Joshua Adams

29 Dec 1848 - 15 Apr 1935

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Joshua Adams

29 Dec 1848 - 15 Apr 1935
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Joshua Adams was born 30 December 1848 at Mount Pisgah, Iowa, the twelfth child of Elias Adams and Malinda Railey Adams. His father was the presiding Elder at Mount Pisgah. The family arrived in Utah in 1850 before he was two years old. They moved to Layton, Utah where they built their home of red p

Life Information

Joshua Adams

Born:
Died:

Kaysville City Cemetery

501-699 E Crestwood Rd
Kaysville, Davis, Utah
United States
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Maxmo11

April 10, 2013
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starfam

April 10, 2013

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History of Joshua Adams By Veta Winget (Granddaughter)

Contributor: Maxmo11 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Joshua Adams was born 30 December 1848 at Mount Pisgah, Iowa, the twelfth child of Elias Adams and Malinda Railey Adams. His father was the presiding Elder at Mount Pisgah. The family arrived in Utah in 1850 before he was two years old. They moved to Layton, Utah where they built their home of red pine logs. It consisted of one log room 16 x 18 feet and had a dirt roof and a dirt floor and a fireplace in one end of the room. The furniture was home made and the door swung on wooden hinges. A piece of greased fabric was hung in the windows since no glass was available. Their food was cooked in kettles over the fireplace. The family sat around the room on winter evenings and the scene was one of happiness and contentment. He grew up under the influence of a kind and wise father and mother in the vicinity of that pioneer home. He assisted his father with the construction of the first reservoir to be erected in the Territory of Utah. This reservoir stored water for irrigation purposes. When Johnson’s Army invaded Utah in 1858, he drove his father’s oxen in their move south. Two years later he was able to see this same Army leave Utah to return east and participate in the Civil War. In 1862 he saw General Conner and his soldiers from Fort Douglas march north in the dead of winter and attack the Indian stronghold located northwest of Franklin Idaho who were under Chief Pocatello. Sixteen soldiers and 368 Indians were killed in the battle. Some of the wounded soldiers stayed overnight at the home of his father, Elias Adams, on their return to the Fort after the battle. He did contract work for the Union Pacific Railroad through Weber Canyon with oxen and wagons from Corrine, Utah to Phillysburg, Montana, a distance of 500 miles. His work brought him in contact with numerous hard characters and the ‘Bullwhackers of 69’ but he did not indulge in the use of tobacco or liquor and even refrained from swearing. While freighting down the Deer Lodge River in Montana, they could not make more than five miles a day because the wagon wheels frequently lodged in the deep frozen ruts. On 29 December 1873 he married Sarah Criddle and they had ten children. He later married Emma Gilbert and by this marriage four children were born. He was the first to construct a bridge across the Bear River at Riverdale, Idaho, the total length of the bridge being 200 feet. Before the bridge was constructed, 25 men worked feverishly for two days to get a cable across the river to be used in ferrying the boat back and forth to carry mail and passengers. However, the swift current of the water defeated their efforts. He devised another plan and with the assistance of his brothers Elias and Hyrum, who happened to be present, the cable was put across the river and anchored at either end and was ready for use within less than half a day. He was the largest contractor of the Oneida Idaho Canal and was president of the company for a number of years. At one time he owned 800 acres of farmland and made real estate transactions that involved $500,000. He operated one of the first sawmills in Cub River Canyon. He also ran a butcher shop in Franklin, Idaho and a drug store in Preston, Idaho at one time. He served as president of the Mutual Improvement Association in Fairview, Idaho. One of his daughters stated, “I can never remember a time when we were at home that we did not start and end the day with family prayer.” Joshua seemed to enjoy doing things that other men dare not attempt; the more difficult the task the more he loved the doing. His wife Sarah died 6 March 1930 in Layton, Utah. He later married a widow, Augusta Nelson, on 2 July 1931 in Farmington, Utah. They spent four happy years together. He contracted pneumonia and was ill for three days, but he wouldn’t consent to be dressed and undressed but died on 15 April 1935 with his clothes on. The following is a clipping from the Salt Lake Telegram, Tuesday evening February 20, 1934: FARMINGTON MAN RECALLS FIRST HANGING, INDIAN SURPIRSE: OTHER UTAH EVENTS. Joshua Adams, 86, married last time at 83, is happy. By Bill McDougall Farmington—Joshua Adams, 86 of Farmington, remembers the first man to be legally hanged in Utah Territory, and the two principals in the tragedy ate dinner with Mr. Adams parents just before the final fight. Mr. Adams was camped with his family near what is now the temple grounds in Salt Lake City, Utah when Johnson’s