Milo Andrus

6 Mar 1814 - 19 Jun 1893

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Milo Andrus

6 Mar 1814 - 19 Jun 1893
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Grave site information of Milo Andrus (6 Mar 1814 - 19 Jun 1893) at Holladay Memorial Park in Holladay, Salt Lake, Utah, United States from BillionGraves

Life Information

Milo Andrus

Born:
Died:

Holladay Memorial Park

4969 S Memory Ln
Holladay, Salt Lake, Utah
United States

Headstone Description

ALL ABOVE WOMEN ARE WIVES OF MILO
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finnsh

July 3, 2012
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10131307t@gmail.com

July 13, 2014
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StoneCypher

June 16, 2014
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finnsh

June 29, 2012

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Abigail Jane Daley History

Contributor: finnsh Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Abigail Jane Daley written by Stella Fisher Brossard, granddaughter She came in '48, and how brave and courageous she was. With abiding faith in her Heavenly Father and her love for the Gospel of Jesus Christ, she was able to bring her family from Winter Quarters to Salt Lake City, Utah. I write of my grandmother, Abigail Jane Daley Andrus, who left Winter Quarters, the spring of 1848, with five children, endured the hardships of that long trek across the plains, arriving September 24, 1848 in the Heber C. Kimball Company. Her husband, Milo Andrus, was sent from Winter Quarters to England, on a mission, in the spring of 1848. Shortly before he left Winter Quarters, according to his diary, he was sealed to Sara Ann Miles, who accompanied him to England. To the union of Abigail Jane Daley and Milo Andrus were born six children: Mary Jane Andrus, born November 1833, at Florence, Huron County, Ohio; James Andrus, born June 14, 1835, at Florence, Huron County, Ohio; Sara Ann Andrus, born May 31, 1837, at Caldwell, Missouri, died 1838 at Caldwell, Missouri; John Daley Andrus, born April 23, 1837, at Woodside, Adams County, Illinois; Millennium Andrus (my mother) born August 31, 1845, at Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois; Amanda Ann Andrus, born November 19, 1847, at Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, Iowa. With these five children she arrived safely in Salt Lake City, Utah. The oldest boy, James, 13, had to take the place of a man, and with the help of his brother, John, 7 did the work of a man during that long and strenuous trip across the plains. They walked every step of the way, and barefoot too, along with their sister, Mary Jane, and their mother. They had too many times to pick the burrs from their feet. At one time, they came to a place where the Indians had been in battle. They picked out some of the hides to cover their feet, as they were sore and bleeding. My mother, Millenium, was only three, and rode in the wagon with her baby sister, Amanda. Just after my mother returned from Salt Lake City to her home in Oxford, Idaho, after she had attended the Golden Jubilee July 24, 1893, she said to me, "As the parade passed by, my sister, Mary Jane, broke into tears and said, "All it needs to make it complete is James, John, and me to be walking barefoot beside the wagon." There was no complaining from my blue eyed, Dutch grandmother, who walked each day through wind and rain, or days of blistering sun, on the prairie land, or fording deep streams. She was thankful each night that her Heavenly Father, with his protecting care, had given her strength to do her daily tasks, and to arise next morning with courage to continue on. What joy was theirs when they reached the journey's end that day in September. That winter the big wagon box was their home. The boy's bed, being under the wagon, where there was some protection from frost and rain. Grandfather writes in his diary of their wagon, "The winter of 1846 my house, in the basement, was made into a wagon shop and in the spring I started on a journey to the West.' That winter (1848-49) in Salt Lake City fuel was plentiful and easy to obtain, but food was scarce. They experienced a hard winter. A man by the name of Session kept them many times from starving. The Saints had put in their crops, but the crickets had taken them. Not half will ever be told of what they endured. My mother told me, more than once, and each time tears would fill her eyes and a lump come in her throat, that during the scarcity of food in Salt Lake City before help came, that her mother, of whom I write, made some bread from her last bit of meal; and when it was baked and ready to eat there was not enough for all, so she divided it among her children and while they were eating it she went behind the house so that she could not see them eating, for she was as hungry herself. How a mother loves her children and how she sometimes has to sacrifice. Abigail's children were hard workers and sacrificed for one another. The oldest boy, James now 13, was of tough fiber and brave spirit. In the canyons he worked long and hard to get fuel against the winter. Grown men, admiring the boy's pluck, would aid him, and he would proudly drive home with his load of wood. The second son, John, of a quieter, less ambitious nature, early learned the use of fire arms and became a first class shot. With his old muzzle loader he killed great numbers of wild ducks, as these were plentiful and sell them for fifty cents. Mary Jane did washing every day of the week and ironed by moonlight to obtain the few groceries they could buy. The younger girls herded the cows and pulled "pig-weed" and "mustard" and other edible weed; and, when evening came and cows were brought in, they had aprons full of weeds, which were cooked and became a mess of greens. In 1850, my grandfather returned from England. Times were better then, crops had been harvested, wild fruit picked and dried, and a log cabin built. The food was simple, consisting of cereal grains; whole corn, fresh in season, dried, or parched for winter; wheat cracked to coarse bits, or sometimes parched; milk and butter; some eggs; and fowl; wild meat at times, venison and ducks. Sugar was had in the form of sorghum or molasses, as a form of sugar cane would be grown in Utah, and a few crude sorghum mills existed. Potatoes, carrots and cabbages were coming into production. So, all in all, after the Latter-day Saints had passed their first few years of bitter struggle, their food supply was ample and well balanced. Fruit was scarce until orchards could grow to maturity. The canyons produced a small amount of wild berries. Copying from grandfather's diary again, after giving an account of his work in the Mission Field, his trip across the plains where he was Captain of fifty-five wagons in 1850, he writes, "After one week's rest I went to work in the 19th ward and built me a house; and about the first of January, 1851, my wife, Jane and I parted." In 1852, Abigail Jane married Elisha W. Vannette . To this union a little girl was born, who died in infancy; and later another daughter, Elizabeth was born, who became the wife of John Bullen. My grandmother later moved to Richmond, Utah, and spent the rest of her life there. I remember my dear old grandmother whom I dearly loved and who died when I fourteen years of age, 27 October 1894. I often visited her when a child, as Oxford, Idaho, was only thirty miles from Richmond, Utah. Much much father than it is today though, since the mode of travel is so different. Her hair was always done with ringlets on each side of her face, and a bob in the back of her head. How well I liked the cottage cheese. She called it Dutch cheese; and those pottawattamie plum preserves; and the bedstead, so high from the floor, with the white curtains all around it. She kept her little home immaculate Her sister, Nancy Mariah, who never married, always made her home with grandmother until grandmother died. Grandmother was born in Marcellus, Onandago County, New York, January 26, 1815. Her father, John Daley Jr., and his wife Elizabeth Ennis Daley, with their children, moved to Ohio in her early girlhood. Her father was baptized as a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, in 1832. A month after her 18th birthday, Abigail Jane Daley married Milo Andrus, on February 21, 1833, in Florence, Huron County, Ohio. Milo Andrus was the son of Ruluf Andrus and Azubah Smith. Abigail Jane descended from a sturdy race of people, the French Huguenots, and that illustrious family, "The DeWitts," who saved Holland for Holland. Abigail's grandmother was Hannah DeWitt, who was a descendant of Clars DeWitt of Holland, who came with the West Indies Company to what is now New York (1612). The DeWitts at one time were virtually rulers of Holland. Being among the earliest settlers of New York, they have helped make the history of this great nation. Her pedigree on this line is unbroken to the year 1295. The record is found in the Royal Library, at "The Hague" Holland. How proudly my mother used to say, "DeWitt Clinton, thrice Governor of New York was my mother's cousin. Abigail Jane's grandfather, James Ennis, married Hannah DeWitt. The mother of James Ennis was Eleanor Hornbeck, whose mother was Eleanor Cuddeback, whose father was Jacob Cuddeback or Cuddeback. The emigrant ancestor, Jacob Cuddeback or Cuddebec, as it should be spelled, reached America when a very young man. He came with Peter Gumaer, both settling in the wilderness of New York. In 1690, we find them among the first settlers of Deerpark, Orange County, New York. It was difficult for these young men, who had come from families of wealth, to accustom themselves to manual labor. Jacob Cuddeback and his sons were stalwart strong men; naturally, the men at that time were all inventors and mechanics. The men of the family served through all the wars and many times their homes were laid waste by the Indians. The strong stone houses, being the largest, built by Cuddeback and DeWitt families, were used as forts during Indian Wars. Jacob Cuddeback lived to be 100 years old. (Taken from "History of Deer Park, by Peter Gumaer or Cumaer. We also find more of Jacob Cuddebac's life from page 184 on.) Grandmother and grandfather Andrus were proud of their sons, who knew no fear when fighting Indians. James and John Andrus figured in the early history of Utah, especially when trouble with the Indians arose. Grandmother's children were very devoted to their mother and provided well for her and her sister in their declining years, and were all at her bedside when she died; and had tenderly cared for her in her last illness. She was always friendly with her first husband, Milo Andrus, who in his later years took great comfort with the children of his first wife and their families. Abigail was again sealed to Milo Andrus in the Logan Temple on 17 March 1886. She and her husband, Milo Andrus, were born just a year apart; that is, one born in 1814 and grandmother in 1815. They were baptized a year apart: grandfather 1832 and grandmother 1833; and Grandfather Andrus died in 1893 and Grandmother died in Richmond, Utah October 27, 1894, and is buried in the Richmond cemetery.

Milo Andrus (in his own words)

