worked cleaning the yard etc. Got my lessons. Went to Y.F.L.C. Mar. 9 - S.S. Read in Irving's Sketch book. Went to conjoint meeting. Mar. 11 - School was discontinued on account of diphtheria being in town. Junius, Don and I went down to the lake to launch our boat. Waded in the water near waist deep but a wind came up and we were glad to go ashore and dry ourselves. After fishing a little while we went home. Slept up to King Driggs. We had a very good time reading various humorous selections. Read nearly all of Julius Caesar. Mar. 12 - Did various odd jobs around home. Helped smoke meat. Began reading "Prairie." Mar. 14 - Smoked meat. Slept with Junius. Finished reading Julius Caesar. Mar. 15 - Snow. It being cold, I spent the day reading. Attended Y.F.L.C. Mar. 17 - School began again. Mar. 18 - Walked over to American Fork with Junius while he bought some books. Mar. 20 - At school Henson Walker and Wm. Adams lectured on their experiences in The Black Hawk War. Mar. 22 - Worked up on the farm. Marked three acres of lucerne. Went to Y.F.L.C. Had a bad cold. Mar. 24 - Mr. Howes lectured at school on his experiences in The Civil War. He spoke of army life and tactics of the Confederates. He was taken prisoner at Gettysburg and spoke unfavorably of the Federal Prisons. Went to teachers’ meeting. Mar. 25 - Had a bad cold so I stayed home from school. Spent the day reading. Mar. 29 - Did odd jobs about home while father and Edwin were on the bench. Went to Y.F.L.C. Mar. 30 - S.S. Appropriate Easter exercises. McGee Bullock who had just returned from a mission to Georgia addressed the school. Apr. 1 - Attended Mutual. It was the last meeting to be held this season. Apr. 3 - Got "The Seven American Classics" and began reading it. Bro. Coombs visited our school and had a private interview with all the candidates for graduation. Apr. 5 - Went out to Otto's and helped plant strawberries. Went to Y.F.L.C. and was elected President. Apr. 6 - Sunday School. Finished reading "The American Classics." Apr. 7 - Attended teachers’ meeting. Apr. 10 - Finished reading "Battles for the Union." Read a biography of James F. Cooper. Apr. 11 - Finished reading "The Prairie" Apr. 12 - Went to school in the forenoon to take a review for James H. Coombs, Worked making a fence in the afternoon. Apr. 19 - Planted a hedge. Went up to Clarence Jacobs where the Y.F.L.C. was to be held but through a misunderstanding it was decided to not hold a meeting on account of so many being absent. Apr. 20 - S.S. Spent the afternoon with Ira Jensen. Traded outdoor games for 2 old coins Apr. 22 - School. Got my pay from Noble for my share of the destroyed boat. Had a scrap with Othello Clark over a misunderstanding and a rashness on his part. I got a black eye. Mother went up to Clark's with me and we finally became reconciled, Apr. 24 - Ella Larson gave the Eighth grade a lesson in Drawing and Painting. I enjoyed the lesson very much. Apr. 26 - At school Mr. Coombs reviewed us in Arithmetic. Ella Larsen gave us another lesson in art. Went to Y.F.L.C. Was editor of the Contributor, having as my editorial a piece called The Canyon of the Grand. Apr. 27 - S.S. As Junius was going to leave for the sheep herd in the morning, I spent the afternoon with him and slept there over night. Gave him 45 cents for 4 old coins. Apr. 30 - Finished reading "Vacation Studies for Young Naturalists." May 1 - Went up to Gertrude Brown's but there was no Y.F.L.C. May 3 - At school we had exams in nearly all the subjects. May 4 - At S.S. I bore my testimony. Andrew Jensen spoke in meeting on the Divinity of the Book of Mormon, May 6 - The 8th grade went sketching. I sketched the mill and White's house. I enjoyed it very much. May 8 - Miss Larsen gave us a lesson on the Pertiary colors. She gave me considerable encouragement and offered to assist me in drawing during the summer. May 10 - The eighth grade took their final exam, in drawing, domestic science, literature. Father sold the farm for $900.00. May 11 - Went over to Am. Fork and took the State exams in Arithmetic, Grammar, Geography, History, and Spelling. Miss Daisy Nelson gave four of us boys our dinner. May 19 - We had school in the forenoon. Got our programs and also had a meeting to arrange for a surprise on N.K.N. Went down to Ira's and then came home and played ball. May 20 - We met at school again in the forenoon to settle some difficulties with regard to the exam. I received a letter Bro. Coombs saying that I had passed the exam #2. I had received next to the highest grade. We selected a rocking chair as a present for Bro. Nielson and in the evening we gave him a surprise party. May 22 - In the evening our graduating class program was successfully rendered in the meeting house, Afterwards we were banqueted by the seventh grade in the Opera House. Many were the hearty congratulations we all received. The only break in the proceedings was when Othello Clark, our class orator, took a fit in the hall. About ten o'clock we went home and retired knowing that there would