Joseph Palmer

20 Nov 1874 - Apr 1961

Change Your Language

close

You can change the language of the BillionGraves website by changing the default language of your browser.

Learn More
English
Register

Joseph Palmer

20 Nov 1874 - Apr 1961
edit Edit Record
photo Add Images
group_add Add Family
description Add a memory

Joseph Palmer was born November 20, 1874 at Springdale, Washington, Utah to Zemira and Sally Knight Palmer. He was the 11th child of a family of 12 children. Springdale was at the mouth of the canyon named 'Zion.' It is a very beautiful canyon with very high mountains and steep cliffs. The Indians a
Register to get full access to the grave site record of Joseph Palmer
Terms and Conditions

We want you to know exactly how our service works and why we need your registration in order to allow full access to our records.

terms and conditions

Contact Permissions

We’d like to send you special offers and deals exclusive to BillionGraves users to help your family history research. All emails ​include an unsubscribe link. You ​may opt-out at any time.

close
close
Thanks for registering with BillionGraves.com!
In order to gain full access to this record, please verify your email by opening the welcome email that we just sent to you.
close
Sign up the easy way

Use your facebook account to register with BillionGraves. It will be one less password to remember. You can always add an email and password later.

Loading

Life Information

Joseph Palmer

Born:
Died:

Alton Cemetery

Unnamed Rd
Kanab, Kane, Utah
United States
Transcriber

Dana

September 13, 2021
Transcriber

Larry Bulloch

September 13, 2021
Photographer

Larry Bulloch

August 29, 2021

Nearby Graves

See more nearby graves
Upgrade to BG+

Find more about Joseph...

We found more records about Joseph Palmer.

Family

Relationships on the headstone

add

Relationships added by users

add

Grave Site of Joseph

edit

Joseph Palmer is buried in the Alton Cemetery at the location displayed on the map below. This GPS information is ONLY available at BillionGraves. Our technology can help you find the gravesite and other family members buried nearby.

Download the free BillionGraves mobile app for iPhone and Android before you go to the cemetery and it will guide you right to the gravesite.
android Google play phone_iphone App Store