Contributor: finnsh Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Milo Andrus, the author of this biography, is the son of Ruluf Andrus and Azuba Smith. My father is a native of Hartford, Connecticut, and my mother of Rutland, Vermont. They shortly after marriage moved to Essex County in the state of New York, where they resided until their ninth child was born. They had seven boys and three girls, namely: Oran, Almon, Carlo, Erasmus, Harwin, Milo, and Milo (the second). Erasmus, Harwin, and Milo (the first) died in childhood. The dates of their deaths I cannot give in consequence of a fire that burnt up the records of my father’s family. The names of my sisters were Sybil, Sarah, and Emily. My eldest brother, Oran, was born in 1797; Sybil was born in 1799; Almon was born in 1801; the dates of the others I cannot give. The writer of the above, Milo (the second), was born March 6, 1814. When I was five years old, my parents moved to Dunkirk, in the state of New York, where they resided for one and a half years. During that time, there was a circumstance that occurred that seems to me to show the protecting hand of the Lord over me. I went to the shore of Lake Erie and got into a skiff on the shore and went to sleep when the wind arose and took the skiff on the lake, and it was not seen until nearly out of sight. I was then picked up still sound asleep. I have always thought that the Angel of Peace then watched over me. My parents then moved up the lake into the state of Ohio, in Huron County, in the township of Henrietta, where they had three daughters born, namely: Evaline Charlotte, born October 7, 1817; Lucina, born in 1819; and Harriet, born in 1821. At the writing of this sketch [January 1875], the two eldest of my brothers are still alive and three of my youngest sisters. They have all rejected the gospel. “Milo, the youngest son, has embraced the fullness of the gospel as revealed by the Lord in the last days, in consequence of which the balance of the family have cast me out of their feelings. The Lord be thanked I feel to rejoice that I am counted worthy to suffer for the truth’s sake.” My mother died on January 1, 1830. My father died in the winter of 1848. I shall now drop the history of the balance of the family and give a few incidents of my own history. After the death of my mother, I bought the balance of my time until I was twenty-one from my father, for which I paid him one hundred and fifty dollars. In the spring of 1832, I met an Elder of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, though I should say, previous to this, that I had my mind much exercised about a future state and had read the views of Alexander Campbell, being the nearest to the truths of the New Testament. I had been baptized by Elder Orson Hyde, then a minister of that section, but when I compared my scriptures with the teachings of the Elder of the true church of Christ, I found that he had the truth. After trying for nearly one year, I yielded to baptism. “[The Elder] had with him the Book of Mormon, which he said had been translated from the plates by Joseph Smith. He also informed me that Joseph Smith had organized a church, called The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and that he was an Elder of that church. From him I obtained the Book of Mormon. On reading this history, I found to my great satisfaction and joy, that which I had so long desired. But then a question of great importance was before me, which was this: If the history was true, then was the doctrinal part true? This was indeed a question of importance. How to demonstrate it I did not know. I had read in the New Testament scriptures, ‘If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God, that giveth to all men liberally, and upbraideth not.’ I also found that Christ had said that if anyone would obey his doctrine he would know for himself. Consequently, after comparing the doctrinal part of the Book of Mormon with the doctrines of the New Testament, I found that they very well harmonized. It is true that in consequence of the many councils and synods that have given the Jewish scriptures their own rendering, they have left out some of the plain and precious parts, but in the main they agree. Finding this out did not give me the knowledge that I desired. The question was, ‘How shall I get the much-desired information?’ ‘Obey’ was the word of the Elder, who said that he was authorized to declare that I should get the Holy Spirit by doing so, by which I could testify of the truth as well as himself. But I was afraid of being led away or deceived. However, after much prayer and fasting, I went into the water with as humble a heart as I had power to possess, asking the Lord to help me in the days of my anxiety to know the truth; and, to my unspeakable joy, the Lord in his infinite goodness gave me that assurance, which has remained with me from that day to this, for which I feel truly thankful.” One month and nine days previous to my baptism, I was united in marriage to Abigail Jane Daley, whose father had been baptized into the Church of Christ about one year before. We were married February 21, 1833, and baptized April 12, 1833. “When I at first received this gospel by revelation from on high, I contemplated the results. I did not receive it in view of this short space of time allotted to man for an earthly existence. No: I embraced it to continue forever and ever. And now . . . my feelings and hopes are the same, only more abundant, and I feel now that my nature has become so allied to the principles of the gospel that with me it is the kingdom of God or nothing.” “I remember when we first received the gospel, our feelings were that Zion was already established, and that we had nothing to do but to step into the enjoyment of the blessings. We seemed to forget in our joy that we had our salvation to work out, and now we know that it is not to be entered into and enjoyed so easily as we first anticipated.” “If you did not experience, when you were first baptized, that you ran antagonistic to feelings of your friends and neighbors, your experience has been different from mine. Many times I have thought that I could transmit the feelings which inspired me to others, and give them a conception of the great truths I felt and knew to be of God, but very often I found that, if not exactly turned out of doors, it has been plainly intimated to me to leave, and I found I had to make headway against a strong tide.” I was ordained an Elder on May 5, 1833, under the hands of Joseph Wood. I started on my first mission in June 1833 in company with Joseph Wood, traveled a distance of seventy miles preaching every day, and baptized three. We came to Kirtland where the Prophet Joseph Smith resided with his family. The quarterly conference that came off in a few days after our arrival changed my traveling companion, and I was coupled with Ova Truman. Joseph Wood and his fellow laborer went to Philadelphia, and I with my new companion was sent to the southern part of the state of Ohio, to return in three months to the next quarterly conference. We were not very successful and baptized only two persons. After this conference, I was permitted to return home and preach among the branches until winter, when we had a call from the Prophet Joseph by his brother Hyrum to get ready and go with the company of elders to the state of Missouri, a call known as “Zion’s Camp.” Our first daughter and first child was born on November 15, 1833. During the winter of 1833 and spring of 1834, we were instructed to labor and get all the money that we could, to get good rifles, and to make ready to start by the first of May 1834. We accordingly started from Florence, Huron County, Ohio, on the seventh of May 1834. These were from the Florence branch: Nelson Higgins, Hyrum Blackman, Asey Fields, and Milo Andrus. My brother-in-law, James Daley, went with us as far as Mansfield, Richland County, Ohio, where we met with the Prophet Joseph, his brother Hyrum, and the rest of the camp from the east. Our leader was Elder Orson Hyde. There was one circumstance that occurred before we joined the main camp worthy of notice. As I stated before, I had bought my time from my father and had paid him the amount agreed upon, but still I was not twenty-one by ten months. On this account, and as he was so opposed to my going with the “Mormons,” as he called them, he made an effort to stop me. As we had to pass his house on our way, we learned his intentions to stop me at the county seat, Norwalk. Brother Hyde had learned his plan; he went in and made inquiry about a road that we did not intend to travel. Then Brother Nelson Higgins and myself were directed to go around the city and take the road to Mansfield, and he and the sheriff, thinking that we would move slow, did not want to overtake us until we had camped. Accordingly, father, sheriff, and driver drank freely, and when they started they took the road to Tiffin that had been inquired after to mislead them, and they drove until long after dark. The team becoming tired, they gave up the chase and heard of us the next morning, forty miles on the road to Mansfield, and they felt as though they had been badly sold and gave up and went home. On the eleventh of May, we joined the main camp west of Mansfield; on the twelfth, the camp was organized and the law of consecration was for the first time presented. We shelled out to the last cent, and our money went into a commissary’s hands and our supplies were bought by him. I shall not try to name the particulars of this journey. We journeyed on causing considerable excitement, and receiving much good instructions from the Prophet Joseph. After we got into the state of Missouri, or rather, before our company had crossed the Mississippi River, we went into the dense forest as a company, and there offered up to the Lord our fervent prayers that He would spare our lives, and permit us to return to our families. We felt that it would be so, and thanks be to the Lord—not one of us was taken by the cholera that visited the camp that afternoon. Two weeks after we landed on Fishing River, in Clay County, Missouri, where the revelation was given on June 22, 1834 [D&C Section 105]. About this time the cholera made its appearance among us, as it had been predicted by the Prophet. Thirteen of our good brethren were taken away by the dread monster. The camp broke up partly, the Saints scattered around, and the Lord turned away the scourge. The Lord permitted us to return after we stayed there for three weeks. We got back to our families the last day of September 1834, careworn and much fatigued. I had the cholera on the way home, but the Lord healed me, and then we went on our way rejoicing. In the summer of 1835, I traveled in the state of New York with Nathan Baldwin, baptized several, and the following winter went to school in Kirtland. In the spring of 1836 I was in Kirtland at the dedication of the Temple and the endowment of the Elders that the Lord had promised as a reward for their offerings. The blessings of the Lord were poured out abundantly. There is one thing that I would here relate that was a great joy to me, and that was when the Holy Ghost was poured out on the Elders. I saw fire descend and rest on the heads of the Elders, and they spoke with tongues and prophesied. On our return to Kirtland from the mission in the east, I went to school in Kirtland, studied grammar, and then studied Hebrew under Professor —— of New York. On going back to Florence, Ohio, I was chosen as the President of the Florence Branch, with instructions to move them to Missouri in the fall of 1836. We went as far as Terre Haute, Indiana; when it was late and cold, we put up for the winter. Our eldest son, James, was a babe three months old, and we came near losing him to human appearance, but the hand of the Lord was in it. We raised up a branch of the Church in that place. Early in the spring of 1837, we started for Missouri, and arrived in Caldwell County in time to put in a crop. In 1838 we were mobbed out of the county. We had one child born in Missouri, a girl, namely Sarah Ann. We went to Illinois in the winter of 1838, and the next summer we lost our little girl born in Missouri. In the fall, after I had the chills and fever for two months and was not able to scarcely walk, I was sent on a mission to Canada. But owing to the Patriot War, we were not permitted to go to Canada, and I spent the winter preaching in the state of Ohio. I returned home in the spring of 1840 and spent my time in laboring and preaching in the counties around Nauvoo until the spring of 1844. I was then sent to the state of Ohio with Elder John Loveless. We traveled in the south part of Ohio for two months when we heard of the assassinations of the Prophet Joseph and his brother Hyrum. We went home as quick as steam would take us, arriving in time to see their mortal remains before they were interred. I then went to Carthage Jail, where they were murdered, and saw the floor stained with the best blood of the present generation. The people were all fleeing for fear of justice overtaking them. I called at Hamilton’s Hotel to see Elder John Taylor, who was wounded in the jail. Then I went to Adams County, where my family had fled for safety; I found them well but much alarmed. “In consequence of my long and intimate acquaintance with Joseph Smith, I know that he was a good man and a great prophet, because that which he prophesied came to pass. . . . As far as I have ability, I am willing to bear this testimony to the inhabitants of the earth, and pray the Lord to accompany this testimony with his Holy Spirit to all the honest in heart.” After we had mourned the loss of our Prophet and Patriarch for a few weeks, during which time I was chosen one of the Nauvoo police, I helped to watch the city by night and worked on the Temple by day. The work of the endowments commenced in the fall of 1845 and winter of 1846. I spent six weeks of the time in the Temple and was much blessed. During the past four years, we had two more children born, namely: John D. Andrus and Millennium. After the death of the Prophet Joseph Smith, I was ordained one of the Presidents of the Tenth Quorum of the Seventies. In the winter of 1846, my house, in the basement, was made into a wagon shop, and in the spring we started on our journey to the west. We overtook the main camp at Pisgah, and from there went to Council Bluffs, where the government called on us for a battalion of 500 men to go to Mexico. After the battalion was started, I was sent forward with others to the number of one hundred and fifty wagons, went as far as the Pawnee Indian Village, and then went 150 miles to the northwest among the Ponca Indians. After staying there for two months, we went back to Winter Quarters and stayed and farmed in that county in the year 1847. In the spring of 1848, I was sent on a mission to England. Shortly before I left, Sarah Ann Miles was sealed to me, and she accompanied me to England. We arrived in Liverpool on the first of August, and on the thirteenth of August at a general conference, I was appointed President of the Liverpool Conference, which place I filled to the best of my ability until January 1850 when I was released to come home. During my stay in the conference, there were three new branches added and between two and three hundred added to the Church by baptism. I baptized thirty persons in one evening. The Lord made manifest His power in healing the sick and in blessing the Church with signs following the believers. Milo Jr. was born in Liverpool, October 1, 1848. We left Liverpool in January 1850 onboard the ship Argo. Jeter Clinton presided over the company; we were eight weeks and three days on the ship from Liverpool to New Orleans with some sickness and two deaths on the passage. I was sick with the cholera, my wife had poor health all the way, and Milo Jr. was sick (we thought that he would die), but the blessings of the Lord brought us through. “On our journey up, we passed through the country of Caldwell County, Missouri where the Saints once lived. When I contemplate the many hardships that the Church has gone through it causes me to marvel that so many have lived as have and taken the pressure.” We came up the Mississippi River on board the steamer Uncle Sam with Captain Van Dosen, master. We landed at Kanesville early in May and the first company of Saints was organized early in June. I was chosen as a captain over 55 wagons. We had a good time on the plains, arriving in Salt Lake City on last day of August, having but one death on the journey, that of a stranger going to California. I baptized fifteen persons on the journey. James Leithead and Richard Hopkins were clerks of the company. A more full account of the mission to England is recorded in the Tenth Quorum of the Seventies record. After one week’s rest, I went to work in the 19th Ward and built me a house. About the first of January 1851, my wife Jane and I parted. In June 1851 I married the widow Tuttle, and the following November my wife, Sarah Ann Miles, died. I married Adeline Alexander in March 1852. In December 1852, I married Mary Ann Webster. In the spring of 1854, I was sent to St. Louis to preside over the stake there. “We arrived in St. Louis . . . all well and in good spirits, having made the trip in twenty-eight traveling days. . . . I began to feel after the Saints, and found many disaffected, and the Holy Spirit came upon me when I thought of the best plan to save the most and I counseled them to renew their covenant by baptism, and by making new records, as the old were imperfect. I also opened the door to those who had been cut off, only forbidding such as were forbidden by all laws this side of the mountains. The result [was that] the Saints [were] rejoicing and bearing testimony that they never felt better in their lives.” I stayed there for one year and rebaptized and confirmed about 800 Saints. I was sent up the river to buy cattle for the emigration of 1855, and in the fall was appointed by E. Snow and D. Spencer to bring the last company of sixty-three wagons home. “When I came to the shores of the Missouri River on the identical spot where the camp of Israel landed June 1846, it will be impossible for me with my power of description to give even a faint idea of what I felt. On that spot once stood the prophet and apostles who hold the living oracles of God, the destinies of men, nations, and kingdoms on this earth in their hands but how little known and understood by poor fallen men. I then turned my eyes and gazed at those distant bluffs that were spotted with our wagons and teams, with our wives at work, and our children sporting and playing over those hills, whilst the vast plains below were filled with horses and cattle that moved the Israel of God to their home of freedom in the valleys of the mountains. I then looked upon that piece of table ground where the liberty pole was raised, and the proud American eagle above the stars and stripes unfurled its wings in the fresh breezes of heaven’s atmosphere, whilst the drum and the rife called loudly for volunteers to swell the ranks of the American Army to take part in the achievement of more glory and more territory to these United States, called the land of the free and the home of the brave. I have passed through the countries over lands that the general government have had our money for, and after that, we [were] forced to leave them, contrary to every principle of law of right either of God or of man, but the spirit seems to whisper, ‘Be still, and know that I am God.’” “[On our arrival to Kansas], we pitched our tents, and when night came on we had a peaceable and quiet place to lay down—the green grass around us, the rolling prairies in the distance, clad in their mantles of green; it was a change from the muddy Missouri that all seemed to enjoy with great delight. To add to our happiness, we met with Brother Ballantyne and the members of his little camp under the open canopy of heaven and the shining beauties that the delightful moon gave to prairie fields, and the singing of the sweet singers of Israel as they died away in the distance under heaven’s high-arched halls that were spread above our heads, causing all hearts that were not past feeling to rejoice, while we returned thanks unto the Lord for all past blessings.” I arrived in Salt Lake City late in October, and in December of the same year married Elizabeth Brooks, Ann Brooks, and Jane Munday. In February 1857 I married Margaret Boyce, and in February 1858 I was married to Emma Covert. I was acting bishop of the Big Cottonwood Ward in 1858, and in the fall of 1859 was appointed to another mission to England. For the first six months, I was appointed to travel the conferences; for the last nine months I presided over the Birmingham District, embracing the Birmingham, Warwickshire, and Staffordshire conferences. In the summer of 1861 I started for home with 700 Saints on board the ship Underwriter. I was appointed president of the company, and we had a good passage to New York with no deaths. I was then appointed to take charge of 900 to Florence, Nebraska, on the cars. I stayed in Florence for five weeks, was then appointed Captain to take a company of 66 wagons across the plains and arrived in Salt Lake City in September 1861. In the fall of 1870 I married Francena Tuttle. In the fall of 1870 I was again sent to the states on a mission. I came back in the spring of 1871. Since that time I have been in Utah on the Home Missionary List and have worked with my hands for a living. At this date, January 9th, 1875, I am living in St. George, Utah. “My maxim is and has been . . . to act when I am called upon either to preach or do anything else for the building up of the kingdom of God.”

