Jr Lewis Dunbar Wilson

21 Sep 1840 - 28 Jan 1922

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Jr Lewis Dunbar Wilson

21 Sep 1840 - 28 Jan 1922
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Lewis Dunbar Wilson, Jr. 1805 - 1922 Written by Robert James Cunningham Lewis Dunbar Wilson, Jr., a Utah pioneer of 1853, was born September 21, 1840 at Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, a son of Lewis Dunbar Wilson Sr., and Nancy Ann Waggoner who were converts from Chittenden County, Vermont. He was born
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Life Information

Jr Lewis Dunbar Wilson

Born:
Died:

Riverside Thomas Cemetery

939-949 State Highway 39
Blackfoot, Bingham, Idaho
United States
Transcriber

kcapson

October 13, 2012
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huntindead

October 9, 2012

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Lewis Dunbar Wilson, Jr.

Contributor: kcapson Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Lewis Dunbar Wilson, Jr. 1805 - 1922 Written by Robert James Cunningham Lewis Dunbar Wilson, Jr., a Utah pioneer of 1853, was born September 21, 1840 at Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, a son of Lewis Dunbar Wilson Sr., and Nancy Ann Waggoner who were converts from Chittenden County, Vermont. He was born four years after his father and mother were converted and baptized into the church, at the time when the saints were being so severely tried and perse[#$@^!]ted in Nauvoo. He remembers as a small boy, sitting upon the knee of the Prophet Joseph Smith while he was telling stories. He remembered hearing the noise and confusion at the time of the Prophet’s martyrdom; of seeing the dead body after his life had been taken. He used to tell of one time when the mob had chased the Prophet into his father’s home, of seeing his mother hide the Prophet under the bed while his father went out with a gun to keep the angry mob back. His father, being one of the High council (D&C 124:127-132) was given a sword by the Prophet and his sword, along with one of the first printed Books of Mormon was kept by Lewis Dunbar until the time of his death. He remembered the cold bitter night of February 1846, when his father and family left Nauvoo, with the first company of Saints and started westward to make a new home. All of his early childhood years were lived in hardship, self-denial and sorrow, while pioneering their way across the plains to Utah. It was seven years after the family left Nauvoo before they reached Salt Lake Valley. His father having stopped at Garden Grove four years, planting and harvesting crops, making clothing and earning money with which to buy teams, wagons, and equipment so they could travel on. In his father’s diary it reads, “Having been driven from Nauvoo, just out of a sick bed with a family of ten, five of them without shoes and hardly a shirt to their backs. With a borrowed team and wagon, one hundred pounds of flour and twenty-five pounds of pork, we have spent three years of the most distressing cir[#$@^!]mstances I ever met.” How severely tried was Lewis’s young soul, only he could have told, when after the family left Garden Grove, and had traveled one hundred and sixty miles [#$@^!]her west to Kanesville, Iowa. On July 19, 1851 his mother died while his father was away se[#$@^!]ring clap lumber for the neighbor’s house. Her death left his father with nine living children and Samuel, a newly born infant, to continue their way across the plains. It was while in Kanesville, on September 26, 1850, at the age of ten years, Lewis was baptized by his father and became a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, just one year before his mother’s death. On Sept 28, 1851, two months after Nancy Waggoner Wilson died, his father married Sarah Elizabeth Waldo (this marriage ended in divorce). The family lived in Kanesville two years after his mother’s death. The following is an excerpt from his father’s trail journal: “On June 6th, we left the states for the valley of Great Salt Lake in company of Daniel Miller and J.W. Cooley & Co. Traveled with them four or five weeks and made such poor progress that G[eorge].C. Wilson—B[radley]. B[arlow]. Wilson, two of my brothers and myself, went ahead, and traveled about double the distance a day that we had been in the habit of traveling and passed on for several weeks with out any thing strange oc[#$@^!]rring. We killed some game along the way and enjoying ourselves first rate being all well and making good progress on our journey. We saw no Indians on the road for several weeks. At length we began to come across some of the red men of the west who appeared very civil until we met a band of them who were moving. They passed us civilly all but G.C. Wilson’s pony. He had gone back for an antilope (sic) that some of the boys had killed. When they went to pass him and his wife in the pony wagon, some of them [#$@^!]t some of their capers and scared the ponies. They spun and slipped the neck yoak [yoke] ring right off of the tongue and both got on one side of the tongue and jerked my brother right off the fore end of the wagon and run over him with the waggon (sic.) His wife caught hold of one of the lines and held on to it until they ran around on a small circle when some of the boys ran and caught them as they came around. After all there was not much injury sustained. It hurt my brother some. So we passed on for some days with out any more molestation. Later we came up to a large camp of them. They came out and formed a line across the road and called us to stand and required some provisions. After giving some little sugar and coffee they consented to let us pass but they followed us and shook their [#$@^!]ts and whooped and tried to scare our teams but didn’t succeed. They followed us to where we camped, some hundred and fifty of them. We had to get supper for about fifty of them to get rid of them. While we were getting supper ready they stole all of our spare [text missing]. From that time on we passed on quite well until we accomplished our journey. We reached the City of the Great Salt Lake Aug. 29th 1852 [1853] and found it a general time of health and prosperity with the exception of a little Indian fuss.” Wilson, Lewis Dunbar, Sr., Reminiscence and diary, 1846-1854, 9-10 They reached Salt Lake in 1853, soon thereafter moving to Ogden, where they established residence. His father was a hard-working pioneer and builder and soon established a home, bought city property and farmland. He married Nancy Ann Cossett, on April 10, 1854, to provide a mother and a home for his children, but he died three years later on March 11, 1856, after an illness of eighteen hours – just three years after reaching the Salt Lake Valley. His death found the oldest son of the family living in California, the oldest daughter married, leaving Lewis at the age of sixteen the oldest of the family of seven. He learned many useful lessons from his father in thrift and determination, in carpentry and building, and now went [#$@^!]vely to work on his father’s farm and wherever he could se[#$@^!]re employment. First one guardian and then a second was appointed by the court over the family and property, but very little was done to meet the financial obligations left by his father. As soon as Lewis Dunbar became of age, this responsibility fell upon him. His father, like all other ambitious pioneers, had [#$@^!]nched out and acquired property in Ogden and vicinity, which was not paid for, due to his sudden death. Lewis must now shoulder these obligations, clear his father’s name and meet the court requirements, besides keeping the family together. One year he worked at a sawmill east of Salt Lake City and stayed at President Brigham Young’s home. In the year of 1856 (actually 1857) President Brigham Young, to prevent Johnson’s Army from entering the valley, called him out with Lot Smith’s Company. They were instructed to burn or destroy supply wagons and to drive off their cattle. Lewis was with the company who burned a train of sixty wagons and drove off eighteen hundred head of oxen and beef cattle. In 1862 he was called upon a mission to the States, with the D. Henry Miller Company, to bring the poor people to Zion, acting as one of the guards placed over the money sent by the Church to defray the expenses. This money was hidden in a sack of flour and Lewis used to tell his children many interesting stories of its protection. During these trips he showed many times his daring, fearless quality in the restoration of stolen horses and cattle to their owners. He was twice taken a prisoner by the Indians (it being his duty to ride ahead to locate water and a camping spot for the company.) He had the experience of smoking the peace pipe with the Indians. At one time his own personal pony was stolen from the camp at night and Lewis searched for two days on foot before he found it in a corral guarded by four white men. Lewis first tried to reason and persuade the men, and finally as a last resort ran to the pony, [#$@^!]t the rope and tried to ride him out of the corral, but the men were too quick for him. They threw a lasso over his pony’s neck. Lewis hardly knew what to do now, as he was afraid another lasso would find his own neck, but acting on the moment’s impulse, he drew his revolver and shot the rope in two pieces and rode out. He had been gone three days from the camp and company. One time he became very ill, and had no appe[#$@^!]e to eat and had almost lost faith in living, when a fowl came fluttering over their camp. The men shot it with the remark, “This has been sent for Wilson.” The broth from the cooked fowl did prove to be the help he needed, for he commenced to improve at once. At another time when they had come within a short distance of the camp of the poor struggling saints, a large white bird kept hovering over their camp. At first they refrained from shooting the fowl, but when it repeatedly came back and flew so low over them, they thought it must have been sent for some purpose, so they shot it and carried it with them to the Saint’s camp. When they reached the camp of the Saints, they found them very ill with cholera and this bird was cooked and the broth measured out to the suffering people. Again Lewis Dunbar was taught that the Lord will provide. He returned from his last mission trip to Omaha, just before New Years and was married to Catherine Wiggins, a daughter of Ebenezer Fairchild and Elender Moore Wiggins on December 31, 1862, New Years Eve! Catherine was born in Crooked Creek, Hancock County, Illinois, April 13, 1844. They had a civil marriage, but when in 1864 he was ordained an elder, they went to the Salt Lake Endowment House and were married for time and eternity. Lewis at this time was light complexioned, blue eyed, strong featured, with a head of very heavy light brown [#$@^!]rly hair. He was pleasant and mischievous in disposition, a strong robust, ambitious young man. A natural leader, almost self educated, one would say as far as book learning was concerned, but master of a great amount of native ability and the determination to make the best of his opportunities. He attended night school and kept on climbing in all phases of life. He was popular and very well liked by all with whom he associated. Catherine was a pretty girl with dark hair and eyes and fine features. She had more book learning than her husband and was of a very refined and reserved nature. As a girl she taught school, probably one of the first teachers in Ogden. Soon after their marriage, Lewis o[#$@^!]d a cooper shop in Ogden on 25th Street, just above Washington. In this shop they made churns, barrels, tubs, pans, buckets, wash-boilers, etc. (One of the churns is kept in the Blackfoot Relic House.) His business grew until he had all the work he could do and he was able to pay off the indebtedness of his father and