Linda Frances Hasson

17 Dec 1953 - 25 Jun 1997

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Linda Frances Hasson

17 Dec 1953 - 25 Jun 1997
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Grave site information of Linda Frances Hasson (17 Dec 1953 - 25 Jun 1997) at Provo City Cemetery in Provo, Utah, Utah, United States from BillionGraves

Life Information

Linda Frances Hasson

Born:
Married: 22 Aug 1972
Died:

Provo City Cemetery

610 S State St
Provo, Utah, Utah
United States

Epitaph

Beloved Wife and Mother... A True Daughter of Zion
Transcriber

crex

June 8, 2011
Transcriber

Aunty Bec

April 13, 2020
Transcriber

KathyZ

April 15, 2020
Transcriber

Larry

April 18, 2020
Photographer

GraveTrain

June 8, 2011

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Family

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  • John Hasson
    Buried here
    Not Available - Not Available
  • John Hasson
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Grave Site of Linda Frances

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Linda Frances Hasson is buried in the Provo City Cemetery at the location displayed on the map below. This GPS information is ONLY available at BillionGraves. Our technology can help you find the gravesite and other family members buried nearby.

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Memories

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Random memories of Linda Frances Biggers Hasson, my mother

Contributor: crex Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

When the youngest of us started school, my mother resumed working on her college education. She was majoring in microbiology. I believe it was because it was a good major for going into medical school. She figured that if something ever happened to my father, she would have a college degree to help her support the family. She got within 3 credit hours of graduation (this is the equivalent of one class), went to a career fair and found out the only job she could possibly get was as a lab technician/assistant for $15/hr. She said that wasn't enough to support the family and she decided to be a 100% full time mother was good enough for her. So she never graduated college. Also, many times growing up, I remember my mother asking my father if he would re-marry if she ever died. This wasn't a one time occurrence. It was probably a couple times a year. My father's usual response was, "I'll die first anyways." But that was not the case. While my mother was attending college, remember that she married right out of High School, so she didn't attend college until after all of us kids were in school, she lost her calculator. She looked all over for it. Anyone with kids will sympathize with what she did next. She lined up all seven of us children and asked, "who lost the calculator?" No one admitted to playing with it or even touching it. I certainly don't remember playing with it. It's not like calculators were some magical device that displayed all types of colors & lights like to day's cell phones. Why play with a boring old calculator when we had a Nintendo and Lego's? Besides, if I wanted to do math, I'd just do it, not use a calculator. (I guess that's the benefit of third grade math). Well, she told us that if no one admitted to it, we'd all get spanked. Our mother & father raised us to be honest at all times, even if it meant getting spanked, so... we all got spanked. No one admitted to using the calculator. After she finished spanking us and started to calm down, she looked in her purse again, and at the very bottom...She found her calculator. When we moved to Utah, (that was Linda's vote, everyone else voted to move back to Texas), we lived in a neighborhood on the side of the mountain. It was a fun place to live for the three little kids (Michelle, Gary, & I). Everyday, except Sunday, we had every boy in a six house radius (from the ages of 8 to 14) over at our house playing. It was a blast for us kids. But something my mother observed, was that she was the only stay at home mom in the entire neighborhood. I guess that's why we never really played at anyone else's house in that neighborhood...my mother preferred to have the whole neighborhood at our house under a mother's supervision than have us off somewhere else with no adult supervision.