Milo heals crippled girl

Contributor: finnsh Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

While in Florence, Ohio, Milo described a miracle: "One of the young people of the city, a twelve year old girls named Nancy, had some months earlier been thrown from a horse and had broken her hip so near the socket that it could not be set. the physicians in the community agreed that it would be impossible for her to walk on that leg again. After she and her parents joined the Church, the unbelievers scoffingly asked 'If miracles can be performed, why don't your Mormon elders heal her?' Milo felt strongly impressed to go to the home of the crippled girl. Entering her house, which was in the center of town, he walked over to the afflicted girl and taking her by hand, commanded her in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ to arise, leave her crutches, and walk. She arose in faith, full of joy and was from that hour made whole."

Wikitree

Contributor: finnsh Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

1773, March 12 - born Vermont Inscription of stone at the ?Andress cemetery? Lorain Co., Ohio, reads: Ruluf Andress, born 12 Mar 1773, died 1849. ?Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord from henceforth, yea, saith the spirit, that they may rest from their labours and their works do follow them? 1777- Azuba born in Rutland, Vermont 1789, Dec 31 - Guardian bond. This is "A"Ruluf Andress, but not OUR Ruluf Andress". 99%sure 1795- Ruluf and Azuba married in Prob Rutland Co., Vt 1795 - Rufluf Andrus on grand list for 1795 not on tax list for1797-98 # 31 8 # personal Rutland Co., Vt. 1796- Sybil born in Rutland, Vermont* 1798- Oran born in Poultney, Rutland, Vermont 1800- Almon born in Poultney, Rutland Co., Vermont 1800- Census of Poultney,Rutland Co., Vtermont Rufus with 2 males besides himself and 2 females. The family checks out as Oran b. 1797, Almon b. 1800, Sybil b. 1796 and Rufus and Azubah. Between summer1800 Sept 1802 and Family moves from Poultney, Rutland County, Vermont, to Elizabethtown, Essex, New York 1802- Sara Minerva born in Elizabethtown, Essex County, New York. 1804- Carlo born in Elizabethtown, Essex County, New York 1806 - Ruluf Lieutenant in N. Y. Militia. Council of Appointment, Military Records, State of New York. 1784 -1821 . Page 830 of Volume 1 lists: Essex Co. - Lt. Col. Joseph Sheldon?s Regt., Rueben Sanford, Capt. (Brigade)- Ruloph Andrews, Lieutenant. Vol. 2 p. 1103 (Incorrectly given in the index as page 1183). Essex Co. - regt. commanded by Lt. Col. Elijah Barnes, Lieutenants Ruluf Andres (there is a notation also ?name formerly misspelled?) and Reuben Smith. 1807- Erasmus born in Elizabethtown, Essex County, New York 1808- This indenture made the 10 of August in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eight between Ruluf Andres of the Town of Jay in the County of Essex and State of New York of the first part and Asa Hascall of the Town of Essex in the County and State aforesaid.... Ruluf for 500 $ to him in hand from Asa Hadcall...rec`ipt acknowledeged...Lot # 27 on the Lands granted by Legislature of the State of New York to Nathaniel Mallory and others...Beginning at a Stake and stone eight links (link 66 feet)Northerly from a beach tree marked 27 cb or Eb 1798 thence Northerly one hundred rods to the school House, thence East one hundred and sixty rods, thence Southerly one hundred rods to a Maple tree, thence West one hundred and sixty rods to the place of Beginning Reserving 1.5 acre School...no Mortqage ... 1808-- Essex County SS- Be it remembered that on the twenty-ninth day of October in the year or our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eight personally appeared before me Daniel Ross Esquire first Judge of the Court of Common Pleas of the County of Essex William Donaghy who is to me well known who being duly sworn by me deposeth and saith that he did see Ruluf Andrus the grantor within named sign, seal and deliver the within instrument as his own voluntary act and deed and that he know the said Ruluf Andrus was the grantor within named and that he together with Levi Cooley did subscribe and to the within deed as witnesses in the presence of each other and the grantor and I having examined the same and finding therein no material erasures or interlineations except those noted do allow the same to be recorded. - Daniel Ross 1809- Harwin born in Elizabethtown, Essex Co., New York 1809 - Deed as a grantor. Elizabethtown, Essex Co., New York, Registry of Deeds book A. p. 399. This indenture made the tenth day of August in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eight between Ruluf Andres of the town of Jay in the County of Essex and State of New York of the first part and Asa Hascall of the town of Essex in the County and State aforesaid of the second part witnesseth that the said party of the first part for and in consideration of the sum of five hundred dollars lawful money of the United States of America to him in hand paid and before the ensealing and delivery of these presents by the said party of the second part, the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged hath confirmed and by these presents doth grant bargain sell remise release alien and confirm unto the said part of the second part and to his heirs and assigns forever that certain tract, piece or parcel of land now in the possession of the said party of the first part situate, lying and being in the said town of Jay known and distinguished by the name and description of Lot number twenty-seven on the lands granted by the Legislators of the State of New York to Nathaniel Mallory and others and bounded as follows: Beginning at a stake and some eight links northerly from a beach tree marked twenty-seven C. B. 1779 thence northerly one hundred rods to the schoolhouse thence east on one hundred and sixty rods thence southerly one hundred rods to a maple tree thence west one hundred and sixty rods to the place of beginning (reserving one acre and one half at the said school house_) Containing one hundred acres be the same more or less on the south end of said Lot number twenty seven together with all and singular the hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining and the reversion and reversions, remainder and remainders, rents, issues and profits thereof, and all the estate, right title, interest, claim or demand whatsoever, of the said party of the first part eighter in law or equity of in and to the above bargained premises with the said hereditaments and appurtenances. To have and to hold the said premises above described to the said party of the second part his heirs and assigns, to the sole and only proper use benefit and behalf of the said party of the second part his heirs and assigns forever and the said party of the first part for himself his heirs executors and administrators doth covenant grant promise and agree to and with the said party of the first part at the time of the ensealing and delivery of these presents is lawfully and rightfully seized in his own right of the above described premises with the appurtenances without any manner of condition, mortgage, limitation of uses, or uses, or other matters, cause or thing whatsoever to alter change or determine the same exception the title and claim with the people of the state of New York hold and now have in and to the above described lands and the said party of the first part for himself, his heirs, executors and administrators doth covenant promise and agree to and with the said party of the second part his heirs and assigns to warrant and defend the above granted and bargained premises and the appurtenances thereunto belonging against all title or claims whatsoever of any person or persons except the title and claim which the people of the state of New York have and hold in and to the same. In witness whereof I the said Ruluf Andrus have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written. Ruluf Andrus L. S Sealed and delivered in the presence of Levi Cooley & William Donaghy Recorded Nov. 2nd 1808 fee 1.30 1810- Ruluf appears in Census of Jay, Essex County, New York Ruluf Andrus 2 Males under 10 Carlo 6 and either Erasmus 3 or Harwin1 both die young 2 males 10-16 Oran 12 and Almon 10 1 male 26-45 Ruluf abt 37Yo Females 1 under 10 Sally Abt 8 1 10-16 Sybil Abt 14 1 26-45 Azubah 33 Yo 1811- Emily born in Essex County, New York 1812- Milo 1st born in Elizabethtown, Essex County, New York Record of Mortgage for Ruluf in Elizabethtown, Essex Co., N. Y. 1814- Milo 2nd born in Elizabethtown or Pleasant Valley or Wilmington, Essex County, New York 1815- Record of mortgage for Ruluf in Elizabethtown, Essex Co. New York 1816- Lucina born prob in Dunkirk, Chautauqua Co., New York 1817- fall Moved to Brownhelm (Henrietta area), Huron Co., Ohio in 1817 same year as Simeon Durand(next door), Samuel Parker (moved on) John Dennison(moved with Rulufand lived next door), Seth Morse, Joseph Swift, Leonard Calvin, Hugh Alexander, Clark Baldwin and, Levi Shepard did. 1817 Oct 1 Eveline Charlotte born she says Henrietta ( formed 1827) Brownhelm, Huron, Ohio 1817 History of the Henrietta Baptist Church from Settlement up to 1 Jan. 1876, p. 81, under 'Mrs. Ruluff Andress': 'Ruluff Andress and family came from New York State in 1817, Mr. Andress built the first dam across the Vermilion River at Birmingham, for Perez Starr. He also built a saw mill. . . . Mr. and Mrs. Andress had nine children. Some of them Milo, . . . Charlote, . . . Harriet, . . . Lucius, ...Sally.... "This listing of some of Ruluf's children raises the question of the identity of Lucius, an interesting question requiring further research. " Andrus recorder. Vol 1. # 2 (Perez Star is a Cousin of Martin Harris another cousin is Emmer harris Martins brother who liced in Brownhelm and Florence. Perez' brother Jared Star joined the LDS Church and comes West.) Laura 1820- Ruluf appears in the Brownhelm Twp.,Huron Co., Ohio census Ruluf Andrews Males 1 under 10 Milo age 4 10-16 Carlo age 16 16-26 Almon (Oran is head of house in Essex Co) Females 3 under 10 Emily 9 Lucina T 4 Evaline Charlotte 3 over 26 but not yet 45 Azubah 43 Yo 1820 tax 80 Ac lot 101 Brownhelm, Huron Co., Ohio 1820 Ruluf builds first bridge across the vermillion in Birmingham MEMOIRS OF TOWNSHIPS - BIRMINGHAM [FLORENCE TWP. ERIE COUNTY, OHIO ] by Uriah Hawley [from the FIRELANDS PIONEER, Sept. 1861 ] The first bridge across Vermillion river, in Birmingham, was built in 1820. The Commissioners of Huron Co. gave 150 or 200 dollars and the inhabitants gave the rest. It stood several years, till a freshet took it down stream. 1821 - Ruluf assessed Personal Property Tax on 3 cattle in Florance, Huron Co., Ohio Others noted Josiah, William ,and Lambert Blackman, William Carter, Levi Fuller, Luther Harris, Uraih Hawley,Aaron, Daniel and Dyon? Higgins, Chester King , Zachariah, Samuel, H,and Asahel Parker Samuel Parker moved onto , Charles and Nathanand Sheldon Smith, Perez , Jared and William Starr (These Stars are cousins to the Martin and Emer Harris familyof Palmyra New York) and Joab Squires. 1822- Harriet born in Brownhelm, Huron Co. Ohio 1822 - Paying taxes in Norwalk, and Brownhelm,Huron Co., Ohio 1824- Ruluf appears in Poll book of Norwalk, Huron, Ohio In otherwords he had moved! 