Louisa Wray

26 Aug 1857 - 28 Dec 1937

Register
Register to get full access to the grave site record of Louisa Wray
Terms and Conditions

We want you to know exactly how our service works and why we need your registration in order to allow full access to our records.

terms and conditions

Contact Permissions

We’d like to send you special offers and deals exclusive to BillionGraves users to help your family history research. All emails ​include an unsubscribe link. You ​may opt-out at any time.

close
close
Thanks for registering with BillionGraves.com!
In order to gain full access to this record, please verify your email by opening the welcome email that we just sent to you.
close
Sign up the easy way

Use your facebook account to register with BillionGraves. It will be one less password to remember. You can always add an email and password later.

Loading

Life Information

Louisa Wray

Born:
Died:

Riverside Thomas Cemetery

939-949 State Highway 39
Blackfoot, Bingham, Idaho
United States

Epitaph

MOTHER
Transcriber

dustyfeathers

August 9, 2013
Photographer

Will

July 21, 2013

Nearby Graves

See more nearby graves
Upgrade to BG+

Find more about Louisa...

We found more records about Louisa Wray.

Grave Site of Louisa

edit

Louisa Wray is buried in the Riverside Thomas Cemetery at the location displayed on the map below. This GPS information is ONLY available at BillionGraves. Our technology can help you find the gravesite and other family members buried nearby.

Download the free BillionGraves mobile app for iPhone and Android before you go to the cemetery and it will guide you right to the gravesite.
android Google play phone_iphone App Store