be more excitement on the morrow. May 23 - Ira Jensen and I rode over to Lehi in a buggy together and went up to the city park where the commencement exercises were to be held. After we got our badges we entered the pavilion in a body. A fine program was rendered. Prof. E. S. Hinckley and R. Lyman delivered encouraging addresses. All the graduates ate their dinner together (lunches) in the grove. In the afternoon the north end of the Co. played baseball against the south end. Alvin C. and Clarence C. made good points for our side. We beat 6-2. Walked around the city with some of my class mates. We all put in together and bought a bouquet of flowers for Othello who wasn't able to attend. About ten o'clock we started home feeling happy and gay. May 25 - At S.S. I helped pass the sacrament. Mother and father had gone on a visit to a friend in Salt Lake Co. King Driggs came down and we went sketching. I went to an outdoor meeting held by six sheep wagon preachers whose chief hope seemed to be based on nothing but. Jno. 3:16. Some of our elders tried to show them the necessity for work as well as faith but whenever they lost a point they would get angry. Otto came down to see father but he was not home. May 26 - Finished reading "Modern Europe." May 27 - Did odd jobs. Finished reading "Black Beauty." Mother and father came home, having got me a job in Holliday at $22.50 per month. May 28 - Got ready to leave for Holliday in the morning (Thursday). Helped shoe the horses; went up to King's and had a talk with him. May 29 - Father took me in the buggy to Holliday to work on a farm, and I was introduced to my new boss, Mr. Boyce. After dinner I began hoeing beets. The job was mainly weeding and thinning beets, hoeing strawberries, doing chores, harvesting hay, and irrigating. I learned a good deal living with this family. The job lasted until about the middle of August. May 30 - Got up at 5 o'clock and did chores. Fed pig, cut wood, and milked cow. Began work in the beets. Mr. Boyce went to town in the forenoon. May 31 - Got more acquainted. South wind all day. Had some strawberries. Boss criticized my not hoeing out all the weeds. June 1 - Fasted. At S.S. I visited the Theology class. In the afternoon I read in "The Sketchbook." Went over to Jensens and also down to Oliver's and had a talk with him. June 2 - Hoed 5/8 of an acre of beets. June 4 - Worked as usual. In the evening Mr. Boyce treated us all to some ice cream. June 5 - Hoed beets for two girls to thin. It made me scratch to keep them going as they wanted them almost thinned. June 6 - Artillery from Ft. Douglas went past on their way to Cottonwood canyon. In the afternoon I hoed strawberries. Boss criticized me for not loosening up the ground enough. June 7 - Soldiers return for their rusticating trip. Hoed strawberries. Went after a jug of hay and then went swimming in Cottonwood creek. June 8 - Didn't go to church. Began reading the Bible. Bert Jensen came over after me to go down and help watch their strawberries. Had all I could eat. Went swimming. June 9 - Loaded oats. Ran the hand cultivator for Will Stout in his onions. July 13 - I had received word that Josephine had come home for a visit and as I also wanted to see Otto before he left for his mission, I got permission from Mr. Boyce to go home for a few days. Got up at five o'clock and hoed beets until 3 o'clock in the afternoon. Then I got ready and George took me in the buggy to the Point of the mountain and then I walked to Lehi Jct. where I took the train for Pleasant Grove. July 14 - Walked around the place noting the changes. Had a chat with Junius and went swimming. Met Josephine about seven o'clock. Gave Otto ten dollars to help him on his mission. July 15 - Went to S.S. Had a discussion with Zemira and Otto on some Bible questions. July 16 - Tended Otto Draper. Went up town and saw a woman hypnotized. Left for Holliday at 5 o'clock with Bro. Peterson. Camped at Dry Creek. July 17 - Arrived at Murray at 4:00 o'clock in the morning. Walked up to Holliday. When I got to the farm it was still quite early and as I was very sleepy I laid down in the lucerne on a little knoll and went to sleep. I was suddenly awakened by the noise of the mower. I got up just in time to get out of the way. Worked until about four o'clock when I gave out and as I also had a toothache I went to the house. July 18 - Finished second hoeing. Toothache. July 19 - Began pulling weeds out of the beets. Still had the toothache, July 20 - Had some ripe apricots. July 21 - Watered oats in the afternoon. Had a fine swim. My chest began to feel sore. July 22 - Felt quite sick with head and stomach ache as well as my lungs being sore. July 23 - Was ill nearly all day. Ordered some stereopticon views. July 24 - Helped wash. Weeded beets. Bought a box of Cymro Salve. Got a letter from Junius and wrote one to the folks. July 28 - Finished reading Exodus. Went up to Burkes and had some ripe peaches. Read in the Improvement Era. I continued to work for Mr. Boyce until about the middle