1825- Ruluf votes 11 Oct Norwalk, Huron, Ohio 1827- Ruluf appears in Census of Norwalk, Huron, Ohio 1827 - Ruluf Andrews a householder in District 2, Norwalk, Twp., East part of Twp Norwalk, Ohio 1830 March 23, 1830 NORWALK REFLECTOR "NOTICE. Whereas my son, Milo Andrus has left my employ, without any just provocation. I hereby caution all persons against harboring, trusting or employing him, as they will be prosecuted, according to the strict letter of the law. Ruluff Andrus Norwalk, March 23, 1830" 1830- Ruluf votes on 12 Oct Norwalk, Huron, Ohio 1830 Census (? East)Norwalk Huron Co. Ohio (next door Elijah Page) (Next door Thomas S Squires) 1 Male 50 but not yet 60 Ruluf 57 1 Female 5 but not yet 10 Harriett (8) and one 10 but under 15 Evaline Charlott abt (13) , one fifty but under 60 Azubah 53 1831 Dec 5 NORWALK REFLECTOR - SAW MILL, to let. The subscriber will let HIS Saw Mill, the ensuing season, on liberal terms = which will be well supplied with logs of the first rate timbers. Also twelve acres of land, under good improvement with a room in the dwelling - house for a small family ; or , he will hire a young man to tend said Saw Mill on shares, or give him good wages. -- One. well acquainted with sawing lumber, will meet good encouragement. -- Inquire of Ruluff Andres. Norwalk, Dec. 5. 1831 note in 1833 Oran is advertising thirty acres for sale with a good mill seat on Rattlesnake Creek did he buy the mill or did he always own the "mill seat and Ruluf only owned the improvements? 1832- 1 Jan Azuba dies in Puckerbrush,or East Norwalk, Huron, Ohio 1833- Ruluf receives license to run Tavern in Norwalk, Ohio 1833- Ruluf marries Catharine Bryant in Crawford, Ohio 1834 May (Milo Andrus Autobiography with notes by me) There was one circumstance that occurred before we joined the main camp worthy of notice. As stated before, I had bought my time from my father, and had paid him the amount agreed upon, but still I was not twenty-one by ten months. On this account, and as he was so opposed to my going with the "Mormons," as he called them, he made an effort to stop me. As we had to pass his house on our way, [LKA: The hotel that we have a picture of in Laura's Corner at the miloandrus.org site is near Norwalk on the way from Florence. I believe this is the place that Milo is talking about.] we learned his intention to stop me at the county seat, Norwalk; and Brother Hyde had learned his plan, he went in and made inquiry about a road that we did not intend to travel, and then Brother Nelson Higgins and myself were directed to go around the city and take the road to Mansfield, [LKA: Nelson Higgins is later in the First Quorum of the Seventy with Milo, and is tied into the Henrietta settlers by a tie to the Durands. Ruluf would have recognized him and gone looking for Milo.] and he and the sheriff thinking that we would move slow, did not want to overtake us until we had camped, accordingly father, sheriff and driver drank freely, [LKA: Where were they drinking? Ruluf had a liquor license for his hotel in 1834. I believe the hotel in East Norwalk is where Orson Hyde found them and asked after the wrong road.] and when they started they took the road to Tiffin, that had been inquired after to mislead them, and they drove until long after dark, the team becoming tired they gave up the chase and heard of us the next morning forty miles on the road to Mansfield, and they felt as though they had been badly sold, and gave up and went home. 1845 plat map of the tavern's location can be found at William S Hyde had bought it from Oren in 1844 at which time it was occupied by some of "Oran's realtions". I figure that this was Ruluf and others. http://www.rootsweb.com/~ohhuron/platnorwalk2.htm 1849- (October from Milo in his journal) Monday, 15 - Still in Liverpool. I have just received a letter from William Lang of Madina, Madina Co., Ohio bearing the date 11 September 1849 bringing the news of the death of my father who departed this life on the 1849, 27th of June,at the advanced age of seventy-six years in the Township of Henrietta, Lorain Co. Ohio. He was buried by the side of my other, who departed this life on the 1 Jan 1831 in the township of Norwalk, Huron Co., Ohio, in the fifty-seventh year of her age. She died about one year after the Gospel was restored by an Angel. They are interred in the Church yard in Henrietta near my brother's house. Thus our ancestors are gone, and their children grow up to manhood and womanhood. They are ten in number, four sons and six daughters. Milo, the youngest son... Ruluf and Azubah were burried at the Cemetery on Simeon Durand's land. In recent years and because of an Andrus living across the street while all Durands had long since moved on it was named the Andrus Cemetery. 1877 March 9 Milo does a vicarious baptism, 1877 March 16 Milo does Endowment for Ruluf he is the 2nd person Milo does after Gd Father (These are religious rites Milo was a Mormon) 1939-In a letter of May 17, 1939 Alice Andress Doolittle dau of Carlos Andress and Wealthy Smith, of Dallas, Texas states her GGrandfather, Ruluf Andress came from England with his wife, Azubah White, and settled in Massachusettes, later moving to Hartford Conn, where their son, Ruluf II was born. This has been checked with no documentation located; others are welcom to try. Ruluf Report There are no deeds for Ruluf in either Lorain Co., Ohio or Huron Co., Ohio we still need to check Erie co. at Sandusky. Ruluf was born in either Ct or Vt. The first place that any one has reported seeing a record that we can be certain of being him is in a tax record in 1795 in Poultney VT. The first record that I have that lists him is in the 1800 Census of Vt . as Rufus Andrus. I do not believe after doing extensive research that he ever met Sibil Andrus who was said to be his illegitimate Mother. *Different sources show different places of birth for the first four children. It is fairly established that Ruluf and Azuba lived in Poultney, Rutland, Vermont, until after Almon was born. They lived in Essex County, New York, from then until abt 1815 when they moved to Dunkirk, Chautauga, New York and in abt Sept. 1817, they moved to Brownhelm Twp., Huron County, Ohio. This becomes confusing as well, because that area of Huron county becomes Lorain Co in 1824 and the lower 3 tears of the Brownhelm platt becomes Henrietta in 1827 along with the unorganized area to the south. Township records for Henrietta Twp were checked in 1967 for Ruluf all that was located was the first carpenter Contractor was Ruluf Andress. [LKA: I feel it important to put Milo's autobiography into historical context, as there are numerous points that are likely the way he remembered them, but not historicly verifiable. He would have been about 60 at the writing, with no records to go from.] Milo Andrus, the author of this biography, is the son of Ruluf Andrus and Azuba Smith. My father is a native of Hartford, Connecticut, and my mother of Rutland, Vermont. [LKA: Almon and Harriett in 1880 census say Ruluf was born in Vermont.] They shortly after marriage [LKA: married about 1795] moved to Essex County, [LKA: In 1800 he is listed in Poultney, Vermont as Rufus.] state of New York, where they resided until their ninth child was born--seven boys and three girls, namely: Oran, Almon, Carlo, Erasmus, Harwin, Milo and Milo 2nd. Erasmus, Harwin, and Milo 1st died in childhood, the dates of their deaths I cannot give in consequence of a fire that burnt up the records of my father's family. The names of sisters were Sybil, Sarah, and Emily. My eldest brother, Oran, was born in 1797[LKA:10 Apr 1798]; Sybil was born in 1799;[LKA: 23 Apr 1796] Almon was born in 1801; [LKA: 10 Apr, 1800 in Poultney, Vermont.] the dates of the others I cannot give. The writer of the above, Milo 2nd, was born March 6th, 1814. When five years old, my parents moved to Dunkirk, state of New York, where they resided one and a half years. During that time there was a circumstance occurred, that seems to me to show the protecting hand of the Lord over me. I went to the shore of Lake Erie and got into a skiff on the shore and went to sleep, when the wind arose and took the skiff on the lake, and it was not seen until nearly out of sight. I was then picked up still sound asleep. I have always thought that the Angel of Peace then watched over me. [LKA:The timing of this story is off, as the family moves to Brownhelm, Huron, Ohio--later called Henrietta--in the fall of 1817, which puts the 18 month time frame back to about April of 1816. This would make Milo just barely 2 when he moved to Dunkirk and 3-1/2 when he left. Perhaps the family visited Dunkirk when Milo was 5 years old.] My parents then moved up the lake into the state of Ohio, in Huron County, township of Henrietta, [LKA: Henrietta is not formed until 1827-8] where they had three daughters born, namely: Eveline Charlotte, born October 7th, 1817; Lucina, born 1819; [LKA: According to her census and her family records she is born March 11, 1816, which would have been in the Dunkirk, New York era. Milo's date for her would have her married and having children by 14.] Harriet, born 1821. At the writing of this the two eldest of my brothers are still alive and three of my youngest sisters. [LKA: This puts the writing of the biography between Carlo's death in 1870 and Oran's death in 1874.] They have all rejected the gospel. [LKA: I believe that others in the family may have joined the church and then rejected it.] My mother died January 1st, 1830. My father died in the winter of 1848. [LKA: 1849] I shall now drop the history of the balance of the family, and give a few incidents of my own history. Elena Goodworths Ref. Grave at Andress Cemetery Marriage license for second marriage Crawford Co. Ohio Wms Bros History of Lorain Co (Ohio) 1789 Hyrum L, Andrus, 1980 Biography of grandson James B. Squires from Portrait and Biographical Album of Fayette Co Iowa 1891 Squires Family Bible in poss. Charles L Squires, Strawberry Pt, Iowa 52076 Lorain Co. Ohio Marriages 1824-1848 Elyria City Library Bible record of daughter in poss of mrs MJ Johnson, 5304 Oaklawn Ave Edina Minnisota 55424 Probate record of Oran from District Clerk, Probate Court, Madison Co. Iowa at Winterset, Iowa 50273 Record of Deaths, Erie Co Record of Marriages, Huron Co. Ohio, Old series. Andress family bible in poss, of Mrs, Almon Ray Andress 9344 Brendon Lane Apt. 508-9, No. Olmstead, Ohio Marriages Erie Co. Abbott Family from Mrs Donna Lang T. Pence 2210 Cyperess Gardens Rd., Winter Haven. Florida 33880 (died 1979) Huron and Lorain Counties (Ohio) Commemorative Record, Biographies - Portraits JH Beers and Co 1894 Autobiography of Milo Andrus (Sr.) Driver Family Tree by Miss Ruth Minkler, 1143 W. 20th St. Lorain Ohio Graves Lake Road Cemetery, Brownhelm, Ohio (Rt. # 10 1 Mi N, Kipton.) D. Desert News 21 June 1893 Vol 26:171 (1:20). Civil War records of Son Squire (or Samuel) Fac 355-891 1850 Census of Nauvoo, Hancock Co,. Ill. Gs 2537 Pt 13. Town of Sonora #2146-21??? Grave in cemetery at Monona, Clayton Co., Iowa This info could contain info about any children of Ruluf

