Lawrence Carl Johnson

17 Jan 1899 - 26 Dec 1981

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Lawrence Carl Johnson

17 Jan 1899 - 26 Dec 1981
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Grave site information of Lawrence Carl Johnson (17 Jan 1899 - 26 Dec 1981) at Benjamin Cemetery in Benjamin, Utah, Utah, United States from BillionGraves
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Life Information

Lawrence Carl Johnson

Born:
Married: 24 Nov 1920
Died:

Benjamin Cemetery

8435 S 3200 W
Benjamin, Utah, Utah
United States

Epitaph

Married Nov. 24, 1920
Transcriber

Robbhaas

June 1, 2011
Photographer

chloejo

June 1, 2011

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LAWRENCE CARL JOHNSON 1899-1981

Contributor: Conyngham Created: 1 year ago Updated: 4 months ago

Written by his sister, Elsie J. Wortley Star marble player in the elementary school, bush league baseball player through the teen years, president of the Spanish Fork Irrigation Company, Counselor to Bishop Eugene Hansen in the Benjamin ward, successful farmer and cattle man, president of the Utah Farm Bureau, etc. etc...and best of all the beloved father of his five children. These reflect some of the accomplishments of Lawrence Carl Johnson, commonly nicknamed "Bish." At christening he was named Lorenzo, not Lawrence, after Lorenzo Snow, who was then President of the Church. Regardless of what one may be christened, the law permits one to choose his own name, even without court proceeding. The change undoubtedly had its origin in the fact that he was called Lawrence from the beginning, not Lorenzo. His mother called him "Lassie" all her life. Lawrence's father became bishop on the Benjamin Ward when Lawrence was a small boy, and somehow as he became a teenager, his friends began to call him "Bish." This stuck, and many knew him by no other name. Lawrence was born on January 17, 1899, in Benjamin, Utah, to John and Edla Lundell Johnson. This was three months before his father left for his mission to Sweden on April 21, 1899. Lawrence was then a sweet, cuddly baby, a joy to his mother and older brothers and sisters. He demanded attention and got it. Edward, his oldest brother, was often the nurse maid, as his mother had many other calls on her with the father gone. Although Lawrence eventually became a big man, yet he was rather small in his childhood. He was well but small and agile. His father said that as a boy, Lawrence always ran, seldom walked. Early in life he began showing athletic ability. When he was in the sixth grade, he was shooting marbles so well that he was unable to get any of his classmates to play with him. He won all their marbles. In the spring of the year before farming began, a group of town "bums" began playing marbles on the south side of the store just across from the school. Charlie Hickman became the champion of the group, and it was with him that Lawrence found himself pitted. The men stood around and praised Lawrence and laughed at Charlie, just the thing to goad Lawrence on to his very best. This was done after school and Lawrence had chores to do at home. He was instructed to come home promptly after school or else. As badly as he hated the or-else, the temptation to take all the marbles from Charlie was so great that night after night he came home, with bulging pockets ready for any punishment from his dad, who by this time would have pretty well done Lawrence's chores. Lawrence's scholastic attainments were not spectacular--not because he did not have the ability, but more because his interests ran along other lines than books. It was also because his teacher in the upper grades made no attempt to empathize with the students. Consequently to them he was just a taskmaster and was thoroughly disliked. Lawrence with his independent nature, ignored Mr. Wooten's assignments with an attitude of "I couldn't care less." However, in the spring of 1914, Lawrence graduated from the eighth grade; he then attended the Brigham Young High School in Provo in 1915-1916. During these years Lawrence was busy on the farm as all farm boys of his day were. He learned from his father the cultivation of crops. The beets, and his father always had many acres, had to be thinned, weeded, and topped by hand. The grain and the hay did not require as much hand labor, but what with irrigating and harvesting, there were no idle hours around the Johnson