or latter part of August when I quit work in order to make preparations to attend school. I think I had fully satisfied my employer for when father came to take me home he paid me $25.00 per month instead of $22.50 as he had agreed. Aug. 19 - Junius Hayes, my most intimate and favorite boyhood chum, and I had long anticipated an outing trip together when we could spend several days hunting, fishing, sketching and conversing together. At last we saw the opportunity and after considerable planning finally decided to scale Mt. Timpanogos, Utah's grandest mountain. The evening before the day set, brought us several disappointments so that we were unable to get a horse to carry our provisions etc. and other minor things caused us to alter our plans so that we would only be able to be away one day. We slept on the lawn so as to catch the first gleam of morning light. At 3:00 o'clock we arose, ate breakfast and in less than an hour we started on our trip as happy as if we were about to ascend some noted peak in the Alps. When we got near the mouth of Battlecreek Canyon we could see what appeared to be a haystack on fire out on Provo Bench. We watched the constant change of clouds and also admired the silvery lake below as it shone in the beautiful moonlight. We soon reached the camp where J. L. Brown and family were spending the hot summer. At the falls we stopped and fired the gun and as we stood listening to echoes slowly die and become blended with the steady rumble of the water falling over that mighty ledge, our souls became filled with awe and admiration of the mighty works of nature and we almost forgot the real purpose of our trip. At the springs we took a last drink and then started up the Ball Mt. As we ascended through the brush I was often reminded of certain descriptions in Cooper's "Leather- stocking Tales" When we got to the quaken asp grove we stopped and cut our initials in a tree, Then we climbed up a little knoll and Junius set fire to a large balsam tree to show me a sample of the fires he used to make out on the reservation. Continuing through the grove we finally reached the summit of the mountain at 8:30 o'clock. Here we found two monuments built of stones. We took their measurements which are as follows: North monument 7' 8" high and 11' 4" in circumference, South monument about a block from the other one, 6' 3" high and 10' 6" around. Then we followed the divide toward Mt. Timpanogos. At a little flat we stopped and ate a light lunch, after which we descended a short distance into the ravine (continuation of Rock Canyon) which we had chosen as the best route to gain the highest peak on the mountain which by now seemed to be but a few blocks away. As we were climbing up over the ledges we saw some little chipmunks which until we had shot one and examined it at close range it appeared to be a species of red Squirrel such as we had read of. On we climbed, over ledges, gravel slides and barren cliffs until but very few signs of vegetation could be seen above us. At last we came to a great ledge or cliff about 60 feet high which seemed to dispute our right to ascend further. It was wet and slippery and a short moss grew in the crevices. We consulted as to what would be the best thing to do and as a result I left my little load of things with Junius below and climbed carefully to the top in order to see over it and determined which would be the best place to climb it. Here I saw that the top of the cliff was the lower edge of a great slide of rocks and gravel. Accidentally I tried a boulder that lay balanced on the edge and it went bounding down straight toward my friend below. Striking a rock about a rod ahead of him it glanced so that it missed him only a yard or two. We were both white with fear. I descended and then we both climbed over the barrier at a more safe place some distance to our right. On a ledge about 150 yards from the top we stopped to rest and recover from our nerve-straining experience. Below us lay the beautiful valley with Utah Lake nestling close up to the foot of the mountain. The fire Junius had kindled seemed to have spread some and great volumes of smoke arose making the pyramid shaped mt. resemble a volcano. To the west we could see six distinct ranges of mountains and we could also see far beyond the mountains to the south. We sat here and made a sketch of this wide scene that stretched before us, We were hungry and thirsty besides the air seemed rather thin and our heads ached so after we had written our names and hid them in a can under some rocks and each fired the gun as if we had been triumphant; we decided to descend and postpone the realization of our hopes until some more favorable time. This was about four o'clock so that it was about sundown when we reached the fire. We were greatly surprised and almost terrified to see the large area it now covered. It was useless to attempt to extinguish it so we hurried down the mountain to the springs where we were refreshed with a cool drink from the springs. It was dusk before