Lydia A. J. Wilson

13 Sep 1868 - 23 Jan 1958

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Lydia A. J. Wilson

13 Sep 1868 - 23 Jan 1958
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Mother started writing this about 1928, soon after Joel returned from his mission………. Lydia A. Johnson Wilson born 13th September 1868 at Toquerville, Washington County, Utah. I was the fourth child of Seth Johnson and Lydia Ann Smith Johnson. We left Dixie when I was four years old. I can’t

Life Information

Lydia A. J. Wilson

Born:
Died:

Hillsdale Cemetery

2650 E Road
Panguitch, Garfield, Utah
United States

Epitaph

Mother

Headstone Description

Mother
Transcriber

ashlin2008

July 13, 2015
Photographer

Ron Haymore

June 2, 2013

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Memorial / Obituary / Personal History

Contributor: ashlin2008 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Mother started writing this about 1928, soon after Joel returned from his mission………. Lydia A. Johnson Wilson born 13th September 1868 at Toquerville, Washington County, Utah. I was the fourth child of Seth Johnson and Lydia Ann Smith Johnson. We left Dixie when I was four years old. I can’t remember when we moved form Dixie with the old ox team, Buck and Berry. We were about a week coming home. Well I remember when we crossed the Sevier River how frightened I was of such a big stream of water and when we got in the middle of the stream the oxen stopped to drink. I looked over the side of the wagon and saw the swift water. I thought we were going to drown, but we got safely over to the little town on the East Side of the river. The town was named after my grandfather Joel H. Johnson — Hillsdale. He had built a sawmill there and there were a few families, mostly Johnson’s living there. The mill was run by water so there was a big mill race run close by, which was always an eyesore as we were told if we fell in the water it would take us down into the great deep penstock where the water came out the bottom on the big wheel that ran the mill. I have stood by holding to Mothers hand watching Father run the mill. It was quite a sight to see the big logs stripped up into lumber but I was always so afraid of water that I dared not walk around to examine things lest I fall in a little water. Probably when I was six years old the Indians were doing all kinds of devilment around, so that little town came in for its share. They would come into town and steal things. They would come in the daytime and locate things then come at night and take them. One night they stole our clothes off the clothesline. A night or two after this they stole a saddle that hung on the end of the house. Then we were frightened. We kids thought they would be after us next. Not long after that they got braver still. The cattle were all in our corral and they came in the night and drove them off. So the next morning the men all went to follow the Indians with the cattle. The men all went but one lame man. His name was Clarence Jackson. One of grandfather’s wives, Aunt Janet still lived there. Grandfather had gone with part of his family to start another place. The lame man lived at Aunt Janet’s so all the women and children gathered there, huddled together in one little log room. When night came on and the men hadn’t come back they were all sure frightened. They all huddled together, perfectly quiet, listening for any sound outside. The room was nearly dark so the children did not know when the lame man had gone out to look around and see if he could hear or see anything. When he came in we all thought sure the Indians were coming and every kid scampered for the bed and crawled under. I remember I was one of the first under so was last to come out. They sure laughed at me but I didn’t regret the trip under there as I had plenty of company. The next year after the Indians quit bothering, something else had to come. They raised pretty good crops but winter came long before they were ready for it. They had grain but very little of it was ground into flour so we lived mostly on boiled wheat. We would have a little piece of bread, then a cup of grain with milk on it. When I was eight or nine years old father was put in as Bishop when a ward was organized at Hillsdale. Up until this time it had been a Branch of Panguitch Ward. Father thought it too small a place, as more people were moving in so they decided to move the town up on the hill two miles above the mill. So Grandfather Wilson bought the mill and the land around it and they still own it. The town on the hill grew to be quite a town. They built log houses. Father built his in a row, six in number, and there is where we lived while I grew to womanhood. My oldest sister Julia was married about the time the town was moved. Mother’s part of the family lived on a ranch in the canyon where Father had a farm. We milked cows there, made butter and cheese for winter; always some to sell for clothes. So Mother and one of the boys would go to Dixie in the fall to sell the butter and cheese and bring cloth from the Washington factory to make our clothes. When I got my red and black flannel dress made I was sure fixed up. When I was eighteen years old I began going out with J. W. Wilson. We were married 12 June 1889 in the Manti Temple. He built a sawed log house, two rooms, at old Hillsdale by the mill. When we had two children William Alma, and Levina, he was called on a mission to the Southern States. Alma was little less than three years old and Vina was ten months. He was gone two years and four months. He returned 12 January 1895. He left 25 September 1892. Our next baby was born nine months after he got home, Lydia Eva, born 20 October 1895. He built another room on our house when our family began to grow so fast. Martha Anna, the next born August 3, 1897, Mary Myrtle, July 7, 1899, George Junius, August 26, 1901, Joel Arthur, September 4, 1903, and Joseph Hyrum born February 25, 1907. My Father and Mother and most of my family lived at Georgetown, a