farm. All the children helped as needed. Occasionally Lawrence was able to hire himself out to some farmer and thus picked up a little cash for himself. In reminiscence Lawrence referred to two things in his teenage years that gave him much pleasure: "My pony named Bally, and a new pair of Club skates I received every Christmas. Bally and I went many places together. He was sure footed and a pleasure to ride." Other members of the family remembered well this pony that was such a part of Lawrence's life. Only on rare occasions did anyone else ride him. Once Elsie rode him to the store to get some kerosene for the lamps. The potato plug in the spout of the can did not function properly and kerosene leaked out on the side of Bally. This made the hair fall out and the bare spot on the side of Bally did not enhance his beauty. He was a small yellowish brown horse with a white face. The older children in the family still retained the image of Lawrence on his pony running at break-neck speed. The skates were a delight to Lawrence because a slough ran nearly his home. In the winter the water froze and skating was good. Being athletic, he excelled in this sport and spent many hours on his skates. To skate out to Utah Lake and back was a delight. When the United States became involved in World War I, Lawrence was just the age to become fired with the desire to join the army; this he did in June of 1918. He received his basic training at Fort Collins, Colorado. His company was then sent to Camp Humphries, Virginia, where they built a training camp for soldiers coming in. He referred to the work there as being very hard. Then in Greenville, South Carolina, he got his final training for overseas duty. He was all set to go with full pack and C-rations, when he was pulled out of his company and sent to Washington, D.C. There he was assigned to special duty in the Security Service. He was issued a pass and a pistol, receiving instructions from day to day by the assigned officer. He was serving here when the Armistice was signed, and remained here until April when he was sent to Fort D. A. Russell in Wyoming and discharged. The buddies he left in South Carolina went overseas and did duty in France and Germany. He returned to Benjamin in time to participate in the Victory Bond Drive which his father as Bishop of the Benjamin Ward was heading. Lawrence distinguished himself in soliciting the town in this final drive for which he received a medal and a citation from Washington D.C. Seeking employment shortly after he came home, he went to Carbon County and worked a few weeks in the coal mines. Then he went to Midvale, where in a short time he became Pit Foreman in the smelter. But the depression was moving in. Money became scarce, and finally there was no work for Lawrence in Midvale. In the meantime Lawrence had met Lottie Jenkins, a slender, dark-eyed, vivacious girl who worked in a confectionary. They were married by Brigham S. Young in the Salt Lake County Courthouse on November 24, 1920. Their marriage was solemnized in the Salt Lake Temple on August 14, 1924. They set up housekeeping in an apartment on First Avenue, and then moved to Wasatch Street, where Lucille was born on September 11, 1921. After a rough winter with little or no work in sight, Lawrence left Midvale in June of 1922 for Clarkdale, Arizona. Aunt Augusta and Uncle Gus Larson had been living in Clarkdale for some time and were established there. The Clarkdale baseball team was scouting for players, and the Larsons encouraged Lawrence and Dewey Canning to go down to Clarkdale with them. (Aunt Augusta and Leonel had been visiting in Utah, and the boys rode back with them.) While Lawrence had gone primarily to play baseball, when he got there, there was a need for crane operators. He realized that this would be a more practical job, so he never played baseball but broke in on the crane. By September he was able to send for Lottie and Lucille, and together they began to move ahead financially. Lawrence paid high tribute to Lottie: "She was a good homemaker and it was her good management that put us on our feet." On October 3, 1923, Thorval made his appearance in the home, and Lawrence felt the need of getting ahead faster. To do so he and a fellow worker, David Yank, started a firewood business. They bought a one-ton truck and a stationary saw to begin, then another truck. This was a successful