Army reached the state in 1856. As a youth he gathered buffalo bones about where Becks’ Hot Springs is now located. Mr. Adams fled with the family when Indians rushed his parents’ home near Kaysville. He played in the dirt while his father was building the first reservoir in Utah at Pond Hollow, northeast of Kaysville in 1850. Mr. Adams has a good memory, for he was still a child when some of these things happened. Born in Mount Pisgah, Iowa on 30 December 1848, the son of Elias and Melinda Railey Adams, his family crossed the plains to Utah and arrived in 1850. MORNING ATTACK: “It was early in the morning,” he recalls of the Indian attack. “Mother looked out the window to see a band of 50 Indian braves on horseback circling the widow Wheeler’s home about a mile from our place. Widow Wheeler was framed in the doorway with a musket at her shoulder. My brothers, George and Joe, had just harnessed a team of mares to our wagon to haul some hay. Mother picked me up, threw me in the wagon and climbed in after my brother. We started down the road towards Driggs’ house three miles away. George turned the reins over to Joe and jumped from the wagon to run back and face the Indians with father. When mother was scared, you could hear her screams about as far as you could a train whistle, and she was sure hollering. We stopped to pick up the Driggs family and another family a little beyond their house. They heard mother long before we ever got there. A woman had just had a baby at the second house and the men couldn’t put her in the wagon so they picked up the bed and all and packed it back into some brush and hid her. Then they started back to help father. HORSES EXHAUSTED: By that time, though, the Indians had caught up with us. Our horses were steaming with sweat and just about done in. We couldn’t have gone much farther anyway. But the Indians were laughing and carrying on as though it was a good joke. They ran their horses around us in a circle for a while, then the leader came up, pointing to my mother, laughed and said: ‘White squaw heap scared. Sure can holler.’ My mother never forgave them for that joke.” Mr. Adams homesteaded what is now Fairview, Idaho in 1874 and named it at a settler’s meeting one night. He helped develop Preston, Idaho, built the first bridge across the Bear River in 1899, and was the largest contractor on the construction of the Oneida, Idaho canal, a million and a half dollar job. He was President of the Oneida Irrigation District for four years and a director for six years. “I spent 45 years ranching in Idaho, he smiled, but I always wanted to get back home to Utah. I had 37 different homes, each one a little closer to Kaysville. I’d just keep trading what I had for land nearer home.” CONVICTED OF MURDER: “That Irishman was quite a fellow. Everyone liked him. He gave himself up immediately and was taken to Salt Lake for trial and was convicted of murder. A scaffold was erected, I remember. Utah wasn’t a state then and had no penitentiary. The Irishman had a lot of friends. There was a great crowd to see the execution. The Marshal himself hated to go through with the job. Some friends led a fine big horse, fully saddled, up to the scaffold and told the Irishman that if he wanted to jump on the horse and run, not a shot would be fired. But he shook his head. The Marshal offered $25 to anyone in the crowd who would spring the trap. After a long pause, a man came forward, took the money, and the Irishman plunged into eternity, the first man legally hanged in Utah.” YOUTHFUL HORSE TRAINER: Mr. Adams used to break horses in his youth. “Horses and I got along pretty well together. One time in 1876 at Promontory Point, Utah I bought two wild horses and couldn’t figure out how to get them back home, so I decided I’d break one of them right there. I managed to tie up one horse long enough to get a saddle on him. Then I tied the second horse to the first one’s tail and climbed on the leader. We had quite a time for a while, but the one I was riding couldn’t buck much because the hind horse pulled him down every time he went up in the air. They were pretty well broke by the time I got to Kaysville.” “Two men, packers working for Ben Simon, a partner of Jim Bridger, used to stop at our house on their trips South. I don’t remember their names or the exact year this happened. One was an Irishman and the other a New England Yankee who drank a lot. The Irishman was always afraid the Yank would kill him some day when he was drunk. They ate dinner one noon at our house, then started on. An hour later the Irishman killed the Yank in what he claimed was self defense. We all thought he told the truth, but he couldn’t prove it.” LIKES TO SLEEP: Asked what he liked to do best in his youth, he replied, “Sleep, and that still goes right now!” Mr. Adams married Sarah Criddle December 29, 1873. Ten children came of that marriage. In 1886 he was married a second time. Emma Gilbert was his second wife, and they had four children. After his second wife’s death, he grew lonely and just to prove that man never grows too old to fall in love, he married Augusta C. Nelson in the Farmington Utah Courthouse in July 1931, in is eighty-third year. The present Mrs. Adams is 86, one year younger than her husband. “And I’m mighty proud of my 14 children and 85 grandchildren,” Joshua Adams concluded.

