Leland Van Wagoner

7 Apr 1899 - 12 Aug 1969

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Leland Van Wagoner

7 Apr 1899 - 12 Aug 1969
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INTERVIEW WITH LELAND VAN WAGONER Technician on the Tabernacle Organ from 1945 to 1955 By Carole J Fowler, sister-in-law -- April 1967 Leland’s interest in organs began in 1921 in the city of Provo, Utah. He had always been interested in things mechanical and any kind of music. The fact that his g

Life Information

Leland Van Wagoner

Born:
Died:

Provo City Cemetery

610 S State St
Provo, Utah, Utah
United States

Epitaph

FATHER MOTHER

Headstone Description

Father Leland
Mother E. Leona M.
Transcriber

dvdmovieking

June 8, 2011
Transcriber

MsCarolB

April 10, 2020
Transcriber

T

June 8, 2015
Photographer

Drewski

June 7, 2011

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Leland Van Wagoner is buried in the Provo City Cemetery at the location displayed on the map below. This GPS information is ONLY available at BillionGraves. Our technology can help you find the gravesite and other family members buried nearby.

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Interview with Leland Van Wagoner

Contributor: T Created: 2 years ago Updated: 9 months ago

INTERVIEW WITH LELAND VAN WAGONER Technician on the Tabernacle Organ from 1945 to 1955 By Carole J Fowler, sister-in-law -- April 1967 Leland’s interest in organs began in 1921 in the city of Provo, Utah. He had always been interested in things mechanical and any kind of music. The fact that his good wife was an outstanding organist in the area was the drawing card to the mechanics of an organ. If she played an organ which wasn’t quite in tune, or was not functioning properly, she would call for her husband’s assistance. It was at this time when the huge Wurlitzer organs became popular to use in the movie theaters as background music for the films. These organs were very expensive to build, but the theater owners felt even with the high initial cost they would still save money over the long run as it cost several hundred dollars each week for an orchestra. The average salary paid a theater organist during the twenties was forty-five dollars a week. Leland operated a Photo Studio next door to the theater in Provo. When he heard of the installation of the big pipe organ, he quickly paid a visit to the owner. He volunteered his services free hoping to get a chance to help build the organ. The owner said, “But Van, I can’t let you do it for nothing.” Leland insisted he wanted to get the experience and would be only too happy to spend as many hours as possible without pay. When the job was finished he was told there would never be an admission charge for him or any of the family. Oh how thrilled the children were to be able to go to the theater and just say, “We’re Van’s kids” and in they’d go. They were surely proud of their Papa. The actual profession of Leland was photography. In nineteen thirty-five he was offered a good position with the Salt Lake Tribune News Paper. This called for a move to Salt Lake City which the young family undertook. He spent ten enjoyable years with the Tribune, still keeping up an interest in organs. A message from the Presiding Bishop’s Office was on his desk one day. He called upon the Brethren, whereupon, they offered him the job of caring for the Tabernacle Organ. This involved about three or four hours a day and worked in fine with his schedule as he didn’t report for work at the Tribune until afternoon. After a year and a half a work program was planned which would involve full time, so he left the newspaper business and devoted full time to his “hobby”. The new work schedule included service for the Ward organs throughout the Church and really kept Leland busy. Approximately two years later the “rebuilding” of the Tabernacle Organ was started. This involved many hours working closely with the factory men to get the perfection desired for such a world famous instrument. He was sent to the factory by the Church in order to get some specialized training. The Organ was completed in nineteen forty-eight at a cost of $125,000. The console consists of five manuals and eight organs within one large organ. The names of the eight organs are, swell, great, choir, solo, bombard (which is the trumpet section and most powerful), the positive, pedal, and anti-final (which is the echo organ). During the interview I felt a sincere interest displayed by Leland about his job with the Church. He said it was a tremendous feeling to care for such a well known instrument. To be connected with the Tabernacle Organ was a magic word to any organ manufacturing company in the world. Most of the old organ was shipped to the BYU campus and installed by Leland in the Joseph F. Smith Building. He also installed the organs in the Bonneville Stake Center, the Idaho Falls Temple, U of U Institute of Religion, and in Provo at the Christian Science Church and the Burg Mortuary. The original Tabernacle Organ was completed in eighteen sixty-seven. It then contained seven hundred pipes. It has since been rebuilt several times. Only twelve of the original pipes remain in use in the back. Only eight of the front pipes play. Leland was released from Church service due to ill health in nineteen fifty-five. After his recovery he returned to the photography business operating under the name of Lee Van Photo in Salt Lake City. He still keeps an active interest in what goes on at the Tabernacle and does a good deal of photo work for the Church. Before entering into the photo business again he was asked to come to Illinois and assist in installing two organs for the Lutheran Church in Decatur and Bloomington. He explained an interesting point to me. All small organs built to size specified by the position it will occupy. They are then put together, played, and tuned at the factory. All parts are numbered and then taken apart and shipped to the Church. They are then unpacked and placed in position on a numbered “foot board”. “How does our Tabernacle Organ compare with other large pipe organs in the world?”, I asked. He told me the largest organ in the world is in Convention Hall at Atlantic City, Florida. It has 44,000 pipes and considered to be the finest in tone quality. The Tabernacle Organ has 10,746 pipes at last count and is among the tops in tone quality. All organists throughout the world are able to know what each of the fine organs are capable of doing with the publication of a “stop list” in the well known organ publications. I feel that I gained much in the short time I spent with Leland. He is a thoroughly interesting person.