project and it continued for six years, until Lawrence and Lottie moved back to Benjamin, Utah. While in Arizona, Lawrence and Lottie were paying for twenty-five acres of land in Benjamin, which his father farmed. But his father's health began to fail and he needed help. At this time Lottie was suffering badly from hay fever and was advised by her doctor to get out of Clarkdale. Therefore in the summer of 1928, Lawrence took his family to Benjamin and relieved his father of the heavy farm work. Things looked good for a time. Then came the crash of 1929. Stocks tumbled and farm land and crops went to a new low. In the fall after the crops were harvested, Lawrence went to Tooele, Utah, and worked in the smelter. This is reminiscent of his father's experience when he first went to Benjamin to establish himself. It was during the Cleveland Depression, and John Johnson left his family in the fall to work in the Murray smelter. In the spring when Lawrence returned to Benjamin, he bought the Mace place where he lived with his family until 1933. At this time he bought his father's farm and moved into the old home again. (He had lived there in part of the house when they first came from Arizona.) When Sammy returned from his mission in December of 1928, he and Lawrence set up the operation for a dairy. They started with thirty cows and in normal conditions would have succeeded, but the bottom fell out of the butter market soon after they started. With other reverses during the Depression, it was obvious that the business would not support two families. Sammy and Ethel moved to California, and Lawrence continued the dairy business for a short time, but gradually moved out of it entirely and began feeding cattle. In this he was very successful. He demonstrated insight into modern farming methods and farm management. Modern machinery replaced the horsepower. His farm was instrument leveled so that irrigation lost its drudgery. Instead of raising sugar beets, he turned to hay, grain, and corn; feeding all to his cattle. His grain-fed cattle brought high prices because it was quality meat. He became known in Utah County for his know-how in farming. His organizing ability and understanding of marketing placed him in the top position of the Utah County Farm Bureau. Shortly after he took over the Johnson farm, he was made director of the Spanish Fork South Irrigation Company, and later he was made president of the Benjamin Drainage District. In regards to this Lawrence said, "This made my job two-fold. In the summer months I had to see that our water supply was sufficient to mature the crops. In the winter months my concern was to make sure our drains were working properly to carry away the water from the subsoil so it would not deposit its minerals in the farm land. By so doing much of the farm land was redeemed and began producing good crops again." His leadership was also demonstrated in connection with solving a water shortage problem. "We didn't have enough water for our crops and the distribution system was hard to maintain. The water waste was high. A water engineer was hired to make a study of our system. His report after studying and compiling facts for a year indicated that we were losing 30% of our much needed water mostly through seepage. By cementing the ditches we could recover 27% of this loss. The report showed that a ten-second foot stream of water would seep away in ten miles. Now began a long and arduous task of stopping this seepage. Plans had to be made, farmers had to be convinced, and $24,000 had to be raised. This necessitated contacting loan agencies and getting legal advice. We had to incorporate into a company including 95% of the users. As not all farmers were sold on the idea, getting full cooperation in incorporation and getting easements was an effort. "In 1965 we were 95% done with putting in concrete ditches. The farmers were happy with the results and things were well over the hump. I had had a longer term of president of the company and felt strongly that I should step down. I resigned and Ronald Jensen was elected to succeed me." J. Edward said that when visiting Nathaniel Ludlow a year or so before he died, Nathaniel gave credit to Lawrence for having put through the cement ditch project. Lawrence had developed the ability to handle men well on a project. Men understood readily his instructions and directions and carry them out as