Adams Family Reunion 1956

Contributor: Maxmo11 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Adams Family Reunion 1956 Contributed By JenniferDavis· 2013-07-22 19:26:58 GMT+0000 (UTC) · 0 Comments Sunday, August 5, 1956 Lagoon Beach Terrace QUESTION: Who were the first pioneers in Layton, Utah? ANSWER: Elias Adams and wife, with the following sons and daughters: Mary; Rufus; John; Anna; George; Catherine; Joseph; Elias, Jr.; Caroline and Joshua. They arrived in October 1850, coming from Illinois with two covered wagons, 8 oxen and two saddle horses, locating near the mountains, east of Layton City where they immediately built a pioneer log home 16 x l8 feet which contained a large fireplace. This first home was covered with a dirt roof. QUESTION: Who built the first reservoir in the West ? ANSWER: Elias Adams, being assisted by his sons. The dam was forty feet long by four feet high and was used to impound irrigation water. The dam was started in 1852. In succeeding years the reservoir has been enlarged and is now one of the major storage systems in northern Utah. Joseph Adams conceived the plan of building two parallel ***** and then by sluicing methods, filled the space between the ***** with sand and clay at a cost of leas than one cent per square yard of fill dirt. QUESTION: Where was the first schoolhouse in Layton? ANSWER: It was located three miles northeast from the City of Layton. The schoolhouse was made of pine logs. It was 12 x 16 feet la size with a thatched roof covered with clay. A stone fireplace occupied one end of the room; the benches were pine slabs with legs for supports. The floor was composed of mother earth. Mrs. Thomas King was the teacher who taught reading, writing, and arithmetic. She was paid with wheat, flour, corn or meat by the parents of children who attended this first school in 1860. QUESTION: Who drove turkeys 200 miles in 1858? ANSWER: With the approach of Johnson’s Army, which numbered 2500 heavily armed troops of infantry and artillery, the Elias Adams family, with the other Utah pioneers, moved south for self-protection. Hyrum and Malinda were small and rode in the covered wagon with their mother, while Joshua who was ten years old drove the oxen. Grandfather Elias herded the cows and young stock as the caravan moved along. Elias, Jr. and Joseph drove three sheep, which were placed in a community herd. Caroline, who was 13 years old, walked and drove eleven turkeys. When it was learned that the Army came in peace and not to make war the pioneers returned to their various homes after an absence of several months. Later in life Caroline became an efficient practical nurse in Southern Idaho where, without the aid of a doctor, she delivered hundreds of babies on lonely ranches from Preston to Soda Springs, Idaho. QUESTION: Who built the first brick house in Layton? ANSWER: It was a two-story residence and was built by Elias Adarns in 1870 about 2 1/4 miles east of the Layton business district. Elias Adams made his own red brick. He learned the process of manufacturing brick while living at Quincy, Illinois where he owned and operated a brickyard, together with a flour mill before joining the LDS Church in 1843. QUESTION: What is the name of your relative who died in 1852 and was buried in Layton before there was a cemetery? ANSWER: Mary Ann Adams, age 28, eldest child and daughter of Elias and Elmira Adams. She passed away in the pioneer home of her father and was laid to rest in a home-made casket at the foot of the mountain. QUESTION: Where is Mary Ann Adams Dow buried? ANSWER: Her body has never been removed from its original resting place, which is about 500 feet west of her father’s old home. Several attempts have been made during the past 50 years to locate the grave without success. The boulder and other landmarks have been removed with the march of time. QUESTION: Which of your relations brought the first California gold to Utah? ANSWER: Rufus and John Adams, ages 23 and 19, respectively, and oldest sons of Elias Adams removed from Layton, Utah, to Carson Valley, Nevada in 1851. They engaged in ranching and blacksmithing and returned to Utah in 1850 to visit their parents, bringing much California gold in the form of $20.00 gold pieces which they concealed in the end-gate of their wagon to avoid highway robbery. QU.ESTION: Who built the first wagon bridge across the Bear River in Cache Valley? ANSWER: It was built by Joshua Adams in 1899. The bridge had three piers besides the two abutments, all of which was made of pine logs and stone and designed for one-way traffic. The bridge was 200 feet long and crossed the Bear River near Riverdale, Idaho, where “Josh” owned and cultivated 500 acres of farm land and supervised a saw mill. He not only could tame wild horses to be his servants but trained a bear to do tricks and a pair of elk to pull a sleigh. Uncle Josh hauled freight from Utah to the Montana gold fields as a young man and received $150 for his summer’s pay while driving five yoke of oxen on two freight wagons a distance of 500 miles from Corinne, Utah to