Memories

add

Joseph Palmer and Helen Jane Robertson

Contributor: Dana Created: 2 months ago Updated: 2 months ago

Joseph Palmer was born November 20, 1874 at Springdale, Washington, Utah to Zemira and Sally Knight Palmer. He was the 11th child of a family of 12 children. Springdale was at the mouth of the canyon named "Zion." It is a very beautiful canyon with very high mountains and steep cliffs. The Indians at that time were afraid to go into, having suspicions that evil gods were in there. Helen Jane Robertson was born at Kanab, Kane, Utah on March 16, 1875, to Thomas and Sarah Ann Cordingly Robertson. She was the 10th child of a family of 13 children. When they were both very young, the "United Order of Zion" was organized in many of the settlements in southern Utah by the Prophet Brigham Young. The one which lasted the longest was at Long Valley, later called "Orderville," due to this very fact. Brigham Young said "the object of the 'Order' is to labor for the benefit of the whole, to retrench their expenditures, to be prudent and economical, to study well the necessities of the community and to pass by its many useless 'wants' to secure life, health and union." In order to obtain membership in the order, applicants were required to answer and conform to many questions. Some of those were: • What is your object of seeking to unite yourself and your family to the Order? Do you believe the Lord requires you to take this course? • Have you trained your family to fear the Lord? Do they practice your teachings? • Are you in debt? Do you have any property? • Are you willing for yourself and your family and all you possess to be governed and control by the Order? Questions about their habits were also asked, including their habits regarding the use of tobacco, tea, coffee, and whether they practiced stealing, lying or using profane oaths on dumb animals, and if so, would they cease such conduct? Applicants were also asked whether they would conform to all the rules of the Order, including working, eating and trying to maintain peace. Joseph's parents joined the Order in the spring of 1876, he being only 11 years old. They moved by way of Short Creek (now Colorado City), Pipe Springs, Moccasin, Kanab and over the deep sand to Orderville. It is said the sand was so deep that everyone had to walk across them, as the teams could hardly pull the wagons. Helen's parents joined the Order when Helen was 2 years old. Their family moved with ox teams across the deep sand from Kanab to Orderville. It took two days to make the trip of 22 miles in the spring of 1877. Both Helen and Joseph told me of the experience living and growing up as children in the Order. They all ate at the "Big Table" and had to ask to be excused when they were finished. They all were fitted for shoes for each winter. And everyone had jobs to do. Just about everyone had to weed the gardens, Grandma Helen was asked to tend children and Grandpa Joseph to tramp hay and milk cows. They tell of the big dining hall. The food was prepared at one end. The bread was baked in large ovens made of brick. When Helen was older, she helped prepare the food. She also learned to make cloth. They had to card wool from the sheep, then spin it into yarn and weave it into cloth. She still had the carders and spinning wheel when I was little; and she showed us how the .carding and spinning was done. Christmas in the Order was celebrated with a big tree in the dining hall. Every present on the tree was homemade. One year a man obtained a china doll head and from this he made a mold then made plaster of paris doll heads for each girl in town. The women painted the face and hair on the heads and made the doll bodies and clothing. Helen was thrilled to receive one of these dolls and she thought it was so lovely. Helen was 8 years old before she ever saw store candy. It was called "hard tack." Helen's father, Thomas Robertson, had a brass cornet, which all the kiddies called a "horn." He would play a tune when it was time for Sunday school, Sacrament Meeting and Primary. Every evening he would play "Do What is Right" to call the people together for prayers. On May 6, 1883, Joseph and Helen were baptized by Helen's father Thomas Robertson. Joseph didn't know at the time that Brother Robertson would be his father-in-law. It was in the Dining Hall that the first Primary was organized. Helen remembers being in attendance. Sister Eliza R. Snow came to Orderville to help get it organized. She held up the watch that John Taylor had in his pocket in the Carthage Jail. She showed the children where the bullet struck it, saving Brother Taylor's life when Joseph Smith was killed. Another memory of Helen's was the Quarterly Conference held in Orderville. On one occasion the General Authorities severely reprimanded the people for not doing certain important things. When Old Man Spencer was called upon to offer the dosing prayer, he said "Oh Lord, Make something of us if you can. Amen." Joseph and Helen were 10 years old when the Order broke up and all the people went back to caring for themselves. The United Order was an ideal situation, if the people could only live up to its standards. As one dear lady over 80 years old said, "My, did we work! But, oh, we were happy! We did not worry about losing our jobs. We were always busy. There was not much sickness. We had a purpose in life - to establish a better social order here on earth and to secure for themselves a higher degree of exaltation in the spirit world. Both Joseph and Helen's fathers had two wives, so they knew what it was like living during the plural marriage period. They both had some schooling as they turned the Dining Hall building into a school, church and dance hall. They had capable teachers that drilled phonics, spelling, pronunciation, and penmanship. Text books were not plentiful and they used slates instead of notebooks. Growing up during this interesting period of time taught both Joseph and Helen to share and share alike as they considered every one as equals. They were also taught the gospel of Jesus Christ. Their parents were faithful and had experienced the beginning of the church when they were children, and were driven from their homes and crossed the plains to find peace. Grandpa: Joseph would always tell us that it was his grandpa's wagon that Joseph Smith used to get the gold plates from the Hill Cumorah. He had much honor for him, which gave me the feeling that the gospel was true and all that Joseph Smith said was true. Grandpa's father, Zemira, also served the Lord in his youth as he went with the Mormon Battalion to California and then back to Utah when he was 15 years old. Both Joseph and Helen lost their father's when they were young. Joseph's father died of "stones" in Orderville on 22 Oct 1880 when Joseph was only 6 years old. Joseph was raised by his mother, Sally, and had to take responsibility early. He worked at farming and had a great love for animals, especially horses. He learned to handle horses very well, and told of the many races they would have up the main street of Orderville at holidays. Helen was only 12 years old when her father, Thomas Robertson, went to Salt Lake City to have an operation for gallstones. The doctors removed two gallstones about the size of a large bird egg. However, there were no hospitals, and he died on the operating table. He had brothers living in Spanish Fork, so he was buried there. He had been buried for an entire week before word of his death reached the family in Orderville, as the mail service was so poor. Helen said it was "try weekly" service - it came one week and tried the