become owner of his father’s first investments. Besides owning the large farm in Wilson Lane, he now owned acres of valuable land in the heart of Ogden City, West 25th Street and the property where the Union Pacific Depot now stands. He owned and managed his own cooper shop until the Union Pacific Railroad came into the valley and then he sold it. Polygamy was now being taught and practiced in the Church and eleven years after Lewis Dunbar had married Catherine Wiggins; he took in plural marriage, Eliza Ellenor Hunt. They were married in the Endowment House on March 10, 1873. Eliza Ellenor was the daughter of William [#$@^!]dford and Ellenor Wiggins Hunt. She was born in Ogden City, Utah, August 29, 1856. She was Catherine’s sister’s daughter. (Catherine’s niece) The following year Lewis Dunbar was called on a mission to the Eastern States. He was ordained a Seventy on Oct. 12, 1874 and set apart by Apostle Orson Pratt for his mission. While laboring in Ohio, he asked and was granted permission to contact his relatives. His father’s six brothers, with their families had settled in this vicinity many years before. He went to the home of an elderly aunt and found her very prejudiced against his religion. However, he was invited to be voice as they knelt in evening prayer. As he prayed, her repeated and repeated “Amen” every few words, made him very much confused. He did not know whether this utterance was meant for him to stop or continue. After prayer she told him he would be able to find a night’s lodging across the street. This was the nearest contact he had with his people. He had only been gone about six months when he contracted black erysipelas, which just seemed to cook the flesh off his nose and it fell off. He was honorable released and advised by his doctor to go home immediately. After Lewis Dunbar’s second marriage he built a large two-story frame home just west of the Weber River and moved his two families there. They lived there in peace and love for several years. In the duplex a large hall ran the length of the building and divided the two apartments. Catherine and family lived on one side and Eliza and family on the other. This hall o[#$@^!]d out into a long room running the width of the building. This room served for a separate kitchen on each end, but held a large extension table, which could be extended almost the length of the room, and was used for thrashers, wedding suppers, and joint family dinners. Soon after his return from his mission, he was appointed superintendent of the Sunday School in Wilson Ward which position he held until he moved to Idaho. During the intervening years before politics played havoc with plural marriages, Lewis established the first hardware store and lumberyard in Ogden, on his property on East 25th Street. He became quite financially independent and spent much time looking after the buying of lumber and building supplies. It was he who placed the first plate glass windows in Salt Lake City. During this time he made a mistake in the man he took into his business as a partner. The firm was registered as “Wilson & Company.” This man was a trained bookkeeper so Lewis turned the books and the management of the store over to him, along with the authority of signing his signature. Lewis was gone a great amount of time while looking after the buying in Washington and Oregon of lumber and the outside contracts of building and supplies. After the Edmunds Law passed, Lewis was severely harassed by the marshals of the law and was compelled to live most of the time during the next few years on the underground, leaving his partner to assume more and more control of the lumber and hardware business. The privilege of using the signature of “L.D. Wilson” was greatly misused. Heavy investments were made and money borrowed and as a result when Lewis was permitted to live in the open and to go back and assume management of his business, he was broken financially. Lewis found it necessary to sacrifice his $30,000 farm and all his holdings to the debtors of his business. This necessity left him an honest man, but with no home for his two families. Lewis was not discouraged, however. In the fall of 1885 he moved Eliza, his second wife, and family to an area west of Blackfoot, Idaho, called Riverside. All of the Blackfoot country at that time was a sagebrush wilderness, the home of wild animals. There were no canals, no fences, no roads, no church, and no school. Catherine and her family, along with Eliza’s children were left in Ogden, as Catherine didn’t feel she could pioneer again. The Wilson family [#$@^!]vely set to work to establish new homes. He built two log homes, built fences, cleared farmland and began growing crops. At the end of two years, he moved all of his family to Blackfoot. Lewis was not privileged to live with his two families for many months before the government officers were again on his trail, making it hard for him and his wives and children. In 1887, two years after moving to Blackfoot, he was arrested and put on trial and given the choice of either deserting Eliza, his second wife and family, or going to prison. Choosing the latter he was sent to Boise for a term of six months. Kind friends had him liberated at the end of three months but this only resulted in his being arrest again immediately and compelled to put up a thousand dollar bond for his appearance at the May term of court in 1888. He was sentenced to serve two years in the US Prison at Sioux Falls, South Dakota. His case was finally appealed and he was released after a term of eighteen months. During this time of his first months in service, Lewis was put on the rock gang with the hardest criminals in the prison. A large gaslight burned all night directly in front of his cell door, which greatly impaired his eyesight. One night while in prison, only being allowed fragments or censored parts of his letters received from home, he went to bed praying and worried over his families. He had to leave them in such poor cir[#$@^!]mstances, with only the support of his young sons, in their pioneer homes, with bitter prejudice all around them. He was shown that night, for his comfort, a friend delivering a load of flour to his loved ones. This with many other testimonies while in prison was a comfort, proving that the Lord had not forgotten him. During his time in South Dakota, three nights before the day on which his pardon was received by the governor and warden of the prison, he was shown in a vision his pardon do[#$@^!]ment, with its dates and signatures of his Idaho State Governor and other officials. He was shown what steps he must take in order to be liberated, as it was the intention of the prison warden to detain him another six months. The following morning, after the vision, Lewis confidentially told another Mormon inmate that his pardon would come three days later. This good Mormon friend allowed this information to reach the warden and Lewis was fearfully looked at as the visionary Wilson. Three days later, on the morning of the pardon date, Lewis Dunbar was called into the warden’s office. The warden had seated the governor and other state officials to witness Lewis’s disappoi[#$@^!]ent and chagrin, when his pardon was denied. The warden said, “Sorry, Wilson, but your pardon did not come.” Lewis told him to go to his desk and pull out a certain drawer and there he would find his hidden pardon do[#$@^!]ment, signed by the Idaho governor. The warden hesitated, stammered, and tried to refuse but the governor insisted and upon his doing as Lewis suggested brought forth the do[#$@^!]ment. Lewis was released to go home in almost broken health, from his heavy lifting in the rock and lime quarry, but not crushed in spirit or determination. He bore his testimony over and over again, both by his words and in his every day life, of the kindness and reality of God, and his belief in prayer. His faith throughout his life was strong. His families always arose to commence the day with an earnest prayer and retired at night with the same blessed protection. His children were taught cleanness of living; no rough or smutty jokes were ever allowed in his homes. He taught them honesty and thrift and to keep out of debt. In the year of 1886, Lewis Dunbar became one of the first Presiding Elders west of Blackfoot in the Basalt Ward of the Bingham Stake. The first organization was started in the home of his second wife, Eliza. He later served as first counselor in the Riverside Ward Bishopric for nine years and then was released to become the first counselor of the High Priests Quorum which position he held until the time of his death. During those hard pioneer years in Idaho, when doctors were scarce and people were poor, and when he was building homes, and because of his strong, humble faith and knowledge, Lewis and Eliza went to administer healing herbs and to give service in times of sickness and death. They would travel for miles around. He always carried to these houses a bulwark of strength and comfort. He used his acquired skill, wisdom, and knowledge in rebuilding his own finances but also in building and financing of meeting houses as he directed the building of several. He built the first [#$@^!]hing granary in Riverside. One year after growing a large crop of potatoes, he could not find a sale for them, so he put his ingenuity and dauntless ambition into effect, by boarding a train for New York City. Here he went to one of the large hotels and asked the management to accept his gift of Idaho potatoes to be baked and served to the hotel guest for dinner. During the meal he was presented in the dining room and introduced as, “Wilson, the Idaho Potato King” who had given the potatoes that they were eating to the hotel as a compliment. He carried this [#$@^!]le with him up until his death. Needless to say, he sold his entire potato crop at a good price, and shipped them directly to New York City. As time moved on he became well established in Idaho. When he was seventy-seven years old, he became very seriously ill; the doctors gave him only a few hours to live, and all his children were called home at the doctor’s request. Lewis passed into a coma during the night and he was thought to be dead. He regained consciousness however; and told his wives and children how his spirit had passed from this earth to the other side. After passing through one veil, he could see beyond another. His father was standing conversing with relatives, church officials, and acquaintances. Lewis tried to pass through the second veil and join his father, but was not permitted to do so. The guide told him that he could go no [#$@^!]her until he had performed certain temple work for his father. He had pled to return and take care of this obligation and was permitted to do so. Propped up in his bed with pillows, he bore his testimony of the Gospel and begged his children to live it and to freely forgive and love one another. He said, “There is no man-made business or corporation on earth to equal a noble family.” He encouraged his children to live to join the hearts of the children unto the fathers and further the gospel of Christ, to live worthy of advancement in the priesthood and not to procrastinate time. His family joined in a prayer circle at his request. He testified that while the family joined in prayer he saw heavenly personages so bright and shining they could scarcely be looked upon. Many things were shown him too sacred to reveal but which bore testimony of the divinity of God. He was healed by the power of the Priesthood and lived to go with his wife Eliza and spend three months at the St. George Temple doing temple work. He died January 28, 1922, at the age of eighty-one, leaving a family of fourteen children and eighty-one grandchildren. He left an untarnished name far and near. His strong faith had dominated his whole life, and the direction of his families.