Miles City, Montana. QUESTION: Who moved south in 1858 upon the approach of Johnson’s Army with all their worldly possessions loaded on a two-wheeled wagon cart drawn by oxen? ANSWER: Catherlne and Richard Pilling. The coverlng of the cart consisted of two birch bows over which a sheet was drawn. The cart was pulled by one ox and a cow. Thirty years later they left for Alberta Canada, with six teams of horses and wagons where they engaged extensively in wheat and cattle ranching. QUESTION: Who was buried in a mountain snow slide in l875 and was dug out alive? ANSWER: Joseph Adams. He was hunting on the mountain in February, east of Layton wlth his brother, Hyrum, Elias and Richard Pilling, Jr. The hunters located a head of Rocky Mountain Sheep on the sunny side of the South Fork of Kays Creek Canyon. Hyrum shot a ram, which, though wounded, followed the other sheep through deep snow around the shady side of the canyon. The hunters below the sheep were caught in a snow slide. Elias saw the slide coming and buried himself in the snow; the slide passed over him without injury. Joseph, being above, did not have time to escape and was carried 1500 feet in the slide over rocks and brush. Hyrum, Richard and Elias located Joeeph by a spot of blood on the surface of the packed slide which had piled up in the bottom of the canyon. After much digging with their rlfles, Joseph was released from his tomb of ice. His clothes were in shreds from the brush, His companions shared their clothes and assisted him down the mountain to home and safety. QUESTION: Who accidentally drove a single horse and buggy two miles before a wheel fell off because the hired man forgot to put on the burr after a grease job? ANSWER: Hyrum and Annie Adams had this unusual experience before automobile invaded the mountain west. The hired man had received instructions to harness the horse and grease the buggy, while the folks put on their best clothes for a 30-mile shopping trip to Ogden. The travelers were proceeding along the mountain road two miles from home when suddenly the right front wheel fell off. Hyrum started back along the road, watching carefully for the missing burr. After walking half a mile the hired man galloped up on a saddle horse and upon meeting Hyrum apologized for his failure to replace the burr after completing the grease job at the home. The repairs were made and the travelers continued on their way. This strange experience is typical of life. According to the rule book, they just can’t happen. QUESTION: Who owned the most cultivated acres in Davie County before the turn of the century? ANSWER: George W, Adams, in 1898, possessed 2000 acres of good land in the Layton area. All of this property was under irrigation. His hard-working sons used 36 work horses to plant and harvest the crops grown upon this vast estate. In 1898 George W. Adams also owned all the water supplied by Snowcreek. He operated two grain headers and one horsepower threshing machine during the harvest season.. QUESTION: Who mothered seven children and kept the home fires burning while her husband went to Alaska in 1898 in search of yellow gold? ANSWER: Malinda J. Burton, Her husband sold all the sheep and livestock to finance an expedition to Klondike near the Arctic Circle to prospect for gold. When he returned home in 1899, Malinda had saved the $500.00 left in the bank by John before his departure. He instructed his wife to use the money to support the family during his absence. Instead, this valuable nest egg helped John and Malinda finance a successful adventure in another sheep herd. QUESTION: Who challenged a bear with a knlfe and then built a wooden bear trap that worked? ANSWER: Elias Adams, Jr., his brother' Joseph Adams, and others were on the mountain getting logs, They left their lurch in a sheltered spot in Crooked Hollow. Tired and hungry, they returned at noon to find a large cinnamon she-bear devouring their lunch. They tried to drive her away but she wouldn’t leave. They discussed killing her. Then Elias suggested that they might use a method he had read about which was sometimes used in Africa to kill lions. A man holding a knife would wrap his arm and hold it out toward the lion. When the lion lunged for the arm, be was stabbed. Elias volunteered to attempt the lure on condition that the others would stand by with axes ready. He wrapped his arm in a coat and tried to tempt the bear but the bear only walked away. They built a trap of logs similar to a small hut with a trap door that dropped down when the bear was inside. They baited the trap with the remains of their lunch. The next day when they came back the bear bad eaten the lunch and escaped by dlgging under the trap. A floor was added and the trap was again baited and set. When they again returned they discovered that the bear had been there and gone, having chewed and squeezed her way out between the logs. Several days later John W. Burton was herding sheep in the area and found the dead bear, She had crawled off lo the brush to die after crushing her ribs in her escape from the trap