we reached Jim Brown's camp and in his hurry Junius had broken a bottle of turpentine which he carried in his hip pocket. It is needless to record that we were tired when we reached home but except for the fire we did not regret the day's experiences. The fire burned brightly for over a week and smoked a fortnight longer. So brightly did it burn that even several nights afterward Junius observed it to cast a distinct shadow from the moon down in town. Aug. 31 - After S.S. Edwin took me over to Provo, where I had rented a room in which to batch while I attended BY Academy, to begin school in the morning. Called at Emma's and saw some souvenirs which Otto had sent home. Also read his missionary blessing. It seemed rather lonesome after Edwin went home leaving me in my little Bachelor's Hall. Had a scrap with the flies but finally I succeeded in getting most of them out. Serenading after I went to bed. Sept. 1 - Got up at 5:40 and at 8:30 I went down to the Academy. Got acquainted with Chas. M. Nokes of Riverton. Registered in the Commercial School and paid my tuition ($46.00). Visited the Library Museum, Gym etc. Met John Hayes and Gertrude and Cynthia Brown. Sept. 2 - Got up at 6:30 and went down to the Academy and at 9:45 attended devotional exercises in College Hall. There was a magnificent painting of Brigham Young the founder of the institution. Got acquainted with Fayette Marshall of Lyman, Wyoming, and was assigned a desk in the Commercial room. Sept. 3 - Got up at 6:00 o'clock. Finished electing my studies: English, Miss Annie Pike; Commercial Arith., Frederick Warnick; Penmanship, Thos. U. Smith; Bookkeeping, J. B. Keeler. Got acquainted with Milton Holdaway and George Bartholomew. Had callers visit me at Bachelor's Hall and was introduced to Muzetta Newsom and Jennie Wall. About two weeks later I received a letter from Box B. calling me to take the missionary course at the B.Y.A. I hated to leave off my other studies but finally in obedience to the call I had my tuition refunded and joined the Missionary Class which was conducted by Orin W. Jarvis. Oct. 8 - Repetition classes were started to be held at 7:45 o'clock every morning. Attended a lecture on the Southern People by Geo. A. Smith. Oct. 9 - Prof. Hughs of Toronto, Canada, gave a fine lecture during the Theology hour in College Hall. His subject was "High Ideals and Aims in Life." He complimented the people of Utah for their broad views and good educational institutions. Oct. 16 - It was Founders Day so I went down to the Academy as early as possible and helped get our class banner ready. Our colors were olive and white, symbolizing purity and peace and our motto was, "Let your Light Shine." We copied down and practiced our yells then marched to our place in the procession that was forming out on the street. Then we marched to the depot and back to the Tabernacle where appropriate services were held. After dinner I went down to the campus and watched the games and athletic contests. Nov. 2 - Saw the Foucalt demonstration to prove the rotary motion of the earth toward the east and that free moving bodies north of the equator are deflected to the right. It was performed by a large pendulum hanging from the ceiling of the Tabernacle. Dec. 4 - Bro. Smart spoke to the Miss. class on his mission to Samoa. Dec. 11 - In our class meeting Bro. Heber Magleby, a member of the B.Y.A. So. Amer. Expedition spoke on his experiences in Mexico and Central America, Dec. 14 - Began reading "Mr. Durant of S.L.C." which I finished on the 17th. 1903 Jan. 8 - Went to classes as usual. Pres. James G. McQuarrie of the Eastern States Mission visited our Dept. and spoke to us. He said that the questions asked in order to determine the value of a missionary are all incentives to high ideals. Some of them are, Is he a good speaker? Writer? Is he humble? Obedient? Energetic? Discrete? Has he a good knowledge of the Gospel? Does he carry a good influence? Jan. 10 - Read in the Book of Mormon. Jan. 11 - Read up to page 160 in the Book of Mormon. Jan. 15 - Some of the prominent actors and actresses of the "Corianton" company visited the school at Devotional and each recited in turn and was loudly applauded. Jan. 16 - Went home. Spent the evening with Junius. Jan. 17 - Wrote to Otto and Leona. Helped kill a pig. Went to Y.F.L.C. after which most of us went to the theatre, "Down in Maine." Jan. 19 - Went to the dentist to get my teeth filled as I had been troubled with a toothache for sometime, Also went the following Wed. and Sat. Jan. 25 - Read in the B. of M. In the Tabernacle spoke on the blessings awaiting those who overcome. "We have enough evil of our own to overcome without criticizing our fellows." In the evening in College Hall, Bro. Townsend spoke on -The Necessity of Cultivating our Imagination." Jan. 26 - Went to the dentist; Teeth still sore. Attended a lecture on Liquid Air. The lecturer had some with him and performed many interesting experiments with it. Feb. 8 - Elder Molten(?) spoke on the effect of persecution