clockwork, whether in military or in civilian life. He could start out at the bottom and in no time at all be operating the crane or the donkey locomotive. His savvy in this regard was not acquired out of books. It was natural intelligence. On a job his personality inspired confidence and respect on the part of the men--both those over him and under him. From 1947 to 1953 Lawrence served in the Benjamin Ward Bishopric. He was second counselor to Eugene Hansen until O. R. Stewart moved to Salt Lake, and then he became first counselor. Both he and Lottie were active in American Legion activities. Their family grew to five children. Howard was born November 16, 1930; William (Bill) on March 7, 1937, and Dorothy on January 11, 1939. In 1965 Lawrence retired from farming. He first leased his farm and then sold it to his son Bill. But he was far from idle. As director of the Strawberry Water Users Association, in which position he served twenty years, he began devoting his time to the needs of developing recreational facilities of the Strawberry Valley. The population of this area had grown to great numbers each summer and there was need for planning and management. For this Lawrence was well fitted and was made chairman of all recreation in Strawberry Valley. He immediately set about to get culinary water systems, so badly needed. Camp and cabin sites were established. Boat ramps and launching areas were provided, and road construction inaugurated. Lawrence found the duties at Strawberry a full time job. The operation under his supervision was successful financially as well as recreationally. Since he was a member of the Finance Committee of the association, he was in a position to watch the financial workings and see where he stood at all times. Lottie was a real partner to Lawrence in his work. She managed a good home. The last few summers of her life she went to Strawberry with him and participated in his activities. But her health began to fail causing much concern on Lawrence's part. He knew her heart was bad, and he watched her closely, never leaving her alone for long periods. Even when he was feeding cattle in the winter time, he went into the house periodically to check on her. The last months of her life, he was with her constantly. But her condition worsened and on April 6, 1968, she died in her home in Benjamin. Her last illness came suddenly and by the time the doctor could reach her, she was too far gone to take to the hospital. After some months of loneliness, Lawrence met an old acquaintance of his and Lottie's, Charlotte Merriott. She was a widow living in Springville. Lawrence and Lottie had met her and her husband about twenty years before in some American Legion activities. Their friendship grew and on May 1, 1969, they were married. They made a trip to California after their marriage, stopping to see relatives in various places. In Berkeley, Edward asked Lawrence if he was passing in the inspection by Charlotte's relatives. Charlotte did not give him a chance to answer. She clasped his arm with enthusiasm, and said, "You bet he is passing inspection." Edward said he loved Charlotte from that moment. Charlotte, like Lottie, enjoyed Strawberry and supported Lawrence in his activities there until 1978, when he suffered a heart attack. He could no longer take on the physical activities connected with the Strawberry assignment, but he did not slip into inactivity. He was a charter member of the American Legion of Salt Lake Post 2, and had kept up his activities in it through the years. But when the World War I Veterans organized, he shifted his attention to that organization. He accepted one responsibility after another until he became Commander of the State of Utah in 1980. In this capacity he travelled to all the Barracks in Utah as well as to two national groups. There are no ranks among them; the sole purpose is to assist one another and foster brotherhood. The average age at this time was 86. Ending his activities that year was a trip to the National Convention in Hot Springs, Arkansas. It was a trip that he and Charlotte enjoyed very much. Lawrence lived a very productive life. His challenges were many, including the early deaths of two fine sons and that of his beloved Lottie. But he maintained a healthy attitude toward life. He struggled with cancer for a few years, and it finally took him on December 26, 1981, at the age of 82.