Memories

add

Memorial / Obituary / Personal History

Contributor: AdamCD333 Created: 6 years ago Updated: 6 years ago

Louisa Jensen Wray

Mary Wray Hansen and Logan Dean Hansen

Contributor: dustyfeathers Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Logan Dean Hansen Dec. 29, 1897 – Sept. 25, 1969 Dean was born in Lake Shore, Utah as the twelfth child of Niels Peder Hansen and Ane Julie Elise Dorthea Jensen. While he was still a baby, Dean’s mother died of dropsy [Feb. 16, 1898] (edema: an abnormal excess accumulation of serious fluid in connective tissue, a water swelling.) None of his descendants know how his childhood was, but he had a stepmother, and life must have been different for the family than it was when his mother was still alive. For some reason, he left home at age eleven and went on his own. There is a blank in his history until he got married. Perhaps he herded sheep. Somehow, he had moved from Utah by the time he reached adulthood and was working for the railroad when he married and settled in Pocatello, Idaho. He never did like his given name of “Logan” for he was named after the city of Logan, Utah and his brother was named after the nearby town of Hyrum, Utah. The kids used to tease Dean and call him “Brigham City” and other towns’ names. His brother was luckier; they called him “Hy”. So, for most his life he went by Dean or L.D. When his children picked out the headstone for him they ordered “L. Dean Hansen” to be engraved into the standup headstone at the Highland Cemetery in Great Falls, Montana. He was a handsome man, standing 5’10” He weighed 160 pounds at his heaviest, but he never had a “pot” belly. He was always slim. His eyes were green, but he tanned easily. Thus he usually looked dark-complicated, but he was white-skinned beyond the tan line. As a young man he loved to race horses and his horse were as fast and slick as his cars were later when they became available. He had a horse named Tattoo. He always drove a horse and buggy to date Mary Louisa Wray who lived with her mother in Riverside, Idaho near Blackfoot. They had known each other for years, but they didn’t live in the same town. She never answered her daughters’ questions when they asked her how young she was when she started dating, but they knew it had to be quite young since she married Dean when she was sixteen years old, “almost seventeen” as Mary later insisted. One day when Dean was 21 years old, he announced to Mary, “so and so (another couple they knew) are going to the Salt Lake Temple on Dec. 3 and we’re going with them”. That was all the proposal amounted to. He stopped smoking long enough to get a recommend because he knew she wouldn’t marry him outside the temple. But he went back to smoking after that. They were married as Dean said, on December 3, 1919. Monna thinks he really didn’t understand a lot about the doctrine of the Church. He was mostly aware of the “thou shalt not’s” and felt negative about the Church without understanding enough of the bigger picture of the possible blessings of keeping the commandments. Yet he always wore his garments and respected them all his life. Although he remained mostly an inactive member, Dean held one position in the Church, that of Sunday School Superintendent. However, Betty was talking to me in Feb. and I asked her if Grandpa wore his garments. She said yes…everyday! And one time when he was working in Wyoming and he couldn’t get any replacements he made his own. He drew the markings on his own long underwear. As was the case for many boys his age, Dean only went as far as the fifth grade in school. He wasn’t a full-time student even at that. Yet, he was sharp in mathematics and prided himself in doing math well. He didn’t like to write letters because he said, “I don’t spell well.” He didn’t read books, but he enjoyed reading the newspaper and later on, watching TV. He didn’t go into the military. His sole desire was to “support his family” and to retire by the age of 40”. But by time he had reached that goal, he didn’t have any other major goals to aim for. He thought if he could live until he was 60 it would be a good, long life, so in a sense, he was successful since he lived 71 years. During Mary and Dean’s early married life, three children were born while they lived in Pocatello. He didn’t want to have any children, but then Max came along and he said, “One boy—that’s fine.” Betty was born and he said, “One boy and one girl—that’s just right.” After Bob was born and grew a little, they had a family portrait taken. Dean thought it was the extent of his family. But when Monna was born in 1930, he threw up his hands. This was during the Great Depression and it was harder to care for a large family. Their children were born in a twenty year span from 1920-1940: Max Dean – 1920, Betty Jean – 1922, James Robert – 