Lillian Prince (Terry)

17 Feb 1910 - 27 Feb 1992

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Lillian Prince (Terry)

17 Feb 1910 - 27 Feb 1992
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Personality Spotlight of Jesse Fenton Prince and Lillian Terry Prince Ward News-1989 It’s an extraordinary couple who decide to build a new home when he is 80 and she 77! But that is exactly what FENTON and LILLIAN TERRY PRINCE did and they love their cozy nest. As Fenton says, “You might as wel

Life Information

Lillian Prince (Terry)

Born:
Married: 10 Aug 1932
Died:

Orem Cemetery

770 Murdock Canal Trail
Orem, Utah, Utah
United States

Epitaph

MOTHER FATHER
Our children: Terry, Carma Rene, Carolyn, Diane, Mariann, J Bruce
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trishkovach

May 30, 2011
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junedraper

April 14, 2020
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RehsaHpesoj

April 3, 2020
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MsCarolB

April 6, 2020
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dmczone

April 6, 2020
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KathyZ

April 8, 2020
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PapaMoose

May 30, 2011

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Family

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  • J. Fenton Prince
    Buried here
    14 Dec 1906 - 16 Oct 1990
  • Terry Prince
    Child
    Others not buried here
  • Carma Prince
    Child
    Others not buried here
  • Rene Prince
    Child
    Others not buried here
  • Carolyn Prince
    Child
    Others not buried here
  • Diane Prince
    Child
    Others not buried here
  • Marianne Prince
    Child
    Others not buried here
  • J. Bruce Prince
    Child
    Others not buried here

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Memories

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Personality Spotlight on Fenton and Lillian, Ward Newsletter

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Personality Spotlight of Jesse Fenton Prince and Lillian Terry Prince Ward News-1989 It’s an extraordinary couple who decide to build a new home when he is 80 and she 77! But that is exactly what FENTON and LILLIAN TERRY PRINCE did and they love their cozy nest. As Fenton says, “You might as well enjoy the latter part of your life as well as the first!” Fenton was born in Washington, UT, but moved to Gooding Idaho, by covered wagon when he was 5 years old. He is next-to-youngest of 11 children. After graduating from high school in Idaho, he came to BYU on a football scholarship. He had already lettered in basketball, track and wrestling in high school. He was also on the basketball and track teams at the Y. One day his track coach, Ott Romney, watched him loping around the track and gave him a nick-name which endured a long time. He said, “Look at that big horse running!” Fenton became “Big Horse” and his young , smaller brother, “Little Horse.” Lillian was born and reared in Orem (called the Provo bench in those days) and is the 2nd eldest in a family of 7 children. Her family had orchards and fruit patches so she was and expert at picking berries and fruit from an early age. She is also a talented writer and has written for both The Daily Herald and The Deseret News. She now puts her skills to good use writing a twice-yearly family newsletter. Both Lillian and Fenton are graduates of BYU and both in the field of education. Lillian achieved her degree after 18 years of marriage and 6 children so made her children promise they’d get their degrees faster than their mom! She later went on to get her master’s degree in elementary counseling. Fenton became a principal for 35 years. The Princes met in freshman English and began dating. On one occasion she went to see Fenton play football and upon entering the stadium (the old one) heard the announcement over the loudspeaker, “Now entering the stadium is Lillian Terry who is dating Fenton Prince!” One of Fenton’s buddies had seen her come in announced her presence to the whole stadium! They were married in the Logan Temple on Aug. 10, 1932. Immediately after their marriage, they were called to serve a mission in Texas. However, Lillian’s mother was very ill so she could not leave. Fenton went on without her. She nursed her mother through her last illness and, at her mother’s passing, joined her husband in the mission field. He taught in the Church schools in Texas and they both served as proselyting missionaries, even speaking on street corners. When Lillian was married she stated that Orem was the one place she didn’t want to live! After 2 years in Texas, she changed her mind! They have been in Orem ever since with the exception of a couple of years. The Princes had a marvelous experience when the whole family spent a year in Honolulu when Fenton took a principal exchange. Wanting to make a good first impression the family members were all dressed in suits for the males (complete with a hat for Fenton), dresses and gloves for the girls. When they arrived in the hot, humid climate of Hawaii, they realized they may have carried propriety a bit too far! Because of their large family, people in the airport and on the plane soon recognized them as the Prince family. Fenton soon realized that the family was in the public eye because they were Mormons and he was a school principle. Many came to his office to chat and ask questions about the Mormons. He was concerned about doing the right thing so asked what he should do when inquiries were made about his religion. His boss advised him to be courteous and answer! Fenton was only too happy to do so. Many of the missionaries told him after that doors were opened to them because the people had either met or heard of Fenton. The Princes have 4 daughters, 2 sons, 24 grandchildren and 4 greats. They are very proud of them all. Both Lillan and Fenton love to travel and have done so extensively. They have visited all 50 states (Hawaii when it was still a territory), 13 countries of Europe, Egypt, Israel, Turkey, the Isle of Patmos, the islands of the Caribbean and Mexico on a bus. They went to Japan with the football team and on an Alaskan cruise up the inland waterway. They have also run the Colorado River from Lake Powell to Lake Mead. What adventuresome people! Both have been faithful in Church service in many callings from the bishopric, SS and High Priest president for him and R.S. presidency and teaching for her. They love their present callings as consultants for the Family History Library. After 56 years of marriage they think it is going to last! They credit their marital success to having their priories in the right place—family and church come first. They feel a temple marriage tends to promote a greater commitment. They are living examples of that great principle.