LAWRENCE CARL JOHNSON 1899-1981

Contributor: Robbhaas Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Written by his sister, Elsie J. Wortley Star marble player in the elementary school, bush league baseball player through the teen years, president of the Spanish Fork Irrigation Company, Counselor to Bishop Eugene Hansen in the Benjamin ward, successful farmer and cattle man, president of the Utah Farm Bureau, etc. etc...and best of all the beloved father of his five children. These reflect some of the accomplishments of Lawrence Carl Johnson, commonly nicknamed "Bish." At christening he was named Lorenzo, not Lawrence, after Lorenzo Snow, who was then President of the Church. Regardless of what one may be christened, the law permits one to choose his own name, even without court proceeding. The change undoubtedly had its origin in the fact that he was called Lawrence from the beginning, not Lorenzo. His mother called him "Lassie" all her life. Lawrence's father became bishop on the Benjamin Ward when Lawrence was a small boy, and somehow as he became a teenager, his friends began to call him "Bish." This stuck, and many knew him by no other name. Lawrence was born on January 17, 1899, in Benjamin, Utah, to John and Edla Lundell Johnson. This was three months before his father left for his mission to Sweden on April 21, 1899. Lawrence was then a sweet, cuddly baby, a joy to his mother and older brothers and sisters. He demanded attention and got it. Edward, his oldest brother, was often the nurse maid, as his mother had many other calls on her with the father gone. Although Lawrence eventually became a big man, yet he was rather small in his childhood. He was well but small and agile. His father said that as a boy, Lawrence always ran, seldom walked. Early in life he began showing athletic ability. When he was in the sixth grade, he was shooting marbles so well that he was unable to get any of his classmates to play with him. He won all their marbles. In the spring of the year before farming began, a group of town "bums" began playing marbles on the south side of the store just across from the school. Charlie Hickman became the champion of the group, and it was with him that Lawrence found himself pitted. The men stood around and praised Lawrence and laughed at Charlie, just the thing to goad Lawrence on to his very best. This was done after school and Lawrence had chores to do at home. He was instructed to come home promptly after school or else. As badly as he hated the or-else, the temptation to take all the marbles from Charlie was so great that night after night he came home, with bulging pockets ready for any punishment from his dad, who by this time would have pretty well done Lawrence's chores. Lawrence's scholastic attainments were not spectacular--not because he did not have the ability, but more because his interests ran along other lines than books. It was also because his teacher in the upper grades made no attempt to empathize with the students. Consequently to them he was just a taskmaster and was thoroughly disliked. Lawrence with his independent nature, ignored Mr. Wooten's assignments with an attitude of "I couldn't care less." However, in the spring of 1914, Lawrence graduated from the eighth grade; he then attended the Brigham Young High School in Provo in 1915-1916. During these years Lawrence was busy on the farm as all farm boys of his day were. He learned from his father the cultivation of crops. The beets, and his father always had many acres, had to be thinned, weeded, and topped by hand. The grain and the hay did not require as much hand labor, but what with irrigating and harvesting, there were no idle hours around the Johnson farm. All the children helped as needed. Occasionally Lawrence was able to hire himself out to some farmer and thus picked up a little cash for himself. In reminiscence Lawrence referred to two things in his teenage years that gave him much pleasure: "My pony named Bally, and a new pair of Club skates I received every Christmas. Bally and I went many places together. He was sure footed and a pleasure to ride." Other members of the family remembered well this pony that was such a part of Lawrence's life. Only on rare occasions did anyone else ride him. Once Elsie rode him to the store to get some kerosene for the lamps. The potato plug in the spout of the can did not function properly and kerosene leaked out on the side of Bally. This made the hair fall out and the bare spot on the side of Bally did not enhance his beauty. He was a small yellowish brown horse with a white face. The older children in the family still retained the image of Lawrence on his pony running at break-neck speed. The skates were a delight to Lawrence because a slough ran nearly his home. In the winter the water froze and skating was good. Being athletic, he excelled in this sport and spent many hours on his skates. To skate out to Utah Lake and back was a delight. When the United States became involved in World War I, Lawrence was just the age to become fired with the desire to join the army; this he did in June of 1918. He received his basic training at Fort Collins, Colorado. His company was then sent to Camp Humphries, Virginia, where they built a training camp for soldiers coming in. He referred to the work there as being very hard. Then in Greenville, South Carolina, he got his final training for overseas duty. He was all set to go with full pack and C-rations, when he was pulled out of his company and sent to Washington, D.C. There he was assigned to special duty in the Security Service. He was issued a pass and a pistol, receiving