Abigail Jane Daley History

Contributor: Tyler Created: 4 months ago Updated: 4 months ago

Abigail Jane Daley written by Stella Fisher Brossard, granddaughter She came in '48, and how brave and courageous she was. With abiding faith in her Heavenly Father and her love for the Gospel of Jesus Christ, she was able to bring her family from Winter Quarters to Salt Lake City, Utah. I write of my grandmother, Abigail Jane Daley Andrus, who left Winter Quarters, the spring of 1848, with five children, endured the hardships of that long trek across the plains, arriving September 24, 1848 in the Heber C. Kimball Company. Her husband, Milo Andrus, was sent from Winter Quarters to England, on a mission, in the spring of 1848. Shortly before he left Winter Quarters, according to his diary, he was sealed to Sara Ann Miles, who accompanied him to England. To the union of Abigail Jane Daley and Milo Andrus were born six children: Mary Jane Andrus, born November 1833, at Florence, Huron County, Ohio; James Andrus, born June 14, 1835, at Florence, Huron County, Ohio; Sara Ann Andrus, born May 31, 1837, at Caldwell, Missouri, died 1838 at Caldwell, Missouri; John Daley Andrus, born April 23, 1837, at Woodside, Adams County, Illinois; Millennium Andrus (my mother) born August 31, 1845, at Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois; Amanda Ann Andrus, born November 19, 1847, at Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, Iowa. With these five children she arrived safely in Salt Lake City, Utah. The oldest boy, James, 13, had to take the place of a man, and with the help of his brother, John, 7 did the work of a man during that long and strenuous trip across the plains. They walked every step of the way, and barefoot too, along with their sister, Mary Jane, and their mother. They had too many times to pick the burrs from their feet. At one time, they came to a place where the Indians had been in battle. They picked out some of the hides to cover their feet, as they were sore and bleeding. My mother, Millenium, was only three, and rode in the wagon with her baby sister, Amanda. Just after my mother returned from Salt Lake City to her home in Oxford, Idaho, after she had attended the Golden Jubilee July 24, 1893, she said to me, "As the parade passed by, my sister, Mary Jane, broke into tears and said, "All it needs to make it complete is James, John, and me to be walking barefoot beside the wagon." There was no complaining from my blue eyed, Dutch grandmother, who walked each day through wind and rain, or days of blistering sun, on the prairie land, or fording deep streams. She was thankful each night that her Heavenly Father, with his protecting care, had given her strength to do her daily tasks, and to arise next morning with courage to continue on. What joy was theirs when they reached the journey's end that day in September. That winter the big wagon box was their home. The boy's bed, being under the wagon, where there was some protection from frost and rain. Grandfather writes in his diary of their wagon, "The winter of 1846 my house, in the basement, was made into a wagon shop and in the spring I started on a journey to the West.' That winter (1848-49) in Salt Lake City fuel was plentiful and easy to obtain, but food was scarce. They experienced a hard winter. A man by the name of Session kept them many times from starving. The Saints had put in their crops, but the crickets had taken them. Not half will ever be told of what they endured. My mother told me, more than once, and each time tears would fill her eyes and a lump come in her throat, that during the scarcity of food in Salt Lake City before help came, that her mother, of whom I write, made some bread from her last bit of meal; and when it was baked and ready to eat there was not enough for all, so she divided it among her children and while they were eating it she went behind the house so that she could not see them eating, for she was as hungry herself. How a mother loves her children and how she sometimes has to sacrifice. Abigail's children were hard workers and sacrificed for one another. The oldest boy, James now 13, was of tough fiber and brave spirit. In the canyons he worked long and hard to get fuel against the winter. Grown men, admiring the boy's pluck, would aid him, and he would proudly drive home with his load of wood. The second son, John, of a quieter, less ambitious nature, early learned the use of fire arms and became a first class shot. With his old muzzle loader he killed great numbers of wild ducks, as these were plentiful and sell them for fifty cents. Mary Jane did washing every day of the week and ironed by moonlight to obtain the few groceries they could buy. The younger girls herded the cows and pulled "pig-weed" and "mustard" and other edible weed; and, when evening came and cows were brought in, they had aprons full of weeds, which were cooked and became a mess of greens. In 1850, my grandfather returned from England. Times were better then, crops had been harvested, wild fruit picked and dried, and a log cabin built. The food was simple, consisting of cereal grains; whole corn, fresh in season, dried, or parched for winter; wheat cracked to coarse bits, or sometimes parched; milk and butter; some eggs; and fowl; wild meat at times, venison and ducks. Sugar was had in the form of sorghum or molasses, as a form of sugar cane would be grown in Utah, and a few crude sorghum mills existed. Potatoes, carrots and cabbages were coming into production. So, all in all, after the Latter-day Saints had passed their first few years of bitter struggle, their food supply was ample and well balanced. Fruit was scarce until orchards could grow to maturity. The canyons produced a small amount of wild berries. Copying from grandfather's diary again, after giving an account of his work in the Mission Field, his trip across the plains where he was Captain of fifty-five wagons in 1850, he writes, "After one week's rest I went to work in the 19th ward and built me a house; and about the first of January, 1851, my wife, Jane and I parted." In 1852, Abigail Jane married Elisha W. Vannette . To this union a little girl was born, who died in infancy; and later another daughter, Elizabeth was born, who became the wife of John Bullen. My grandmother later moved to Richmond, Utah, and spent the rest of her life there. I remember my dear old grandmother whom I dearly loved and who died when I fourteen years of age, 27 October 1894. I often visited her when a child, as Oxford, Idaho, was only thirty miles from Richmond, Utah. Much much father than it is today though, since the mode of travel is so different. Her hair was always done with ringlets on each side of her face, and a bob in the back of her head. How well I liked the cottage cheese. She called it Dutch cheese; and those pottawattamie plum preserves; and the bedstead, so high from the floor, with the white curtains all around it. She kept her little home immaculate Her sister, Nancy Mariah, who never married, always made her home with grandmother until grandmother died. Grandmother was born in Marcellus, Onandago County, New York, January 26, 1815. Her father, John Daley Jr., and his wife Elizabeth Ennis Daley, with their children, moved to Ohio in her early girlhood. Her father was baptized as a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, in 1832. A month after her 18th birthday, Abigail Jane Daley married Milo Andrus, on February 21, 1833, in Florence, Huron County, Ohio. Milo Andrus was the son of Ruluf Andrus and Azubah Smith. Abigail Jane descended from a sturdy race of people, the French Huguenots, and that illustrious family, "The DeWitts," who saved Holland for Holland. Abigail's grandmother was Hannah DeWitt, who was a descendant of Clars DeWitt of Holland, who came with the West Indies Company to what is now New York (1612). The DeWitts at one time were virtually rulers of Holland. Being among the earliest settlers of New York, they have helped make the history of this great nation. Her pedigree on this line is unbroken to the year 1295. The record is found in the Royal Library, at "The Hague" Holland. How proudly my mother used to say, "DeWitt Clinton, thrice Governor of New York was my mother's cousin. Abigail Jane's grandfather, James Ennis, married Hannah DeWitt. The mother of James Ennis was Eleanor Hornbeck, whose mother was Eleanor Cuddeback, whose father was Jacob Cuddeback or Cuddeback. The emigrant ancestor, Jacob Cuddeback or Cuddebec, as it should be spelled, reached America when a very young man. He came with Peter Gumaer, both settling in the wilderness of New York. In 1690, we find them among the first settlers of Deerpark, Orange County, New York. It was difficult for these young men, who had come from families of wealth, to accustom themselves to manual labor. Jacob Cuddeback and his sons were stalwart strong men; naturally, the men at that time were all inventors and mechanics. The men of the family served through all the wars and many times their homes were laid waste by the Indians. The strong stone houses, being the largest, built by Cuddeback and DeWitt families, were used as forts during Indian Wars. Jacob Cuddeback lived to be 100 years old. (Taken from "History of Deer Park, by Peter Gumaer or Cumaer. We also find more of Jacob Cuddebac's life from page 184 on.) Grandmother and grandfather Andrus were proud of their sons, who knew no fear when fighting Indians. James and John Andrus figured in the early history of Utah, especially when trouble with the Indians arose. Grandmother's children were very devoted to their mother and provided well for her and her sister in their declining years, and were all at her bedside when she died; and had tenderly cared for her in her last illness. She was always friendly with her first husband, Milo Andrus, who in his later years took great comfort with the children of his first wife and their families. Abigail was again sealed to Milo Andrus in the Logan Temple on 17 March 1886. She and her husband, Milo Andrus, were born just a year apart; that is, one born in 1814 and grandmother in 1815. They were baptized a year apart: grandfather 1832 and grandmother 1833; and Grandfather Andrus died in 1893 and Grandmother died in Richmond, Utah October 27, 1894, and is buried in the Richmond cemetery.

Milo Andrus (in his own words)