Linda Frances Biggers Hasson & Her Father William Stullken Biggers

Contributor: crex Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

This is a story I remember my mother telling on a few occasions. I'm sure I don't remember the details fully, but if any of my siblings or my father remember this story, I'd be glad for any corrections they have to offer. My maternal grandfather died when I was really young. I think it was 1986 or something like that. I think I remember the funeral, but the only faint memory I have of it was being in a large room with tile and being told, "This is your cousin Richard. Play with him." It was probably the first time I met him. I don't remember anything beyond that, but Richard and I became really good friends later on in life when we lived a lot closer to each other. Anyways, I don't remember Grandpa Biggers, but my mother always talked about him. She loved her Daddy. Well, my mother recounted several times, a dream she had where Grandpa came and spoke to her. I want to say it happened sometime around 1987 & 1988. Michelle & I (the twins) were still very young, and Gary was even younger. He came to her and asked if she was ready to join him. He held her hand and they started to walk towards a light. My mother stopped, and said, "I can't. I can't leave. The twins need me. My kids need me. John needs me." Grandpa responded, "You can stay for another 10 years or you can come with me now." Then my mother responded, "I'll stay." Then Grandpa walked back into the light and she walked the opposite direction. She woke up after that.

Family Dinner

Contributor: crex Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

We always had our family dinners at 5 PM every day. It didn't matter what was going on, we had family dinner at 5 PM. This was the reason the younger kids did not play band instruments. Marching band interfered too much with this priority my parents had set. Thus the younger kids learned orchestra instruments. This 5 PM rule was very frustrating as a teenager. You get home from school, have to do your homework and chores before you can go play with your friends, and by the time that was all done, it'd be 4:50, and my mother would remark, you can go play with your friends, but you have to be home by 5. With my friend's house 5 minute walk away, it was very frustrating. Anyways, my favorite part about family dinner, was not the food. I remember liking the food, or at least trying it all, but what I remember most was listening to all the stories and conversations people were having. I was the second youngest of the family, so it was not very often I got to control the conversation. But my Daddy was an amazing story teller, so it didn't matter.

Life timeline of Linda Frances Hasson

1953
Linda Frances Hasson was born on 17 Dec 1953
Linda Frances Hasson was 16 years old when During the Apollo 11 mission, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first humans to walk on the Moon. Apollo 11 was the spaceflight that landed the first two people on the Moon. Mission commander Neil Armstrong and pilot Buzz Aldrin, both American, landed the lunar module Eagle on July 20, 1969, at 20:17 UTC. Armstrong became the first person to step onto the lunar surface six hours after landing on July 21 at 02:56:15 UTC; Aldrin joined him about 20 minutes later. They spent about two and a quarter hours together outside the spacecraft, and collected 47.5 pounds (21.5 kg) of lunar material to bring back to Earth. Michael Collins piloted the command module Columbia alone in lunar orbit while they were on the Moon's surface. Armstrong and Aldrin spent 21.5 hours on the lunar surface before rejoining Columbia in lunar orbit.
Linda Frances Hasson was 19 years old when Vietnam War: The last United States combat soldiers leave South Vietnam. The Vietnam War, also known as the Second Indochina War, and in Vietnam as the Resistance War Against America or simply the American War, was a conflict that occurred in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia from 1 November 1955 to the fall of Saigon on 30 April 1975. It was the second of the Indochina Wars and was officially fought between North Vietnam and the government of South Vietnam. The North Vietnamese army was supported by the Soviet Union, China, and other communist allies; the South Vietnamese army was supported by the United States, South Korea, Australia, Thailand and other anti-communist allies. The war is considered a Cold War-era proxy war by some US perspectives. The majority of Americans believe the war was unjustified. The war would last roughly 19 years and would also form the Laotian Civil War as well as the Cambodian Civil War, which also saw all three countries become communist states in 1975.
Linda Frances Hasson was 29 years old when Michael Jackson's Thriller, the best-selling album of all time, was released. Michael Joseph Jackson was an American singer, songwriter, and dancer. Dubbed the "King of Pop", he was one of the most popular entertainers in the world, and was the best-selling music artist during the year of his death. Jackson's contributions to music, dance, and fashion along with his publicized personal life made him a global figure in popular culture for over four decades.
Linda Frances Hasson died on 25 Jun 1997 at the age of 43
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Linda Frances Hasson (17 Dec 1953 - 25 Jun 1997), BillionGraves Record 12900 Provo, Utah, Utah, United States

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