little town near Cannonville. We lived in our little log house at Hillsdale for eighteen years. We never had much of this world’s goods but we had as much as any of the others. We were happy till death came in. My husband took sick April and died July 30, 1907. Another excerpt from W. A. Wilson’s writing: “During a lifetime of nearly ninety years of love and service she found no time to be idle. Her hobby was people, she loved them all, and was never more happy than when fixing a meal or making a bed for one to a dozen extra. As a boy I never knew her to miss taking a nice dish of food to a sick neighbor, spending a little time to tidy up the house, wash a few dishes, give a new baby a bath, or do what ever needed doing.” This is written by Myrtle, her daughter—another incident to show Mother’s great faith: “Lydia J. Wilson, born to Seth Johnson and Lydia Ann Smith, was truly a blessed daughter of our Heavenly Father. Throughout her life she exercised great faith in the Lord, particularly so when it came to the healing of those who were sick or afflicted. She herself, was healed through faith, fasting and prayers after having undergone surgery and diagnostic testing which indicated the presence of cancer in her stomach. Lydia believed that the Lord loved his children and would bless them if prayers were accompanied by implicit faith. One of Lydia’s grandsons, William H. (Bill) Baldwin, met with an accident when he was only one and a half years of age. Bill’s mother, Myrtle Wilson Baldwin, had placed him in an “old, poor, rickety” high chair, pushed the chair up to the table and gave Bill his lunch. As Bill was eating he pushed his feet against the tale, the high chair tipped over and the teaspoon he had in his mouth injured him. He began to bleed profusely, with every beat of his heart the blood would spurt out of his mouth. Myrtle grabbed him and ran to her mother’s place some two and one half blocks away. As she entered the home she handed the baby to her mother (Lydia) and said: “Do something quick.” Lydia took the infant in her arms and sat in a chair, requesting Myrtle to kneel in front of her. Then she began to pray saying: “Father in Heaven, help us quick, we are alone and we need the bleeding of this infant to stop” . . . Almost immediately after the prayer ended the bleeding ceased and except for a minor injury, Bill was all right. This certainly was an example of the faith of this wonderful woman.” A tribute taken from the Johnson Bulletin, written by Leona Jolley: (This is a true picture of Mother Lydia Annie) TRIBUTE TO LYDIA ANNIE JOHNSON WILSON Who was it that befriended everyone? Always had an extra bed and meal? Who had open house from sun to sun? Whose hospitality was so real? “It was Aunt Lill.” Who was it looked after the sick and the sad? Who comforted those in distress? Who always had a home for the homeless? Well, all Southern Utah can guess - - “It was Aunt Lill.” Her love knew no bounds, her charity was limitless, The world was her neighbor, whom she served With unselfishness. Dear Aunt Lill. Mother’s home was always open to relatives and friends. I remember hearing many coming from Southern Utah to Conference or Conventions or whatever, say, “I will meet you at Aunt Lydia’s or Aunt Lill’s, as many called her.” Her home would often be overflowing with friends and acquaintances, a wholesome place to associate and visit with friend and neighbor. I recall when we lived in Reno in 1937 Mother wrote and said: “The Johnson brothers and sisters are all getting together for a reunion. My home will be their headquarters. Will you come and help me?” This is an occasion I shall never forget. My mother’s eight brothers (one not present) and seven sisters were there. Eva W. Heaton Additional Information About the life of Lydia Ann Wilson By Jerry King Shirts Hillsdale was a cold town in which it was hard to keep a supply of water. At the time Grandma lived there, the only well was close by their place. Her father was Grandma’s teacher. A James B. Williams was also her teacher in Hillsdale. Grandma’s father was always Bishop of the wards where they lived. He was Bishop in Hillsdale and later when they moved to Georgetown, he became Bishop there. He also operated a store for many years. As Bishop, Grandma’s father opened his house to all the visiting authorities who came to preach. He and Grandma’s mother would give up their bed to the visitors. One time President John Taylor and his wife came to stay wit them, and when he left he gave Grandma’s mother a five-dollar bill, quite a sum in her eyes. Grandma’s father used to tell many times of a period in his life when he was very sick. While he was laying on his bed, too sick to get up, he ordained James William Wilson and Joseph Deliverance Wilson and his own two sons, Alvin and George, Elders so they could administer to him. During her childhood Grandma’s family moved to Georgetown, about six miles from Cannonville. Grandma lived there until she married and went back to Hillsdale. Grandmother’s mother helped to support the family. She began to make and embroider buckskin shirts for them. They would bring her the two skins it took for a shirt. She would have the Indians tan the skins; then she would smoke it herself, this to keep it from shrinking when it got wet. She would use a special wood which was put in a trench with a smokehouse on top. The fire was kept burning for a certain length of time so that the smoke could go up through the stretched buckskin. Following this process she would cut out and sew the shirts and do her fancywork on them. She later began to put beaver fur on the wrists of the buckskin gloves. She was often up until one an two o’clock in the morning sewing. George and the older brother would always get up and get breakfast for the family and Grandma would do the dishes. If she was in school she always came home at recess and did them. Grandma did some crocheting. At one time she learned a pattern for a chair tidy, a horse. Several wanted one and she made eight or ten of them.