in the development of character. "New truth nearly always comes in contact with ancient error." Feb. 13 - Benj. Blake Jr. of St. George whom I had met about a month after I had entered school and who had since about the middle of January shared my bachelor's hall with me, came over to spend Sat. and Sun. Feb. 14 - The weather was very cold. In the evening we attended a lecture in the meeting house by Prof. Marshal of the U. of U. on "Westminister Abbey." Feb. 15 - Went up town to go to S.S. but were surprised to find the meeting house in ashes. Practically nothing had been saved. The loss is estimated at about $7,000.00 which was covered by only $1,000.00 insurance. S.S. was held in the New School House. In the afternoon we had a sleigh ride to Provo. Feb. 20 - Walked home. Feb. 21 - Mother was ill so I did most of the washing. In the evening I attended a Priesthood Meeting in the city hall to decide upon a new site for a meeting house. Apostle Teasdale was present. Mar. 3 - Dr. Christenson finished filling my teeth which cost me $11.00. Mar. 6 - Dr. J. M. Tanner spoke in devotional and also to the Missionary class. Among other things he said we should try to broaden the circle of our acquaintances and not confine ourselves to some certain crowd. He reminded us of how quick we should degenerate if left to ourselves. Going on a mission should cleanse our minds thoroughly from evil and degenerating thoughts. Walked home through the mud. Mother is still somewhat ill. Mar. 7 - Did odd jobs around home. Washed clothes and mopped floor. Attended Y.F.L.C. Appointed judge in a debate. Received word that my brother, Charles, had met with an accident out at Ironton where he was working on the railroad. Mar. 14 - Cleaned up my room and began studying. Then mother came over with provisions. In the evening I went to a lecture by Bro. Magelby on the Maories and Moariland (New Zealand) Samoa and Hawaii. He spoke briefly of the possibility of those islands having been settled by the Nephites (Alma 63:5-10). Mar. 15 - In S.S. by comparison showed how nearly alike the languages of New Zealand, Samoa and Hawaii are and spoke briefly of the specimens which he brought of their fine carving. Their knives, axes, etc., were made of a kind of stone found in the bed of the ocean. It is harder than steel and had a similar ring to it. Two Maori children then addressed the audience in their native tongue. Mar. 27 - Sold tickets and went to a lecture by Ellen M. Stone who was captured by brigands in Turkey and held for a ransom of $100,000.00. She was rather a large lady weighing about 200 lbs. She spoke rather rapidly and was quite modest in mentioning herself. The experiences for which she is noted were related very gracefully and vividly. After the lecture I, among others, had the privilege of shaking hands with her. Apr. 17 - About one o'clock in the afternoon Benj. Blake and I went for a walk down to the lake. When we saw a boat and finding the oars hid in some weeds nearby we decided to take a little row as Ben had never been in a boat before. A slight breeze was blowing just enough to make us enjoy the water and to tempt us farther from shore. The waves became higher and higher and we got nearer and nearer the middle of the lake. We were about three miles from the shore when Ben suggested that we go back as the breeze had now gotten to be almost a wind and the boat was small and unsafe. A few minutes after I had turned the boat toward home, a stiff breeze from the southwest came suddenly upon us and the waves now threatened to upset the boat. We both got excited. Ben tried to help row but we only got into a worse predicament. The boat was turned broadside against the waves and each seemed to be all but successful in tipping us over. I took both oars and tried my best to get the point of the boat against the waves. At this juncture the combined force of wind and wave wrested the left oar from me and we were left in worse circumstances than ever. I knew that my companion could not swim and as a watery grave seemed to be the only alternative it was not long until we were praying aloud for divine aid. At the same time that I prayed earnestly to my Heavenly Father, I used the remaining oar to advantage in keeping the end against the waves, realizing that "Faith without works is dead." After I had tugged away for about an hour I looked back of me to see how far we were from the shore but was disappointed in not being able to see that we had moved at all. The cruel waves were at least ten feet high and the wind blending its hideous whistle with the doleful roar of the water only tended to make us seem more helpless in the hands of these fierce elements. I felt the Lord would help us and I soon could see that we were being carried toward Geneva. Sometimes the waves in front of us would be high and threatening but a prayer seemed to subdue each one before it got to us. The sun was now about 3/4 of an hour high and from a natural way of looking at our situation it would take until midnight before