next. Helen began working at 13 years old, as the family had a difficult time after Thomas' death. She began doing housework for $1.50 a week. She had a little schooling before her father died, but couldn't afford to go thereafter, as they had to pay tuition to attend. Joseph and Helen grew up together and were fine young people during their teenage years. They went on evening rides in a wagon and on horseback. They had corn roasts, candy pulls, and plays and dances in the Big Hall. They were attracted to each other and, following their courtship days, they decided to get married. Helen had earned some money and with the help of her mother, she had a few things ready, including quilts and a ticking for their bed, which she had filled with corn husks. She made sheets and pillow cases from some bleached muslin material. She wove a rag carpet for their first house that Joseph had bought. They went to Manti, Utah to be married in the temple. It was November and they had to travel by wagon. It took over two weeks, and it was cold and snowy. Joseph’s sister, Emma, went with them to chaperone, she being 7 years older than Joseph. He had just turned 19 and Helen was just over 18 years old. At one time on the trip they got stuck in the mud. Helen and Emma had to pry up on a log to help pull the wheel out of the mud, while Joseph managed the team of horses. They were finally married 23 November 1893 by John G.L. McAllister. While they were on this trip they bought some bed springs, a lamp, a few dishes, and a stove. The stove cost $20.00 and they had only $10.00. The merchant trusted them until they could get home. They had $10.00 coming to them, or they would have never dared go into debt that much. They had a wedding dance in the Big Hall and many of the people of the town came and gave them many useful gifts. It is said that the fall of 1893 and the following spring were the hardest they had ever seen. Wool sold for 2-1/2 cents a pound. Sheep sold for $1.00. Calves sold for $2.00. Work was scarce, and Joseph didn't own any land. The next winter, Joseph worked at Lee's Ferry on the Colorado River. He saved all the money he could from this job. Their first child was born 6 May 1895 at Orderville, Kane, UT. It was a little girl they named Artiemesia. She brought much joy to Helen, as Joseph was working at the Ferry. In 1900 they were able to purchase a small farm across the river in Mt. Carmel, Utah, just a few miles from Orderville. Joseph was never afraid of work and enjoyed ranching and developing and cultivating the land. He raised hay, and had milk cows, chickens, and other cattle to sell. And he always had a fine team of horses. Both Joseph and Helen were devoted to the church and held many positions. At this time in their lives, Helen was the Primary President, and Joseph taught Sunday school. In June of 1901, Joseph was called on a mission for the church to the Southeastern States. He spent some time in Provo, taking the missionary courses. Helen and 6-year-old Artiemesia went with him. Helen said that it was here at this time that she saw bananas and oranges for sale. It was their first time to see bananas! When Joseph left for the two year mission, Helen and Artiemesia moved back to Orderville to live with her mother, Sarah Ann. While she lived in Orderville again, she served as a Relief Society Visiting Teacher, a counselor in the Primary, and a teacher in the Sunday school. Joseph served his mission as the apostles in the days of Christ-without "purse or scrip". The Elders had to depend on the people they met to give them a bed and meals as they traveled in the countryside. Lorenzo Snow was the Prophet of the Church at that time. Joseph kept a journal and recorded many wonderful experiences, stating that at one place the spirit was so strong that "his eyes runneth over with joy!" However, there were times when they went without food or a place to sleep. He was a great missionary. He returned on 6 September 1903 and on that very day he baptized his daughter Artiemesia, as she had turned 8 years old the previous May. After the mission, Joseph moved his family back to the farm in Mt Carmel. Their second child, Ray Joseph, was born 18 July 1904. Ray was his pride and joy. He used to tell me "girls are no good, because you just have to give them away" when they get married. In the next 8 years Helen and Joseph were blessed with three more children who lived. Jennie was born July 3, 1906, Bernice on March 25, 1909 and finally Lillis was born on July 29, 1912. The family lived on the farm in Mt Carmel when Ray, Jennie and Bernice were born, but had moved to Orderville by the time Lillis arrived. These child-bearing years were difficult, as Helen had several miscarriages and stillbirths. She once said that if all the babies she had carried would have lived, there would have been 13 children instead of only 5. I believe she was like me-with a negative RH factor, and grandpa was RH+. In those days these problems were unknown. Helen had stillborn twins, and it was thought she might die because she had such a difficult time with them. Her midwife through all these problems was Joseph's dear mother, Sally. Joseph provided for his family by farming. At that time, all the work was done with teams of horses. He told stories of times they had horses run away while cutting hay. There were also accidents. Once he had his foot and leg broken by a horse, but he never had them set by a doctor. The bones just healed and later in his life he limped. He also cut his little finger almost off, and when it healed; it was permanently bent I remember he could sure pinch if you put your finger in that bend. When they moved to Orderville in 1911-1912, they ran the "hotel." Helen: - and the girls cleaned the rooms, did the washing and cooked the meals. This is when Mesia met a young man from Kanosh, UT, named Preal George. They were married 19 Oct 1919. When Mesia moved to Kanosh, Helen felt very lonesome, and Kanosh seemed so far away. She and Mesia had more than a mother-daughter relationship-they were best friends. Helen felt like the bottom had fallen out of her life when Mesia left her home. In 1921, they sold the business in Orderville and bought a home and farm in Alton, Kane County, UT. The home was built by Helen's brother-in-law (Emma's husband) Jonathan B. Heaton. It was across the street from her brother, Isaac Robertson's home. At that time all the freight traffic from Salina to Kanab went through Alton and down Johnson Canyon. Salina was where the train tracks ended, and the wagons were too heavy to cross the sand between Orderville and Kanab. The children had schooling in Orderville through the 9th grade. When the family moved to Alton there was a teacher there who taught a "Little High School", but they had to go to St George to finish high school. Ray was able to graduate from high school and then he began to herd sheep. Jennie met George E. Heaton in Alton and was married 1 Jun 1926 in the St George temple. Exactly one year later, on 1 Jun 1927, Ray was married also in the St George temple. He had met a girl named Melba Pugh from Kanab whose family lived in Sink Valley each summer. Bernice moved to Kanab to find work and there she met Lloyd Pugh. They were married 16 May 1931. Later that fall, Lillis was called on a mission to the Central States; headquartered in Independence, MO. Helen again had a difficult time with all of her children growing up and leaving home. She did so enjoy them. Jennie and George came and lived with them, as George was frequently at the sheep herd. Ray and Melba bought a small home across the street to the west of Helen and