Memorial / Obituary / Personal History

Contributor: ashlin2008 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

A SKETCHOF LYDIA ANNIE (JOHNSON) WILSON (Written by Herself) I, Lydia Annie Johnson Wilson, was born September 13, 1868, at Toquerville, Utah (Washington County.) I was the fourth child of Seth Johnson and Lydia Ann Smith. When I was about four years of age, my father with his family moved from Dixie (with ox teams) to a little town on the headwaters of the Sevier River. This little town was called Hillsdale, having been named after my grandfather, Joel Hills Johnson. It was at this little town that I spent the earlier part of my life. For several years after we moved to Hillsdale, we lived near an old sawmill. My father operated this mill – this was in reality, his means of gaining a livelihood for his family. Waterpower was the only power that was available and could be used to run the mill; the water came to the mill through a large water race. A lasting fear of water was instilled into my being as I would watch the great stream of water run through the flume into the pen stop to give the mill power. I was always afraid that I would fall into the flume and be carried over the power wheel and be drowned. About this time of my life, when I was very young, the Indians were very troublesome and my fear of them was a growing one. They would visit town in the daytime, locate different articles, which they would like to have, and then return at night, and steal these things. One night they stole a saddle that was hanging on the corner of our house, and at another time they even stole some of our clothes that were hanging on the line. They became so bold that at one time they drove off all the stock from the public corral. The next morning after this had happened all the men of the town, except one who was crippled and whose name was Clarence Jackson, left for the purpose of trying to catch the Indians and bring back the stolen cattle. All the women and children with one man, Clarence Jackson, gathered at the home of my grandfather, Joel H. Johnson, to await the return of the men folks. When night came all of us sat very quiet around the fireplace. Mr. Jackson often left the house, going to a certain spot where he would signal the return of the men or the return of the Indians. We children did not see him when he left the house the first time so when we heard his footsteps outside, feared that the Indians were returning and scrambled under the bed. This furnished a great deal of amusement to our elders as Mr. Jackson came into the house. This incident shows the fear which people naturally held for the Indians in those days. Sometimes during the winter, food became so scarce, and very often I and my brothers and sisters were forced to live on cooked wheat and milk, with sometimes a piece of bread. A short time after my father moved the town “upon the hill” he built a row of log houses with a large fireplace in the end of each room. This was the families’ new home, and also a new town, which later grew into quite a thriving village. He also built a log schoolhouse, which answered the purpose of a museum and hall, church, and theatre all combined. It was in this building where I received my education. When I was thirteen years of age, I began courtship with James W. Wilson, whom I married seven years later, on June 12, 1889 at the Manti Temple. Very shortly after we were married, my husband built a two-room log house and it was our first home – a happy home too it was. On September 25, 1892, my husband left to fill a mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. He spent about twenty-eight months in the Southern States Mission, arriving home on January 18, 1895. All the while he was on his mission I had the whole responsibility of caring for two babies and looking after the household affairs. After his return – in fact, during the next twelve years, six more children were born to us. When my youngest child was about five months old, my husband died leaving me with eight children to raise. He had been dead only about two and one half years when I was taken ill. For the next two years I suffered from an unknown malady, but with the assistance of my two older children I was able to maintain a home. It was discovered that I had cancer of the stomach and at the end of two years my condition became so serious that it was necessary for me to undergo an operation. Even then there was no hope for my recovery and it was predicted that I would not last long. It was then that I exercised my faith in the Lord Jesus Christ, asking him to spare me that I might rear my family until they were able to care for themselves. This was twenty odd years ago and the Lord did pour out his blessings upon me for I have lived many years of health and happiness and my family is grown and able to care for themselves, so when He calls again I’m ready to go. The last years of my life until now (1933) have been spent in working for the dead. I have done work in the Salt Lake Temple for over a thousand souls. In this work I hope to continue while I still live. Lydia Annie Johnson and James William Wilson are the parent’s of 8 children.