1925, Monna – 1930, Dale – 1933, Connie – 1938, and Myrna – 1940. His pet gripe and most famous quote: “I’ll be so damned glad, Mary, when these kids get bigger so I won’t have sticky doorknobs.” Dean was a clean man and hated sticky doorknobs. [In listening to the “Magnificent Seven” talk in Feb. ’08, I asked why some of them didn’t have middle names, Connie replied, that Grandpa said he was going to run out of names and so he only gave the last four kids one name.] In 1919, a Brother Molen was recruiting LDS families from Idaho to move up to the Sun River Valley to raise sugar beets in Montana. Many families responded. The Nielsons, the Corbetts, the Olsons, Blackburns, Robinsons, and the Dean Hansen family were a few that settled in the Vaughn, Montana area. When they first discussed the idea, Dean’s friends thought he was crazy t leave a good steady, paying job to try the unknown in Montana. But that was part of the attraction—Dean didn’t want to work for wages all his life. And Mary finally said, “All right, I’ll go if there’s a church, but if there’s no church, I’m not going.” He quit his job, loaded the family up, and moved them to Montana. He later said, “Montana has been good to us.” However, Mary later said of this time, she knew the Lord wanted her to come to Montana because Dean could have ridden up free on the train to look the country over and gone back to Idaho for his family, but he didn’t do it that way. He said later, “If I had come and looked at Montana first, I never would have come. Pride is what kept me here. I couldn’t stand the thought of going back and facing those same guys and asking for my job back.” After they had been in Montana a few months he said, “Well, Mary, I think we’ll go back to Pocatello.” “Those are the best words I’ve heard,” she replied. He intended to go into the sugar beets, but he never did because he only had forty acres and that wasn’t enough land. He farmed and did odd jobs like weeding and plowing the fire guards along the railroad tracks to stop the fires from spreading from the steam engines. He bid for the particular job and hired fellows to work for him in order to plow five furloughs on each side of the track from Vaughn to Simms. They used three plows—a double and a single to do it. Some years he contracted to put up all the hay for the Floweree Ranch at Simms. He hired the Corbett boys to help him, but he always hesitated because they were so big and heavy they broke the seats of the tractor. Dean worked for the Purvis Dairy for a dollar a day for awhile, too. When the family moved to Montana, they didn’t have a home of their own to start with. They lived with Dean’s brother Andy for a bout a year, staying in three rooms while Andy’s family lived in the other part of the house. Then Dean brought a shell of a house down from the range pasture. The horses had used it as a shelter and it was covered with horse manure and infested with bed bugs. The windows had all been smashed out, and oh, how Mary cleaned and cleaned to get rid of those bed bugs!! But at last the family moved into their own home. The original building had four rooms. The kitchen was large enough to eat in at first, but as the family grew, they ate around a large round oak table in the family room. The chairs were turned out from the table for the family to kneel by for family prayers. [Betty said that the only time she can remember ever praying for special intervention was when Bob was in WWII in Europe. Grandma gathered the family together and they knelt and prayed for his safety; told Feb. ‘08]. The family also had a leather and wood davenport that could sleep two as well as a couch for a single person. {Max said there was a time that all the kids shared the same bed…they laid across it to sleep]. The parents’ bed didn’t ever have a door on it and it opened out to the family room. It did have a closet in it. There was a second bedroom for the children. The kitchen had a cook stove, a wash stand, and a cupboard. Later on, Ed Wellington did the carpentry work for the closed in porch or “shanty” added on the back of the house where Mary did her washing in good weather. He also added a very small bedroom for the boys and a new living room, too. Other than a small vent in the wall, there was no heat in that back bedroom. The farm had a bunkhouse for the hired men who did the milking and put up the hay. Of course, as was common in those days, there was no bathroom, electricity, or telephone to begin with. The family did have an old mean turkey gobbler that strutted back forth in front of the out house, keeping people trapped in there until someone else left that house that he could go chase or else until he got tired and left them along. They had one mean turkey that would chase anyone wearing Mother’s blue coat. The turkeys raised we Submitted By: DianeJHansen