Joseph. Ray helped on the farm during the summers as they had the sheep up in the canyon west of Alton. Joseph and Helen always had a big garden with potatoes, corn, beans, peas, onions, carrots, squash and many berry bushes. This kept them very busy. Helen also enjoyed raising beautiful flowers in the garden. She also made quilts, hankies, and doilies, and was ever churning butter and making bread. Joseph was busy watering, cutting and hauling hay, milking and caring for the cows, pigs, chickens and sheep on the farm. 1932 came as a severe trial for the family, as two of their precious daughters died only two weeks apart. On 27 October 1932 Jennie, who was living with them in Alton, had gone out to the garden and had a heart attack. She died before they could get word to George. She had been in poor health for some time. They had two daughters, Elaine, who was 4 years old and Dorothy who was only one and a half. Lillis was in the mission field and had an appendectomy operation. She was doing fine, and although the operation had gone well, some infection set in. She died 12 November 1932. In Artemisia’s history, she wrote "the Mission President, S.U. Bennion, who came home with the body said Lillis' last words were 'Just two steps Jennie, then we're all right' He felt there was a tie between the two girls, as they passed away just 15 days apart. This was a great sorrow to the entire family, but they accepted it as did Job of old, when he said "The Lord giveth, and the Lord taken away. Blessed be the name of the Lord." Helen took Jennie's children and cared for them until their father, George, remarried some years later. This did help to keep her busy. Joseph and Helen were always active in church. Joseph worked in the Sunday school. He was the Superintendent for many years. He also served in the Young Men's Mutual Improvement Association. He enjoyed teaching and helping the young people learn about the gospel. He was also a priesthood adviser and home teacher. He baptized all his children on their eighth birthday, except Artemesia, as he was on his mission. However, he baptized her as soon as he returned home. Helen worked in the Relief Society as President, Counselor, Work Director, and Visiting Teacher. She also worked in the Primary. While she was the President of the Relief Society, they, at that time, had to prepare the dead for burial, making their clothes and all. She was honored and crowned "Queen for a Day" on 7 Mar 1954, after moving to St George. A beautiful tribute was written for her by Mable Jarvis. Helen enjoyed quitting all her life. TO SISTER HELEN R. PALMER - OUR QUEEN FOR A DAY Crowned by St. George 4th Ward Relief Society, 7 March 1954. There is ONE among us here, whose example is most dear; ONE, whose years of gentle living, Humbly serving, kindly giving¬- Symbols of true Royalty Weave a pattern bright and fair, for us to emulate and share. Through her childhood years she knew Nice Parent Leadership, and grew to love the world of honest labor Of kindness to each friend and neighbor; to seek for faith instead of fame, And to be proud of her good name. A daughter of brave pioneers, She had not time for foolish fears; And found that joy, when each day ended Upon her own good deeds depended. She learned soon after she was eight To darn and mend; for fold clothes straight And, in due time, to cook and sew And all that good housekeepers know. In leisure hours, along with play, She learned to quilt, knit and crochet; And, in her well trained, nimble fingers, Each art and skill, and handcraft lives To bless her family and her friends And, through the years, her work extends In gentleness and dignity To help Relief Society. She's pieced enough quilt tops, we know To reach from here to Jericho; And miles and miles of quilting too Her busy hands found time to do. For all of sixty years or more, She has been adding to her score, At Alton, Orderville and here (St., George) Week after week, year after year, In each Relief Society Wherever she might chance to be; As block teacher and Officer Doing each task assigned to her, Contented with each day's reward Of joy in service of the Lord. She is one of twelve who are living still Who served as President at Orderville. Our pleasure, now, is to present This humble, heartfelt sentiment To Helen Palmer, whose good life As daughter, mother, and as wife Whose many years of kind and gracious serving Are so inspiring, and so deserving. As officers and many members, we Of the 4th Ward Relief Society Present you with this gift and crown, and say "God bless you, Queen Helen, now and always. By Mabel Jarvis-at the request of Vilate Leavitt and Nine Green, Queen Committee for March 7, 1954-Fourth Ward Relief Society, St. George, Utah. A note was added on the bottom: Dear Sister Helen, I count it a privilege and honor to be here for this occasion. You have always been an inspiration. Joseph and Helen went to St. George to work in the temple in the winter until 1936-37 when Ray decided to stay in from the sheep herd and help on the farm. They decided to buy a small house and stay in St George all year. They then built a large apartment house on their lot and had renters to help with living expenses. They also had a garden spot, barn and chicken coop. I remember Grandpa Joseph telling about bringing his team of horses down from Alton. He had to go through the mile-long tunnel in Zion National Park. As they went through the tunnel, the horses’ hooves made such a noise he had a hard time holding them. He rode one and led the other. It was a 100 mile trip. Joseph never owned a car. I remember the time he was going to learn to drive. We were at the meadow milking the cows and he was going to drive back to Alton. As he turned the corner to go up the lane to the house, he was going too fast and pulled back on the steering wheel, calling "Whoa! Whoa!" He went around the corner so fast he tipped over a 10 gallon can of milk that was in the back of the truck. The milk spilled out of the back end of the truck all the way up the lane. After that he said driving was not worth that much milk. He never tried to drive again. Joseph and Helen worked at the temple in St. George for over 20 years, doing the work for many people. Helen had been sending what money she could to England to have research done on her family line. I remember how happy she was when she received 300 names of her ancestors so she could get the temple work done for them. Joseph worked in the baptistery. I can still see Grandma ironing Grandpa's starched white shirts that he wore at the temple with a flat iron heated on her coal and wood stove. At age 82, Helen was having a hard time threading her needle to quilt She had heard of an operation to remove cataracts from a person's eyes that would help them see better. She had never been in a hospital or had anyone take care of her before, but she decided she wanted to have this procedure done. The operation took much longer than she had expected. I was expecting Raymond at the time (the summer of 1957) and I came up to St George to see the doctor. I went by Grandma and Grandpa's home and remember Grandpa sitting alone on the porch looking so sad. Grandma was gone for over two months, and would return in August When Raymond was born on 6 Sep 1957, she was home. She told me "Now you have as many kinds of children as Brigham Young," as Raymond was my first boy after having two girls. It was a great shock to me when Daddy called to tell me Grandma Helen Jane had had a stroke and was taken to Kanab to Aunt Bernice's home. She lived only six more days and passed away on 30 September 1957. I felt I had truly lost a best friend, as Grandma was always there for me and she was a person I could really talk to. This was also hard on my father, Ray, as he still depended so much on her and her advice. Her death also left Grandpa Joseph alone again, which was hard on him. My parents soon found that he couldn't live alone, so they moved down to St George in the fall and spent the winter there with him. Daddy worked in the temple with Grandpa and Mama taught school in Colorado City. During the summers, all three of them moved back to Alton to take care of the farm and the cattle they fed in the summer. Grandpa was very lonely for those 3½ years. In April of 1961 he, too, had a stroke. Mama rushed him to the hospital in Kanab and Aunt Bernice took him to her home there as they couldn't do anything for him in the hospital. He lived another two weeks and died on 15 April. 