Lewis Dunbar Wilson Jr. Life Story

Contributor: kcapson Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Lewis Dunbar Wilson Jr., A Utah pioneer of 1853, was born September 21, 1840 at Nauvoo, Illinois. He was the son of Lewis Dunbar Wilson, Sr. and Nancy Ann Waggoner who were converts from Chitten County, Vermont. He was born four years after his mother and father were converted and baptized into the church at the time when the Saints were being severely tried and persecuted at Nauvoo. As a small boy he remembered sitting upon the knee of the Prophet Joseph Smith while he was telling stories. Lewis remembered hearing the noise and confusion at the time of the Prophet’s martyrdom and seeing the dead body after his life had been taken. He used to tell of one time when the mob chased the Prophet into his father’s home and seeing his mother hide the Prophet under the bed while his father went out with a gun to keep the angry mob away. His father, being one of the High Council (Doctrine and Covenants Section 124, Verses 127-133) was given a sword of the Prophet, and Lewis Dunbar kept this sword, along with one of the first Books of Mormon, until the time of his death. The sword is now found in the possession of his grandson, Lloyd Wilson. He remembered the cold, bitter night of February 1846, when his father and family left Nauvoo with the first company of Saints and started westward to make a new home. All of his early childhood years were lived in hardship, self-denial, and sorrow while pioneering their way across the plains to Utah. It was seven years after the family left Nauvoo before they reached the Salt Lake Valley. His father having stopped at Garden Grove for four years, planting and harvesting crops, making clothing, and earning money with which to buy teams, wagons, and equipment so they could travel on. In is father’s diary it reads, “Having been driven from Nauvoo, just out of a sick bed, with a family of ten, five of them without shoes and hardly a shirt to their backs, with a borrowed team and wagon, one hundred pounds of flour and twenty-five pounds of pork, we have spent three years of the most distressing circumstances I ever met”. How severely tried was Lewis’ young soul, only he could have told, when after the family left Garden Grove and had traveling one hundred and sixty miles further west to Kanesville, Iowa. In July, 1851, while his father was away securing clap lumber for a neighbor’s house, his mother died. Her death left his father with nine living children and Samuel, a newly born infant, to continue their way across the plains. It was while in Kanesville, on September 26, 1850, at the age of ten years, Lewis was baptized by his father and became a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, just one year before his faithful mother passed away. The family lived in Kanesville two years after his mother’s death. They reached Salt Lake in 1853, soon thereafter moving to Ogden where they established residence. His father, being a hardworking pioneer and builder, soon established a home and bought city property and farmland. He married Nancy Ann Cosset on April 10, 1854, to provide a mother and home for his children, but he dies three years later on March 11, 1856, after an illness of eighteen hours, just four years after reaching the Salt Lake Valley. His death found the oldest son of the family living in California, the oldest daughter married, leaving Lewis, at the age of sixteen, the oldest of the family at home. He learned many useful lessons from his father in thrift and determination, in carpentry and building, and now went bravely to work on his father’s farm and wherever he could secure employment. First one guardian and then a second was appointed by the court over the family and property, but very little was done to meet the financial obligations left by his father. As soon as Lewis Dunbar became of age, the responsibility fell upon him. His father, like all other ambitious pioneers, had branched out and acquired property in Ogden and vicinity, which was not paid for, due to his sudden death. Lewis had the responsibility to pay these obligations and clear his father’s name and meet the court requirements, in addition to keeping the family together. One year, he worked at a sawmill east of Salt Lake City and stayed at President Brigham Young’s home. In the year of 1856, he was called out with Lott Smith’s company by President Brigham Young to prevent Johnson’s Army from entering the valley. They were instructed to burn or destroy supply wagons and to drive off their cattle. Lewis was one of a company who burned a train of sixty wagons and drove off eighteen hundred head of oxen and beef cattle. In the year of 1862, he was called on a mission to the states with the D. Henry Miller Company to bring the poor people to Zion. He acted as one of the guards placed over the money sent by the church to defray the expenses. This money was hidden in a sack of flour, and Lewis used to tell his children many interesting stories of the money’s protection. During these trips, many times he showed his daring, fearless quality in the restoration of stolen horses and cattle to their owners. He was taken a prisoner twice by the Indians because it was his duty to ride ahead to locate water and a camping spot for the company. He had the experience of smoking the peace pipe with the Indians. At one time, his own personal pony was stolen from the camp at night, and Lewis searched for two days on foot before he found it in a corral guarded by four white men. Lewis first tried to reason and persuade the men, and finally as a last resort, ran to the pony, cut the rope, and tried to ride him out of the corral, but the men were too quick for him. They threw a lasso over the pony’s neck. Lewis hardly knew what to do because he was afraid another lasso would find his neck, but acting on a moment’s impulse, he drew his revolver and shot the rope in two and rode out. He had been gone three days from the camp and from the company. At one time he became very ill, and he had no appetite to eat and had nearly lost faith in living. Then one day, a foul came fluttering over their camp. The man who shot it said, “This has been sent for Wilson.” The broth form the cooked foul did prove to be the help he needed because he commenced to improve at once. At another time when they had come within a short distance of the camp of the poor people struggling, a large white bird kept hovering over their camp. At first they refrained from shooting the foul, but when it repeatedly came back and flew so low over them they thought it must have been sent for a purpose, so they shot it and carried it with them to the Saint’s camp. When they reached the camp, they found some very ill with cholera, and this bird was cooked and the broth measured out to the suffering people. Again Lewis Dunbar was taught that the Lord will provide. He returned from is last trip to Omaha just before New Year’s and was married to Catherine Wiggins, a daughter of Ebenezer Fairchild and Elender Moore Wiggins, On December 31, 1862. She was born I LaHarpe, Hancock County, Illinois, on April 13, 1845. They had a civil marriage, but they went to the Salt Lake Endowment House in 1864 when he was ordained an elder and were married for time and eternity. Lewis, at this time, was light-complexioned, blue eyes, strong features, and a head of very heavy light brown hair, which was curly. He was pleasant and mischievous, and a strong, robust, ambitious young man. He was a natural leader, and he was nearly self-educated as far as book learning was concerned, but he was master of a great amount of native ability and had the determination to make the best of opportunities. He attended night school and kept climbing in all phases of life. He was popular and very well liked by all with whom he associated. Catherine was a pretty girl. She had more book learning than her husband. She was of a very refined and reserved nature. Soon after his marriage, he opened up a copper shop in Ogden on 25th Street, just above Washington. In this shop churns, barrels, tubs, buckets, wash-boilers, etc. were made. (One of the churns is kept in the Blackfoot Relic House.) His business grew until he had all the work he could do and was able to pay off the indebtedness of his father’s and became owner of his father’s investments. Besides owning the large farm on Wilson Lane, he now owned acres of valuable land in the heart of Ogden City, West 25th Street, and the property where the new Union Pacific Depot now stands. He owned and managed his own copper shop until the Union Pacific Railroad came into the valley, and then he sold his shop. Polygamy was now being taught and practiced in the Church, so eleven years after Lewis Dunbar had married Catherine Wiggins, he took in plural marriage Eliza Ellenor Hunt. They were married in the Salt Lake Temple on March 10, 1873. Eliza Ellenor was the daughter of William and Ellenor Wiggins Hunt. She was born at Ogden City, Utah, August 29, 1856. She was Catherine’s sister’s daughter. The year following Lewis Dunbar’s second marriage, he was called and responded to a mission in the Eastern States. He was ordained a Seventy on October 12, 1874 and set apart by Apostle Orson Pratt for this mission. While laboring in Ohio, he asked and was granted permission to contact his relatives. His father’s six brothers and their families had settled in these vicinities years before. He went to the home of an elderly aunt and found her very prejudiced against his religion. However, he was invited to be the voice as they knelt in evening prayer. As he prayed, she kept repeating “Amen” every few words, which made him very confused. He did not know if this utterance was meant for him to stop or continue. After prayer she told him he would be able to find a night’s lodging across the street. This was the nearest contact he had with his people. He was not able to stay and finish his mission because when he was out only six months, he contacted black-erysipelas, which seemed to just cook the flesh off his nose, and it fell off. He was honorably released and advised by his doctor to go home immediately. After Lewis Dunbar’s second marriage, he built a large, two-story frame duplex just west of the Weber River on his farm. He moved his two families into the new home where they lived in love and peace for several years. The duplex had a large hall running the length of the building dividing the two apartments. Catherine and her family lived in one side, and Eliza and her family lived on the other side. This hall opened into a long room the width of the building. This room served as a separate kitchen on each end, and it held a large extension table, which could be extended nearly the length of the room and was used for thrashers, wedding suppers, and joint family dinners. Soon after his return from his mission he was appointed superintendent of the Sunday school in Wilson Ward, which position he held until he moved to Idaho. During the intervening years before politics played havoc with plural marriage, Lewis Dunbar established the first hardware store and lumberyard in Ogden on his own property on East 25th Street. He was now quite financially independent, but just previous to the passing of the Edmond’s Law, he made a mistake in the man he took into his business as a partner. The firm was registered as “Wilson and Company”. This man was a trained bookkeeper, and so Lewis Dunbar turned the books and the management of the store over to him, along with the authority of signing the signature of Lewis D. Wilson and Company. Lewis was gone a great amount of time while looking after the buying of lumber in Washington and Oregon, and the outside contracts of building and supply. T was Lewis who placed the first plate glass windows in Salt Lake City. After the passing of the Edmonds Law, Lewis was severely harassed by the marshall of the law, so he was compelled to live most of the time the next few yearson the underground, leaving his partner to assume more and more control of the lumber and hardware business. The privilege of using the signature of the “L.D. Wilson Lumber and Hardware Company” was greatly misused. Heavy investments were made and money borrowed, using the L.D. Wilson and Company signature and business as security. As a result, Lewis Dunbar found, when he was permitted to live in the open and go back to assume management of this business, he was broken financially, and strange to say, his partner had become a prosperous man. Lewis Dunbar found it necessary to sacrifice his $30,000.00 farm and all his holdings to the debtors of his well-established business. This necessity left him an honest man but with no homes for his families. This partner did not live a great many years, however, to enjoy his dishonestly acquired money. He died, as it had been prophesied he would, at middle age of a most painful death suffering with boils over his entire body. In his dying request, the family wired for Lewis Dunbar to come to his bedside, as he said he could not de without asking Lewis’ forgiveness. Lewis was not discouraged, however. In the fall of 1885, he left his first wife, Catherine, her family, and Eliza’s older children in the old home. With Eliza and her smaller children (in company with two other families), he came to Idaho to pioneer a new home for his two families. Throughout Lewis’ married life, up until his death, he was always thoughtful of his wife, Catherine, giving her first consideration in everything. If only once piece of furniture could be purchased, Catherine got it, and Eliza waited her turn. He lived the principle of polygamy as loyally, honestly, and honorably to both families as he knew how, striving always to keep them all happy. He located two homesteads west of the Blackfoot Trading Post or town site. All of the Blackfoot country at that time was a sagebrush wilderness, the home of wild animals. There were no canals, no roads, no church, and no school. The older children were left in Ogden for the school season. Hardships, yes, but Lewis being a son and Eliza a daughter of real pioneers, they bravely went to work to establish new homes.(I used to hear Father say that the Lord had taken away all his money o keep him humble in the Church.) At the end of two years, he moved his first family to Blackfoot, Lewis had now built two houses from logs, he and his young sons had cut and hewn. For Catherine, with Eliza’s help, he had built a home, a garden growing, and a farm to live with his two families in for many months before the government officers were again on his trail, making it very hard for him and his wives and children. Indeed, they all suffered for this law of plural marriage in the Church. In the year of 1887, two years after moving to Blackfoot, and only a few months after moving his first family, he was arrested and put on trial and given the choice of either deserting Eliza, his second wife and family, or going to prison. Choosing the later, standing true to those he loved and his religion, he was sentenced and sent to Boise for a term of six months, but kind friends had him liberated at the end of three months to return home to his needy families. But this only resulted in him being arrested again immediately for the same offence, and he was compelled to put up a thousand dollar bond for his appearance at the May term of court in 1888. At the May term of court, he was sentences and sent to serve two years in the U.S. Prison at Sioux Falls, South Dakota. His case was finally appealed to the U.S. Circuit Court, and he was released after a term of eighteen months with the recommendation from the U.S. Attorney General that the Government remunerate him for the time spent unjustly in prison. Needless to say, this was not done. His case was declared a case of false imprisonment. During the time of his first months in service, Lewis was put on a rock gang with the hardest criminals in the prison. A large gaslight burned all night directly in front of his cell door, which greatly impaired his eyesight. One night while in prison, being allowed only fragments or censored parts of his letters received from home, he went to bed praying and worrying over his families because he had to leave them in poor circumstances with only the support of his young sons in their pioneer home. There was a bitter prejudice all around them. For his comfort that night, he was shown that a friend was delivering a load of flour to his loved ones. This, with many other testimonies while he was in prison, was a comfort and proved that the Lord had not forgotten him. He served eighteen months. Three nights before the day on which his pardon was received by the governor and warden of the prison, he was shown in a vision is pardon document with its date and signatures of the Idaho State Governor and other officials, as he was shown just what steps he must take in order to be liberated as it was the intention of the South Dakota Prison Warden to detain his another six months. The following morning after the vision, Lewis confidently told another Mormon inmate that his pardon would come in three days. This good Mormon friend allowed this information to reach the warden. Lewis was jeeringly laughed at as the “Visionary Wilson”. Three days later, on the morning of the pardon date, Lewis was called to the warden’s office. The warden had the governor with other state officials seated in there to witness Lewis’ disappointment and chagrin when his pardon was denied. The warden said, “Sorry Wilson, but your papers did not come.” Lewis told him to go to a certain drawer in his desk, and here he would find his pardon signed by the governor. The warden hesitated, stammered, and tried to refuse, but the governor insisted upon his doing what Lewis suggested. In all humiliation, the warden was forced to bring the document forth. Lewis was released to go home nearly broken in health from heavy lifting in the rock and lime quarries, but he was not crushed in spirit or determination. He bore his testimony over and over again by both mouth and his daily life of the kindness and all reality of God and his belief in prayer. His faith throughout his life was strong. His families always rose to commence the day with an earnest prayer and retired at night with the same blessed protection. His children were taught cleanliness of living. No rough, smutty jokes were allowed in his home. He taught them honesty, thrift and to keep out of debt. In the year of 1886, he became one of the first presiding Elders west of Blackfoot in the Basalt Ward of the Bingham Stake. He kater served as first counselor in the Riverside Bishopric for nine years and then was released to become the counselor of the High Priest’s Quorum which position he held until the time of his death. During those hard, pioneer years in Idaho, when doctors were scarce and people were poor, and when he was building homes, and because of his strong, humble faith and knowledge, Lewis And Eliza were to administer healing herbs and to give service in times of sickness and death. They would travel fro miles around. He always carried to these homes a bulwark of strength and comfort. He used not ony his acquired skill, wisdom and knowledge in rebuilding his own finances, but in building and financing of meeting houses as he directed the building of several. He built the first tithing granary in this part of the state. He was a leader among men in thrift and in energy. One year, after growing a large crop of potatoes, he could not find a sale for them, so he put into effect his ingenuity and dauntless ambition, by boarding a train for New York City. Here he went into one of the large hotels and asked the management for his gift of Idaho rural potatoes to be baked and served to the hotel guests for dinner. During the meal, he was presented in the dining room and introduced as “Wilson, the Idaho potato king,” who had given the potatoes that they were eating to the hotel as a compliment. This title he carried up until his death. He shipped them (potatoes) directly to New York after that. As time moved on, he became well established in Idaho. He lived to be the father of sixteen children, ten of whom were born to Catherine Wiggins Wilson, and six children were born to Eliza Hunt Wilson. He sent and supported four missionaries in his family; his last son filled two missions. When he was seventy-seven years old, he became seriously ill. The doctors gave him only a few hours to live. All his children were called home at his doctor’s request. Lewis passed into a coma during the night, and they thought he was dead. Upon regaining consciousness, he told his wives and children how his spirit had passed from this earth to the other side. After passing through one veil, how he could see beyond another, his father standing there, conversing with relatives, church officials and acquaintances. He tried to pass through the second veil to join his father, but he was not permitted to do so. He was told by the guide he could not go further until he had performed certain temple work for his father. He had to plead to return and take cars of this obligation and was permitted to do so. Propped up in bed with pillows, he bore his testimony of the gospel and begged his children to live it and to freely forgive and love one another. He said, “There is mo man-made business or corporation on equal to a noble family For his children to live to join the hearts of the children unto the fathers and further the gospel of Christ, to live worthy of advancement in the priesthood and not to procrastinate time.” His family joined in a prayer circle at his request. He testified that while the family joined in prayer he saw heavenly personages so bright and shining they could scarcely be looked upon. Many things were shown to him too sacred to reveal but which bore testimony of the divinity of God. He was healed by the power of the priesthood and lived to go with his wife, Eliza, and spent three months at the St. George Temple doing temple work. He died at the age of eighty-one, January 28, 1922, leaving a family of fourteen children and eighty-one grandchildren. All the children have been married in the temple. He left an untarnished name far and near. His strong faith has dominated his whole life and set the direction of his families. COMMON ANSESTOR: ROBERT WILSON, born 1600 Descent from father to son: Benjamin (first immigrant ancestor) Christened 1636 Jeremiah Born 1665 Joseph Born 1692 Deliverance Born 1737 (Deliverance Jr.) Bradley Born 1769 Lewis Dunbar Born 1805 Lewis Dunbar Jr. Born 1840 Catherine Wiggins – first wife of Lewis Dunbar Jr. First Generation Children: Catherine Rozilla Jennie Lind Martha Vilate Mary Elizabeth Sarah Lettie William Lewis Ezra Dunbar Elvaretta Annie Pearl Ellen Arthur Ebenezer Eliza Ellener Hunt – second wife of Lewis Dunbar Jr. First Generation Children: Rosella May Enoch Albert Joseph Leonard Lola Ellener Ethel Rebecca Maude Eliza (This history was compiled and arranged by his daughter, Ethel Wilson Harrison, from his own personal record book, church history records, and personal contributions gleaned from members of his two loving families, and a diary left by his father, Lewis Dunbar Wilson Sr. – preserved by the family and now found in the church historian’s office.