Interview with Grandma Prince written from audio file

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Velma Mentes was telling one story that Grandma Hirst used to love to tell often. We used to visit Grandma Hirst often. We loved going to her place. One time when we were there at Grandma’s house she said “Lillian my back is itching will you scratch it for me?” I had seen my father when he was out in the field working, when his back was itching he would go out over to a fence post and rub his back against it to stop it from itching. So I said to Grandma “Why don’t you wub your back on a post like Papa do?” Velma said Grandma got a big kick and laugh out of that and used to tell it often. When I was just a baby and Olive was about 4 our father was called on a mission. So our mother and the two children went to live with Grandma. Mother worked at Hotel Roberts and Grandma would take care of us while she was gone. My sister Olive said that when a bad storm and thunder and lightning would come up, grandma would put us in the closet and leave us there until the storm was over. Another time that we enjoyed when I was young was harvest time on the farm. At that time there wasn’t enough people living on Provo bench (which later became Orem) at that time to get local help; anyone who did live there had their own fruit to harvest. So we used to have our cousins and some of our relatives from Fairview come and stay with us until the harvest was over. Velma Mentes who was a cousin closest to my age says she will never forget how my father, her Uncle Charlie, used to come into the bedroom at 4 o’clock in the morning saying “wake up girls. It’s time to get up. The strawberries are waiting.” We would go out ready to go out to the field and pick berries. We tried to get out there before and get a few picked before it got so hot, then about 7:30 we would come in and have breakfast and mother would have a nice hot meal all prepared for us. It really tasted good, and by that time we were very hungry. Then in the afternoon we had our cousins to play with and we really had fun. We played “inny i over” and some other kind of ball games and jacks which we played with a pocket knife. I think they finally did away with that game because it was too dangerous. Anyway it was really fun to have the cousins there and a big lark for us. I have thought about it since and I am sure it wasn’t so much fun for my mother who did all the extra cooking besides helping with some of the farm work. (I was just thinking the game I talked about when were kids and played with pocket knives. It was called rumblepeg.) Our Christmas’s when I was young were not so lavish as many of them are today. But we always anticipated, it was the same excitement kids do today. We would always have an orange in our stocking and that was about the only time of year that we got an orange. And then the candy that we got in our stocking we always looked forward to because that was something else we didn’t have very much of and usually when we did have it it was some that we had made. Of course we had plenty of fresh fruit we had apples all the year round. And we usually planned on one special gift and mine was usually a new china head for my doll because I always managed to break mine before another Christmas came around. One Christmas stands out when my mother had crocheted this sweater and cap for my doll, there was always a new dress for our dolls also. And Grandma usually came out and helped with Christmas dinner. And our cousins the Pines lived next door and we would run over there and see what they had received. We really had fun with our cousins when I was growing up. We had real candles on our Christmas tree. We had candle holders with fasteners to fasten them to the branches of the tree and of course it was very dangerous to have real lights on your Christmas tree so we could only light them for a little while. We never lite them unless we were all there to see them lighted and then we could only have them lite for a little while. Another one of the nice experiences we had later on after I was married and had children, Fenton had been called to be the Chairman of the ward genealogy committee and he had asked that I be called to be his secretary. We decided that if we were going to ask other people to do genealogy we needed to do our own. And so we began writing family histories and getting family group sheets prepared. The stake had outlined some requirements for us to do to be eligible for our stake certificate. I think all of us received our certificate and many in the ward also in Stake Conference that next spring. But the other thing that we decided was that if we were going to ask other people to do research we needed to find out what it was all about. So one day our whole family went to the library. Bruce, Marianne and Carolyn and Diane and Dad and I were there. It was the old original library and very different from the library today. Of course Bruce was very young at that time and Marianne was not very old either. Anyway we were green about the whole thing. We sat at a table and there was a lady there, Mrs. Parks, who was sitting at the same table. She sensed that we didn’t know very much about what we were trying to do. And so she said “I come here often and I don’t have much to do today. Could I help you?” And so we were glad for the help. We told her we wanted to research the Thayne’s from Scotland. And so she guided us to the parish records we needed and we were able to find the family we were looking for and Diane and Carolyn were able to help read the records. With that start and with further records and further visits we were able to send hundreds of names to