Louisa Jensen Wray Aug. 26, 1857-

Contributor: dustyfeathers Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Notes for Louisa (Lovisa) Jensen—38 July 3, 1997 Historical Sketch of Louisa Jensen Wray Pioneer of Utah – 1859 – by Alice Skanchy Louisa Jensen Wray was born in Jutland, Guddlen County, Denmark, and August 26, 1857. Her parents were Jens Christian Jensen and Mariane Jensen. Her parents heard the message from the LDS missionaries, were converted and joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. They decided to immigrate to America. Mother had an older brother, Anthon. He was working away from home at the time and did not come to America with them. They sailed from Liverpool, England, April 11, 1859 on the ship “William Topscart”. There were 725 Saints in the party under the direction of Robert F. Nelson. After a voyage of several weeks they landed temporarily at New York City, America. May 14, and then continued their journey to New Orleans at the mouth of the Mississippi River. Here, they transferred to a river boat and sailed up the Mississippi River to St. Louis and then up the Missouri to Florence (Council Bluffs, later Omaha) and arrived there May 25. It was here they made plans to cross the plains to Utah. My grandfather teamed up with another man for the trek. Grandfather had a horse and this man had an ox and wagon. They loaded the wagon and started the company. Grandfather had a fatal accident. As he climbed in the wagon, the team started and he fell out and broke his neck. This was a shock to Grandmother. She had to leave Grandfather by the roadside in an unmarked grave and carry the full burden of the journey to Utah. The man with whom Grandfather teamed, turned out to be a rascal and very unreliable. He dumped Grandmother’s belongings from the wagon to the ground, told her she would have to make her own way to Utah, and went on his way. Soren Nielsen, one of the parties, came along and when he saw Grandmother’s plight, he told her he would haul her belongings and she and her child could ride with him. A year or so later this acquaintance developed into a marriage. Mr. Nielsen had a daughter with him. He had had his legs broken, and was a cripple. He had to walk with the aid of 2 canes the rest of his life. My mother was only 2 years old and had to sit or lie in a wash boiler in one corner of the wagon. Grandmother walked all the distance across the plains. The company arrived in Utah in the fall of 1859. My mother’s uncle, Peter Jensen, who had immigrated to Utah earlier, met them in Salt Lake City. They stopped their driving that winter. Since Cache Valley was being settled rapidly and there were good opportunities for new settlers and emigrants; Grandmother, Uncle Peter Jensen, my mother (Soren Nielsen) and his daughter decided to locate in Cache Valley with other settlers. They were among the first pioneer settlers in Hyrum, Cache County, Utah during the year 1860. My grandmother married Soren Nielson. His daughter grew to womanhood and married George Ward. My mother’s brother, Anton, who was left in Denmark, was met years later by an LDS missionary, Ingwold Thorsen of Hyrum. Mr. Thorsen told Anthon all about our folks and converted him to Mormonism. Anthon came to Hyrum, married and located at College Ward. My mother was baptized at Hyrum in 1865 as a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. She spent her girlhood days in Hyrum and later married James Wray, a young man from England. They were married in the Salt Lake Endowment House, December 8, 1873. In 1897, the family moved to Idaho and worked. We are happy for the teachings we received from them. All the daughters have held positions of responsibility in the Relief Society, Primary, and MIA. The sons have served as bishop, counselors, high councilman, and various other church positions. Three of the sons: James Enos, Grover Nathaniel, and Joseph Chartrill have filled missions. Four of the grandsons: Everett Wray, Gerald C. Wray, Kenneth Nelson, and Gene W. Dalton have filled missions. One granddaughter, Monna Hansen filled a mission in old Mexico, 1953-1955. Robert Allen, a great grandson, also filled a mission.