instructions from day to day by the assigned officer. He was serving here when the Armistice was signed, and remained here until April when he was sent to Fort D. A. Russell in Wyoming and discharged. The buddies he left in South Carolina went overseas and did duty in France and Germany. He returned to Benjamin in time to participate in the Victory Bond Drive which his father as Bishop of the Benjamin Ward was heading. Lawrence distinguished himself in soliciting the town in this final drive for which he received a medal and a citation from Washington D.C. Seeking employment shortly after he came home, he went to Carbon County and worked a few weeks in the coal mines. Then he went to Midvale, where in a short time he became Pit Foreman in the smelter. But the depression was moving in. Money became scarce, and finally there was no work for Lawrence in Midvale. In the meantime Lawrence had met Lottie Jenkins, a slender, dark-eyed, vivacious girl who worked in a confectionary. They were married by Brigham S. Young in the Salt Lake County Courthouse on November 24, 1920. Their marriage was solemnized in the Salt Lake Temple on August 14, 1924. They set up housekeeping in an apartment on First Avenue, and then moved to Wasatch Street, where Lucille was born on September 11, 1921. After a rough winter with little or no work in sight, Lawrence left Midvale in June of 1922 for Clarkdale, Arizona. Aunt Augusta and Uncle Gus Larson had been living in Clarkdale for some time and were established there. The Clarkdale baseball team was scouting for players, and the Larsons encouraged Lawrence and Dewey Canning to go down to Clarkdale with them. (Aunt Augusta and Leonel had been visiting in Utah, and the boys rode back with them.) While Lawrence had gone primarily to play baseball, when he got there, there was a need for crane operators. He realized that this would be a more practical job, so he never played baseball but broke in on the crane. By September he was able to send for Lottie and Lucille, and together they began to move ahead financially. Lawrence paid high tribute to Lottie: "She was a good homemaker and it was her good management that put us on our feet." On October 3, 1923, Thorval made his appearance in the home, and Lawrence felt the need of getting ahead faster. To do so he and a fellow worker, David Yank, started a firewood business. They bought a one-ton truck and a stationary saw to begin, then another truck. This was a successful project and it continued for six years, until Lawrence and Lottie moved back to Benjamin, Utah. While in Arizona, Lawrence and Lottie were paying for twenty-five acres of land in Benjamin, which his father farmed. But his father's health began to fail and he needed help. At this time Lottie was suffering badly from hay fever and was advised by her doctor to get out of Clarkdale. Therefore in the summer of 1928, Lawrence took his family to Benjamin and relieved his father of the heavy farm work. Things looked good for a time. Then came the crash of 1929. Stocks tumbled and farm land and crops went to a new low. In the fall after the crops were harvested, Lawrence went to Tooele, Utah, and worked in the smelter. This is reminiscent of his father's experience when he first went to Benjamin to establish himself. It was during the Cleveland Depression, and John Johnson left his family in the fall to work in the Murray smelter. In the spring when Lawrence returned to Benjamin, he bought the Mace place where he lived with his family until 1933. At this time he bought his father's farm and moved into the old home again. (He had lived there in part of the house when they first came from Arizona.) When Sammy returned from his mission in December of 1928, he and Lawrence set up the operation for a dairy. They started with thirty cows and in normal conditions would have succeeded, but the bottom fell out of the butter market soon after they started. With other reverses during the Depression, it was obvious that the business would not support two families. Sammy and Ethel moved to California, and Lawrence continued the dairy business for a short time, but gradually moved out of it entirely and began feeding cattle. In this he was very successful. He demonstrated insight into modern farming methods and farm management. Modern machinery replaced the horsepower. His farm was instrument leveled so that irrigation lost its drudgery. Instead of raising sugar beets, he turned to hay, grain, and corn; feeding all to his cattle. His grain-fed cattle brought high prices because it was quality meat. He became known in Utah County for his know-how in farming. His organizing ability and understanding of marketing placed him in the top position of the Utah County Farm Bureau. Shortly after he took over the Johnson farm, he was made director of the Spanish Fork South Irrigation Company, and later he was made president of the Benjamin Drainage District. In regards to this Lawrence said, "This made my job two-fold. In the summer months I had to see that our water supply was sufficient to mature the crops. In the winter months my concern was to make sure our drains were working properly to carry away the water from the subsoil so it would not deposit its minerals in the farm land. By so doing much of the farm land was redeemed and began producing good crops again." His leadership was also demonstrated in connection with solving a water shortage problem. "We didn't have enough water for our crops and the distribution system was hard to maintain. The water waste was high. A water engineer was hired to make a study of our system. His report after studying and compiling