the library to have the temple work done. Another interesting experience at the library put me in touch with a lady who along with her husband was in charge of the Prince genealogy. At that time you couldn’t go to the shelf and pick up your own records you had to write the reference you wanted then take it to the window and then the workers would get the book you needed and call your name. I thought I had heard my name called and I went to the window and another lady came to the window also. I was Lillian Prince she was Lyda Prince and we had both thought that they had called our name. But this was really nice because I was able to get acquainted with Lyda Prince. That gave us another source to get additional genealogy and at that time they weren’t submitting the sheet that they were preparing through their research but they were putting them together in packets and selling them to relatives to get money to go on with the research. That gave us another source and I felt like the Lord had a hand in both of these experiences to help us along with our genealogy and we have been interested in genealogy ever since. The other year that we really treasured was the year that we spent in Hawaii. Fent had arranged for an exchange Principalship to Hawaii. He would go to Kuhio School and be the Principle there. And the Principle from Kuhio would come over to Westmore and take his place. So we had our whole family over there, eventually. At first Dad and I and Renee and Carolyn and Diane and Bruce and Marianne went and then Terry came over later. We left in August and had heard that the weather would be 80 degrees. We thought that sounded great. But 80 degrees and humid heat wasn’t that pleasant, but by a couple of months it was very pleasant weather. Anyway, we wanted to make a good impression as we landed in Hawaii so we all had our hats and our gloves, but we soon found out that the islands were very casual and that hats and gloves went in the closet. The Vice Principle Mrs. Gelding and some of the teacher had met us at the plane and loaded us down with leis and then took us to a nice restaurant for dinner. They had done their homework and said we know you are Mormon and don’t drink tea or coffee or alcoholic beverages so just tell us what you would like to drink. They had found a nice place for us to rent which was large enough for our family. And we liked it so we were able to move in after just a few nights in motel on the Wai ki ki beach. I had not planned to teach at that time, but they needed teachers and since we found that things were more expensive than we had thought they would be, I accepted a teaching position and Kalihi Elementary. A school populated mostly from public housing children. The children spoke pidgin English and at first it was very hard for me to understand them. But I was glad that I had decided to teach because it put me in touch with the Hawaiian people and helped me to understand and know their culture. I had a first grade. At that time the schools in Hawaii were homogeneously group. That next year they changed that idea and I think that Dad had some influence in the change because he had worked with some of them during the year to not changing the idea. But there were five first grades and my children were the lowest in the building of the five first grades, so you know it was quite a challenge but it turned out to be an interesting and fun year. The children spoke mainly pidgin English and I rode to school with two Japanese ladies and one Chinese lady. For the first two weeks even though they spoke very good English I couldn’t understand what they were saying. They enunciated differently and spoke a little faster than I was used to. Anyway, after two weeks I could understand everything they said and I wondered why I hadn’t been able to understand them in the first place. One day I said to them “I’m having a hard time to understand the children.” And they said “well, just remember they are having a hard time to understand you also.” And I’m sure that was true. As I said, they spoke the pidgin English, for instance, one day a sister of one of my children came to the door and she just stood in the door and one of my children came up and said “Mrs. Prince, this girl like you.” And I said “Well, fine I like her too.” Then they just said “Well Mrs. Prince she likes you.” Then I said “Well, good I like her too.” And then they said “Well, Mrs. Prince she like you.” And then I knew what they wanted, this girl at the door wanted to talk to me. And there was one of the boys, Robert, having trouble losing his pencil and he said “every time I leave my pencil on my desk, every time I come back, no say.” His pencil would disappear. One day someone had put a quarter on my desk for hot lunch and I was trying to find out who had given me the lunch money. One boy, Eugene, his mother sold beads down at Waikiki beach, was one that did take hot lunch more than anyone else so I called him up and I said “did you give me hot lunch money Eugene?” No answer. I said “did you bring hot lunch?” and no answer. I said “did you put this quarter on my desk for hot lunch?” No answer. So I decided I would have to speak his language. So I said “Eugene, ya brought hot lunch, ya?” and he said yes that was his quarter. Then one day we were getting ready to read a story and it was about a mouse and I asked them if they knew where a mouse lived and they said yes he lives in a puka, and I had never heard that word before. And I said “a puka? What’s a puka?” and they said well it’s a hole in the ground. When their papers would get holes in they would get pukas in. One day one of the children came with a bandage on his head and I said “What’s the