Lewis Dunbar Wilson Life Story

Contributor: kcapson Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Lewis Dunbar Wilson Jr., a Utah pioneer of 1853, was born September 21, 1840 at Nauvoo, Illinois. He was the son of Lewis Dunbar Wilson, Sr. and Nancy Ann Waggoner who were converts from Chitten County, Vermont. He was born four years after his mother and father were converted and baptized into the church at the time when the Saints were being severely tried and persecuted at Nauvoo. As a small boy he remembered sitting upon the knee of the Prophet Joseph Smith while he was telling stories. Lewis remembered hearing the noise and confusion at the time of the Prophet’s martyrdom and seeing the dead body after his life had been taken. He used to tell of one time when the mob chased the Prophet into his father’s home and seeing his mother hide the Prophet under the bed while his father went out with a gun to keep the angry mob away. His father, being one of the High Council (Doctrine and Covenants Section 124, Verses 127-133) was given a sword of the Prophet, and Lewis Dunbar kept this sword, along with one of the first Books of Mormon, until the time of his death. The sword is now found in the possession of his grandson, Lloyd Wilson. He remembered the cold, bitter night of February 1846, when his father and family left Nauvoo with the first company of Saints and started westward to make a new home. All of his early childhood years were lived in hardship, self-denial, and sorrow while pioneering their way across the plains to Utah. It was seven years after the family left Nauvoo before they reached the Salt Lake Valley. His father having stopped at Garden Grove for four years, planting and harvesting crops, making clothing, and earning money with which to buy teams, wagons, and equipment so they could travel on. In is father’s diary it reads, “Having been driven from Nauvoo, just out of a sick bed, with a family of ten, five of them without shoes and hardly a shirt to their backs, with a borrowed team and wagon, one hundred pounds of flour and twenty-five pounds of pork, we have spent three years of the most distressing circumstances I ever met”. How severely tried was Lewis’ young soul, only he could have told, when after the family left Garden Grove and had traveling one hundred and sixty miles further west to Kanesville, Iowa. In July, 1851, while his father was away securing clap lumber for a neighbor’s house, his mother died. Her death left his father with nine living children and Samuel, a newly born infant, to continue their way across the plains. It was while in Kanesville, on September 26, 1850, at the age of ten years, Lewis was baptized by his father and became a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, just one year before his faithful mother passed away. The family lived in Kanesville two years after his mother’s death. They reached Salt Lake in 1853, soon thereafter moving to Ogden where they established residence. His father, being a hardworking pioneer and builder, soon established a home and bought city property and farmland. He married Nancy Ann Cosset on April 10, 1854, to provide a mother and home for his children, but he dies three years later on March 11, 1856, after an illness of eighteen hours, just four years after reaching the Salt Lake Valley. His death found the oldest son of the family living in California, the oldest daughter married, leaving Lewis, at the age of sixteen, the oldest of the family at home. He learned many useful lessons from his father in thrift and determination, in carpentry and building, and now went bravely to work on his father’s farm and wherever he could secure employment. First one guardian and then a second was appointed by the court over the family and property, but very little was done to meet the financial obligations left by his father. As soon as Lewis Dunbar became of age, the responsibility fell upon him. His father, like all other ambitious pioneers, had branched out and acquired property in Ogden and vicinity, which was not paid for, due to his sudden death. Lewis had the responsibility to pay these obligations and clear his father’s name and meet the court requirements, in addition to keeping the family together. One year, he worked at a sawmill east of Salt Lake City and stayed at President Brigham Young’s home. In the year of 1856, he was called out with Lott Smith’s company by President Brigham Young to prevent Johnson’s Army from entering the valley. They were instructed to burn or destroy supply wagons and to drive off their cattle. Lewis was one of a company who burned a train of sixty wagons and drove off eighteen hundred head of oxen and beef cattle. In the year of 1862, he was called on a mission to the states with the D. Henry Miller Company to bring the poor people to Zion. He acted as one of the guards placed over the money sent by the church to defray the expenses. This money was hidden in a sack of flour, and Lewis used to tell his children many interesting stories of the money’s protection. During these trips, many times he showed his daring, fearless quality in the restoration of stolen horses and cattle to their owners. He was taken a prisoner twice by the Indians because it was his duty to ride ahead to locate water and a camping spot for the company. He had the experience of smoking the peace pipe with the Indians. At one time, his own personal pony was stolen from the camp at night, and Lewis searched for two days on foot before he found it in a corral guarded by four white men. Lewis first tried to reason and persuade the men, and finally as a last resort, ran to the pony, cut the rope, and tried to ride him out of the corral, but the men were too quick for him. They threw a lasso over the pony’s neck. Lewis hardly knew what to do because he was afraid another lasso would find his neck, but acting on a moment’s impulse, he drew his revolver and shot the rope in two and rode out. He had been gone three days from the camp and from the company. At one time he became very ill, and he had no appetite to eat and had nearly lost faith in living. Then one day, a foul came fluttering over their camp. The man who shot it said, “This has been sent for Wilson.” The broth form the cooked foul did prove to be the help he needed because he commenced to improve at once. At another time when they had come within a short distance of the camp of the poor people struggling, a large white bird kept hovering over their camp. At first they refrained from shooting the foul, but when it repeatedly came back and flew so low over them they thought it must have been sent for a purpose, so they shot it and carried it with them to the Saint’s camp. When they reached the camp, they found some very ill with cholera, and this bird was cooked and the broth measured out to the suffering people. Again Lewis Dunbar was taught that the Lord will provide. He returned from is last trip to Omaha just before New Year’s and was married to Catherine Wiggins, a daughter of Ebenezer Fairchild and Elender Moore Wiggins, On December 31, 1862. She was born I LaHarpe, Hancock County, Illinois, on April 13, 1845. They had a civil marriage, but they went to the Salt Lake Endowment House in 1864 when he was ordained an elder and were married for time and eternity. Lewis, at this time, was light-complexioned, blue eyes, strong features, and a head of very heavy light brown hair, which was curly. He was pleasant and mischievous, and a strong, robust, ambitious young man. He was a natural leader, and he was nearly self-educated as far as book learning was concerned, but he was master of a great amount of native ability and had the determination to make the best of opportunities. He attended night school and kept climbing in all phases of life. He was popular and very well liked by all with whom he associated. Catherine was a pretty girl. She had more book learning than her husband. She was of a very refined and reserved nature. Soon after his marriage, he opened up a copper shop in Ogden on 25th Street, just above Washington. In this shop churns, barrels, tubs, buckets, wash-boilers, etc. were made. (One of the churns is kept in the Blackfoot Relic House.) His business grew until he had all the work he could do and was able to pay off the indebtedness of his father’s and became owner of his father’s investments. Besides owning the large farm on Wilson Lane, he now owned acres of valuable land in the heart of Ogden City, West 25th Street, and the property where the new Union Pacific Depot now stands. He owned and managed his own copper shop until the Union Pacific Railroad came into the valley, and then he sold his shop. Polygamy was now being taught and practiced in the Church, so eleven years after Lewis Dunbar had married Catherine Wiggins, he took in plural marriage Eliza Ellenor Hunt. They were married in the Salt Lake Temple on March 10, 1873. Eliza Ellenor was the daughter of William and Ellenor Wiggins Hunt. She was born at Ogden City, Utah, August 29, 1856. She was Catherine’s sister’s daughter. The year following Lewis Dunbar’s second marriage, he was called and responded to a mission in the Eastern States. He was ordained a Seventy on October 12, 1874 and set apart by Apostle Orson Pratt for this mission. While laboring in Ohio, he asked and was granted permission to contact his relatives. His father’s six brothers and their families had settled in these vicinities years before. He went to the home of an elderly aunt and found her very prejudiced against his religion. However, he was invited to be the voice as they knelt in evening prayer. As he prayed, she kept repeating “Amen” every few words, which made him very confused. He did not know if this utterance was meant for him to stop or continue. After prayer she told him he would be able to find a night’s lodging across the street. This was the nearest contact he had with his people. He was not able to stay and finish his mission because when he was out only six months, he contacted black-erysipelas, which seemed to just cook the flesh off his nose, and it fell off. He was honorably released and advised by his doctor to go home immediately. After Lewis Dunbar’s second marriage, he built a large, two-story frame duplex just west of the Weber River on his farm. He moved his two families into the new home where they lived in love and peace for several years. The duplex had a large hall running the length of the building dividing the two apartments. Catherine and her family lived in one side, and Eliza and her family lived on the other side. This hall opened into a long room the width of the building. This room served as a separate kitchen on each end, and it held a large extension table, which could be extended nearly the length of the room and was used for thrashers, wedding suppers, and joint family dinners. Soon after his return from his mission he was appointed superintendent of the Sunday school in Wilson Ward, which position he held until he moved to Idaho. During the intervening years before politics played havoc with plural marriage, Lewis Dunbar established the first hardware store and lumberyard in Ogden on his own property on East 25th Street. He was now quite financially independent, but just previous to the passing of the Edmond’s Law, he made a mistake in the man he took into his business as a partner. The firm was registered as “Wilson and Company”. This man was a trained bookkeeper, and so Lewis Dunbar turned the books and the management of the store over to him, along with the authority of signing the signature of Lewis D. Wilson and Company. Lewis was gone a great amount of time while looking after the buying of lumber in Washington and Oregon, and the outside contracts of building and supply. T was Lewis who placed the first plate glass windows in Salt Lake City. After the passing of the Edmonds Law, Lewis was severely harassed by the marshall of the law, so he was compelled to live most of the time the next few yearson the underground, leaving his partner to assume more and more control of the lumber and hardware business. The privilege of using the signature of the “L.D. Wilson Lumber and Hardware Company” was greatly misused. Heavy investments were made and money borrowed, using the L.D. Wilson and Company signature and business as security. As a result, Lewis Dunbar found, when he was permitted to live in the open and go back to assume management of this business, he was broken financially, and strange to say, his partner had become a prosperous man. Lewis Dunbar found it necessary to sacrifice his $30,000.00 farm and all his holdings to the debtors of his well-established business. This necessity left him an honest man but with no homes for his families. This partner did not live a great many years, however, to enjoy his dishonestly acquired money. He died, as it had been prophesied he would, at middle age of a most painful death suffering with boils over his entire body. In his dying request, the family wired for Lewis Dunbar to come to his bedside, as he said he could not de without asking Lewis’ forgiveness. Lewis was not discouraged, however. In the fall of 1885, he left his first wife, Catherine, her family, and Eliza’s older children in the old home. With Eliza and her smaller children (in company with two other families), he came to Idaho to pioneer a new home for his two families. Throughout Lewis’ married life, up until his death, he was always thoughtful of his wife, Catherine, giving her first consideration in everything. If only once piece of furniture could be purchased, Catherine got it, and Eliza waited her turn. He lived the principle of polygamy as loyally, honestly, and honorably to both families as he knew how, striving always to keep them all happy. He located two homesteads west of the Blackfoot Trading Post or town site. All of the Blackfoot country at that time was a sagebrush wilderness, the home of wild animals. There were no canals, no roads, no church, and no school. The older children were left in Ogden for the school season. Hardships, yes, but Lewis being a son and Eliza a daughter of real pioneers, they bravely went to work to establish new homes.(I used to hear Father say that the Lord had taken away all his money o keep him humble in the Church.) At the end of two years, he moved his first family to Blackfoot, Lewis had now built two houses from logs, he and his young sons had cut and hewn. For Catherine, with Eliza’s help, he had built a home, a garden growing, and a farm to live with his two families in for many months before the government officers were again on his trail, making it very hard for him and his wives and children. Indeed, they all suffered for this law of plural marriage in the Church. In the year of 1887, two years after moving to Blackfoot, and only a few months after moving his first family, he was arrested and put on trial and given the choice of either deserting Eliza, his second wife and family, or going to prison. Choosing the later, standing true to those he loved and his religion, he was sentenced and sent to Boise for a term of six months, but kind friends had him liberated at the end of three months to return home to his needy families. But this only resulted in him being arrested again immediately for the same offence, and he was compelled to put up a thousand dollar bond for his appearance at the May term of court in 1888. At the May term of court, he was sentences and sent to serve two years in the U.S. Prison at Sioux Falls, South Dakota. His case was finally appealed to the U.S. Circuit Court, and he was released after a term of eighteen months with the recommendation from the U.S. Attorney General that the Government remunerate him for the time spent unjustly in prison. Needless to say, this was not done. His case was declared a case of false imprisonment. During the time of his first months in service, Lewis was put on a rock gang with the hardest criminals in the prison. A large gaslight burned all night directly in front of his cell door, which greatly impaired his eyesight. One night while in prison, being allowed only fragments or censored parts of his letters received from home, he went to bed praying and worrying over his families because he had to leave them in poor circumstances with only the support of his young sons in their pioneer home. There was a bitter prejudice all around them. For his comfort that night, he was shown that a friend was delivering a load of flour to his loved ones. This, with many other testimonies while he was in prison, was a comfort and proved that the Lord had not forgotten him. He served eighteen months. Three nights before the day on which his pardon was received by the governor and warden of the prison, he was shown in a vision is pardon document with its date and signatures of the Idaho State Governor and other officials, as he was shown just what steps he must take in order to be liberated as it was the intention of the South Dakota Prison Warden to detain his another six months. The following morning after the vision, Lewis confidently told another Mormon inmate that his pardon would come in three days. This good Mormon friend allowed this information to reach the warden. Lewis was jeeringly laughed at as the “Visionary Wilson”. Three days later, on the morning of the pardon date, Lewis was called to the warden’s office. The warden had the governor with other state officials seated in there to witness Lewis’ disappointment and chagrin when his pardon was denied. The warden said, “Sorry Wilson, but your papers did not come.” Lewis told him to go to a certain drawer in his desk, and here he would find his pardon signed by the governor. The warden hesitated, stammered, and tried to refuse, but the governor insisted upon his doing what Lewis suggested. In all humiliation, the warden was forced to bring the document forth. Lewis was released to go home nearly broken in health from heavy lifting in the rock and lime quarries, but he was not crushed in spirit or determination. He bore his testimony over and over again by both mouth and his daily life of the kindness and all reality of God and his belief in prayer. His faith throughout his life was strong. His families always rose to commence the day with an earnest prayer and retired at night with the same blessed protection. His children were taught cleanliness of living. No rough, smutty jokes were allowed in his home. He taught them honesty, thrift and to keep out of debt. In the year of 1886, he became one of the first presiding Elders west of Blackfoot in the Basalt Ward of the Bingham Stake. He kater served as first counselor in the Riverside Bishopric for nine years and then was released to become the counselor of the High Priest’s Quorum which position he held until the time of his death. During those hard, pioneer years in Idaho, when doctors were scarce and people were poor, and when he was building homes, and because of his strong, humble faith and knowledge, Lewis And Eliza were to administer healing herbs and to give service in times of sickness and death. They would travel fro miles around. He always carried to these homes a bulwark of strength and comfort. He used not ony his acquired skill, wisdom and knowledge in rebuilding his own finances, but in building and financing of meeting houses as he directed the building of several. He built the first tithing granary in this part of the state. He was a leader among men in thrift and in energy. One year, after growing a large crop of potatoes, he could not find a sale for them, so he put into effect his ingenuity and dauntless ambition, by boarding a train for New York City. Here he went into one of the large hotels and asked the management for his gift of Idaho rural potatoes to be baked and served to the hotel guests for dinner. During the meal, he was presented in the dining room and introduced as “Wilson, the Idaho potato king,” who had given the potatoes that they were eating to the hotel as a compliment. This title he carried up until his death. He shipped them (potatoes) directly to New York after that. As time moved on, he became well established in Idaho. He lived to be the father of sixteen children, ten of whom were born to Catherine Wiggins Wilson, and six children were born to Eliza Hunt Wilson. He sent and supported four missionaries in his family; his last son filled two missions. When he was seventy-seven years old, he became seriously ill. The doctors gave him only a few hours to live. All his children were called home at his doctor’s request. Lewis passed into a coma during the night, and they thought he was dead. Upon regaining consciousness, he told his wives and children how his spirit had passed from this earth to the other side. After passing through one veil, how he could see beyond another, his father standing there, conversing with relatives, church officials and acquaintances. He tried to pass through the second veil to join his father, but he was not permitted to do so. He was told by the guide he could not go further until he had performed certain temple work for his father. He had to plead to return and take cars of this obligation and was permitted to do so. Propped up in bed with pillows, he bore his testimony of the gospel and begged his children to live it and to freely forgive and love one another. He said, “There is mo man-made business or corporation on equal to a noble family For his children to live to join the hearts of the children unto the fathers and further the gospel of Christ, to live worthy of advancement in the priesthood and not to procrastinate time.” His family joined in a prayer circle at his request. He testified that while the family joined in prayer he saw heavenly personages so bright and shining they could scarcely be looked upon. Many things were shown to him too sacred to reveal but which bore testimony of the divinity of God. He was healed by the power of the priesthood and lived to go with his wife, Eliza, and spent three months at the St. George Temple doing temple work. He died at the age of eighty-one, January 28, 1922, leaving a family of fourteen children and eighty-one grandchildren. All the children have been married in the temple. He left an untarnished name far and near. His strong faith has dominated his whole life and set the direction of his families. COMMON ANSESTOR: ROBERT WILSON, born 1600 Descent from father to son: Benjamin (first immigrant ancestor) Christened 1636 Jeremiah Born 1665 Joseph Born 1692 Deliverance Born 1737 (Deliverance Jr.) Bradley Born 1769 Lewis Dunbar Born 1805 Lewis Dunbar Jr. Born 1840 Catherine Wiggins – first wife of Lewis Dunbar Jr. First Generation Children: Catherine Rozilla Jennie Lind Martha Vilate Mary Elizabeth Sarah Lettie William Lewis Ezra Dunbar Elvaretta Annie Pearl Ellen Arthur Ebenezer Eliza Ellener Hunt – second wife of Lewis Dunbar Jr. First Generation Children: Rosella May Enoch Albert Joseph Leonard Lola Ellener Ethel Rebecca Maude Eliza (This history was compiled and arranged by his daughter, Ethel Wilson Harrison, from his own personal record book, church history records, and personal contributions gleaned from members of his two loving families, and a diary left by his father, Lewis Dunbar Wilson Sr. – preserved by the family and now found in the church historian’s office.