Louisa Jensen Wray Aug. 8, 1857-Dec. 28, 1938

Contributor: dustyfeathers Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Louisa Jensen Wray Aug. 8. 1857- Dec. 28, 1938 (Mother to Mary Louisa Wray Hansen Feb. 14, 1903 – May 24, 1980) Louisa Jensen was born August 26, 1857 in Jutland, Denmark – daughter of Jens Christian Jensen and Marianne Jensen. She was a small delicate child – one of a set of twins weighing only 2 ½ pounds at birth. Her twin brother died a few hours after birth. The family accepted the Gospel in their native land and worked hard and saved to get enough to come to America. They were with a group of Saints in 1869 crossing the plains. One day while they were out on the desert they stopped for their noon rest and lunch. The oxen became frightened and stampeded and the father falling under the wagon was killed. He was buried on the plains, one of the many unmarked graves. All of the wagons were loaded to capacity which left a grief-stricken little widow and a small child alone. One good man came to her and said he would try and haul their things if the mother could walk. So the little girl was put in a wash boiler in the back of the wagon and her mother walked the rest of the way to the Sal Lake Valley. Shortly after reaching Utah the Mother married the man who had befriended them. They settled in Hyrum, facing all the hardships of pioneer life, living in a dugout at first, then in a one room log cabin. At the age of 15, Grandmother (Louisa) met a young Englishman, who had accepted the Gospel with his family in England and immigrated to Utah. Young Wray was educated to be a minister and was blessed with a gift of speech which made him a very interesting speaker. Several churches offered him money to preach for them, where he could probably have had a good secure life, but he refused, saying, “No, I have joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints and I am going to America.” He came to Utah alone, lived and worked for George Ward, Sr. When he left England he was engaged to a young woman by the name of Lizzie Davis. He told Louisa this and she answered, “Then I will be your second wife.” He wrote Lizzie Davis in England in England that he had picked out his second wife and of course she became very angry. She went to his father, who was still in England. He also became very angry saying, “What is the matter with James, has he gone crazy?” Lizzie wrote breaking the engagement, so Louisa Jensen and James Wray were married December 8, 1873 in the Salt Lake Endowment House in Salt Lake City. They made their home in Hyrum as did the rest of the Wray family, who came shortly after. They made their home at the mouth of Blacksmith Fork Canyon, where they kept the toll gate. Grandmother had just turned 17 when her first child was born; a girl and they named her Martha Ann, after her grandmother Martha Monks Wray. One of Grandmothers hardest trial was after eight years of marriage, Grandfather married his second wife. She was willing to accept and live any Church order, but it was difficult. He married Sarah Chantrill, a native of Australia in 1881. They had two sons, Joseph Chantrill and David Baston, but David died in infancy. Sarah was a very good woman, always willing to give a helping hand. Her life was short, dying January 1, 1900. Louisa raised Joseph as if he were her own. James Wray worked as a stone mason, his father’s trade in England. He helped build many of the homes and churches in the locality. He worked on the Logan Temple in 1877 and the Logan Tabernacle in 1878—part of this time given as donation labor. In 1892 the family moved to Idaho, pioneering again in a desolate place west of Blackfoot which was named Riverside. It was along the banks of the Snake River. Here they helped build a community building homes and working in the church. James and Louisa Wray were the parents of 13 children, 6 sons and 7 daughters; the 13th child being born after grandmother was 51 years of age. She received a prize at an old folk’s party in Blackfoot Stake for being the oldest mother with the youngest child. This child only lived six months however, but the 12 all lived to be married and have families. Grandmother and Grandfather were true Latter-Day Saints, full of faith and lived in accordance with the teachings of the Church, but they did not accumulate much of this world’s goods. They were proud of their family and they taught them correct principles and how to be good workers. They were unable to give them all of the education they would have liked to. One daughter said, “We all enjoyed the Priesthood our Father held. I remember many times when we were sick he would place his hands on our head to administer to us. We could feel the Power of the Priesthood. Along with the wonderful faith of our Mother we were made well again.” The family all held many positions in the church. Grandfather was a member of the High Council of Blackfoot Stake for many years and traveled many miles preaching and teaching the gospel. On the 1st of January, 1912, when they were visiting in Logan, Grandmother said she had a very vivid dream that Grandfather was called on a mission. He looked at her when she told him but said nothing. He died three months later on April 15, 1912, at the age of 58. Grandmother always felt that dream was sort of a warning and that he truly was called on a mission. She stayed in Idaho until all her family was married. She enjoyed temple work very much and did endowments for over a thousand names. On February 7, 1936 as she was on her way to the Temple she slipped on the ice, fell and broker her leg. She was in the hospital ten days then moved to her daughter Alice’s home. She was bedfast several months, but was able to get around again. She passed away on December 28, 1938 at the age of 80. I remember her as one of the sweetest kindest people I have ever known. One incident I know of depicts her character. She was invited one Thanksgiving, but before leaving she cooked some soup and made a pie to take to an old lady who was alone. Her name is on the Pioneer Monument on the Hyrum City Square. Her posterity at the present time---13 children, 64 grandchildren, 133 great-grandchildren and 78 great-great grandchildren.