Contributor: Tyler Created: 4 months ago Updated: 4 months ago

Milo Andrus, the author of this biography, is the son of Ruluf Andrus and Azuba Smith. My father is a native of Hartford, Connecticut, and my mother of Rutland, Vermont. They shortly after marriage moved to Essex County in the state of New York, where they resided until their ninth child was born. They had seven boys and three girls, namely: Oran, Almon, Carlo, Erasmus, Harwin, Milo, and Milo (the second). Erasmus, Harwin, and Milo (the first) died in childhood. The dates of their deaths I cannot give in consequence of a fire that burnt up the records of my father’s family. The names of my sisters were Sybil, Sarah, and Emily. My eldest brother, Oran, was born in 1797; Sybil was born in 1799; Almon was born in 1801; the dates of the others I cannot give. The writer of the above, Milo (the second), was born March 6, 1814. When I was five years old, my parents moved to Dunkirk, in the state of New York, where they resided for one and a half years. During that time, there was a circumstance that occurred that seems to me to show the protecting hand of the Lord over me. I went to the shore of Lake Erie and got into a skiff on the shore and went to sleep when the wind arose and took the skiff on the lake, and it was not seen until nearly out of sight. I was then picked up still sound asleep. I have always thought that the Angel of Peace then watched over me. My parents then moved up the lake into the state of Ohio, in Huron County, in the township of Henrietta, where they had three daughters born, namely: Evaline Charlotte, born October 7, 1817; Lucina, born in 1819; and Harriet, born in 1821. At the writing of this sketch [January 1875], the two eldest of my brothers are still alive and three of my youngest sisters. They have all rejected the gospel. “Milo, the youngest son, has embraced the fullness of the gospel as revealed by the Lord in the last days, in consequence of which the balance of the family have cast me out of their feelings. The Lord be thanked I feel to rejoice that I am counted worthy to suffer for the truth’s sake.” My mother died on January 1, 1830. My father died in the winter of 1848. I shall now drop the history of the balance of the family and give a few incidents of my own history. After the death of my mother, I bought the balance of my time until I was twenty-one from my father, for which I paid him one hundred and fifty dollars. In the spring of 1832, I met an Elder of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, though I should say, previous to this, that I had my mind much exercised about a future state and had read the views of Alexander Campbell, being the nearest to the truths of the New Testament. I had been baptized by Elder Orson Hyde, then a minister of that section, but when I compared my scriptures with the teachings of the Elder of the true church of Christ, I found that he had the truth. After trying for nearly one year, I yielded to baptism. “[The Elder] had with him the Book of Mormon, which he said had been translated from the plates by Joseph Smith. He also informed me that Joseph Smith had organized a church, called The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and that he was an Elder of that church. From him I obtained the Book of Mormon. On reading this history, I found to my great satisfaction and joy, that which I had so long desired. But then a question of great importance was before me, which was this: If the history was true, then was the doctrinal part true? This was indeed a question of importance. How to demonstrate it I did not know. I had read in the New Testament scriptures, ‘If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God, that giveth to all men liberally, and upbraideth not.’ I also found that Christ had said that if anyone would obey his doctrine he would know for himself. Consequently, after comparing the doctrinal part of the Book of Mormon with the doctrines of the New Testament, I found that they very well harmonized. It is true that in consequence of the many councils and synods that have given the Jewish scriptures their own rendering, they have left out some of the plain and precious parts, but in the main they agree. Finding this out did not give me the knowledge that I desired. The question was, ‘How shall I get the much-desired information?’ ‘Obey’ was the word of the Elder, who said that he was authorized to declare that I should get the Holy Spirit by doing so, by which I could testify of the truth as well as himself. But I was afraid of being led away or deceived. However, after much prayer and fasting, I went into the water with as humble a heart as I had power to possess, asking the Lord to help me in the days of my anxiety to know the truth; and, to my unspeakable joy, the Lord in his infinite goodness gave me that assurance, which has remained with me from that day to this, for which I feel truly thankful.” One month and nine days previous to my baptism, I was united in marriage to Abigail Jane Daley, whose father had been baptized into the Church of Christ about one year before. We were married February 21, 1833, and baptized April 12, 1833. “When I at first received this gospel by revelation from on high, I contemplated the results. I did not receive it in view of this short space of time allotted to man for an earthly existence. No: I embraced it to continue forever and ever. And now . . . my feelings and hopes are the same, only more abundant, and I feel now that my nature has become so allied to the principles of the gospel that with me it is the kingdom of God or nothing.” “I remember when we first received the gospel, our feelings were that Zion was already established, and that we had nothing to do but to step into the enjoyment of the blessings. We seemed to forget in our joy that we had our salvation to work out, and now we know that it is not to be entered into and enjoyed so easily as we first anticipated.” “If you did not experience, when you were first baptized, that you ran antagonistic to feelings of your friends and neighbors, your experience has been different from mine. Many times I have thought that I could transmit the feelings which inspired me to others, and give them a conception of the great truths I felt and knew to be of God, but very often I found that, if not exactly turned out of doors, it has been plainly intimated to me to leave, and I found I had to make headway against a strong tide.” I was ordained an Elder on May 5, 1833, under the hands of Joseph Wood. I started on my first mission in June 1833 in company with Joseph Wood, traveled a distance of seventy miles preaching every day, and baptized three. We came to Kirtland where the Prophet Joseph Smith resided with his family. The quarterly conference that came off in a few days after our arrival changed my traveling companion, and I was coupled with Ova Truman. Joseph Wood and his fellow laborer went to Philadelphia, and I with my new companion was sent to the southern part of the state of Ohio, to return in three months to the next quarterly conference. We were not very successful and baptized only two persons. After this conference, I was permitted to return home and preach among the branches until winter, when we had a call from the Prophet Joseph by his brother Hyrum to get ready and go with the company of elders to the state of Missouri, a call known as “Zion’s Camp.” Our first daughter and first child was born on November 15, 1833. During the winter of 1833 and spring of 1834, we were instructed to labor and get all the money that we could, to get good rifles, and to make ready to start by the first of May 1834. We accordingly started from Florence, Huron County, Ohio, on the seventh of May 1834. These were from the Florence branch: Nelson Higgins, Hyrum Blackman, Asey Fields, and Milo Andrus. My brother-in-law, James Daley, went with us as far as Mansfield, Richland County, Ohio, where we met with the Prophet Joseph, his brother Hyrum, and the rest of the camp from the east. Our leader was Elder Orson Hyde. There was one circumstance that occurred before we joined the main camp worthy of notice. As I stated before, I had bought my time from my father and had paid him the amount agreed upon, but still I was not twenty-one by ten months. On this account, and as he was so opposed to my going with the “Mormons,” as he called them, he made an effort to stop me. As we had to pass his house on our way, we learned his intentions to stop me at the county seat, Norwalk. Brother Hyde had learned his plan; he went in and made inquiry about a road that we did not intend to travel. Then Brother Nelson Higgins and myself were directed to go around the city and take the road to Mansfield, and he and the sheriff, thinking that we would move slow, did not want to overtake us until we had camped. Accordingly, father, sheriff, and driver drank freely, and when they started they took the road to Tiffin that had been inquired after to mislead them, and they drove until long after dark. The team becoming tired, they gave up the chase and heard of us the next morning, forty miles on the road to Mansfield, and they felt as though they had been badly sold and gave up and went home. On the eleventh of May, we joined the main camp west of Mansfield; on the twelfth, the camp was organized and the law of consecration was for the first time presented. We shelled out to the last cent, and our money went into a commissary’s hands and our supplies were bought by him. I shall not try to name the particulars of this journey. We journeyed on causing considerable excitement, and receiving much good instructions from the Prophet Joseph. After we got into the state of Missouri, or rather, before our company had crossed the Mississippi River, we went into the dense forest as a company, and there offered up to the Lord our fervent prayers that He would spare our lives, and permit us to return to our families. We felt that it would be so, and thanks be to the Lord—not one of us was taken by the cholera that visited the camp that afternoon. Two weeks after we landed on Fishing River, in Clay County, Missouri, where the revelation was given on June 22, 1834 [D&C Section 105]. About this time the cholera made its appearance among us, as it had been predicted by the Prophet. Thirteen of our good brethren were taken away by the dread monster. The camp broke up partly, the Saints scattered around, and the Lord turned away the scourge. The Lord permitted us to return after we stayed there for three weeks. We got back to our families the last day of September 1834, careworn and much fatigued. I had the cholera on the way home, but the Lord healed me, and then we went on our way rejoicing. In the summer of 1835, I traveled in the state of New York with Nathan Baldwin, baptized several, and the following winter went to school in Kirtland. In the spring of 1836 I was in Kirtland at the dedication of the Temple and the endowment of the Elders that the Lord had promised as a reward for their offerings. The blessings of the Lord were poured out abundantly. There is one thing that I would here relate that was a great joy to me, and that was when the Holy Ghost was poured out on the Elders. I saw fire descend and rest on the heads of the Elders, and they spoke with tongues and prophesied. On our return to Kirtland from the mission in the east, I went to school in Kirtland, studied grammar, and then studied Hebrew under Professor —— of New York. On going back to Florence, Ohio, I was chosen as the President of the Florence Branch, with instructions to move them to Missouri in the fall of 1836. We went as far as Terre Haute, Indiana; when it was late and cold, we put up for the winter. Our eldest son, James, was a babe three months old, and we came near losing him to human appearance, but the hand of the Lord was in it. We raised up a branch of the Church in that place. Early in the spring of 1837, we started for Missouri, and arrived in Caldwell County in time to put in a crop. In 1838 we were mobbed out of the county. We had one child born in Missouri, a girl, namely Sarah Ann. We went to Illinois in the winter of 1838, and the next summer we lost our little girl born in Missouri. In the fall, after I had the chills and fever for two months and was not able to scarcely walk, I was sent on a mission to Canada. But owing to the Patriot War, we were not permitted to go to Canada, and I spent the winter preaching in the state of Ohio. I returned home in the spring of 1840 and spent my time in laboring and preaching in the counties around Nauvoo until the spring of 1844. I was then sent to the state of Ohio with Elder John Loveless. We traveled in the south part of Ohio for two months when we heard of the assassinations of the Prophet Joseph and his brother Hyrum. We went home as quick as steam would take us, arriving in time to see their mortal remains before they were interred. I then went to Carthage Jail, where they were murdered, and saw the floor stained with the best blood of the present generation. The people were all fleeing for fear of justice overtaking them. I called at Hamilton’s Hotel to see Elder John Taylor, who was wounded in the jail. Then I went to Adams County, where my family had fled for safety; I found them well but much alarmed. “In consequence of my long and intimate acquaintance with Joseph Smith, I know that he was a good man and a great prophet, because that which he prophesied came to pass. . . . As far as I have ability, I am willing to bear this testimony to the inhabitants of the earth, and pray the Lord to accompany this testimony with his Holy Spirit to all the honest in heart.” After we had mourned the loss of our Prophet and Patriarch for a few weeks, during which time I was chosen one of the Nauvoo police, I helped to watch the city by night and worked on the Temple by day. The work of the endowments commenced in the fall of 1845 and winter of 1846. I spent six weeks of the time in the Temple and was much blessed. During the past four years, we had two more children born, namely: John D. Andrus and Millennium. After the death of the Prophet Joseph Smith, I was ordained one of the Presidents of the Tenth Quorum of the Seventies. In the winter of 1846, my house, in the basement, was made into a wagon shop, and in the spring we started on our journey to the west. We overtook the main camp at Pisgah, and from there went to Council Bluffs, where the government called on us for a battalion of 500 men to go to Mexico. After the battalion was started, I was sent forward with others to the number of one hundred and fifty wagons, went as far as the Pawnee Indian Village, and then went 150 miles to the northwest among the Ponca Indians. After staying there for two months, we went back to Winter Quarters and stayed and farmed in that county in the year 1847. In the spring of 1848, I was sent on a mission to England. Shortly before I left, Sarah Ann Miles was sealed to me, and she accompanied me to England. We arrived in Liverpool on the first of August, and on the thirteenth of August at a general conference, I was appointed President of the Liverpool Conference, which place I filled to the best of my ability until January 1850 when I was released to come home. During my stay in the conference, there were three new branches added and between two and three hundred added to the Church by baptism. I baptized thirty persons in one evening. The Lord made manifest His power in healing the sick and in blessing the Church with signs following the believers. Milo Jr. was born in Liverpool, October 1, 1848. We left Liverpool in January 1850 onboard the ship Argo. Jeter Clinton presided over the company; we were eight weeks and three days on the ship from Liverpool to New Orleans with some sickness and two deaths on the passage. I was sick with the cholera, my wife had poor health all the way, and Milo Jr. was sick (we thought that he would die), but the blessings of the Lord brought us through. “On our journey up, we passed through the country of Caldwell County, Missouri where the Saints once lived. When I contemplate the many hardships that the Church has gone through it causes me to marvel that so many have lived as have and taken the pressure.” We came up the Mississippi River on board the steamer Uncle Sam with Captain Van Dosen, master. We landed at Kanesville early in May and the first company of Saints was organized early in June. I was chosen as a captain over 55 wagons. We had a good time on the plains, arriving in Salt Lake City on last day of August, having but one death on the journey, that of a stranger going to California. I baptized fifteen persons on the journey. James Leithead and Richard Hopkins were clerks of the company. A more full account of the mission to England is recorded in the Tenth Quorum of the Seventies record. After one week’s rest, I went to work in the 19th Ward and built me a house. About the first of January 1851, my wife Jane and I parted. In June 1851 I married the widow Tuttle, and the following November my wife, Sarah Ann Miles, died. I married Adeline Alexander in March 1852. In December 1852, I married Mary Ann Webster. In the spring of 1854, I was sent to St. Louis to preside over the stake there. “We arrived in St. Louis . . . all well and in good spirits, having made the trip in twenty-eight traveling days. . . . I began to feel after the Saints, and found many disaffected, and the Holy Spirit came upon me when I thought of the best plan to save the most and I counseled them to renew their covenant by baptism, and by making new records, as the old were imperfect. I also opened the door to those who had been cut off, only forbidding such as were forbidden by all laws this side of the mountains. The result [was that] the Saints [were] rejoicing and bearing testimony that they never felt better in their lives.” I stayed there for one year and rebaptized and confirmed about 800 Saints. I was sent up the river to buy cattle for the emigration of 1855, and in the fall was appointed by E. Snow and D. Spencer to bring the last company of sixty-three wagons home. “When I came to the shores of the Missouri River on the identical spot where the camp of Israel landed June 1846, it will be impossible for me with my power of description to give even a faint idea of what I felt. On that spot once stood the prophet and apostles who hold the living oracles of God, the destinies of men, nations, and kingdoms on this earth in their hands but how little known and understood by poor fallen men. I then turned my eyes and gazed at those distant bluffs that were spotted with our wagons and teams, with our wives at work, and our children sporting and playing over those hills, whilst the vast plains below were filled with horses and cattle that moved the Israel of God to their home of freedom in the valleys of the mountains. I then looked upon that piece of table ground where the liberty pole was raised, and the proud American eagle above the stars and stripes unfurled its wings in the fresh breezes of heaven’s atmosphere, whilst the drum and the rife called loudly for volunteers to swell the ranks of the American Army to take part in the achievement of more glory and more territory to these United States, called the land of the free and the home of the brave. I have passed through the countries over lands that the general government have had our money for, and after that, we [were] forced to leave them, contrary to every principle of law of right either of God or of man, but the spirit seems to whisper, ‘Be still, and know that I am God.’” “[On our arrival to Kansas], we pitched our tents, and when night came on we had a peaceable and quiet place to lay down—the green grass around us, the rolling prairies in the distance, clad in their mantles of green; it was a change from the muddy Missouri that all seemed to enjoy with great delight. To add to our happiness, we met with Brother Ballantyne and the members of his little camp under the open canopy of heaven and the shining beauties that the delightful moon gave to prairie fields, and the singing of the sweet singers of Israel as they died away in the distance under heaven’s high-arched halls that were spread above our heads, causing all hearts that were not past feeling to rejoice, while we returned thanks unto the Lord for all past blessings.” I arrived in Salt Lake City late in October, and in December of the same year married Elizabeth Brooks, Ann Brooks, and Jane Munday. In February 1857 I married Margaret Boyce, and in February 1858 I was married to Emma Covert. I was acting bishop of the Big Cottonwood Ward in 1858, and in the fall of 1859 was appointed to another mission to England. For the first six months, I was appointed to travel the conferences; for the last nine months I presided over the Birmingham District, embracing the Birmingham, Warwickshire, and Staffordshire conferences. In the summer of 1861 I started for home with 700 Saints on board the ship Underwriter. I was appointed president of the company, and we had a good passage to New York with no deaths. I was then appointed to take charge of 900 to Florence, Nebraska, on the cars. I stayed in Florence for five weeks, was then appointed Captain to take a company of 66 wagons across the plains and arrived in Salt Lake City in September 1861. In the fall of 1870 I married Francena Tuttle. In the fall of 1870 I was again sent to the states on a mission. I came back in the spring of 1871. Since that time I have been in Utah on the Home Missionary List and have worked with my hands for a living. At this date, January 9th, 1875, I am living in St. George, Utah. “My maxim is and has been . . . to act when I am called upon either to preach or do anything else for the building up of the kingdom of God.”