Catherine Wiggins Wilson

Contributor: kcapson Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Catherine was the fifth child of Ebenezer Fairchild Wiggins and Eleanor Moore. Ebenezer's parents, Jonas and Mary Ann Wiggins, were born in Morgan County, Illinois. After their marriage in 1794, they remained in Morgan County where 11 of their 12 children were born. Ebenezer was born in Scott county, Kentucky, on February 4, 1806. His wife was born in Wabash, Pike County, Illinois. These two were married about 1829 and made their home in Nauvoo, Illinois where six girls and one boy were born to them. Catherine's parents joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and crossed the plains with the Daniel Miller and J.W. Cody Company, arriving in Salt Lake City in 1853. Catherine was only seven at that time. They settled in Ogden where she grew up and taught grade school for a short time. She was a very good speller. It was quite a thrill for her when some of Utah's first fruit was brought to her by Apostle Orson Hyde, who was wanting to be more than a friend. But he was an older man, and she thought she would sooner be a young man's sweetheart. At 17, she found Lewis Wilson and they were married on January 17, 1862, and for a short time lived at Wilson Lane. They later moved to Ogden where he had started in the copper and lumber business making churns, etc., the first hardware store and lumber yard that was in Ogden. The first plate glass windows in Salt Lake City were placed by him. During polygamy, Lewis, after getting Catherine's consent, married Eliza Eleanor Hunt on March 10, 1873. Ten children were born to his first wife and six to the second. When the Edmonds Law was passed, it created great difficulties for the families. Catherine was a kind, loving mother, but firm. She always demanded the respect of her children and they all grew up loving her. She didn't allow her children or hired girl to cook or do anything unnecessary on the Sabbath Day. Even the Sunday meal was prepared on Saturday. When the families moved to Idaho, they found winters very severe. In 1888, snow drifts piled high over fences and wild cattle would come from the desert and be found frozen in the snow. The Snake River bridge was a toll bridge, and farmers would take turns going across and doing the shopping for all the group in Blackfoot, or tied their teams near the bridge and walked in. The nearest flour mill was Malad, Idaho. Catherine never turned anyone away hungry. She suffered a stroke when 80 years of age and was bedfast for six years. She never complained and would say there were people worse off than herself. Her mind kept alert until the last. She passed away at the age of 86 on June 6, 1931, and was laid to rest in Riverside Thomas Cemetery beside her husband.