Louisa Jensen

Contributor: dustyfeathers Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Louisa Jensen Wray History of my mother by Alice Wray Skanchy (I have combined three histories into one.) My mother was the smallest of twins, weighing only two and one half pounds. Her brother was much larger and seemed stronger, yet he lived only a short time. Mother was born in Jutland, Denmark, August 26, 1857. She was the daughter of Jens Christian Jensen and Maryanne Andersen Jensen. Her parents heard the message from the L.D.S. missionaries, were converted and joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. They decided to immigrate to America. Mother had an older brother, Anthon. He was working away from home at the time and did not come to America with them. (Insert by Vesta- His name was Jens Anton Jensen and he later came to America.) In the early spring of 1859, she with her parents sailed for America on the ship, "William Tapscott” leaving Liverpool, England, 11 April 1859 with 725 saints under the direction of Robert F. Neslen; they arrived in New York May 14, 1859. After a voyage of several weeks they landed temporarily at New York City, then continued their journey to New Orleans at the mouth of the Mississippi River. Here they transferred to a river boat and sailed up the Mississippi River to St. Louis and then up the Missouri to Florence (Council Bluffs, later Omaha) and arrived there May 25th. It was here that they made their plans to cross the plains to Utah. Grandmother had found on her arrival in New York, that her trunk had not been put on the ship, thus making her wardrobe very scanty. She bought some material and made some clothes as best she could without a machine. They also bought a cow so they would have milk for their little girl. Mother's parents owned one ox and another man owned another. Putting them together to pull a wagon, they started their journey across the plains. (Insert by Vesta. In another history written by the same Alice Wray Skanchy, she states, “Grandfather had a horse and this man had an ox and wagon.. They loaded the wagon and started with the company.” One day after their noon rest, the oxen became frightened and Grandfather fell from the wagon, was caught under the wheels, and was killed and buried on the plains, July 15, 1859. (Insert by Vesta. Again she later says, “As he went to climb in the wagon, the team started and he fell out and broke his neck.” The man owning the one oxen left Mother and Grandmother and their few belongings, helpless and alone. This trial was very hard for Grandmother, but she had faith that the Lord would give her strength, which He did. After the man had removed her belongings at the side of the trail, he told her that he could not be bothered with her now as that would be too much trouble. She asked him what she was supposed to do and he told her that was her look out now. She said she knelt down and prayed to the Lord and asked Him to help her and then she said they sat down by the trail until sundown. Then a man, Soren Neilsen, came along with a family of small children and whose wife had died. He told her that she could travel with him, but that there was not enough room in the wagon for her to ride and that she would have to walk, but they had room for the baby in the rear of the wagon in an old wash boiler. I can remember Grandmother Wray telling about coming across the plains in a wash boiler. Her mother walked behind the wagon to make certain the little girl did not fall out of the wash boiler. Though foot-sore and weary, Grandmother kept bravely on, walking behind the wagon, watching that her baby wouldn't fall out of the boiler. The story of how this Grandmother and her daughter finished their journey across the plains has been related many times by my mother, the 18-month-old daughter at the time. Arriving in Salt Lake City late in the fall they were met by Mother's Uncle Peter Jensen, who took them to Plain City. They lived there for one year and then moved to Hyrum, where Mother's girlhood days were spent. In the year 1873 December 8th, she married James Wray, a good young man, who spent much of his time teaching and preaching the gospel. They were married and blessed with thirteen children, six boys and seven girls, and twelve of them lived to be married. (Louisa and James also assumed the care of 15 year old Joseph Chantrill Wray, the son of James’s plural wife, Sarah Ann Chantrill, who died in 1900.) Mother received a prize in the Blackfoot Old Folks Party for being the oldest mother with the youngest child. They lived in Logan during the time the temple was built. Father worked on it as a mason. In the year 1884 the family moved to Idaho. Here Mother served as a teacher and also a counselor in the Relief Society in the Riverside Ward, Idaho. On April 15, 1912, came her greatest trial when Father passed away. About twelve years later, after all her family had married, Mother sold her home in Idaho and moved to Logan, Utah, where she enjoyed doing temple work. After a short illness, she died at the home of her daughter, Alice Wray Skanchy, 177 East 3rd South, Logan, Utah, December 28, 1837. (I am including here the last section of this second history by Alice Wray Skanchy, as it is new information.) Soren Nielsen, one of the party came along and when he saw Grandmother’s plight, he told her he would haul her belongings and she and her child could ride with him. A year or so later this acquaintance developed into a marriage. Mr. Nielsen had a little girl, a daughter with him. He had had his legs broken and was a cripple and had to walk with the aid of two canes. My mother was only two years old and had to sit or lie in a boiler in one corner of the wagon. Grandmother walked all the distance across the plains. The company arrived in Utah in the Fall of 1859. My mother’s uncle, Peter Jensen, who had emigrated to Utah earlier, met them in Salt Lake City. They stopped there during that winter. Since, Cache Valley was being settled rapidly and were good opportunities for new settlers and emigrants, Grandmother, Uncle Peter Jensen, my mother and Soren Nielsen and his little daughter decided to locate in Cache Valley with the other settlers. They were among the first pioneer settlers in Hyrum, Cache County, Utah, during the year 1860. My grandmother, Maryanne Andersen Jensen married Soren Nielsen. He had to walk with two canes the remainder of his life. His little daughter grew to womanhood and married George Ward. My mother’s brother, Anthon, who was left in Denmark, was met years later by an L.D.S. missionary, Ingwald Thorsen and he converted him to Mormonism. Anthon came to Hyrum, got married and located at College Ward. My mother was baptized at Hyrum in 1865 as a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. She spent her girlhood days in Hyrum and later married James Wray, a young man from England. They were married in the Salt Lake Endowment House, December 8, 1873. In 1884 the family moved to Idaho and located at Riverside near the Snake River west of Blackfoot. They took this trip by train with a small baby, having already found a home in Riverside, then awaiting the birth of the child before moving.