Interview with Leland Van Wagoner

Contributor: Pan Argo Created: 9 months ago Updated: 9 months ago

INTERVIEW WITH LELAND VAN WAGONER Technician on the Tabernacle Organ from 1945 to 1955 By Carole J Fowler, sister-in-law -- April 1967 Leland’s interest in organs began in 1921 in the city of Provo, Utah. He had always been interested in things mechanical and any kind of music. The fact that his good wife was an outstanding organist in the area was the drawing card to the mechanics of an organ. If she played an organ which wasn’t quite in tune, or was not functioning properly, she would call for her husband’s assistance. It was at this time when the huge Wurlitzer organs became popular to use in the movie theaters as background music for the films. These organs were very expensive to build, but the theater owners felt even with the high initial cost they would still save money over the long run as it cost several hundred dollars each week for an orchestra. The average salary paid a theater organist during the twenties was forty-five dollars a week. Leland operated a Photo Studio next door to the theater in Provo. When he heard of the installation of the big pipe organ, he quickly paid a visit to the owner. He volunteered his services free hoping to get a chance to help build the organ. The owner said, “But Van, I can’t let you do it for nothing.” Leland insisted he wanted to get the experience and would be only too happy to spend as many hours as possible without pay. When the job was finished he was told there would never be an admission charge for him or any of the family. Oh how thrilled the children were to be able to go to the theater and just say, “We’re Van’s kids” and in they’d go. They were surely proud of their Papa. The actual profession of Leland was photography. In nineteen thirty-five he was offered a good position with the Salt Lake Tribune News Paper. This called for a move to Salt Lake City which the young family undertook. He spent ten enjoyable years with the Tribune, still keeping up an interest in organs. A message from the Presiding Bishop’s Office was on his desk one day. He called upon the Brethren, whereupon, they offered him the job of caring for the Tabernacle Organ. This involved about three or four hours a day and worked in fine with his schedule as he didn’t report for work at the Tribune until afternoon. After a year and a half a work program was planned which would involve full time, so he left the newspaper business and devoted full time to his “hobby”. The new work schedule included service for the Ward organs throughout the Church and really kept Leland busy. Approximately two years later the “rebuilding” of the Tabernacle Organ was started. This involved many hours working closely with the factory men to get the perfection desired for such a world famous instrument. He was sent to the factory by the Church in order to get some specialized training. The Organ was completed in nineteen forty-eight at a cost of $125,000. The console consists of five manuals and eight organs within one large organ. The names of the eight organs are, swell, great, choir, solo, bombard (which is the trumpet section and most powerful), the positive, pedal, and anti-final (which is the echo organ). During the interview I felt a sincere interest displayed by Leland about his job with the Church. He said it was a tremendous feeling to care for such a well known instrument. To be connected with the Tabernacle Organ was a magic word to any organ manufacturing company in the world. Most of the old organ was shipped to the BYU campus and installed by Leland in the Joseph F. Smith Building. He also installed the organs in the Bonneville Stake Center, the Idaho Falls Temple, U of U Institute of Religion, and in Provo at the Christian Science Church and the Burg Mortuary. The original Tabernacle Organ was completed in eighteen sixty-seven. It then contained seven hundred pipes. It has since been rebuilt several times. Only twelve of the original pipes remain in use in the back. Only eight of the front pipes play. Leland was released from Church service due to ill health in nineteen fifty-five. After his recovery he returned to the photography business operating under the name of Lee Van Photo in Salt Lake City. He still keeps an active interest in what goes on at the Tabernacle and does a good deal of photo work for the Church. Before entering into the photo business again he was asked to come to Illinois and assist in installing two organs for the Lutheran Church in Decatur and Bloomington. He explained an interesting point to me. All small organs built to size specified by the position it will occupy. They are then put together, played, and tuned at the factory. All parts are numbered and then taken apart and shipped to the Church. They are then unpacked and placed in position on a numbered “foot board”. “How does our Tabernacle Organ compare with other large pipe organs in the world?”, I asked. He told me the largest organ in the world is in Convention Hall at Atlantic City, Florida. It has 44,000 pipes and considered to be the finest in tone quality. The Tabernacle Organ has 10,746 pipes at last count and is among the tops in tone quality. All organists throughout the world are able to know what each of the fine organs are capable of doing with the publication of a “stop list” in the well known organ publications. I feel that I gained much in the short time I spent with Leland. He is a thoroughly interesting person.