matter with your head?” and he said “Well it has a puka in it.” He said a boy hit me with a stone. By that time I knew that he had a hole in his head. Then, when they get through with the papers they bring it up and they say “I pow.” Which means I’m finished. One other interesting experience we had was when my faculty went to Animal Ana(?) Park for a picnic and they invited all of the families to come so we could bring our children. So Marianne and Diane and Carolyn and Bruce, Fent and I all went to the picnic. And we played games while Mr. Shimizu(?) and Mr. Ameriama(?) and Mr. Tini(?) cooked the food. And it was a delicious native dish Chinese or Japanese and I was the only haole teacher on the faculty the rest of them were either Japanese or Chinese, so our family were the only haoles at the picnic. And they hadn’t brought any knives and forks and spoons to eat with they just brought chop sticks and when we got ready to eat Marianne leaned over and said “how the heck to you use these things I’m afraid I’m not going to be able to get anything to eat.” But, anyway, Fenton and I had been invited to dinners before and had been taught how to use chop sticks, but the children had never had that experience before. They did manage, and it was a good experience for them. Bruce would take one chop stick in each hand and pile the food up in the middle of his plate and then put both the chop stick together and put them under the pile and scoop up some food. They all managed to clean their plates. One of the other nice experiences we had was when we were honored guests at Kuhio PTA installation night. Of course I was going in for a free ride on Fent’s fame. It was held at an oasis club and there were over 100 guests there. They had a nice dinner and the people were very gracious and friendly. They presented me with a lei, an orchid lei, at the door and then they also gave me an orchid corsage and then one of the ladies had won a dozen red roses at the door prize and she insisted that I had those. When we were ready to go they insisted that we take the center piece home which was as a gorgeous arrangement of bird of paradise and plumeria and red ginger. It was a nice evening and Fent had been asked to talk and had given a nice talk and he had been accepted very well over there. With the teachers and the community people also were happy with the way he organized and managed the school. That evening they gave him a nameplate made of monkey pot in the shape of a surf board with diamond head on it. We still have that memento and we stayed for the program which was a group of Japanese singers and dancers. And then we came home looking like a flower garden. But we arrived just in time to see an Arthur Murray TV program and Terry was in it so we were all very proud of him. [The Arthur Murray Party is an American television variety show which ran from July 1950 until September 1960. We felt like Dad did some missionary work while he was over there because one day the missionaries came to the school and they wanted to meet him. They said that some of the homes that they’d had a hard time getting into before, now when they went to the door they said “Oh, yes, we know Mr. Prince he is our principal and he’s a Mormon. Come on in.” And so they said they were able to get into many of the homes that they were not able to get into before. And I’ll tell just a few experiences that I’ve had with prayer when I’ve felt that I’ve had direct answers. I had wanted for so long to work in the temple and the temple is so sacred and I feel so close to the Lord there. Of course, anyone can ask to work in the temple, you don’t have to wait to be called, but my problem was that my husband did not have the same desire and I wanted us both to serve together. I prayed for months that something would change and we would be able to serve together in the temple. And many times as I pray for things I get a positive feeling like “sure, that blessing will be yours.” But as I prayed for this particular blessing I just got a feeling of a blank, like no one was listening and finally I said “Okay Lord if that blessing is not for us at this time I will accept that answer but please give us something, someway that we can serve and serve together.” It was not many days until we got a call from the genealogical library at BYU asking us to come in for an interview. A week later we were called to work and take care of the temple bureau there. The Lord had given us an opportunity to give some service to the church. And I felt very good about the service we had been called to. And this taught me that I needed to let the Lord guide me and let him decide what was best for me at certain times. Another time and experience I had with prayer was exciting and I’m so grateful I can turn to the Lord with my problems. This time my problem was maybe not a spiritual nature but it was important. I had been serving as secretary to the Orem Heritage committee, in February I was given a letter, a legal paper which was very important to the committee and the only copy they had. I was supposed to make a copy to keep in the minute book and then mail the original back to the committee member who had given it to me. I had worked on the minutes on Monday and had seen the letter, but was busy getting some cleaning done in preparation for a visit from my sister Olive and her husband. So I didn’t take time to copy the letter. The next Monday I finished the minutes and prepared them to be copied and mailed off to the committee. But to my disappointment and frustration I could not find the precious letter. I felt there were only two places that it could be, either in my notebook or the minute book. I searched leaf