MARIANNE Andersen

Contributor: dustyfeathers Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Written by Alice Skanchy Wray—granddaughter Marianne Jensen was born in Holman, Elling, Denmark. A Daughter of Jens and Hanna Marie Jensen: Marianne was born 16 May 1822. At age of 17 she married Jens Christian Jensen. They had a son and named him Anton. At the age of 11 he went to work on a farm. (Our records show the next two children born were: Jens Peter Jensen born 5 June 1848 died 18 April 1856; Maren Jensen born 18 June 1853 died 18 April 1856. Sylvia Engle) Then a pair of twins came to bless them 26 August 1857, a boy Ludvig and a girl Louisa. The boy weighed 4 pounds and the girl not quite 3 pounds. Ludvig died 27 August 1857. When Louisa was two years old they made plans to come to Utah, having joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. In April 1859 they left Liverpool, England on the ship called “William Tapscott” with 725 saints. Captain Robert Neslen was in charge. They were on the ocean several weeks. Upon arriving in New York they had to get a team of oxen and a wagon. Jens Christian Jensen and another man teamed up together, each paying half. Jensen bought a cow so they would have milk for the little girl. Marianne found on her arrival in New York that her trunk had not been put on the ship, thus making her wardrobe very scant. She bought some material and made some clothes the best she could without a machine. (S.J.E.From Louisa’s story) Jens Christian Jensen was killed 15 July 1859, while on the journey to Utah. One day after their noon meal the oxen became frightened and Grandfather fell from the wagon, and was run over by his wagon and buried on the plains. The man they had teamed up with was not a very good man. He put all Marianne’s things on the ground and went on, leaving her with the little girl, saying, “You can stay here until someone comes along to pick you up.” She did just that. Feeling bad, she still had faith that God would help her. Not many hours passed until a driver stopped and said to the man inside the wagon, who had two broken legs. “There is a woman and a little girl sitting here.” The man who owned the wagon was kind. He said, “Tell her we will take her child and also her clothes if she can walk.” So they placed the little girl in a boiler in the corner of the wagon and Marianne and the cow walked until they got to the Mississippi River. This man’s name was Soren Nielsen. They went by boat until they changed from the Mississippi River to Hannibal, then by train to the Missouri River and sailed on to Council Bluffs. They reached Salt Lake in the fall. Marianne was met by her brother Peter Jensen. It was cold and the roads were not very good so they stayed in Tooele until spring, then in 1860 they settled in Hyrum, Utah. Later she married Soren Nielsen. As soon as the Logan Temple was finished they had their temple work done. He was being sealed to his first wife and her to her first husband. Louisa at the age of sixteen met and married James Wray. A fine man who had joined the Church of England. He loved to preach the Gospel. They raised a family of 13 children. Soren Nielsen had a daughter aged twelve, his wife had died in Denmark. Six other children were left with other people in Denmark; he never saw any of them again. When his daughter Senie was seventeen years of age she married George P. Ward as second wife and moved to Idaho where they raised eight children. Marianne and her husband both worked yards of rag carpet for people. They had a few sheep. She would cut the wool, card it, spin it and weave it into cloth. They raised their own garden. Marianne made potato starch and made what they called hop yeast, two five gallon jars on Monday and by Saturday night it would be all gone. The women would send their children with a little flour in a bucket to exchange for yeast, so she had flour to make her bread. They also had some wonderful apples she dried, and did they ever make good apple pie. They also had two cows and from the milk they didn't use she made cheese. She was the sweetest little woman, so good hearted, no one ever left her home hungry. Even to strangers who were selling something, she would always offer them something to eat. In those days the Church had fast meetings the first Thursdays in each month. Every fast day Marianne would go to thank the Lord for his goodness and to pay her fast offering. Her husband could not go. He couldn't walk without two canes as his legs just grew together while he was lying in the wagon. He was such patient man, never complained. Years went by before she heard from her son Anton. A young man by the name of Ingwald Thoresen went on a mission to Denmark. When he returned he went to see Marianne. He said; “I have news from your son Anton.” This made her very happy. Anton was married to Elsie Andersen, they had four children, and two of them died (twins. S.E.), then his wife died. A year later he married Elsie Andreasen, they had two girls. The family joined the church and came to Utah and made their home in College Ward. Here they raised a family of 14 children. He was just like his dear little mother, a friend to everyone. Marianne had only two children survive, but had 29 grand children, 105 great grand children and 50 great, great grand children. She passed away at the age of 72 at the home of her daughter Louisa and James Wray in Hyrum County, Utah. Born 16 May 1822 Married Jens Christian Jensen Married Soren Nielsen Died 17 January 1895 Father—Jens Andersen Mother—Hanna Marie Jensen Children—Jens Anton, Jens Peter, Maren, Louisa, Ludvig