we would reach land. Somehow I was lead to say that we would get in before sundown and from that time it seemed like we were in a current so that our course was changed and we were going straight in toward land. Some force pushed the boat in place of the lost oar so that I could use the one I had with all my might. In this way we went fast and verily did get in to shore to thank our Heavenly Father for his mercy before sundown. We were about 4 miles north of Provo River. We walked home arriving there about 11 o'clock p.m. (end of Diary) Wilford had accumulated about 50 books by the time he enrolled in the Brigham Young Academy in Provo, September 1, 1902. At that time he registered in the Commercial School. Two weeks later he received a call to take the missionary course at the BYA, so he changed courses and prepared for a mission by taking the required classes. He was still in attendance when the name was changed from B. Y. Academy to B. Y. University in 1903, and George H. Brimhall was appointed President. Wilford wrote in his diary: Attended BYU in the fall, batching with 3 Pleasant Grove fellows in a room we rented from Mrs. Rosa B. Hayes. In the later autumn, Miss Jean Allen introduced me to Estelle Mecham, her chum, started to really love her. Estelle was the daughter of Jonathan and Elizabeth Duke Mecham, and was born in Provo, September 30, 1886. She was the oldest daughter in a family of ten, mostly boys, and she grew up loving baseball, hiking, and picnicking, fishing and camping in the canyons. Her father died leaving her mother with the large family to support and Estelle went to work at the Utah Stake Mental Hospital to help support the family. She enjoyed quilting parties and other group parties and buggy rides. She was a beautiful girl and very popular. One evening she and a group of young people were "ticking" on windows, making an unusual sound on the window where two young men were living. M. Wilford Poulson came out and scolded them crossly because his buddy was sick in bed. She met him again as she was returning from a quilting bee with her friend and they dated a few times, but he was a serious fellow, going to school. He soon went on a mission to Sweden, so they corresponded for two years. Wilford served as a missionary in Sweden from 1904 to 1906. His brother Otto was already in the mission field and they spent some time together. After he returned, he and Estelle started dating again, but had a misunderstanding and quit seeing each other until her girl friend got them back together. On April 24, 1907 they were married in the Salt Lake Temple. Her mother couldn't afford to buy her a wedding dress, so Wilford bought some cotton muslin to make a dress. Wilford continued going to school, working at odd jobs to help meet the expenses. His brother, Edwin, boarded with them for a while, and his parents often brought them fruits and vegetables from their farm. Their first child, Marie, was born January 28, 1908. Wilford continued his education, with his wife always encouraging and helping him to accomplish his goals in life. Five more children were born to them: Marion Wilford, Earle Mecham, Helen Estelle, Ardis and Robert Lewis. Wilford was employed as a clerk and an insurance salesman for a short time prior to passing an examination that enabled him to secure a contract to teach elementary school in the Alpine School District. He taught at the Spencer School in Orem for one year, 1908 to 1909, and then was offered a job at the BYU Training School 1910 to 1916. This gave him a good opportunity to pursue his own education. He graduated from BYU in 1914 with an A.B. degree. He was Assistant Professor from 1916 to 1919, and Associate Professor of Education from 1919 to 1922. In 1919 he was awarded a Master of Arts degree from the University of Utah College of Education. The title of his 27-page thesis was "The Conditions and Needs of Secondary School Libraries in Utah." One thousand copies were printed and an abridgement of this thesis was published later that year in the University of Utah Bulletin. At the suggestion of BYU's President, Franklin S. Harris, in the summer of 1921, Wilford began the study of psychology at the University of Chicago. He took 7 1/2 quarters there. He was appointed head of the BYU Department of Psychology by President Harris in 1922. Ten years later he was asked by President Harris to represent BYU at the American Psychological Association annual meeting, to be held in Ithaca, New York. He decided to leave for the convention seven weeks early so that he, his wife, and four of their six children could visit all of the places of interest in early church history. He also visited all of the universities, many bookstores, and many libraries along the way, doing research and collecting material on Mormon history. This trip took them into 32 states and was one of the last trips the family took together. His son, Earle, died the next year at the age of 18, of a heart attack, and two years later, August 19, 1935, his wife died