by leaf and it was not to be found. How was I to tell the committee and how could I to get another copy? I finally called the lawyer who prepared the letter and asked him if he had another copy. He said he had just dictated it over the phone and did not have another copy. That night as I said my prayer I put the problem before the Lord and told him that it was important that I find that letter. Immediately I had the feeling come over me “you will find the letter.” And then I was directed to go over carefully the things I had done the first day I had worked on the minutes. And as I lay in bed thinking through the things I had done I thought it through and I panicked a little when I wondered if I had thrown the papers in the waste basket but I decided I had not. I just felt it should be in the minute book or in my notebook but knew I had searched them very carefully. Then the thought came to me that I had some extra sheets of typing papers, which I had not used and which I had put back in the package of typing paper I just bought. I knew then that that would be where I would find the lost letter. I had put it away with the empty type pages and it was in the package with the typing paper and it was the first sheet of paper I took out when I looked to see if it was there. Another experience which was very precious to me is was when I was Relief Society President. It was when we had Relief Society in the day and I had gotten up early to prepare the room for the Relief Society and while I was there the phone rang and I answered the phone and it was Dad and he just said “I just wanted you to know that I love you.” While I was Relief Society President I had to visit many non-members and members and people that I didn’t know very well. I would be afraid that I wouldn’t be accepted and so I’d pray all the way there that I would be accepted and I always was. Many would say “How did you know that I needed someone today?” Many times while I was Relief Society President I felt frustrated at having so many things to do and so many people wanting help. One day I was feeling especially frustrated and tired and that night as I said my prayer I told the Lord how hard it was and that I was feeling really kind of frustrated at having so many demands made on me. The answer I got was “in as much as ye have done it unto the least of these ye have done it unto me.” When I was teaching at Kalihi Elementary I was often called Mrs. Queen or Mrs. Princess. These were names that they were familiar with because they had had experience with a queen. One of the words that was a little hard to teach was the word little, because they didn’t use that word. If they had a baby it their home, they had one small baby, so they used the word small instead of the word little. So they weren’t quite used to the word little so they didn’t quite understand it. One of the other things that was different in Kalihi School in Hawaii was that we had to stay with our children all through the lunch hour. We would all go down to the lunch room together and I had to go with them and then after we were through with the lunch then we’d go back to the room and put our heads down on our desk and take a rest. That was the kind of the noon hour that we had. But some of the lunches that the children would bring were very interesting. Some of them would bring just a ball of rice wrapped up in newspaper. Many of them would come from very poor families. One special experience I remember in my teaching was in the kindergarten over at Scera Park. I had a little youngster, this was my first year in kindergarten. Well, not my first year cause I taught kindergarten over at Geneva. But this was my first experience with kindergarten in Scera Park. I had one little youngster, he was very unruly and very hard to work with. So I put him on a program where if he would obey the rules and cooperate I would give him special privileges like waking up the children from their nap or passing the milk or some other little thing that all the children liked to do. And this would work for a time and then he’d revert back to his naughty ways and so he’d be taken off the program and then later put back on if he cooperated. We tried several things: interviews with his parents, talks with him, I tried many things. One day I had gone to school early, I was the only one in the room and I was sitting at my desk working on plans for the day and he was the first child to come in the room that day. He came in and stood by my desk with his arms folded and said “Mrs. Prince, I want to be good.” And from then on things worked much better. One of the other things that was special when I was growing up was camping trips we used to take every summer. We’d come to a place in the harvest where we could leave for a few days and we’d get our things ready and go up, mainly up the canyon somewhere to stay. Our Aunts and Uncles and cousins would all come too. And this was a lot of fun. One experience that I remember was we liked to camp by the river and we liked to go swimming in the river, it wasn’t quite as big as it is now. One night I had dared my father to get up at 5 o’clock in the morning and go swimming in the cold river and the water was pretty cold always, but very cold at 5 o’clock in the morning. But anyway, my Dad took the dare and we got up at 5 o’clock the next morning and got in the river and I can assure you we didn’t stay very long. As I was growing up in Orem in high school, our main source of entertainment besides school activities were house parties. And we used to have many of them. I belonged to a group which would take turns having a party at their place. And sometimes we were even aloud to meet at the church.