History of William Duncan

Contributor: Tyler Created: 4 months ago Updated: 4 months ago

William Duncan – 1815-1875 Almost two months after Napoleon was defeated at Waterloo, June 18. 1815, William Duncan was born in Newton. a small mining village in the Pencaitiand Parish in Haddingtonshire, Scotland. William, son of Jane (or Jean) Hogg and Henry Duncan, was born on August 7. 1815 and was christened in Pencaitland on August 20. 1815. Pencaitland is just 3 3/4 miles S. E. of Tranent. William was the seventh child in a family of eight. The first two children. John (8 February 1803). and Joan (16 January 1805. were born in Penston which, is in the Gladsmuir Parish. The next six children were born in Newton in Pencaitiand Parish. George (12 July 1806, James (8 November 1808), Peter (5 March 1813, William (7 August 1815). and John (5 November 1817). Williams's father. grandfather, great grandfather. and great-great grandfather were all born in Penston. in the Gladsmuir Parish. All of them were colliers. From 1608-1799, the Colliers of Scotland were virtually slaves. They were not allowed to leave coal mining nor to move from one place to another without the written consent of the mine owners. This situation came about because of the great need for coal. Being a collier was hard work. and this was a way to keep the working miners from finding employment elsewhere. However, in 1799 an act of Parliament freed the miners and they were allowed to move about freely. It is interesting to note that with this new found freedom their wages were lowered. In an interview. William's oldest living son, Adam. was quoted as saying that his grandparents, Jean and Henry Duncan, died when William was quite young and he was left on his own to roam about. It is not known how old William was when he went into the coal mines. He could have been as young as 8 years old, pulling coal cars. It was quite common for boys of his age to be in the mines. One can only imagine how a boy so young would feel going deep down in the dark, damp coal mines with only a candle to light his way. When 20 years of age. William married Mary Brown who was the daughter of Catherine Smith and Adam Brown. Mary was born in Tranent. a parish just three miles from Gladsmuir. Her father was also a collier. Mary was four years older than William. In the parish register of Tranent, Scotland it reads: "William Duncan. coalier at Crophouse. and Mary Brown, daughter of Adam Brown coalier in Tranent were proclaimed 3. 15. and 22 and were married 27 February 1835." Their banns were read or posted three times as was required by the Church of Scotland. Mary and William had six children. Henry. ~March 1835 (the Salt Lake Temple sealing record lists his birth 5 March 1837); Adam, 7 June 1839; Peter. 1 September 1841; Henry, June 1844: Catherine, 28 December 1844; James John William. 4 November 1850. The two sons that they named Henry, died as children. The first missionaries from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints went to Scotland in December of 1839. The first baptism was in January of 1840, When and where William came into contact with the Mormon missionaries is not known. but he was baptized on 10 of August 1845. His wife, Mary. did not join until three years later on 3rd April 1840. He and his family are listed in the Hunterfield Branch records. It says that William was immersed by David McIfat and confirmed by Henry McEwar. Mary and William moved quite often. It is assumed that it was necessary for them to do so to find work. Their first son. Henry was born in Tranent. Adam was born in Craighill, Peter in Tranent, Henry in Cowden, Catherine in Cowdenfoot, and James John William in Cowden. Peter, the 3rd son of William and Mary, wrote a short genealogy. He wrote that when he was two (in 1843) the family moved to "Cowden Engin'' in the county of Edinburgh. His father worked in the coal pit of the "Duke of Leckagh''. in the Gazetier of Scotland it says that the Duke of Buccleugh. who owned about seven-eighths of the Daikeith Parish, opened up some new coal fields on his property in 1838. He built a bridge over the North Elk river which made the property more accessible. The new area was called, Cowden, and was about a mile and one half from Dalkeith. The "Duke of Leckaght, was probably the Duke of Buccleugh. The family stayed in Cowden for about 7 years. They then moved to Penston for about six months and then went to Prestonpans. From there they went to Prestonlinks where they stayed for three years or so. Peter mentioned that a new works had started up that was called Gladsmuir iron works. He said that the family stayed there for another three years. Then they moved to Tranent and then back to the iron works where they stayed until they emigrated to the United States in 1861. In 1801. large quantities of ironstone were discovered on land between the river Clyde and Forth. This area contained both iron and coal and was mined extensively. The hot-blast furnace was invented in 1828. In a letter written to John C. Duncan, (William's grandson) from Edinburgh. Scotland dated 12 December 1904, "I believe it would interest your father very much to hear that you had paid a visit to his old home in the 'Blast'. I daresay that you did not think much of it yourself when you saw it. I can remember the surprise you got and the remark you made. 'God be thanked they got away from this old place.' I do believe that it has turned out for the good of you all that they did get away from it or else you might have all been brought up to a life underground and no prospects of anything better." This letter was written by Henry Duncan, the son of William's youngest brother, John. In the 1851 census, we find that William and his family resided in the Dalkeith Parish at Cowdenfoot. He and his 12 year old son. Adam , were listed as coal miners. In the 1861 census the Duncan family was in the Gladsmuir Parish in the village of Iron Works. William's occupation was listed as an iron miner as were his two sons. Adam (21) and Peter (19). Catherine (14) and James (10) were listed as "scholars". In an old history written by Jennie Chapman, it says that Adam. when a young boy' had an accident and injured his knee and was unable to walk. William "called the members of the house together and offered a special prayer in his behalf. He was healed instantly and got out of bed and walked--his knee was then as well as the other...a miracle was wrought by anointing and laying hands on the sick." In the Tranent Branch records it shows that William baptized and\or confirmed five people in the year 1857. He and his family were obviously active and living in or near Tranent at that period of time. The family worked hard and saved their money so they could go to Salt Lake City, Utah. On April 19. 1861, they left Scotland and went to Liverpool where they boarded the "Underwriter" which set sail on 23 April 1861. They came steerage and paid cash. He made a deposit for his fare that came to L.22 5.16 D.0. "Description of Emigrants--W States." They were listed on the passenger list as: William Duncan 45 miner from Gladsmuir iron Works Mary Duncan 45 wife Tranent Scotland Adam Duncan 21 miner Peter Duncan 15 miner Catherine Duncan 14 James Duncan 10 From the Church Emigration records the following information is given. "The clipper ship 'Underwriter' cleared from the Port of Liverpool, England, April 22, 1861 and sailed on the evening of the 23rd for New York having on board 618 emigrating Saints under the presidency of Elder Milo Andrus, assisted by Elder Homer Duncan and Charles W. Penrose as counselors...Apostles Amasa M. Lyman, Charles C. Rich and George Q. Cannon visited the ship on Sunday May 21st, as she lay in the river, and held a meeting, giving the emigrating Saints their parting blessings and many choice instructions relative to their journey. After a successful voyage, the 'Underwriter' arrived at New York on Tuesday, May 21st. No deaths occurred on the voyage with the exception of two small children who were sick when they were brought on board. Through the aid of some contributions. most of the passengers left New York for Florence on the evening of May 23rd, at which point they were to wait for the teams from Utah to arrive, to take them across the plains. On the voyage across the ocean the emigrating Saints were divided into nine wards, four on each deck, with a separate ward for the bachelors. A suitable man was placed over each ward...On Sunday April 28th the sacrament was administered in all the wards simultaneously. In the afternoon at 3 o'clock Elder Penrose preached a discourse on deck. In the evening a fresh breeze of wind was experienced which continued on Monday and Tuesday and most of the emigrants were sea sick,.." In a letter written to the leaders and Saints in Britain We will not stop to describe the peculiar pleasures attached to this delightful recreation, (sea-sickness' as we do not wish that the Saints, by anticipation. should be deprived of its peculiar sensations and benefits. They must wait with patience until they come. Experience will be the best school Master. Meetings were also held on Sunday May 12th and 29th. "...The general health of the passengers during the whole voyage was good; no epidemic of any kind manifesting itself. The Elders spoke in glowing terms of the good feeling exhibited by the Saints during the voyage, the power of God being manifest upon many occasions and the Saints governed themselves according to the counsel which had been given them almost without exception. On their arrival at New York about May 22, the company was met by Bros. Pratt. Erastus Snow, Nathaniel V. Jones, and Hooper." (Millennial Star) In a letter written by Edwin Scott to President Cannon written on April 16, 1861, some of the conditions the emigrating members had to cope with were described. "The Saints are generally very poor in this Conference (England, but Scotland could be similar or worse). They are chiefly farm- laborers, the men earning from 8s (shillings) to 10s. per week and the women about 4s. Truly is the saying of Jesus fulfilled--to the poor the Gospel is preached, yet, with all their poverty, they are rich in faith, and they are doing all they can to build up the kingdom of God. It might be of interest to note what was happening in America in 1861. Virginia had seceded from the Union and recognized the Southern Confederacy. North Carolina had seized the Government forts, and all the Slave States were taking up arms for the defense of the South. President Lincoln, in a proclamation. declared that all the ports of the seceded states were to be blockaded. Troops were arriving in Washington from all over the northern states. Fort Sumpter had surrendered and both sides were preparing for war. This was the beginning of the Civil War. The following was published in the Millennial Star along with letters from New York announcing the safe arrival of the various companies of Saints. "The voyage of the 'Underwriter' is described as being a happy one, and characterized by a good spirit and feeling among the Saints. They landed on the 22nd of May, having been one day longer on the passage than the 'Manchester. Both however made the trip in much quicker than average time." N. V. Jones wrote from New York under the date of May 24th: "This company were landed at Castle Garden on the 22nd instant. and proceeded for the West last evening. I have succeeded in forwarding. besides the missionaries. about 35 adult passengers who were deficient of means of proceed further than New York. which gave much Joy to them and their fellow-travellers. I was enabled to do so by donations received. Brother Orson Pratt. Erastus Snow. and Goopere were here on the arrival or the Saints, which has proved a great blessing to the Saints." Again in a letter to George Q. Cannon written by Orson Pratt on May 24. 1861. "The ship 'Underwriter' arrived on Tuesday the 21st, having had a prosperous time...Through the aid of some contributions, the most of the passengers left for Florence last evening at which point they will be obliged to wait some time for the teams from Utah." William, his family and the others arrived in Florence, Nebraska on June 2nd. They had a 6 week waiting period. Then the long journey across the plains began. The Church wagons that had been sent from Salt Lake with supplies arrived and the company started west. On May 2, 1861 Brigham Young wrote the following: "...We confidently anticipate that the assistance now forwarded will clear Florence of all the Saints who may be there wishing to come through this season and notwithstanding the excitement abroad in the land. we anticipate that the brethren will travel so compactly, act so faithfully and prudently, and constantly be so on their guard as to travel in safety to themselves, animals, and property. "It is supposed by some that the Indians on the route east of the Mountains may be inclined to be a little troublesome; but the four companies from here are particularly instructed to be ever on the alert, and at no time to be so far apart but what they can assist each other upon short notice and Brother Joseph W. Young, Ira Eldredge, Joseph Horne and John R. Murdock, with Brothers Jones and Gates, will organize and arrange all the companies to travel in like manner. and each company reasonably strong of itself. As there is no danger in being safe' ? we trust that the immigration will be faithful and prudent in their conduct, and that their faithfulness and good conduct will so secure to them the blessings of Heaven in their travellings and camping, that they will be privileged to arrive safely in our 'mountain retreat'." No one was permitted to get far behind because of danger from the Indians. At nights the wagons were driven in a circle "forming a kind of corral". Everyone stayed on the inside of the circle. Even the oxen were kept on the inside so they would not wander off nor could the Indians steal them. The Duncan family arrived in "Great Salt Lake City" on the 13 September 1861 having traveled in Joseph Horne's Company. In l861, telegraph lines were completed via Great Salt Lake City to California. The Salt Lake Theater was completed n that year but was dedicated in March of 1862. The first mining district was formed in Beaver County, Utah. General Conner was sure that there were extensive deposit of precious minerals in the area. In September of 1863. gold and sliver were found in Bingham Canyon. Conner found silver at the head of Little Cottonwood Canyon. In 1862 a bill was passed in Congress stating that polygamy would not be allowed in U. S. territories. This year also' William received his patriarchal blessing. The Indians destroyed a mail station between Fort Bridger and North Platte, burned coaches, mail bags, killed the driver and stole the stock. In 1886 a congressional Act was approved giving Nevada a 60 mile wide strip containing 20,850 square miles which was formerly a part of Utah. The year of 1867 had great grasshopper damage in July. The first conference was held in the "large tabernacle" This was started in 1863 and was completed three years later. in GSL City on October 6. 1867 at the conference which lasted for three days, 163 missionaries were called to strengthen the settlements in So. Utah. It is possible that William and his family attended the opening of the Tabernacle. The Duncan's arrived in Salt Lake City at a time of 'stress and strife". There was much unrest and political logging for power. There were factions that wanted to break the Mormon influence in the area. The national press wrote anti-Mormon editorials. General Conner invited miners to Utah to help in "subversion" of the Mormon Church. He wrote, ''As set forth in former communications. my policy in this territory has been to invite hither a !large Gentile and loyal population sufficient by peaceful means through the ballot box to overwhelm the Mormons by mere force of numbers, and thus wrest from the church--disloyal and traitorous to the core--the absolute and tyrannical control of temporal and civil affairs, or at least a population numerous enough to put a check on the Mormon authorities... (Chronological History of the Church, Later he softened his tone towards the Mormons, William and his family were miners. Brigham Young was opposed to speculative mining. He advised the church members to "remain true to the call of common-sense duty, that of building homes. making farms. planting orchards. establishing home manufacture, developing coal and iron mines." He knew that this area would be a "gathering place" for ten of thousands. This was represented to be better for the members or the church than joining the mad rush for finding precious metals. William was 46 years old when he and his family came to Utah. In the Chapman history it said that he and his son. Peter. went to work for Jesse Little who was a furniture maker in Salt Lake City. Peter hauled timber from the mountains and William prepared the wood for the cabinet makers. In the 1868 city directory it records that William Duncan was a farmer living in the first Ward. His residence was on 8th East between 6th and 7th South. His grandson. John C. Duncan. said that the family had ,1/4 of the block and William's house faced west on 8th East in what now would be the 2nd house from the corner of 7th South. If so, this would have given them about 2 1\2 acres or land. They had a flowing well, garden, fruit trees and some livestock, etc. From the book PROMINENT MEN OF UTAH: "William Duncan (son of Henry and Jane Duncan of Scotland) came to Utah Sept. 10 1861. Joseph Horn Company. "Married Mary Brown (daughter of Adam and Catherine Brown of Tranent, Haddington. Scotland). Their children are Adam. m. Isabella Robb; Peter, m. Annie McNeal: Henry. died aged 4: Henry d. aged 2; Catherine b. Dec. 28, 1840, m. John Thomas Moon; James died. Family Home in Salt Lake City Utah. "High Priest. Died March 1874." William died on March 2, 1875 at the age of 60 in Salt Lake City, Utah about 12 1\2 years after he left Scotland. He was survived by his wife Mary, three sons and a daughter: Adam. Peter, James, and Catherine. He possibly could have died from lung condition that so many coal miners developed--"black lung. He was the first in his family to embrace the restored Gospel of Jesus Christ. He worked hard to save enough money to bring his family to Salt Lake City. As a result of his faith and commitment, many hundreds of his descendants enjoy the blessing of the Gospel and the freedoms and opportunities that this land of America offers to all. In the "Deseret News" his death was reported: "In the first ward, Salt Lake City, Utah March 2, WILLIAM DUNCAN. son of Henry Duncan and Jane Hogg. "Deceased was born August 7, 1815 in Scotland: became a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Aug 16, 1845; with his family emigrated to Salt Lake City April 19, 1861 and has been faithful in the cause or the everlasting Gospel unto death. Funeral services tomorrow, Thursday at 1 o'clock. Friends are respectively invited. (Mill. Star) William was the first of his family to be buried in the Salt Lake City Cemetery. Later his wife, his son Adam and wife, and six of his grandchildren were all buried in a ten plot area. Great Salt Lake City. Feb. 11, 1862 Duncan, William Son of Henry and Jane Duncan of Scotland. Came to Utah Sep 13, 1861 Joseph Horn company. Married Mary Brown Daughter of Adam and Catherine Brown of Tranent, Haddington, Scotland. Their children Adam m Isabella Robbe, Peter m Anie McNeal, Henry d age 4 Henry d age 2 Catherine b Dec 28 1846 m. John Tomas Moon, James, Died Family Home Salt lake City Utah. Blessing by Chas. W. Hyde, Patriarch, upon the head of Wm. Duncan. son of Henry Duncan and Jane Hogg born Aug. 7, 1815 a New town in Scotland. Wm, I place my hands upon your head and seal upon you a fathers blessing, you shall have light, knowledge and understanding and shall be led in the faith that leads to eternal life. There was joy in heaven when you embraced the new and everlasting covenant. You shall be blessed with long life and your family also shall be blessed; you shall have wives who shall honor and comfort you in your old age. You are a descendant of Joseph through the loins of Ephraim and you are a lawful heir to the fullness of the Priesthood with your posterity after you; they shall honor you and call you blessed of the Father if you continue faithful you shall have an inheritance in Jackson County; you shall be blessed of the father exceedingly; you shall have flocks and herds in great abundance and no good thing shall be held from you and you shall be crowned with glory and eternal life, which blessing I seal upon you forever and ever. Amen"