facts for a year indicated that we were losing 30% of our much needed water mostly through seepage. By cementing the ditches we could recover 27% of this loss. The report showed that a ten-second foot stream of water would seep away in ten miles. Now began a long and arduous task of stopping this seepage. Plans had to be made, farmers had to be convinced, and $24,000 had to be raised. This necessitated contacting loan agencies and getting legal advice. We had to incorporate into a company including 95% of the users. As not all farmers were sold on the idea, getting full cooperation in incorporation and getting easements was an effort. "In 1965 we were 95% done with putting in concrete ditches. The farmers were happy with the results and things were well over the hump. I had had a longer term of president of the company and felt strongly that I should step down. I resigned and Ronald Jensen was elected to succeed me." J. Edward said that when visiting Nathaniel Ludlow a year or so before he died, Nathaniel gave credit to Lawrence for having put through the cement ditch project. Lawrence had developed the ability to handle men well on a project. Men understood readily his instructions and directions and carry them out as clockwork, whether in military or in civilian life. He could start out at the bottom and in no time at all be operating the crane or the donkey locomotive. His savvy in this regard was not acquired out of books. It was natural intelligence. On a job his personality inspired confidence and respect on the part of the men--both those over him and under him. From 1947 to 1953 Lawrence served in the Benjamin Ward Bishopric. He was second counselor to Eugene Hansen until O. R. Stewart moved to Salt Lake, and then he became first counselor. Both he and Lottie were active in American Legion activities. Their family grew to five children. Howard was born November 16, 1930; William (Bill) on March 7, 1937, and Dorothy on January 11, 1939. In 1965 Lawrence retired from farming. He first leased his farm and then sold it to his son Bill. But he was far from idle. As director of the Strawberry Water Users Association, in which position he served twenty years, he began devoting his time to the needs of developing recreational facilities of the Strawberry Valley. The population of this area had grown to great numbers each summer and there was need for planning and management. For this Lawrence was well fitted and was made chairman of all recreation in Strawberry Valley. He immediately set about to get culinary water systems, so badly needed. Camp and cabin sites were established. Boat ramps and launching areas were provided, and road construction inaugurated. Lawrence found the duties at Strawberry a full time job. The operation under his supervision was successful financially as well as recreationally. Since he was a member of the Finance Committee of the association, he was in a position to watch the financial workings and see where he stood at all times. Lottie was a real partner to Lawrence in his work. She managed a good home. The last few summers of her life she went to Strawberry with him and participated in his activities. But her health began to fail causing much concern on Lawrence's part. He knew her heart was bad, and he watched her closely, never leaving her alone for long periods. Even when he was feeding cattle in the winter time, he went into the house periodically to check on her. The last months of her life, he was with her constantly. But her condition worsened and on April 6, 1968, she died in her home in Benjamin. Her last illness came suddenly and by the time the doctor could reach her, she was too far gone to take to the hospital. After some months of loneliness, Lawrence met an old acquaintance of his and Lottie's, Charlotte Merriott. She was a widow living in Springville. Lawrence and Lottie had met her and her husband about twenty years before in some American Legion activities. Their friendship grew and on May 1, 1969, they were married. They made a trip to California after their marriage, stopping to see relatives in various places. In Berkeley, Edward asked Lawrence if he was passing in the inspection by Charlotte's relatives. Charlotte did not give him a chance to answer. She clasped his arm with enthusiasm, and said, "You bet he is passing inspection." Edward said he loved Charlotte from that moment. Charlotte, like Lottie, enjoyed Strawberry and supported Lawrence in his activities there until 1978, when he suffered a heart attack. He could no longer take on the physical activities connected with the Strawberry assignment, but he did not slip into inactivity. He was a charter member of the American Legion of Salt Lake Post 2, and had kept up his activities in it through the years. But when the World War I Veterans organized, he shifted his attention to that organization. He accepted one responsibility after another until he became Commander of the State of Utah in 1980. In this capacity he travelled to all the Barracks in Utah as well as to two national groups. There are no ranks among them; the sole purpose is to assist one another and foster brotherhood. The average age at this time was 86. Ending his activities that year was a trip to the National Convention in Hot Springs, Arkansas. It was a trip that he and Charlotte enjoyed very much. Lawrence lived a very productive life. His challenges were many, including the early deaths of two fine sons and that of his beloved Lottie. But he maintained a healthy attitude toward life. He struggled with cancer for a few years, and it finally took him on December 26, 1981, at the age of 82.