LIFE STORY OF CATHERINE ROZELLA BINGHAM

Contributor: kcapson Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

I was born in Ogden, Utah, on the corner of 25th St. and Washington Boulevard on Oct. 15, 1863. I am the daughter of Lewis Dunbar Wilson Jr. and Catherine Wiggins. I was born in a three-room log house with a long porch on the back, which was built by my father, Lewis Dunbar Wilson. He cut pine trees down from the Wasatch Mountains back of North and South Fork Canyons. They would go up on the hillside and cut the pine trees down, roll the logs down the mountain side and then when they had the logs collected, which they did with a team, they took the logs to a saw mill where they were cut into what was called rough lumber. It was smooth but not as smooth as the boards cut now. The floors and ceilings were built of these rough pine boards. They didn’t have planing machines at that time. We were happy to have those kinds of floors. I took pride in scrubbing the floors for the beautiful pink and red pattern in the boards would glisten like they were waxed. Back of the house was a large granary with a cellar underneath. Here the grain and vegetables were stored. There weren’t any refrigerators at that time so the cellar had to be used for milk, butter, etc. We always kept them clean and sweet smelling. We went into the cellar from a door just off the kitchen. Being the oldest in the family of nine children (six girls and three boys), I took quite a responsibility. As a result I became quite serious minded. I remember hearing Father speak of the hard times we had had and how we had to be careful and not waste, so I gathered together all the bags I could find and filled them with wheat I had gleaned and hid them back in the corner of the granary for I realized how terrible it would be to go without wheat, which we ground up for cereals and flour. As long as we had wheat I knew we’d have flour. I remember one time in particular; I was about six years old. I had driven the cows across the road to the pasture, which at that time was where the Union Station now stands. (This land father donated to the railroads). The sunflowers grew tall and they were scattered all over the pasture. I was wandering among them looking for the biggest when all at once I heard the loudest noise I had ever heard and looking up I saw a monster coming, I thought, after me. I ran like a deer home and hid. Oh! What relief when I realized it had passed and I was still safe and sound. Not long after this father donated the land to the railroad and the engine house was built and later the railroad which ran east past our house on 25th Street. On one occasion Pres. Brigham Young had all of the Sunday School of the Second ward march down to a passenger car that was standing in front of our house and here Pres. Young stood on the steps of the car and shook hands with all of us. I thought that a great honor to have this opportunity. I have seen all of our presidents but Joseph the Prophet. Some of the chums I had at this time were a Nevey girl, Anne Pingree, a sister of Job Pingree, Sarah Janes, Sara Robbins Claydon. They have all passed away but we often talked of Pres. Young and what it meant to us to shake the hand of one of the greatest men living at that time. On Christmas I well remember how we had our hair curled. Our dolls had new dresses to match our own. On one Christmas when we awakened in the morning I thought I was lucky for my stocking was bulging. I was anxious to know what it could be so I got busy and unwrapped quite a bit of paper and came to a pigtail all done up with tissue and tied with a ribbon. My cousin, Sarah Ellen Adams was staying with us and I believe she and the hired help played the joke. Mother and Father were always playing jokes on we children so I had to take it in good part, although it plagued me at the time. I didn’t let them know. We put our new dresses on, combed our hair back, tied a ribbon on it and were all spick and span for the company that had been invited to eat Christmas with us. I remember the first school I attended. It was a large one-room frame building that stood just around the corner on Wall Street in Ogden. Three of us started at the same time. There hadn’t been any school before so that is the reason I hadn’t started before. Ruthinda and Electa Monch, wives of Mr. Monch taught us. Mr. Monch taught the oldest grades. The next school I attended was taught in the Second Ward where we attended church. We were encouraged to attend Sunday School and be there on time. We would get credits for doing it. They also encouraged us to read chapters in the Bible. We’d get more credits for each chapter read. I would enjoy house-cleaning time. Everything had to be taken out. The rooms were white washed (paper and paint were too expensive) and everything cleaned and put back. I was very particular about the curtains and the way they hung. Being the oldest in the family I learned to take care of the children and to do a great deal of work for mother in so much that she didn’t have to have help or a girl around. She was very nervous. This made it impossible for me to attend school very much. When sickness came, I was sent many times to ask Pres. Middleton to come and administer to the sick. I have had my testimony strengthened and my faith in the healing powers that God has given to those holding the power of the priesthood many times. I have seen the sick made well. I also learned to sew for the family. I did so well and enjoyed it so much that later Mother sent me to a sewing school, where I soon learned how to sew anything there was to be sewed. I made all the clothes for the family. I have made all my sisters’ wedding dresses, including my own, and used to paint on material, crochet doilies, and make lace and beautiful tidies. In the year of 1876 Father built a large frame house in what is called Wilson Ward or Lane. This house still stands (1942) as a monument to father about one half-mile west of the D. and R. Railroad. We thought it was a mansion at the time. It was built for two families as father had two wives at that time. It had an upstairs and downstairs and had two kitchens and was built like a double house or apartment for the two families and we all got along nicely together. It was while attending this sewing class the romance of my life started. Heber, my husband was working for Mr. David M. Stewart, who owned the waterworks of Ogden. He had to walk to his home in Wilson. We walked home together. I was stepping out with Anderson the schoolteacher. Heber was also asking for my attention. He got into an argument with the teacher. It ended in a fistfight. I liked Heber the best so really he was the winner. I was thirteen years old when we moved into the new house. How I did like to go out on the porch or portico and look over the country. Both the upstairs and downstairs had these porches which ran the full width of the house. Before father bought this farm, he was a worker in cooper. Later in 1880, he went into the lumber and hardware business. His store was on the corner of 25th and Wall Street. He did a great deal of contract work. This took him from the office, leaving only hired help at the store. When it was too late to rectify the mistakes made in trusting his helpers, he found that many debts had been contracted and charged to father. To settle the debts, father had to sell his business and also the home in the Lane. He picked up and went to Idaho. Here he homesteaded two places ninety acres each about five miles west of Blackfoot in what is called Riverside, one farm for each family. What one family had the other had. Both my mother and Aunt Eliza Ellen were very friendly like sisters and would go together to Relief Society. At the same time Father moved to Wilson Ward, the ward wasn’t organized so on Sunday my sister Jenne and I walked to Ogden to attend Sunday School. Most of the time we stayed for meeting as father’s business was still in Ogden. We would go to singing class and then father would wait for us and we would walk home together in our high-heeled slippers. I didn’t realize what these high-heeled slippers were doing to my feet at the time. The slippers were too small in the first place. They caused a bunion on my foot also a corn which I really have suffered with since then. At the same time the schoolteachers boarded with us. They enjoyed the milk I took care of. I got a lot of praise for the butter I made. We sold a great deal of butter to the stores, which was about 20 pounds a week. It took a lot of work but I took great pride in it. I was asked often to work for other people but father and mother felt like they couldn’t get along without me. Mother wasn’t able to do much work so the responsibility fell upon my shoulders. The ward was established in 1876 and was called Wilson ward. There were quite a number of Wilson families. In 1879 the Sunday School was organized with L. A. Nielson as Superintendent, L. D. Wilson, my father as first counselor and T. J. Wilson as second counselor. I was put in as a teacher. I also was asked to lead their singing. I had been taking lessons at a singing class in Ogden. When the Relief Society was organized by Eliza R. Snow in Ogden I attended the meeting. I also attended Mutual in Ogden. At the Relief Society organization everybody took quilt blocks and handed them in to be made into a quilt. I had always been rather religious but backward in expressing myself. When the Mutual was organized at Wilson Ward I was made second counselor. We had parties and dances and I always enjoyed myself. At the back of our house in the Lane was a large summer kitchen. Both of Father’s families used it. There was a stove at each end. When one of us had a birthday, we’d have a party and dance. Ted Seuel would come with a banjo and Johnnie Staker would bring his fiddle and they would play for the dancing. My sister Jennie and I were married at the same time, Jan. 17, 1884 in the Salt Lake Endowment House by Daniel Wells. I made both of our wedding dresses and other things. The dresses at that time were fitted tight with a skirt of ruffles and frills. I surely was proud of them both. Before we were married we had to be baptized so my father and mother and Heber’s father and mother went down to the river and cut a hole in the ice. To keep us warm they made two tents around a tree and built a fire in each. We dressed there. It is quite a thing to look back at those days when we had to be baptized even if we had been baptized before so we could go to the temple and be married. Heber (Brigham Heber Bingham) and I built our first house of two rooms and a frame lean-to just across the street from where our present home is now. (1940) At the time we built, the road ran on the south side of our house. I had a nice glass door in the kitchen. I could see up and down the street. We planted trees around it and carried water from the ditch, which was on the other side of the road. Later the road was changed to the north side of the house. We looked and felt like we were in a hole and out of place for the back of our house was now the front. Verna was the honored one to be the first born in the new house built later on. It was about this time that father was moving to Idaho. He had his two homes to build to prepare for his two families that mother lived with me in my first home built by Heber. It was quite a task to take care of a sickly mother and to have to rear my first two children, Raymond and Clara. We, Heber and I, worked together. We were happy and contented. All my sisters moved to Idaho with father and homesteaded land there leaving me the only one here. I was quite lonesome but as the scriptures says we leave our own home and cleave unto our husband to make a new home for our posterity. The ditch which ran in front of the house could be crossed only on a plank. One day I wanted to go across but I was rather afraid that I would fall in. Heber said he would carry me. About half way across he began to joke and fool. I was rather heavy and sure enough he lost hold and into the stream I went. He was quite excited then as I was in a delicate condition, but everything came out all right. Several years later we had another scene with this canal. It was full of water. Albert was a baby about two. I was mending his clothes. Something seemed to whisper to me to look for him. I ran out and called him several times but there was no answer. Heber was working near and I called to him. He said he hadn’t been with him. We both started down the ditch. There floating along the ditch was his dress. Heber jumped in after him and immediately began working with his little limp body and both of us prayed. Our prayers were answered as life began slowly to come back into his body. We rushed home with him, ripped the wet clothes off and wrapped him in warm blankets. We gave him warm drinks. He was a very sick baby and the neighbors didn’t think he would pull through, but he did and has grown to manhood. He is a wonderful bishop in the Honeyville ward today and has a wonderful large family. He is also mayor. Heber was called on a mission to Australia when Raymond was only 14 years old, Clara about 12, and Albert 10. We didn’t know just how we were going to manage with seven small children. Verna was only about three years old and we had the land to pay for. But we trusted in the Lord to help us. We had a number of cows. I made butter, gathered fruit from a two-acre orchard. Twice a week I’d go to town with my produce with old Maggie, the