FARMINGTON MAN RECALLS FIRST HANGING, INDAIN SURPRISE

Contributor: Maxmo11 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Copied from a clipping from the Salt Lake Telegram, Tuesday evening, February 20, 1934 FARMINGTON MAN RECALLS FIRST HANGING, INDIAN SURPRISE; OTHER UTAH EVENTS. Joshua Adams, 86 Married last time at 83, is happy. By Bill McDougall Farmington—Joshua Adams, 86, of Farmington, remembers the first man to be legally hanged in Utah Territory, and the two principals in the tragedy ate dinner with Mr. Adam’s parents just before the fatal fight. Mr. Adams was camped with his family near what is now the Temple grounds Salt Lake City, Utah, when Johnston’s Army reached the state in 1856. As a youth he gathered buffalo bones about where Beck’s Hot Springs is now located. Mr. Adams fled with the family when Indians rushed his parents home near Kaysville. He played in the dirt while his father was building the first reservoir in Utah at Pond Hollow, northeast of Kaysville, in 1850. Mr. Adams has a good memory, for he was still a child when some of those things happened. Born in Mount Pisgah, Iowa, December 30, 1848, the son of Elias and Melinda Railey Adams, his family crossed the plains to Utah the same year and homesteaded at what is now Kaysville. MORNING ATTTACK: “It was early in the morning,” he recalls, of the Indian attack, “Mother looked out the window, to see a band of 50 Indian Braves on horseback, circling the Widow Wheeler’s House, about a mile from our place. Widow Wheeler was framed in the doorway with a musket at her shoulder. My brother, George and Joe, had just harnessed a team of mares to our wagon to haul some hay. Mother picked me up, threw me in the wagon and climbed in after my brothers. We started down the road towards Driggs’ House, three miles away. George turned the reins over to Joe an jumped from the wagon to run back and face the Indians with Father. “Then mother was scared you could hear her screams about as far as you can a train whistle, and she was sure hollering. We stopped to pick up the Driggs Family and another family a little beyond their house. They heard mother long before we ever got there. A woman had just had a baby at the second house and the men couldn’t put her in the wagon so they picked up the bed and all and packed it back into some brush and hid her. They then started back to help father. HORSES EXHAUSTED: “By that time, though, the Indians had caught up with us. Our horses were steaming with sweat and just about done. We couldn’t’ have gone much father, anyway. But the Indians were laughing and carrying on as though it was a good joke. They ran their horses around us in circle for a while, then the leader came up, pointing to my mother laughed and said: “White squaw heap scared. Sure can holler!” My mother never forgave them for that joke.” Mr. Adams homesteaded what is now Fairview, Idaho, in 1874, and named it at a settler’s meeting one night. He helped develop Preston, Idaho, built the first bridge across Bear River in 1889 and was the largest contractor on the construction of the Oneida, Idaho Canal, a million and a half dollar job. He was President of the Oneida Irrigation District for four years and a director six years. “I spent 45 years ranching in Idaho,” he smiled, “but I always wanted to get back home to Utah. I had 37 different homes, each one a little closer to Kaysville. I’d just keep trading what I had for land nearer home.” YOUTHFUL HORSE TRAINER: Mr. Adams used to break horses in his youth. “Horses and I got along pretty well together. One time in 1876 at Promontory Point, Utah, I bought two wild horses and couldn’t figure out how to get them both back home, so, I decided I’d break one of them right there. I managed to tie up one horse long enough to get a saddle on him. Then I tied the second horse to the first one’s tail and climbed on the leader. We had quite a time for a while, but the one I was riding couldn’t buck much because the hind horse pulled him down ever time he went up in the air. They were pretty well broke by the time I got to Kaysville,” Two men, packers working for Ben Simmon, a partner of Jim Bridger, used to stop at our house on their trips south. I don’t remember their names or the exact year this happened. One was an Irishman and the other a New England Yankee who drank lot. The Irishman was always afraid the Yank would kill him some day when he was drunk. The ate dinner one noon at our house, then started on. An hour later the Irishman killed the Yank in what he claimed was self defense. We all thought he told the truth, but he couldn’t prove it. CONVICTED OF MURDER That Irishman was quite a fellow. Everyone like him. He gave himself up immediately and was taken to Salt Lake for Trial and was convicted of murder. A scaffold was erected, I remember. Utah wasn’t a state then and had no penitentiary. The Irishman had a lot of friends. There was a great crowd to see the execution. The marshal himself hated to go through with the job. Some friends led a fine big horse, fully saddled up to the scaffold and told the Irishman that if he wanted to jump on the horse and run, not a shot would be fired. But he shook his head. The marshal offered $25 to anyone in the crowd that would spring the trap. After a long pause a man came forward, took the money, and the Irishman plunged into eternity, the first man legally hanged in Utah. LIKES TO SLEEP Asked what he liked to do best in his youth, he replied: “Sleep – and that still goes right now!” Mr. Adams married Sarah Criddle, December 29, 1873. Ten children came of that marriage. In 1886 he married a second time. Emma Gilbert was his second wife, and they had four children. After his second wife’s death he grew lonely and just to prove that a man never grows too old to fall in love, he married Augusta C. Nelson, in Farmington Utah Courthouse, July, 1931, in his eighty-third year. The present Mrs. Adams is 86, one year younger than her husband. “And I’m mighty proud of my 14 children and 85 grandchildren,” Joshua Adams concluded. Originally typed by William Noel Howell, Grandson of Joshua Adams. Retyped Nov. 1963 by Sally Sue Nelson, Great granddaughter in law Retyped Nov. 1967 by Marjorie Nelson Great granddaughter in law