Marriage to Milo Andrus (as recounted by Jerree Sproul Crouch - great-granddaughter)

Contributor: Tyler Created: 4 months ago Updated: 4 months ago

At age 15 and at the encouragement of her father, Adaline reluctantly entered into a marriage with Milo Andrus, who was 21 years her senior. She had five children with Milo Andrus, yet was never happy in the marriage. Milo had four other wives and didn't come around often. He did provide a home for Adaline and her children in Bingham Canyon, UT. In order to support herself and her children, she made and sold butter from the milk cow she owned, and took in sewing and washing. When Adaline was expecting her 5th child, her neighbor three miles away had a worried fear about her. She used to watch Adaline's chimney of the home to ensure that smoke was coming out as a sign that all was well. One day, when she noticed the fire was not lit, she walked the three miles through the snow to check on her and the children. When she arrived, she found that Adaline had delivered the baby but had experienced terrible hemorrhaging and was unable to move or care for the newborn boy. This kind neighbor woman saved Adaline's life and cared for her until she was able to get back on her feet again. During and after this difficult experience, Adaline did a lot of thinking and felt that she couldn't go on alone anymore. She went to visit the prophet Brigham Young and told him of her loneliness and sadness in her marriage. Brigham Young was upset and called her husband in. He told him that he was not deserving of Adaline and provided Adaline with her release from the marriage.

Milo heals crippled girl

Contributor: Tyler Created: 4 months ago Updated: 4 months ago

While in Florence, Ohio, Milo described a miracle: "One of the young people of the city, a twelve year old girls named Nancy, had some months earlier been thrown from a horse and had broken her hip so near the socket that it could not be set. the physicians in the community agreed that it would be impossible for her to walk on that leg again. After she and her parents joined the Church, the unbelievers scoffingly asked 'If miracles can be performed, why don't your Mormon elders heal her?' Milo felt strongly impressed to go to the home of the crippled girl. Entering her house, which was in the center of town, he walked over to the afflicted girl and taking her by hand, commanded her in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ to arise, leave her crutches, and walk. She arose in faith, full of joy and was from that hour made whole."

Life timeline of Milo Andrus

Milo Andrus was born on 6 Mar 1814
Milo Andrus was 12 years old when The Erie Canal opens: Passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie. The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System. Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.
Milo Andrus was 18 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
Milo Andrus was 26 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
Milo Andrus was 46 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
Milo Andrus was 47 years old when Abraham Lincoln is elected as the 16th President of United States. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
Milo Andrus was 64 years old when Thomas Edison announces his invention of the phonograph, a machine that can record and play sound. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Milo Andrus was 70 years old when Eruption of Krakatoa: Four enormous explosions destroy the island of Krakatoa and cause years of climate change. The 1883 eruption of Krakatoa in the Dutch East Indies began in the afternoon of Sunday, 26 August 1883, and peaked in the late morning of Monday, 27 August when over 70% of the island and its surrounding archipelago were destroyed as it collapsed into a caldera. Additional seismic activity was reported to have continued until February 1884, though reports of seismic activity after October 1883 were later dismissed by Rogier Verbeek's investigation into the eruption. The 1883 eruption was one of the deadliest and most destructive volcanic events in recorded history. At least 36,417 deaths are attributed to the eruption and the tsunamis it created. Significant additional effects were also felt around the world in the days and weeks after the volcano's eruption.
Milo Andrus died on 19 Jun 1893 at the age of 79
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Milo Andrus (6 Mar 1814 - 19 Jun 1893), BillionGraves Record 8840636 Holladay, Salt Lake, Utah, United States

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