Life timeline of Lydia A. J. Wilson

1868
Lydia A. J. Wilson was born on 13 Sep 1868
Lydia A. J. Wilson was 9 years old when Thomas Edison announces his invention of the phonograph, a machine that can record and play sound. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Lydia A. J. Wilson was 17 years old when Louis Pasteur successfully tests his vaccine against rabies on Joseph Meister, a boy who was bitten by a rabid dog. Louis Pasteur was a French biologist, microbiologist and chemist renowned for his discoveries of the principles of vaccination, microbial fermentation and pasteurization. He is remembered for his remarkable breakthroughs in the causes and prevention of diseases, and his discoveries have saved many lives ever since. He reduced mortality from puerperal fever, and created the first vaccines for rabies and anthrax. His medical discoveries provided direct support for the germ theory of disease and its application in clinical medicine. He is best known to the general public for his invention of the technique of treating milk and wine to stop bacterial contamination, a process now called pasteurization. He is regarded as one of the three main founders of bacteriology, together with Ferdinand Cohn and Robert Koch, and is popularly known as the "father of microbiology".
Lydia A. J. Wilson was 30 years old when Spanish–American War: The Treaty of Paris is signed, officially ending the conflict. The Spanish–American War was fought between the United States and Spain in 1898. Hostilities began in the aftermath of the internal explosion of the USS Maine in Havana Harbor in Cuba, leading to US intervention in the Cuban War of Independence. American acquisition of Spain's Pacific possessions led to its involvement in the Philippine Revolution and ultimately in the Philippine–American War.
Lydia A. J. Wilson was 37 years old when Albert Einstein publishes his first paper on the special theory of relativity. Albert Einstein was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics. His work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. He is best known to the general public for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2, which has been dubbed "the world's most famous equation". He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect", a pivotal step in the development of quantum theory.
Lydia A. J. Wilson was 44 years old when The British passenger liner RMS Titanic sinks in the North Atlantic at 2:20 a.m., two hours and forty minutes after hitting an iceberg. Only 710 of 2,227 passengers and crew on board survive. RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early hours of 15 April 1912, after colliding with an iceberg during its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City. There were an estimated 2,224 passengers and crew aboard, and more than 1,500 died, making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history. RMS Titanic was the largest ship afloat at the time it entered service and was the second of three Olympic-class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line. It was built by the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast. Thomas Andrews, her architect, died in the disaster.
Lydia A. J. Wilson was 60 years old when Walt Disney character Mickey Mouse premieres in his first cartoon, "Plane Crazy". Walter Elias Disney was an American entrepreneur, animator, voice actor and film producer. A pioneer of the American animation industry, he introduced several developments in the production of cartoons. As a film producer, Disney holds the record for most Academy Awards earned by an individual, having won 22 Oscars from 59 nominations. He was presented with two Golden Globe Special Achievement Awards and an Emmy Award, among other honors. Several of his films are included in the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress.
Lydia A. J. Wilson was 71 years old when World War II: Nazi Germany and Slovakia invade Poland, beginning the European phase of World War II. World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most global war in history; it directly involved more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. In a state of total war, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.
Lydia A. J. Wilson was 77 years old when World War II: Hiroshima, Japan is devastated when the atomic bomb "Little Boy" is dropped by the United States B-29 Enola Gay. Around 70,000 people are killed instantly, and some tens of thousands die in subsequent years from burns and radiation poisoning. World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most global war in history; it directly involved more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. In a state of total war, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.
Lydia A. J. Wilson died on 23 Jan 1958 at the age of 89
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Lydia A. J. Wilson (13 Sep 1868 - 23 Jan 1958), BillionGraves Record 15191963 Panguitch, Garfield, Utah, United States

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