Life timeline of Louisa Wray

1857
Louisa Wray was born on 26 Aug 1857
Louisa Wray was 4 years old when American Civil War: Fort Sumter surrenders to Confederate forces. The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865. As a result of the long-standing controversy over slavery, war broke out in April 1861, when Confederate forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina, shortly after U.S. President Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated. The nationalists of the Union proclaimed loyalty to the U.S. Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States, who advocated for states' rights to expand slavery.
Louisa Wray was 20 years old when Thomas Edison announces his invention of the phonograph, a machine that can record and play sound. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Louisa Wray was 30 years old when Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West Show opens in London. William Frederick "Buffalo Bill" Cody was an American scout, bison hunter, and showman. He was born in Le Claire, Iowa Territory, but he lived for several years in his father's hometown in Toronto Township, Ontario, Canada, before the family returned to the Midwest and settled in the Kansas Territory.
Louisa Wray was 41 years old when Spanish–American War: The Treaty of Paris is signed, officially ending the conflict. The Spanish–American War was fought between the United States and Spain in 1898. Hostilities began in the aftermath of the internal explosion of the USS Maine in Havana Harbor in Cuba, leading to US intervention in the Cuban War of Independence. American acquisition of Spain's Pacific possessions led to its involvement in the Philippine Revolution and ultimately in the Philippine–American War.
Louisa Wray was 48 years old when Albert Einstein publishes his first paper on the special theory of relativity. Albert Einstein was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics. His work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. He is best known to the general public for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2, which has been dubbed "the world's most famous equation". He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect", a pivotal step in the development of quantum theory.
Louisa Wray was 60 years old when Tsar Nicholas II of Russia was forced to abdicate in the February Revolution, ending three centuries of Romanov rule. Nicholas II or Nikolai II, known as Saint Nicholas in the Russian Orthodox Church, was the last Emperor of Russia, ruling from 1 November 1894 until his forced abdication on 15 March 1917. His reign saw the fall of the Russian Empire from one of the foremost great powers of the world to economic and military collapse. He was given the nickname Nicholas the Bloody or Vile Nicholas by his political adversaries due to the Khodynka Tragedy, anti-Semitic pogroms, Bloody Sunday, the violent suppression of the 1905 Russian Revolution, the executions of political opponents, and his perceived responsibility for the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905). Soviet historians portray Nicholas as a weak and incompetent leader whose decisions led to military defeats and the deaths of millions of his subjects.
Louisa Wray was 63 years old when The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified, guaranteeing women's suffrage in America. The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibits the states and the federal government from denying the right to vote to citizens of the United States on the basis of sex. It was adopted on August 18, 1920.
Louisa Wray died on 28 Dec 1937 at the age of 80
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Louisa Wray (26 Aug 1857 - 28 Dec 1937), BillionGraves Record 4719016 Blackfoot, Bingham, Idaho, United States

Loading