1961. He was 86½ years old. He was the last one of his brothers and sisters to die, so we know it was a happy reunion for him on the other side, and that he enjoyed being with his wife, Helen again, as well as his parents and brothers and sisters. PATRIARACHAL BLESSING OF JOSEPH PALMER A blessing by Thomas Chamberlain, Patriarch upon the head of Joseph Palmer, son of Zemira and Sally Knight Palmer. Born at Springdale, Washington County, Utah, November 20, 1875. Given at Orderville, Kane County, Utah, July 15, 1900. Brother Joseph, I place my hands upon your head and by virtue and authority of my holy calling seal upon you a patriarchal blessing. Thy lineage is of Ephraim, that choice son of Joseph who was sold into Egypt. Therefore, thou art a legal heir to the Holy Melchizedek Priesthood, and the great blessings the Lord has promised to bestow upon those who are of Ephraim. Our Heavenly Father has a glorious mission for thee to perform upon earth and he will strengthen and assist thee to accomplish thy mission successfully for thou art beloved of the Lord and His blessings will be upon thee and His preserving care about thee and His Holy Spirit will have charge concerning thy welfare and preservation. The prompting influence of the spirit of the Lord will be thy companion to direct and guide thee through life's journey. Therefore, dead brother, diligently heed the promptings of that divine and Holy Spirit and thou wilt not go astray in any of thy undertakings of life. Remain humble; seek the Lord in fasting and prayer and thy mind will be quickened, thine understanding enlarged to comprehend the principles of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. And thou shalt be endowed from powers from on high to proclaim those glorious, saving principles in simplicity and power in the convincing of the honest in heart. You will be an instrument in the hands of the Lord in bringing many precious souls into the fold of Christ. When trials and discouragements assail you, look unto the Lord in faith and he will hear and answer thy petitions and give thee that strength which is necessary to enable thee to stand firm and steadfast in all the changing scenes of mortality. 'Thine enemies shall not prevail against thee nor have power to confound thee in the Lord's ministry for in times of need thou shalt be prompted and inspired and made valiant in the testimony of Jesus, to the confounding of the wicked and the converting of the honest. In all thy journeyings by land and water thou shalt not be forsaken or left to thyself but God's power will be made manifest in thy deliverance from the dangers that assail thee. Thou wilt rejoice greatly in laboring for the salvation of souls in preaching the word of god and in officiating in the ordinances of the gospel in God's holy temples for the living and the dead. Thou wilt be blessed in thy labors and the bounties of earth hall crown thine efforts and thou wilt always be willing to use of thy substance and devote thy lime and talent for the advancing of God's work upon earth. Thou wilt control and direct thy family's affairs in righteousness and perfect harmony will prevail in thy household. Seek and serve the Lord faithfully and thy desires in regard to posterity shall be granted thee. Be prudent and wise in thy ways and manners of living, strictly observing the word of wisdom and thy life shall be prolonged and thy days lengthened upon earth to assist in the redemption of Zion and to take part in the erection of that great and holy temple which is yet to be reared in Zion's center stake. When thou hast finished thine earthly missions thou wilt be saved with the redeemed and have power to come forth in that great resurrection of the just to be crowned with glory, immortality and eternal lives. These blessings, dear brother, and all others that thy heart may desire in righteousness, for the Lord will loosen thy tongue and make thee mighty in performing His works and for the accomplishment of all the righteous desires of thine heart, and these blessings shall be made sure unto thee through faithfulness in keeping the commandments of GOD and I seal them upon thee in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ, Amen. Recorded in Book (A) Pages 266-267 PATRIARCHAL BLESSING OF HELEN JANE ROBERTSON PALMER Orderville Utah January 14, 1920 A blessing given by Haber J. Meeks Patriarch upon the head of Helen Jape (Robert-. son) Palmer daughter of Thomas and Sarah Ann (Cordingly) Robertson born at Kanab Kane Co. Utah March 16, 175. Sister Palmer according to thy request I lay nay hands upon thy head and to the Authority of the Holy Priesthood give unto thee a Patriarchal blessing which I pray the Lord to direct for thy encouragement and comfort, Thou art a daughter of Abraham through the lineage of Ephraim and chosen daughter of whom much is expected, Thou art entitled to all the graces and gifts and privileges promised to thy sex through the new and everlasting Covenant Thine integrity was proven in the spirit world-an& thy mission marked out before thou vast born. The Lord is pleased with the integrity of thins heart and thine life thus far has been approved by Him, Thy devotion to thy duties and callings in the Church have pleased the Lord and thou hast found favor in his sight: Thy trials and afflictions have been sanctified unto thee, thy soul hasp been purged and refined and thy spirit tempered to the harmony with the spirit of the Lord. Thou are entitled to the whisperings of the still small voice which shall guide thy feet and protect thee from the power of the evil one. In faith thou shall walk before the Lord, thou shalt be healed of thine infirmities and weaknesses and thy fifes work shall be accomplished in righteousness, It is thy privilege to teach the youth of Zion and thy teachings shall bear fruit unto the salvation of many souls. Thou shalt find pleasure in visiting the sick and needy and thy labors shall be abundantly regarded. It is thy privilege to labor in the House of the Lord, His Holy Temples, for the salvation of the dead, Thou shalt do a great Work for thy fathers house, lanes shall be revealed unto thee by Heavenly messengers and thou shalt witness the speaking in Lounges; the interpretation there of and many manifestations of the power of the Lord,. Thou shalt become a queen and Priestess unto the most High God. Approach thy mission with a cheerful heart, for the Lord shall bear thee up and strengthen thee for thy work. I seal this blessing upon thy head in obedience to the covenants thou Nast made and I seal thee up against the power of the destroyer unto the day of redemption, to come forth in the morning of the first resurrection. In the name of Jesus Christ Amen. Heber J. Meeks Patriarch (written by Donna Cain)