horse, hitched to the wagon buggy. I was proud of my butter. The fifteen pounds didn’t go very far. Many wanted it. I was quite proud of myself and with the blessing of the Lord I was able to keep Heber on a mission and finish paying for the land we had bought. We had several sad but funny experiences during the two and a half years father was in the mission. One Sunday Albert and I started out for church in the buggy. Our orchard was just below the house on the south side of the street. We turned out into the road thinking the horse would keep on going up the road. We went down into the orchard so often the horse, old Maggie, thought we were going down into the orchard again. He started on the run down into the orchard. We were excited so was he. He ran too close to the big poplar tree and over we went into a clump of grass with a broken shaft. We didn’t get to church but we were thankful no other harm had befallen us. Another time the buggy was filled with boxes of fruit ready to take to town. Maggie was frightened. He ran up through the orchard. In turning he hit a tree, broke the shafts off the lugs, apples, pears, etc. He kept going through the orchard gate, turned into the front gate and out to the barn. The door to the barn was open. Here he was stopped. The shafts wouldn’t go through the door. Our father was surprised when we met him at the station with a new two-seated white-topped buggy. We had bought and paid for it ourselves. We also had money in the bank. All the fruit I couldn’t sell, my girls and I dried except the very poor or spoiled fruit which we fed to the pigs. Nothing on the farm was wasted. I received two Patriarchal blessings during my life. The first one was given April 5, 1886 by Wm. J. Smith, two years after I was married. It told me the wonderful things I would do if I lived my religion. With an ideal to work for and knowing that through my efforts I would receive the blessings promised me, I have been buoyed up many times when I’ve been discouraged. I’ve tried hard to teach my children to walk upright and straight and attend to all their duties. I did all I could to have them all attend Sunday School with their father. They also went to Primary. We’ve many a stack of sagebrush in clearing land. We worked and saved until our farm grew from twenty acres to seventy acres of farmland and twenty acres of pasture. Father and I have been united in all of our efforts to do all we could. We have tried to teach the children the right principles. They are all honorable citizens and I am proud of them. They have all been united to their husbands and wives in the Temple. We have tried to give them an education to the best of our abilities. At times it seems like an uphill business. Today they are all leaders in the wards and stakes in which they live. Sometimes things looked pretty black for us but many of us lose confidence in prayer because we do not recognize the answers. A writer has written that we ask for strength and God gives us difficulties, which make us strong. We pray for wisdom and God sends problems, the solution of which developed wisdom. We ask for favors and God gives us opportunities. In this way our prayers have been granted which we asked for to guide our lives and those of our children. Father and I never pushed ourselves socially but have been stalwart church members friends to all. Heber was called in with other young men by the church authorities. They made a pledge that they wouldn’t dance the new dances, waltz, two step, etc., that couples danced close to each other to dance. This we lived. We encouraged many entertainments at home, tried in every way to guide the lives of our children in the path of truth and right. I have always raised many chickens from setting hens. The eggs I sold kept me with spending money with which I have tried to give the girls piano lessons, pay for clothing, food, and other things. Pay for the extra things the children needed while attending high school, socials, etc. We all worked together to take responsibilities to be thrifty and to look ahead and be reliable to whatever situation may come. In 1906 my youngest child was born, making ten children; four boys and six girls. In 1901 Sister Eliza Martin was put in as President of the Relief Society in Wilson ward with myself as second and Mrs. Couley as first counselors. I served for four years. Sister Martin’s health began to fail. I learned to love Sister Martin and held her in great esteem. We worked harmoniously together. I would call for her in the buggy with old Pet hitched to it. We’d visit the ward, go to Union Meetings, conferences, visit the sick, and attend all our meetings regularly. We took care of the poor, made clothing for the dead, and I enjoyed working with her more than I can express. I have always remembered and held close to my heart what she said of me. Quote, “I found her capable in every way. She could do many things that I couldn’t and was always willing and cheerful to go when asked into the home where our help was needed. We got along well. She was a great help to us.” We were released in 1914, by Bishop E. A. Bingham. I was reinstated as first counselor to Lizzie Wilson. I served here until August 1916, when I had an unfortunate accident. Before leaving to go to Bishop’s meeting I remembered I had left the chicken coop door open. On going to shut it, I ran a nail, which was sticking up in a board into my foot. When I first saw the nail, I thought of preventing anyone from stepping on it. I was trying to bend it with my foot when it slipped and ran through my shoe. I didn’t think much of it. I thought it no more than a skin bruise. I was more concerned about my recommend and being on time to ride up with Uncle Ed who was bishop at that time. He had to stay at the church late that night and I waited. My foot kept throbbing more and more. The pain was getting so bad I could hardly stand it. As soon as I got home, I called Martha. We worked with it all night but nothing that we could do seemed to help. Dr. Rich was called next morning. Nothing that they did helped in any way. The poison was so great. In three days I was taken to the hospital to have my leg amputated to save my life. This happened August 29, 1916. I had to be released from Relief Society. It was impossible for me to serve longer. Everyone did everything what was possible to make me feel good. I can almost feel now how good it was when Martha bathed me, rubbed my back good and put clean clothes on me. It was through the faith and prayers of my family for me that I lived and that the poison didn’t reach my heart. The children can never really imagine what an effort it has been for me to get around. I haven’t cared to weigh them down with my troubles, and if I could help it, no one ever saw where my leg was taken off, or saw me without my artificial leg when I had taken it off to rest. The stump used to get so very sore at times. My health has been good. I have learned to appreciate the value of my artificial leg. I can walk and work quite well. I feel my awkwardness but with that determination that my father said I had and my own feeling of independence to do the best I can for myself and my family, I feel like I have made a success of my undertakings. Although loosing my leg was a trial at first, I found I could get around with a crutch at first and then with my artificial foot very well. It seemed such a load at first, and at times made the end of my leg very sore. I was very happy when father came to see me and I walked on my new foot. He said, “I knew Zilla could do it.” When there’s no sense there isn’t any feeling. Though it’s an effort to walk always and not step on people’s toes and cause the least amount of harm. But I have never with my humility and timidity been able to go out before the public and feel at ease. I still like to go to Relief Society meetings and read the Relief Society Magazine. In November of 1923, our son Wallace was called on a mission to New Zealand. On the 16th of April 1924, he passed away while in the mission field. His mission was a short one. He and Elder Lyre had gone down to the river to bathe. Wallace was always bubbling with energy. He dove into the stream where they had been bathing the night before, but during the night, there had been a storm and a sand cone had formed in the stream. This is what Wallace hit, when he dove into the water. The impact broke his neck. He died eighteen hours later in the home of one of the Saints there. His body didn’t arrive home until two months later, June 1924. Railroad strikes made it impossible to get his body down to Auckland, New Zealand in time for it to leave on the first boat. It was terrible not to see his face before they laid him away. He had been placed in an airtight casket, which couldn’t be opened. Brother Melvin J. Ballard had set him apart when he left for his mission. He also spoke at his funeral. He told us he had been called to a greater mission and we should be proud of him. He was buried in the Ogden cemetery after services in the Ogden Tabernacle. That was a great trial and the first death in the family. I believe the sorrow of this helped to cause another calamity to come to us. It was just a year after this that Heber had his stroke, May 2, 1925. He had mourned a lot for Wallace and couldn't see why it should happen to one who was already serving the Lord. Wallace had been quite progressive when father would go into the field and around the barnyard, he would see little things that reminded him of Wallace and he would come in with swollen, red eyes. The morning of Heber’s stroke he came in and put his arms around me and kissed me. He must have felt something was going to happen. It took him such a long time to do his chores that morning that I wondered what he was doing all the time. Howard and Hazel had been to a party the night before and were late getting up. When Howard went out to milk, he saw Father laying face down in the corral. He called to Hazel and myself to go out and help carry father in, that something had happened to him. We carried him into the house and called Dr. Edward Rich. He told us Father had had a stroke. Heber lay for several days unconscious. We didn’t know just what the outcome would be when he regained consciousness. When he did regain consciousness, he couldn’t talk or use his right hand. The stroke had affected his right side. He lay in bed for several weeks. We tended him like a baby, he was so helpless. He realized his predicament and put forth a big effort and before long he was able to walk, but he never could talk, excepting for a few words. He used to talk with his hands and finger and we learned to make out almost everything he tried to tell me. We enjoyed each other and in ways of our own we talked to each other and made the best of the situation. We didn’t get out to visit much, but we were happy to have our children come to see us, and once in a while the folks would come and take us visiting. Heber especially liked to see what was going on in the fields. Heber was a good farmer and the boys learned many things of value from their father. In January 17, 1934, Heber and I celebrated our fiftieth wedding anniversary with a golden wedding reception. We had our pictures taken and were given a radio. There were over a hundred guests, fifty grandchildren and one great grandchild present. There was a program and refreshments were served. We all had a wonderful time. At this time, Sept. 11, 1939, we are both in good health. I get a great enjoyment out of reading Relief Society and church books. I am thankful to my family living around me. When I am, in need of help, they are on hand. Especially on my birthdays they come and make it enjoyable by bringing things to please me. I keep up the work in the big home and do for myself and Heber. It made us feel badly to have our last son (Howard) leave us, but God bless him to have success and contentment and happiness. Hazel and Allen have moved up here to take care of us and to rent the place. We are thankful for this. It is good to have one we love near us. June 29, 1939, Father lived fourteen years after his stroke, had good health and memory, and tried in all the ways he could to be a help. June 29, he passed away. I am left without a companion. The children want me to stay with them, but I feel closer to Heber here in our home. I know he is near. Note: original handwritten copy in possession of Alta W. Tolman. * * * * * On March 17, 1939 in the Wilson ward a service was held in honor of the past presidents and counselors of the Wilson Ward Relief Society who were still residing in the ward. Those complimented were Elizabeth Wilson, Estella Nyers, Laura Platt, Lillian Belnap, and myself (Rozella Bingham) with Rosalia Streckler as president. I was the oldest officer present. Tribute was paid to each guest of honor with the presentation of a corsage by Drucilla McFarland. The following poem was read: Today we meet to honor those Who marked a path and blazed the way For other women, such as we To follow in a later day. Among the leaders we would honor Are friends we count most near and dear, Because they march so close beside us And give us faith and love and cheer. Choice among women were those who were starred In time of dire trouble to build a new ward. Their duties were many miles long, But their hearts were so willing They worked with a song for pay. One who served for love of serving, Never asking help or pay, Was dear Rozella Bingham, Reverence to her marks our thanks today. * * * * *