during surgery, He married Jenniev Jorgensen Smith, June 12, 1936, in the St. George Temple, and together they traveled extensively in the eastern and southern part of the United States, where he collected books and early Americana items. They had one child born to them, Jennie Lin. During a sabbatical leave in 1939-40, he did research at the University of California at Berkeley and at Stanford University. Later he returned to do research on items of Mormon Americana at Huntington Library. In the summer of 1946 he spent some time in Ireland, England, France, Denmark and Sweden doing research, while with the World Study Tour. Professor Poulson was a member of the BYU faculty from 1916 to 1958 and was recognized with emeritus status in 1951. He was a friend and sustainer of the BYU library for more than 60 years; he contributed hundreds of books to the library embracing many fields of knowledge, especially psychology and Western Americana. One of his most significant gifts was an 1836 Hebrew Grammar supplement compiled by Oliver Cowdery for use in the School of the Prophets in Kirtland, Ohio. It was believed to be the only copy in existence. He served as a chairman and secretary of the BYU Library Committee and as chairman of book drives and special projects for more than twenty years. In his travels to Europe and throughout America he rendered additional service to the library by searching for rare books, diaries, and significant book collections that could be acquired by the library. He was affiliated with the Utah Educational Association and served as an officer in the NEA Library Department, Utah Library Association, American Psychology Association, and Utah Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters. He was also affiliated with AAAS, Phi Delta Kappa, Sigma Chi (Utah Chapter), BYU Club, and the Reading Committee of the National Parks Council of Boy Scouts of America. In addition to his thesis, his other publications include "Human Nature in Religious Education, 1927, (184 pages) with 3 printings and a total of 9500 sold; a series of lessons on "Personality Study" published in the Relief Society Magazine in 1929-31; In Utah Academy Proceed. "Library Researches for Scientific Study of Mormonism" in 1930; and "Certain Color Preferences of College Students." He was dedicated to libraries, scholarship, Brigham Young University, and to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He once said: "With much inheritance from the past who can doubt the future development of Brigham Young University? Many former students are cherishing the memory of inspired prophecies concerning its destiny. . . . There are many who believe that after making provisions for the best faculty possible, there should be no unnecessary delay in conducting a drive for a well planned fireproof library and auditorium, as well as a science building on Temple Hill. . .Truly may it be said of Brigham Young University, that "The past is full of glory and the future full of promise." Also: "Take people where you find them and leave them better for your having associated with them and help them in the right direction." And: "Any young person with ability and motivation has the price of an education." He was divorced sometime after his second marriage and later sold his home on First East in Provo, where part of the football field or tennis courts on the BYU campus are now. He bought a home in Pioneer Circle in Provo, which he sold when he retired and moved to Salt Lake City. He continued to buy books and had quite a library in his home, with nearly every room filled with books, from the floor to the ceiling, just like a regular library. These books he kept catalogued with the help of his children, grandchildren and even some of his older great grandchildren. Many people came to his home to buy books from him. On many occasions they were from the University of Utah and Brigham Young University libraries. He was proud of his many rare finds. He often would take a supply of books to his children's homes and let them choose which ones they would like to have. Even the grandchildren were allowed to choose some of those that he would run across that he thought they would enjoy having. Sometimes these would be entire sets. He enjoyed his grandchildren and one of the highlights of his life was a special Birthday party held for him at Harmons restaurant where all of his children and grandchildren came. He passed away in Salt Lake City on January 26, 1969 and was buried in Provo, Utah. Shortly after his death, many of his books were donated to the State Prison. Most of his private library was donated at a special ceremony and open house, to the BYU Library by his surviving children: Marion W., Helen P. Whiting, Ardis P. Soulier, Robert L., Jennie Lin Strong; and grandchildren: Nola Marie H. Hemingway and Earle A. Hollingshead, children of Marie P. Hollingshead, deceased. This collection included 7420 books, some of which were rare copies, and 185 boxes of pamphlets, periodicals and manuscripts.