Lillian Terry Prince

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

When I was a teenager I recall Mom making sure that our entire family traveled to the Church’s Genealogy Library (now called the Family History Library) in Salt Lake City. The family made this journey to the “big city” for the day numerous times. At the library Mom gave each of us a research assignment to accomplish and when that was complete she gave us another. The journey itself was a very unusual event for us. It was unusual in those years to travel to Salt Lake City from Orem, Utah, even though it is one many people take routinely now. It emphasized to me that we were on an important quest and it was an experience to anticipate. I recall her talking about her wonderful parents and her ancestral heritage. By example and word she taught me to appreciate and love my heritage and to learn from their choices and experiences. My mother was a wonderful woman. She was loving and kind to all she met. She had great empathy for others and loved to serve them. She was a loving and kind mother who taught me many lessons.

Lillian Terry

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

"When I was a teenager I recall Mom making sure that our entire family traveled to the Church’s Genealogy Library (now called the Family History Library) in Salt Lake City. The family made this journey to the “big city” for the day numerous times. At the library Mom gave each of us a research assignment to accomplish and when that was complete she gave us another. The journey itself was a very unusual event for us. It was unusual in those years to travel to Salt Lake City from Orem, Utah, even though it is one many people take routinely now. It emphasized to me that we were on an important quest and it was an experience to anticipate. I recall her talking about her wonderful parents and her ancestral heritage. By example and word she taught me to appreciate and love my heritage and to learn from their choices and experiences. My mother was a wonderful woman. She was loving and kind to all she met. She had great empathy for others and loved to serve them. She was a loving and kind mother who taught me many lessons."