Life timeline of Leland Van Wagoner

Leland Van Wagoner was born on 7 Apr 1899
Leland Van Wagoner was 5 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
Leland Van Wagoner was 15 years old when Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife, Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, were assassinated by a Yugoslav nationalist named Gavrilo Princip in Sarajevo, sparking the outbreak of World War I. Archduke Franz Ferdinand, Archduke of Austria-Este was a member of the imperial Habsburg dynasty, and from 1896 until his death the heir presumptive (Thronfolger) to the Austro-Hungarian throne. His assassination in Sarajevo precipitated Austria-Hungary's declaration of war against Serbia, which in turn triggered a series of events that resulted in Austria-Hungary's allies and Serbia's declaring war on each other, starting World War I.
Leland Van Wagoner was 30 years old when Babe Ruth becomes the first baseball player to hit 500 home runs in his career with a home run at League Park in Cleveland, Ohio. George Herman "Babe" Ruth Jr. was an American professional baseball player whose career in Major League Baseball (MLB) spanned 22 seasons, from 1914 through 1935. Nicknamed "The Bambino" and "The Sultan of Swat", he began his MLB career as a stellar left-handed pitcher for the Boston Red Sox, but achieved his greatest fame as a slugging outfielder for the New York Yankees. Ruth established many MLB batting records, including career home runs (714), runs batted in (RBIs) (2,213), bases on balls (2,062), slugging percentage (.690), and on-base plus slugging (OPS) (1.164); the latter two still stand as of 2018. Ruth is regarded as one of the greatest sports heroes in American culture and is considered by many to be the greatest baseball player of all time. In 1936, Ruth was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame as one of its "first five" inaugural members.
Leland Van Wagoner was 40 years old when Adolf Hitler signs an order to begin the systematic euthanasia of mentally ill and disabled people. Adolf Hitler was a German politician, demagogue, and Pan-German revolutionary, who was the leader of the Nazi Party, Chancellor of Germany from 1933 to 1945 and Führer ("Leader") of Nazi Germany from 1934 to 1945. As dictator, Hitler initiated World War II in Europe with the invasion of Poland in September 1939, and was central to the Holocaust.
Leland Van Wagoner was 45 years old when World War II: The Allied invasion of Normandy—codenamed Operation Overlord—begins with the execution of Operation Neptune (commonly referred to as D-Day), the landing of 155,000 Allied troops on the beaches of Normandy in France. The Allied soldiers quickly break through the Atlantic Wall and push inland in the largest amphibious military operation in history. The Allies of World War II, called the United Nations from the 1 January 1942 declaration, were the countries that together opposed the Axis powers during the Second World War (1939–1945). The Allies promoted the alliance as a means to control German, Japanese and Italian aggression.
Leland Van Wagoner was 59 years old when Space Race: Launch of Sputnik 1, the first artificial satellite to orbit the Earth. The Space Race refers to the 20th-century competition between two Cold War rivals, the Soviet Union (USSR) and the United States (US), for dominance in spaceflight capability. It had its origins in the missile-based nuclear arms race between the two nations that occurred following World War II, aided by captured German missile technology and personnel from the Aggregat program. The technological superiority required for such dominance was seen as necessary for national security, and symbolic of ideological superiority. The Space Race spawned pioneering efforts to launch artificial satellites, uncrewed space probes of the Moon, Venus, and Mars, and human spaceflight in low Earth orbit and to the Moon.
Leland Van Wagoner died on 12 Aug 1969 at the age of 70
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Leland Van Wagoner (7 Apr 1899 - 12 Aug 1969), BillionGraves Record 12362 Provo, Utah, Utah, United States

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