Life timeline of Lawrence Carl Johnson

1899
Lawrence Carl Johnson was born on 17 Jan 1899
Lawrence Carl Johnson was 7 years old when Albert Einstein publishes his first paper on the special theory of relativity. Albert Einstein was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics. His work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. He is best known to the general public for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2, which has been dubbed "the world's most famous equation". He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect", a pivotal step in the development of quantum theory.
Lawrence Carl Johnson was 13 years old when The British passenger liner RMS Titanic sinks in the North Atlantic at 2:20 a.m., two hours and forty minutes after hitting an iceberg. Only 710 of 2,227 passengers and crew on board survive. RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early hours of 15 April 1912, after colliding with an iceberg during its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City. There were an estimated 2,224 passengers and crew aboard, and more than 1,500 died, making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history. RMS Titanic was the largest ship afloat at the time it entered service and was the second of three Olympic-class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line. It was built by the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast. Thomas Andrews, her architect, died in the disaster.
Lawrence Carl Johnson was 29 years old when Walt Disney character Mickey Mouse premieres in his first cartoon, "Plane Crazy". Walter Elias Disney was an American entrepreneur, animator, voice actor and film producer. A pioneer of the American animation industry, he introduced several developments in the production of cartoons. As a film producer, Disney holds the record for most Academy Awards earned by an individual, having won 22 Oscars from 59 nominations. He was presented with two Golden Globe Special Achievement Awards and an Emmy Award, among other honors. Several of his films are included in the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress.
Lawrence Carl Johnson was 32 years old when Great Depression: In a State of the Union message, U.S. President Herbert Hoover proposes a $150 million (equivalent to $2,197,000,000 in 2017) public works program to help generate jobs and stimulate the economy. The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s. It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century. In the 21st century, the Great Depression is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline.
Lawrence Carl Johnson was 42 years old when World War II: Nazi Germany invades the Soviet Union in Operation Barbarossa. Nazi Germany is the common English name for Germany between 1933 and 1945, when Adolf Hitler and his Nazi Party (NSDAP) controlled the country through a dictatorship. Under Hitler's rule, Germany was transformed into a totalitarian state that controlled nearly all aspects of life via the Gleichschaltung legal process. The official name of the state was Deutsches Reich until 1943 and Großdeutsches Reich from 1943 to 1945. Nazi Germany is also known as the Third Reich, from German Drittes Reich, meaning "Third Realm" or "Third Empire", the first two being the Holy Roman Empire and the German Empire. The Nazi regime ended after the Allied Powers defeated Germany in May 1945, ending World War II in Europe.
Lawrence Carl Johnson was 59 years old when Space Race: Launch of Sputnik 1, the first artificial satellite to orbit the Earth. The Space Race refers to the 20th-century competition between two Cold War rivals, the Soviet Union (USSR) and the United States (US), for dominance in spaceflight capability. It had its origins in the missile-based nuclear arms race between the two nations that occurred following World War II, aided by captured German missile technology and personnel from the Aggregat program. The technological superiority required for such dominance was seen as necessary for national security, and symbolic of ideological superiority. The Space Race spawned pioneering efforts to launch artificial satellites, uncrewed space probes of the Moon, Venus, and Mars, and human spaceflight in low Earth orbit and to the Moon.
Lawrence Carl Johnson was 66 years old when Thirty-five hundred United States Marines are the first American land combat forces committed during the Vietnam War. The United States Marine Corps (USMC), also referred to as the United States Marines, is a branch of the United States Armed Forces responsible for conducting amphibious operations with the United States Navy. The U.S. Marine Corps is one of the four armed service branches in the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and one of the seven uniformed services of the United States.
Lawrence Carl Johnson was 74 years old when Vietnam War: The last United States combat soldiers leave South Vietnam. The Vietnam War, also known as the Second Indochina War, and in Vietnam as the Resistance War Against America or simply the American War, was a conflict that occurred in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia from 1 November 1955 to the fall of Saigon on 30 April 1975. It was the second of the Indochina Wars and was officially fought between North Vietnam and the government of South Vietnam. The North Vietnamese army was supported by the Soviet Union, China, and other communist allies; the South Vietnamese army was supported by the United States, South Korea, Australia, Thailand and other anti-communist allies. The war is considered a Cold War-era proxy war by some US perspectives. The majority of Americans believe the war was unjustified. The war would last roughly 19 years and would also form the Laotian Civil War as well as the Cambodian Civil War, which also saw all three countries become communist states in 1975.
Lawrence Carl Johnson died on 26 Dec 1981 at the age of 82
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Lawrence Carl Johnson (17 Jan 1899 - 26 Dec 1981), BillionGraves Record 7200 Benjamin, Utah, Utah, United States

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