Joseph Palmer and Helen Jane Robertson

Contributor: Dana Created: 2 months ago Updated: 2 months ago

Joseph Palmer was born November 20, 1874 at Springdale, Washington, Utah to Zemira and Sally Knight Palmer. He was the 11th child of a family of 12 children. Springdale was at the mouth of the canyon named "Zion." It is a very beautiful canyon with very high mountains and steep cliffs. The Indians at that time were afraid to go into, having suspicions that evil gods were in there. Helen Jane Robertson was born at Kanab, Kane, Utah on March 16, 1875, to Thomas and Sarah Ann Cordingly Robertson. She was the 10th child of a family of 13 children. When they were both very young, the "United Order of Zion" was organized in many of the settlements in southern Utah by the Prophet Brigham Young. The one which lasted the longest was at Long Valley, later called "Orderville," due to this very fact. Brigham Young said "the object of the 'Order' is to labor for the benefit of the whole, to retrench their expenditures, to be prudent and economical, to study well the necessities of the community and to pass by its many useless 'wants' to secure life, health and union." In order to obtain membership in the order, applicants were required to answer and conform to many questions. Some of those were: • What is your object of seeking to unite yourself and your family to the Order? Do you believe the Lord requires you to take this course? • Have you trained your family to fear the Lord? Do they practice your teachings? • Are you in debt? Do you have any property? • Are you willing for yourself and your family and all you possess to be governed and control by the Order? Questions about their habits were also asked, including their habits regarding the use of tobacco, tea, coffee, and whether they practiced stealing, lying or using profane oaths on dumb animals, and if so, would they cease such conduct? Applicants were also asked whether they would conform to all the rules of the Order, including working, eating and trying to maintain peace. Joseph's parents joined the Order in the spring of 1876, he being only 11 years old. They moved by way of Short Creek (now Colorado City), Pipe Springs, Moccasin, Kanab and over the deep sand to Orderville. It is said the sand was so deep that everyone had to walk across them, as the teams could hardly pull the wagons. Helen's parents joined the Order when Helen was 2 years old. Their family moved with ox teams across the deep sand from Kanab to Orderville. It took two days to make the trip of 22 miles in the spring of 1877. Both Helen and Joseph told me of the experience living and growing up as children in the Order. They all ate at the "Big Table" and had to ask to be excused when they were finished. They all were fitted for shoes for each winter. And everyone had jobs to do. Just about everyone had to weed the gardens, Grandma Helen was asked to tend children and Grandpa Joseph to tramp hay and milk cows. They tell of the big dining hall. The food was prepared at one end. The bread was baked in large ovens made of brick. When Helen was older, she helped prepare the food. She also learned to make cloth. They had to card wool from the sheep, then spin it into yarn and weave it into cloth. She still had the carders and spinning wheel when I was little; and she showed us how the .carding and spinning was done. Christmas in the Order was celebrated with a big tree in the dining hall. Every present on the tree was homemade. One year a man obtained a china doll head and from this he made a mold then made plaster of paris doll heads for each girl in town. The women painted the face and hair on the heads and made the doll bodies and clothing. Helen was thrilled to receive one of these dolls and she thought it was so lovely. Helen was 8 years old before she ever saw store candy. It was called "hard tack." Helen's father, Thomas Robertson, had a brass cornet, which all the kiddies called a "horn." He would play a tune when it was time for Sunday school, Sacrament Meeting and Primary. Every evening he would play "Do What is Right" to call the people together for prayers. On May 6, 1883, Joseph and Helen were baptized by Helen's father Thomas Robertson. Joseph didn't know at the time that Brother Robertson would be his father-in-law. It was in the Dining Hall that the first Primary was organized. Helen remembers being in attendance. Sister Eliza R. Snow came to Orderville to help get it organized. She held up the watch that John Taylor had in his pocket in the Carthage Jail. She showed the children where the bullet struck it, saving Brother Taylor's life when Joseph Smith was killed. Another memory of Helen's was the Quarterly Conference held in Orderville. On one occasion the General Authorities severely reprimanded the people for not doing certain important things. When Old Man Spencer was called upon to offer the dosing prayer, he said "Oh Lord, Make something of us if you can. Amen." Joseph and Helen were 10 years old when the Order broke up and all the people went back to caring for themselves. The United Order was an ideal situation, if the people could only live up to its standards. As one dear lady over 80 years old said, "My, did we work! But, oh, we were happy! We did not worry about losing our jobs. We were always busy. There was not much sickness. We had a purpose in life - to establish a better social order here on earth and to secure for themselves a higher degree of exaltation in the spirit world. Both Joseph and Helen's fathers had two wives, so they knew what it was like living during the plural marriage period. They both had some schooling as they turned the Dining Hall building into a school, church and dance hall. They had capable teachers that drilled phonics, spelling, pronunciation, and penmanship. Text books were not plentiful and they used slates instead of notebooks. Growing up during this interesting period of time taught both Joseph and Helen to share and share alike as they considered every one as equals. They were also taught the gospel of Jesus Christ. Their parents were