“A Few Remembrances of My Life” by Catherine Rozella Wilson Bingham

Contributor: kcapson Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

My Grandmother’s Life-Story As She Wrote It For Me (Alta Rae Wilson), Dec. 1, 1936 I am the daughter of Lewis Dunbar Wilson Jr. and of Catherine Wiggins Wilson. I was born in Ogden, Utah on October 15, 1863, the first child in a large family. The family lived on the corner of twenty-fifth and Wall Street in a three-room house. The logs with which it was built was brought from the Wasatch Mountains. After they were put in shape they made a nice warm house with a porch on the side and a granary and cellar. Since I was the eldest in a large family I learned very young to assist my parents with the work and car for the little ones. When I was about six I used to take the cows across the street and herd them. The pasture was covered with tall sunflowers. One day I heard the train coming to the engine house which was near. I thought a train could go anywhere so I was very frightened and ran back to the house. The railroads in Ogden were first constructed near our home. My father gave a piece of his land to the company to build a part of the railroad on. On one occasion when the railroad ran past our home Brigham Young had all the Sunday School of the second ward march down to a passenger car that was in front of our house. Brigham Young stood on the steps of the car and he shook hands with each person as they marched by. I was one of those who shook hands. I feel it a great privilege to have seen all of the Presidents of the Church with the exception of Joseph Smith, the Prophet. On Christmas we always looked for a good time. We had our hair curled up in papers the night before. We also hung our stockings up. I remember one time when I hung both of mine up. The next morning I was feeling smart because both of my stockings were filled. But when I sat down to see what was in them I was surprised! I pulled out what appeared to be a long stick of candy wrapped in pretty paper. Instead of candy it was a pigtail! And everyone laughed at me. After receiving our presents we took the papers out of our hair. We dressed our new dolls to match our own dresses and waited for the company who were invited to dinner. I started school with two other sisters. The schoolhouse was not far from our house. I also attended Ruthinda and Lecty Monches school. Also Ms. Brown’s school. We children enjoyed house-cleaning time. Everything was taken out of the rooms, which were whitewashed again. The curtains were made fresh and clean and were hung just right. Especially the balances around the poster-beds had to hang just right! Mother’s health was not very good and so I cared for the younger children and assisted with the work when I could. I was often sent by my parents to get the elders to come and administer to the sick. My parents believed strongly in this ordinance. Their strong faith strengthened my own. I learned to help my mother in every way. When the schoolteachers boarded with us they enjoyed the milk and butter I took pride in keeping fresh and sweet. I was asked to do work away from home very often. My parents taught us to go regularly to Sunday School. We read chapters from the Bible or the other ‘good books’ in order to earn our credit marks. I liked Sunday School and the teachers and especially the songs we sang. When father built our home in Wilson Lane the ward was not organized so on Sundays my sister and I walked to Ogden to attend Sunday School in the second ward. Most of the time we marched with the Sunday School to meeting as father’s business was still in Ogden, we went to singing class at night and walked home with father who had waited for us. I was about fifteen years old when the Wilson Sunday School was organized in 1879 with L.H. Nielson as Superintendent, Thomas G. Wilson as first councilor, and L.D. Wilson as second councilor. There we sang the songs I had learnt in Ogden and liked so much to sing. About this time I started going to dances and became acquainted with the other young people. I worked in the Mutual. I was treasurer for a short time. In the back of our home in Wilson was a long room which had been built for two kitchens but which had not been partitioned off. On birthdays we would make up a party and enjoy ourselves by dancing to the music of a fiddle or banjo in the huge room. Very often our parents would join with us. We all had a good time together. It was about 1882 that I met Heber Bingham Jr. He worked in Ogden laying sewer pipe the same time I was learning dressmaking. So it happened that we would walk home in the evenings together. The next winter my sister and I were rebaptized in the Ogden River. The river was covered with ice and it was very cold. Father made a bon-fire under the trees with quilts and blankets hung around to keep in the heat while we changed our clothes. I had made our wedding dresses and other things just alike. We had our recommends and had a double wedding. I married Heber Bingham Jr. January 17, 1884 in the Salt Lake Endowment House by Daniel H. Wells. Heber and I made our home in Wilson Lane and have lived there since. In 1886 I received a patriarchal blessing by William J. Smith. On September 24, 1916 I was given another by Nathan Hawkes. I realize I have indeed been blessed. They have been a comfort to me. My husband fulfilled an honorable mission to Australia in 1899. My oldest boy, Raymond, was fourteen and the next, Albert, was ten. Their father left them in charge of the farm while he was gone. There were also five younger children in the family at that time. We had just built a new home on a rather sandy piece of land so a windmill was erected to furnish water for our use. While my husband was away it caved in and we had a hard job getting it back into shape again. The windmill was necessary in order to have water for use in the house, for the animals to drink, and to keep the trees and plants alive. I managed to keep the orchard alive. I picked the fruit off the ground and dried all I couldn’t sell. And so we got along fine. We all kept well, kept our expenses from running over and had some to go on the next year. The second year all the children went to school. We felt we had been blessed indeed. My oldest boy, Raymond graduated from Weber Academy in 1906 and left for a mission to Germany. After returning he taught school for some time, then he bought a farm in Weston, Idaho, married and settled down to become a prosperous farmer and bishop of his ward. When Albert, the next to the oldest was about two years old he fell in the irrigation canal while trying to cross on a plank. I was sewing at the time and unaware of my small son’s danger. I was prompted suddenly to call him. I did so but received no answer. I ran quickly down to the ditch and saw his small body floating down the stream. I pulled him out quickly and some of those who had come running when I screamed worked with him until his breath came. I put him to bed and he got better. Those around when it happened said he would never get well. Today he has eight sons and one daughter. He is a prosperous farmer, Mayor of Honeyville, Utah and he also is bishop of his ward. I feel I was inspired to leave my work and look for him. In after years when the Relief Society was being organized (1910) Eliza D. Martin was set apart as President of the Society. I was second councilor until 1914 when I became first councilor when Sister Martin resigned on account of her poor health. She said of her councilors that they had worked harmoniously together for several years. She said in a letter, “Sister Bingham was a help to her. She had always called for me with the horse and buggy and together we went to meetings and visited other wards. We also visited and took care of the sick. We made clothes for the dead. I found Sister Bingham capable in every way. She could do many things I could not and was always willing and cheerful.” Sister Martin did all she could for the good and benefit of all. She was wise and intelligent and I enjoyed working with her. I was interested in the Relief Society lessons and liked to take part. In 1916 the North Weber Stake people were going down to the Salt Lake Temple to do work for the dead. I was busy getting my work done so I could go. I had been making a change with the chickens so I went out to look after them. I saw a nail sticking up in a board. I realized it was dangerous so I tried to press it over with my foot. Instead of bending over it ran into my foot about an inch and a half. I did not think the accident serious so I went to the house and bathed it in warm water. I put my shoe on again and went about my work. After some time my foot commenced to hurt badly and then I called for assistance. I soaked it in an antiseptic solution. The next morning the doctor examined and opened the wound. I put iodine on it thinking it would prevent further infection but it became worse. For five days it became worse. I had blood poison! They lanced it but it didn’t seem to help. After I had suffered nine days I was taken to the hospital for amputation of my leg in order to save my life. Brother William Hunter anointed and blessed me. Many prayers were offered for me. My name was sent to the Temple and I know I was blessed and by the mercy of the Lord my life was spared to my family. I can work and use my artificial boot but I feel handicapped. I am glad I have had the privilege of living and enjoying the company of my family. In 1924 my third son met his death while on a mission in New Zealand. That was the greatest trial that had ever come to the family. But I believe the Lord called him to service on the other side and will provide for him. President Wright said he died in honor and that his parents had need of being proud of him. In May 1925 my husband had a paralytic stroke which left his left side almost useless from his head to his foot. His speech was taken from him. Since, however, he had regained partial use of his limbs and can say enough words to express his desires and needs. I and our family are thankful for his life. I am thankful for all the blessings my husband and I have enjoyed and are enjoying together.” Signed Mrs. B.H.Bingham

The Cedar Churn

Contributor: kcapson Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Written by Elvaretta A. Wilson Watson when asked to write about a cedar churn made by her father, Luis Dunbar Wilson, in the early days of Ogden.

Life timeline of Jr Lewis Dunbar Wilson

1840
Jr Lewis Dunbar Wilson was born on 21 Sep 1840
Jr Lewis Dunbar Wilson was 19 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
Jr Lewis Dunbar Wilson was 20 years old when Abraham Lincoln is elected as the 16th President of United States. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
Jr Lewis Dunbar Wilson was 39 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Jr Lewis Dunbar Wilson was 47 years old when Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West Show opens in London. William Frederick "Buffalo Bill" Cody was an American scout, bison hunter, and showman. He was born in Le Claire, Iowa Territory, but he lived for several years in his father's hometown in Toronto Township, Ontario, Canada, before the family returned to the Midwest and settled in the Kansas Territory.
Jr Lewis Dunbar Wilson was 55 years old when George VI of the United Kingdom (d. 1952) George VI was King of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Commonwealth from 11 December 1936 until his death in 1952. He was the last Emperor of India and the first Head of the Commonwealth.
Jr Lewis Dunbar Wilson was 68 years old when Ford puts the Model T car on the market at a price of US$825. Ford Motor Company is an American multinational automaker headquartered in Dearborn, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit. It was founded by Henry Ford and incorporated on June 16, 1903. The company sells automobiles and commercial vehicles under the Ford brand and most luxury cars under the Lincoln brand. Ford also owns Brazilian SUV manufacturer Troller, an 8% stake in Aston Martin of the United Kingdom, and a 49% stake in Jiangling Motors of China. It also has joint-ventures in China, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, and Russia. The company is listed on the New York Stock Exchange and is controlled by the Ford family; they have minority ownership but the majority of the voting power.
Jr Lewis Dunbar Wilson was 77 years old when Tsar Nicholas II of Russia was forced to abdicate in the February Revolution, ending three centuries of Romanov rule. Nicholas II or Nikolai II, known as Saint Nicholas in the Russian Orthodox Church, was the last Emperor of Russia, ruling from 1 November 1894 until his forced abdication on 15 March 1917. His reign saw the fall of the Russian Empire from one of the foremost great powers of the world to economic and military collapse. He was given the nickname Nicholas the Bloody or Vile Nicholas by his political adversaries due to the Khodynka Tragedy, anti-Semitic pogroms, Bloody Sunday, the violent suppression of the 1905 Russian Revolution, the executions of political opponents, and his perceived responsibility for the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905). Soviet historians portray Nicholas as a weak and incompetent leader whose decisions led to military defeats and the deaths of millions of his subjects.
Jr Lewis Dunbar Wilson died on 28 Jan 1922 at the age of 81
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Jr Lewis Dunbar Wilson (21 Sep 1840 - 28 Jan 1922), BillionGraves Record 2350492 Blackfoot, Bingham, Idaho, United States

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