Life timeline of Martin Wilford Poulson

1884
Martin Wilford Poulson was born on 21 Nov 1884
Martin Wilford Poulson was 8 years old when Electrical engineer Nikola Tesla gives the first public demonstration of radio in St. Louis, Missouri. Nikola Tesla was a Serbian American inventor, electrical engineer, mechanical engineer, physicist, and futurist who is best known for his contributions to the design of the modern alternating current (AC) electricity supply system.
1893
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Martin Wilford Poulson was 19 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
1903
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Martin Wilford Poulson was 30 years old when Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife, Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, were assassinated by a Yugoslav nationalist named Gavrilo Princip in Sarajevo, sparking the outbreak of World War I. Archduke Franz Ferdinand, Archduke of Austria-Este was a member of the imperial Habsburg dynasty, and from 1896 until his death the heir presumptive (Thronfolger) to the Austro-Hungarian throne. His assassination in Sarajevo precipitated Austria-Hungary's declaration of war against Serbia, which in turn triggered a series of events that resulted in Austria-Hungary's allies and Serbia's declaring war on each other, starting World War I.
1914
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Martin Wilford Poulson was 45 years old when Babe Ruth becomes the first baseball player to hit 500 home runs in his career with a home run at League Park in Cleveland, Ohio. George Herman "Babe" Ruth Jr. was an American professional baseball player whose career in Major League Baseball (MLB) spanned 22 seasons, from 1914 through 1935. Nicknamed "The Bambino" and "The Sultan of Swat", he began his MLB career as a stellar left-handed pitcher for the Boston Red Sox, but achieved his greatest fame as a slugging outfielder for the New York Yankees. Ruth established many MLB batting records, including career home runs (714), runs batted in (RBIs) (2,213), bases on balls (2,062), slugging percentage (.690), and on-base plus slugging (OPS) (1.164); the latter two still stand as of 2018. Ruth is regarded as one of the greatest sports heroes in American culture and is considered by many to be the greatest baseball player of all time. In 1936, Ruth was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame as one of its "first five" inaugural members.
1929
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Martin Wilford Poulson was 55 years old when Adolf Hitler signs an order to begin the systematic euthanasia of mentally ill and disabled people. Adolf Hitler was a German politician, demagogue, and Pan-German revolutionary, who was the leader of the Nazi Party, Chancellor of Germany from 1933 to 1945 and Führer ("Leader") of Nazi Germany from 1934 to 1945. As dictator, Hitler initiated World War II in Europe with the invasion of Poland in September 1939, and was central to the Holocaust.
1939
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Martin Wilford Poulson was 61 years old when World War II: Hiroshima, Japan is devastated when the atomic bomb "Little Boy" is dropped by the United States B-29 Enola Gay. Around 70,000 people are killed instantly, and some tens of thousands die in subsequent years from burns and radiation poisoning. World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most global war in history; it directly involved more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. In a state of total war, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.
1945
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Martin Wilford Poulson was 68 years old when Jonas Salk announced the successful test of his polio vaccine on a small group of adults and children (vaccination pictured). Jonas Edward Salk was an American medical researcher and virologist. He discovered and developed one of the first successful polio vaccines. Born in New York City, he attended New York University School of Medicine, later choosing to do medical research instead of becoming a practicing physician. In 1939, after earning his medical degree, Salk began an internship as a physician scientist at Mount Sinai Hospital. Two years later he was granted a fellowship at the University of Michigan, where he would study flu viruses with his mentor Thomas Francis, Jr.
1953
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Martin Wilford Poulson died on 26 Jan 1969 at the age of 84
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Martin Wilford Poulson (21 Nov 1884 - 26 Jan 1969), BillionGraves Record 26510 Provo, Utah, Utah, United States

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