The Saga of Josh Adams

Contributor: Maxmo11 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

The saga of Josh Adams, early builder By Newell Hart Preston, Idaho Paper As kids we used to hear many stories about early-day characters, both saintly and colorful. Old Josh Adams (1848-1935) was a little of both. He pioneered in Utah years before coming her to do the same. I once asked James Woolf if he remembered this man, an early Riverdale neighbor. “Oh yes,” he said, “”Josh lived up on the flat – Adams Flat they called it. But Josh lived everywhere. Once he lived up here where Newbolds now live. They’d come down past my father’s place. They had a one-horse sleigh so the kids could come down the hill and over to school. The other outfits had two horses, so this would cause their horse to have to walk in the middle where there wasn’t any track. But Josh, he could scheme things out. He rearranged the shafts just a little, off set them just enough, and then the horse could walk in one regular track – and the runners could trail along in the two regular bobsleigh tracks.” (Cache Valley Newsletter, May, 1975). Among places he lived here were Fairview (where he homesteaded and had married Emma Gilbert a second wife), Clifton (where his daughter Lillie Howell, lived), Franklin (had a butcher shop), Cub River (Had a sawmill – and where he captured a cub bear from the swift river, bare-handed, and kept it as a pet for his many children). By his own account, Josh lived in 37 different homes. He was a breaker of wild horses, an ox-team supply hauler for early-day railroad building; as a boy he gathered buffalo bones near the old Beck’s Hot Springs, and he played in the dirt while his father was building the first reservoir in Utah at Pond Hollow, northeast of Kaysville. Later he made real estate transactions involving half a million dollars. The Sara Mar DUP Camp, in its History of Fairview, states that Joshua Adams was the first to construct a bridge across Bear River at Riverdale (1899 is a date given elsewhere). The length was 200 feet. “Before the bridge was constructed,” the account states, “25 men worked feverishly for two days to get a cable across the river to be used in ferrying the boat back and forth for carrying mail and passengers, but the swift current of the water defeated their efforts. He devised a plan which worked, and with the assistance of his brothers, Elias and Hyrum, who happened to be present, the cable was put across the river and anchored at either end and ready for use within less than half a day of elapsed time.” The history also tells this about his contract work for the railroad: “His work brought him in contact with numerous hard characters and the ‘Bull-whackers of ’69, but he did not indulge in the use of tobacco or liquor, and even refrained from swearing.” Josh Adams was the largest single contractor on the Oneida Irrigation District (now Twin Lakes), a tough , heart-breaking project that went on for 20 years. His part was confined to the earlier years after work began in 1902. He was president of the company for four years and a director for six. One of his construction jobs in Preston became a landmark here for years. This was the old Shipp Building a large frame two-story structure which occupied the present Sprouse-Reitz space on South Main. It was Bill Head who recalled that Josh was the builder. The Trail Blazer says the year was 1883 ad that Dr. M. B. Shipp, Preston’s first practicing physician, operated a drug store here. The Co-op Drug Store, with Ezra C. Foss as pharmacist, purchased the Shipp stock and operated here awhile. This Josh Adams structure was sold to John Christensen, a Preston shoemaker, after 1900. The building, over the years housed many a business which flourished and moved elsewhere or died. For a time (1938) I even ran a news reporting and circulation agency in one of its small cubby-holes. Most of us remember the big north-wing, just below the old Second Ward Church House, as a candy kitchen – run by Phil Margetts, R. C. Swenson, or Joe McCann. The building burned down in 1943, then owned by Gus and Grace Johnson who had the Quality Bakery up the street. This ended Josh’s landmark job. Josh Adams married Sarah Criddle in 1873, and in 1931 (then a widower), Augusta C. Nelson. At this time he was living in Farmington, “Closer back to home” as he told a reporter. There were ten children from the first marriage and four from the second. Many descendants are living in the area as well as in Utah. (Another segment about Josh Adams will be given later)

Historical Sketch of John Criddle prepared for the Driggs, Criddle Reunion, September 1950, by a grand-daughter, Alta Criddle Hess.