faithful and had experienced the beginning of the church when they were children, and were driven from their homes and crossed the plains to find peace. Grandpa: Joseph would always tell us that it was his grandpa's wagon that Joseph Smith used to get the gold plates from the Hill Cumorah. He had much honor for him, which gave me the feeling that the gospel was true and all that Joseph Smith said was true. Grandpa's father, Zemira, also served the Lord in his youth as he went with the Mormon Battalion to California and then back to Utah when he was 15 years old. Both Joseph and Helen lost their father's when they were young. Joseph's father died of "stones" in Orderville on 22 Oct 1880 when Joseph was only 6 years old. Joseph was raised by his mother, Sally, and had to take responsibility early. He worked at farming and had a great love for animals, especially horses. He learned to handle horses very well, and told of the many races they would have up the main street of Orderville at holidays. Helen was only 12 years old when her father, Thomas Robertson, went to Salt Lake City to have an operation for gallstones. The doctors removed two gallstones about the size of a large bird egg. However, there were no hospitals, and he died on the operating table. He had brothers living in Spanish Fork, so he was buried there. He had been buried for an entire week before word of his death reached the family in Orderville, as the mail service was so poor. Helen said it was "try weekly" service - it came one week and tried the next. Helen began working at 13 years old, as the family had a difficult time after Thomas' death. She began doing housework for $1.50 a week. She had a little schooling before her father died, but couldn't afford to go thereafter, as they had to pay tuition to attend. Joseph and Helen grew up together and were fine young people during their teenage years. They went on evening rides in a wagon and on horseback. They had corn roasts, candy pulls, and plays and dances in the Big Hall. They were attracted to each other and, following their courtship days, they decided to get married. Helen had earned some money and with the help of her mother, she had a few things ready, including quilts and a ticking for their bed, which she had filled with corn husks. She made sheets and pillow cases from some bleached muslin material. She wove a rag carpet for their first house that Joseph had bought. They went to Manti, Utah to be married in the temple. It was November and they had to travel by wagon. It took over two weeks, and it was cold and snowy. Joseph’s sister, Emma, went with them to chaperone, she being 7 years older than Joseph. He had just turned 19 and Helen was just over 18 years old. At one time on the trip they got stuck in the mud. Helen and Emma had to pry up on a log to help pull the wheel out of the mud, while Joseph managed the team of horses. They were finally married 23 November 1893 by John G.L. McAllister. While they were on this trip they bought some bed springs, a lamp, a few dishes, and a stove. The stove cost $20.00 and they had only $10.00. The merchant trusted them until they could get home. They had $10.00 coming to them, or they would have never dared go into debt that much. They had a wedding dance in the Big Hall and many of the people of the town came and gave them many useful gifts. It is said that the fall of 1893 and the following spring were the hardest they had ever seen. Wool sold for 2-1/2 cents a pound. Sheep sold for $1.00. Calves sold for $2.00. Work was scarce, and Joseph didn't own any land. The next winter, Joseph worked at Lee's Ferry on the Colorado River. He saved all the money he could from this job. Their first child was born 6 May 1895 at Orderville, Kane, UT. It was a little girl they named Artiemesia. She brought much joy to Helen, as Joseph was working at the Ferry. In 1900 they were able to purchase a small farm across the river in Mt. Carmel, Utah, just a few miles from Orderville. Joseph was never afraid of work and enjoyed ranching and developing and cultivating the land. He raised hay, and had milk cows, chickens, and other cattle to sell. And he always had a fine team of horses. Both Joseph and Helen were devoted to the church and held many positions. At this time in their lives, Helen was the Primary President, and Joseph taught Sunday school. In June of 1901, Joseph was called on a mission for the church to the Southeastern States. He spent some time in Provo, taking the missionary courses. Helen and 6-year-old Artiemesia went with him. Helen said that it was here at this time that she saw bananas and oranges for sale. It was their first time to see bananas! When Joseph left for the two year mission, Helen and Artiemesia moved back to Orderville to live with her mother, Sarah Ann. While she lived in Orderville again, she served as a Relief Society Visiting Teacher, a counselor in the Primary, and a teacher in the Sunday school. Joseph served his mission as the apostles in the days of Christ-without "purse or scrip". The Elders had to depend on the people they met to give them a bed and meals as they traveled in the countryside. Lorenzo Snow was the Prophet of the Church at that time. Joseph kept a journal and recorded many wonderful experiences, stating that at one place the spirit was so strong that "his eyes runneth over with joy!" However, there were times when they went without food or a place to sleep. He was a great missionary. He returned on 6 September 1903 and on that very day he baptized his daughter Artiemesia, as she had turned 8 years old the previous May. After the mission, Joseph moved his family back to the farm in Mt Carmel. Their second child, Ray Joseph, was born 18 July 1904. Ray was his pride and joy. He used to tell me "girls are no good, because you just have to give them away" when they get married. In the next 8 years Helen and Joseph were blessed with three more children who lived. Jennie was born July 3, 1906, Bernice on March 25, 1909 and finally Lillis was born on July 29, 1912. The family lived on the farm in Mt Carmel