Life timeline of Lillian Prince (Terry)

1910
Lillian Prince (Terry) was born on 17 Feb 1910
Lillian Prince (Terry) was 20 years old when The New York Stock Exchange crashes in what will be called the Crash of '29 or "Black Tuesday", ending the Great Bull Market of the 1920s and beginning the Great Depression. The New York Stock Exchange, is an American stock exchange located at 11 Wall Street, Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York. It is by far the world's largest stock exchange by market capitalization of its listed companies at US$21.3 trillion as of June 2017. The average daily trading value was approximately US$169 billion in 2013. The NYSE trading floor is located at 11 Wall Street and is composed of 21 rooms used for the facilitation of trading. A fifth trading room, located at 30 Broad Street, was closed in February 2007. The main building and the 11 Wall Street building were designated National Historic Landmarks in 1978.
Lillian Prince (Terry) was 30 years old when Adolf Hitler signs an order to begin the systematic euthanasia of mentally ill and disabled people. Adolf Hitler was a German politician, demagogue, and Pan-German revolutionary, who was the leader of the Nazi Party, Chancellor of Germany from 1933 to 1945 and Führer ("Leader") of Nazi Germany from 1934 to 1945. As dictator, Hitler initiated World War II in Europe with the invasion of Poland in September 1939, and was central to the Holocaust.
Lillian Prince (Terry) was 35 years old when World War II: German forces in the west agree to an unconditional surrender. The German Instrument of Surrender ended World War II in Europe. The definitive text was signed in Karlshorst, Berlin, on the night of 8 May 1945 by representatives of the three armed services of the Oberkommando der Wehrmacht (OKW) and the Allied Expeditionary Force together with the Supreme High Command of the Red Army, with further French and US representatives signing as witnesses. The signing took place 9 May 1945 at 00:16 local time.
Lillian Prince (Terry) was 46 years old when Disneyland Hotel opens to the public in Anaheim, California. The Disneyland Hotel is a resort hotel located at the Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, California, owned by the Walt Disney Company and operated through its Parks, Experiences and Consumer Products division. Opened on October 5, 1955, as a motor inn owned and operated by Jack Wrather under an agreement with Walt Disney, the hotel was the first to officially bear the Disney name. Under Wrather's ownership, the hotel underwent several expansions and renovations over the years before being acquired by Disney in 1988. The hotel was downsized to its present capacity in 1999 as part of the Disneyland Resort expansion.
Lillian Prince (Terry) was 55 years old when Martin Luther King Jr. received the Nobel Peace Prize for combating racial inequality through nonviolence. Martin Luther King Jr. was an American Baptist minister and activist who became the most visible spokesperson and leader in the civil rights movement from 1954 until his death in 1968. Born in Atlanta, King is best known for advancing civil rights through nonviolence and civil disobedience, tactics his Christian beliefs and the nonviolent activism of Mahatma Gandhi helped inspire.
Lillian Prince (Terry) was 69 years old when Jim Jones led more than 900 members of the Peoples Temple to mass murder/suicide in Jonestown, Guyana, hours after some of its members assassinated U.S. Congressman Leo Ryan (pictured). James Warren Jones was an American religious cult leader who initiated and was responsible for a mass suicide and mass murder in Jonestown, Guyana. He considered Jesus Christ as being in compliance with an overarching belief in socialism as the correct social order. Jones was ordained as a Disciples of Christ pastor, and he achieved notoriety as the founder and leader of the Peoples Temple cult.
Lillian Prince (Terry) was 76 years old when Space Shuttle program: STS-51-L mission: Space Shuttle Challenger disintegrates after liftoff, killing all seven astronauts on board. The Space Shuttle program was the fourth human spaceflight program carried out by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), which accomplished routine transportation for Earth-to-orbit crew and cargo from 1981 to 2011. Its official name, Space Transportation System (STS), was taken from a 1969 plan for a system of reusable spacecraft of which it was the only item funded for development.
Lillian Prince (Terry) died on 27 Feb 1992 at the age of 82
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Lillian Prince (Terry) (17 Feb 1910 - 27 Feb 1992), BillionGraves Record 5534 Orem, Utah, Utah, United States

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