Contributor: Maxmo11 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Historical Sketch of John Criddle prepared for the Driggs, Criddle Reunion, September 1950, by a grand-daughter, Alta Criddle Hess. Our subject, John Criddle, born the 25th of December 1826. Parish of Oldcleve, Somersetshire, England, just across the bay from Cardiff, South Wales. He was the son of William Criddle and Elizabeth Rossiter and the grandson of James Criddle and Hannah Braggs. John was the fifth child in a family of seven, four boys and three girls: William, Mary, Elizabeth, Harriet, John, James and George. They were farmers and humble in circumstances, but honest and sincere in their every day living. John was unassuming in character and followed the "Mormon Creed" strictly, namely-- "To mind your own Business." John Oriddle heard and accepted the gospel in England, being baptized by Ebenezer A. Williams. He was the only one of the family who joined the church, Thus fulfilling the Scripture—“One of a family”. He came to America in 1853 on a sail ship, which made the trip in six weeks. His first home in Utah was at Jedediah M. Grant's where he spent the first winter, that of 1853. In the spring of 1854 he went to the First Presidency, to be directed to something as a means of support. He was told there was a widow, with five children, twenty-two miles north of Salt Lake, at Fort Kays Ward (now known as Kaysville) , on a thirty (30) acre farm. She needs help. Will you go up and help her? John came out and worked on the farm that spring and in June (Sept.) he and Elizabeth Ann Taylor Driggs were married. Samuel Driggs having died the 16th of January 1854. John Criddle had left a sweetheart, Mary Lluellen, in England. At the time of his marriage to Elizabeth Ann Driggs, John Criddle stood proxy for Samuel Driggs and Mary Lluellen was sealed to John Criddle. It was a brave act for John Criddle, A lone man, to come out here where he had no relatives or friends. The Driggs, Criddle home was on the mountain road directly east of Daysville, approximately one and one-half miles. Driggs built a square adobe one-room house, with a dirt roof. Later, when they raised sugar cane, they used the cane squizzings and willows with dirt for the roof. Driggs with his wife and four daughters were the first family to make a home on the mountain road; later a son was born. The church authorities advised not to take too large a tract of land, to take only small tracts, be sociable and neighborly. Driggs settled on about 30 acres. The settlers plowed around a tract of land, turning two furrows together, cut stakes, sharpened and drove them into the ground, got limbs and brush and rip wrapped the stakes to make a fence. It was a wonderful act for John Criddle to come into the family and raise the five Driggs Children. When John Criddle was married, he went to the mountain, got logs, hewed them, and built a log room on to the adobe one already built by Samuel Driggs. John and Elizabeth Ann had five children of their own, making ten in all. They are: Louisa Driggs 18 Sept. 1841 Hannah Driggs 18 Sept. 1843 Maria Driggs 8 Mar. 1846 Levi Driggs Sept. 1848 (died in infancy) Jane Driggs 28 Dec. 1849 Amasa Driggs 7 April 1852 Elizabeth Criddle 21 June 1855 Sarah Criddle 7 Nov. 1858 John Criddle 16 April 1860 William Criddle 21 Mar. 1863 James Criddle 16 Mar. 1865 John Criddle was ordained a Seventy, in the 55th Quorum, August 23, 1857, by John Bright. John belonged to the Utah Militia as organized by Governor Brigham Young. In 1865, John Criddle, Ebenezer A. Williams and Alonzo King, were called by the authorities, Brigham Young, Jedediah M. Grant, and Heber C. Kimball, to go to Winter Quarters to help emigrants and get hardware supplies. They went with ox teams, leaving in April and returning in September. Elizabeth Ann Taylor Driggs Criddle caught cold at that time and suffered with neuralgia, in her shoulder, the rest of her life. John Criddle died of cancer, on the 14th day of May 1884, at Kaysville, Utah. Age 58 years. John Criddle crossed the plains in the Joseph W. Young Company. The record of this company is as follows: Captain Joseph W. Young’s Company, the ninth company of the season, consisted of 321 emigrating Saints, 272 of whom belonged to the “Ten Pound Company”, and 49 to the “Perpetual Emigrating Fund Company”. On June 3rd they were reported ready to move from Keokuk, Iowa, having 42 wagons, 32 of which belonged to the “Ten Pound Company” and 10 to the other emigrants. Having made the journey in safety as far as Council Bluffs, they crossed the Missouri River, July 11, 1853, and on July 31st were over taken by Elder Isaac C. Haight, who was returning to Salt Lake City, after having acted a emigration agent at Council Bluffs. Elder Haight writes: “On July 29th we overtook Joseph W. Young’s Company in the Sand Hills between Loup Fork and Wood River and traveled with them to Wood River and stayed over Sunday, the 31st with them. Sister Young’s health is very delicate, also Elder Rostrons’. After making some repairs we held meeting in the evening. All seemed to feel first-rate and rejoiced that they were thus far on their journey, enjoying good health, except in the above cases.” Elder Joseph W. Young’s Company arrived in Great Salt Lake, October 10, 1853, all well. Following is an official statement written by Henry Pugh, the secretary of the Joseph W. Young Company, to President Brigham Young; Big Sandy 22 Sept. 1853 Dear Brother: I embrace the first opportunity of remitting you the enclosed list according to your request and trust you will find it contains all the information you require; I also hope it is tolerable correct, although there may be some slight errors, for it is almost impossible to arrive at a perfect statement, on account of the difficulties we are now encountering in the want of grass and the consequent daily loss of cattle. I believe 13 gave out on the 20th Inst. and 5 or 6 more yesterday, consequently the total number herein given will be minus the sum of those numbers and I fear before the close of this day there will be further reduction. I remain in the bonds of the new and everlasting covenant, Your faithful brother, Henry Pugh, secretary. Emigrating list of men, women, children, etc. now proceeding towards Great Salt Lake, forming a company under the charge and presidency of Captain Joseph W. Young: (names are then listed) and grandfather’s name (John Criddle) appears twenty-fourth (24th)

Joshua Adams and Emily Gilbert, a Short Story

Contributor: Maxmo11 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Joshua Adams came with his family to Utah when he was two years old. As a young child, he assisted his father in the construction of the first reservoir to be erected in the Territory of Utah, for the storage of irrigation water. When Johnson’s army invaded Utah in 1858, he drove his father’s oxen and moved south. In 1862, he was General Conner and his soldiers from Fort Douglas march in the dead of winter and attack an Indian Stronghold under the direction of Chief Pocatello northwest of Franklin, Idaho, where 368 Indians were killed. He did contract work for the Union Pacific railroad. On 29 December 1873 he married his first wife, Sarah Criddle. By this marriage he had ten children. On 30 December 1885 he married Emily Gilbert and he had four more children with this marriage. They had a temple divorce 23 April 1899. Emily Gilbert was divorced because of the requirements set by the Edmunds-Tucker act with regards to polygamy. She then married her Cousin William Gilbert on 31 Jan 1900.

Life timeline of Joshua Adams

1848
Joshua Adams was born on 29 Dec 1848
Joshua Adams was 11 years old when Charles Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
Joshua Adams was 20 years old when Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton founded the National Woman Suffrage Association, breaking away from the American Equal Rights Association which they had also previously founded. Susan B. Anthony was an American social reformer and women's rights activist who played a pivotal role in the women's suffrage movement. Born into a Quaker family committed to social equality, she collected anti-slavery petitions at the age of 17. In 1856, she became the New York state agent for the American Anti-Slavery Society.
Joshua Adams was 31 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Joshua Adams was 33 years old when The world's first international telephone call is made between St. Stephen, New Brunswick, Canada, and Calais, Maine, United States. A telephone call is a connection over a telephone network between the called party and the calling party.
Joshua Adams was 44 years old when Electrical engineer Nikola Tesla gives the first public demonstration of radio in St. Louis, Missouri. Nikola Tesla was a Serbian American inventor, electrical engineer, mechanical engineer, physicist, and futurist who is best known for his contributions to the design of the modern alternating current (AC) electricity supply system.
Joshua Adams was 60 years old when Ford puts the Model T car on the market at a price of US$825. Ford Motor Company is an American multinational automaker headquartered in Dearborn, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit. It was founded by Henry Ford and incorporated on June 16, 1903. The company sells automobiles and commercial vehicles under the Ford brand and most luxury cars under the Lincoln brand. Ford also owns Brazilian SUV manufacturer Troller, an 8% stake in Aston Martin of the United Kingdom, and a 49% stake in Jiangling Motors of China. It also has joint-ventures in China, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, and Russia. The company is listed on the New York Stock Exchange and is controlled by the Ford family; they have minority ownership but the majority of the voting power.
Joshua Adams was 68 years old when Tsar Nicholas II of Russia was forced to abdicate in the February Revolution, ending three centuries of Romanov rule. Nicholas II or Nikolai II, known as Saint Nicholas in the Russian Orthodox Church, was the last Emperor of Russia, ruling from 1 November 1894 until his forced abdication on 15 March 1917. His reign saw the fall of the Russian Empire from one of the foremost great powers of the world to economic and military collapse. He was given the nickname Nicholas the Bloody or Vile Nicholas by his political adversaries due to the Khodynka Tragedy, anti-Semitic pogroms, Bloody Sunday, the violent suppression of the 1905 Russian Revolution, the executions of political opponents, and his perceived responsibility for the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905). Soviet historians portray Nicholas as a weak and incompetent leader whose decisions led to military defeats and the deaths of millions of his subjects.
Joshua Adams was 79 years old when Walt Disney character Mickey Mouse premieres in his first cartoon, "Plane Crazy". Walter Elias Disney was an American entrepreneur, animator, voice actor and film producer. A pioneer of the American animation industry, he introduced several developments in the production of cartoons. As a film producer, Disney holds the record for most Academy Awards earned by an individual, having won 22 Oscars from 59 nominations. He was presented with two Golden Globe Special Achievement Awards and an Emmy Award, among other honors. Several of his films are included in the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress.
Joshua Adams died on 15 Apr 1935 at the age of 86
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Joshua Adams (29 Dec 1848 - 15 Apr 1935), BillionGraves Record 3531582 Kaysville, Davis, Utah, United States

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