when Ray, Jennie and Bernice were born, but had moved to Orderville by the time Lillis arrived. These child-bearing years were difficult, as Helen had several miscarriages and stillbirths. She once said that if all the babies she had carried would have lived, there would have been 13 children instead of only 5. I believe she was like me-with a negative RH factor, and grandpa was RH+. In those days these problems were unknown. Helen had stillborn twins, and it was thought she might die because she had such a difficult time with them. Her midwife through all these problems was Joseph's dear mother, Sally. Joseph provided for his family by farming. At that time, all the work was done with teams of horses. He told stories of times they had horses run away while cutting hay. There were also accidents. Once he had his foot and leg broken by a horse, but he never had them set by a doctor. The bones just healed and later in his life he limped. He also cut his little finger almost off, and when it healed; it was permanently bent I remember he could sure pinch if you put your finger in that bend. When they moved to Orderville in 1911-1912, they ran the "hotel." Helen: - and the girls cleaned the rooms, did the washing and cooked the meals. This is when Mesia met a young man from Kanosh, UT, named Preal George. They were married 19 Oct 1919. When Mesia moved to Kanosh, Helen felt very lonesome, and Kanosh seemed so far away. She and Mesia had more than a mother-daughter relationship-they were best friends. Helen felt like the bottom had fallen out of her life when Mesia left her home. In 1921, they sold the business in Orderville and bought a home and farm in Alton, Kane County, UT. The home was built by Helen's brother-in-law (Emma's husband) Jonathan B. Heaton. It was across the street from her brother, Isaac Robertson's home. At that time all the freight traffic from Salina to Kanab went through Alton and down Johnson Canyon. Salina was where the train tracks ended, and the wagons were too heavy to cross the sand between Orderville and Kanab. The children had schooling in Orderville through the 9th grade. When the family moved to Alton there was a teacher there who taught a "Little High School", but they had to go to St George to finish high school. Ray was able to graduate from high school and then he began to herd sheep. Jennie met George E. Heaton in Alton and was married 1 Jun 1926 in the St George temple. Exactly one year later, on 1 Jun 1927, Ray was married also in the St George temple. He had met a girl named Melba Pugh from Kanab whose family lived in Sink Valley each summer. Bernice moved to Kanab to find work and there she met Lloyd Pugh. They were married 16 May 1931. Later that fall, Lillis was called on a mission to the Central States; headquartered in Independence, MO. Helen again had a difficult time with all of her children growing up and leaving home. She did so enjoy them. Jennie and George came and lived with them, as George was frequently at the sheep herd. Ray and Melba bought a small home across the street to the west of Helen and Joseph. Ray helped on the farm during the summers as they had the sheep up in the canyon west of Alton. Joseph and Helen always had a big garden with potatoes, corn, beans, peas, onions, carrots, squash and many berry bushes. This kept them very busy. Helen also enjoyed raising beautiful flowers in the garden. She also made quilts, hankies, and doilies, and was ever churning butter and making bread. Joseph was busy watering, cutting and hauling hay, milking and caring for the cows, pigs, chickens and sheep on the farm. 1932 came as a severe trial for the family, as two of their precious daughters died only two weeks apart. On 27 October 1932 Jennie, who was living with them in Alton, had gone out to the garden and had a heart attack. She died before they could get word to George. She had been in poor health for some time. They had two daughters, Elaine, who was 4 years old and Dorothy who was only one and a half. Lillis was in the mission field and had an appendectomy operation. She was doing fine, and although the operation had gone well, some infection set in. She died 12 November 1932. In Artemisia’s history, she wrote "the Mission President, S.U. Bennion, who came home with the body said Lillis' last words were 'Just two steps Jennie, then we're all right' He felt there was a tie between the two girls, as they passed away just 15 days apart. This was a great sorrow to the entire family, but they accepted it as did Job of old, when he said "The Lord giveth, and the Lord taken away. Blessed be the name of the Lord." Helen took Jennie's children and cared for them until their father, George, remarried some years later. This did help to keep her busy. Joseph and Helen were always active in church. Joseph worked in the Sunday school. He was the Superintendent for many years. He also served in the Young Men's Mutual Improvement Association. He enjoyed teaching and helping the young people learn about the gospel. He was also a priesthood adviser and home teacher. He baptized all his children on their eighth birthday, except Artemesia, as he was on his mission. However, he baptized her as soon as he returned home. Helen worked in the Relief Society as President, Counselor, Work Director, and Visiting Teacher. She also worked in the Primary. While she was the President of the Relief Society, they, at that time, had to prepare the dead for burial, making their clothes and all. She was honored and crowned "Queen for a Day" on 7 Mar 1954, after moving to St George. A beautiful tribute was written for her by Mable Jarvis. Helen enjoyed quitting all her life. TO SISTER HELEN R. PALMER - OUR QUEEN FOR A DAY Crowned by St. George 4th Ward Relief Society, 7 March 1954. There is ONE among us here, whose example is most dear; ONE, whose years of gentle living, Humbly serving, kindly giving¬- Symbols of true Royalty Weave a pattern bright and fair, for us to emulate and share. Through her childhood years she knew Nice Parent Leadership, and grew to love the world of honest labor Of kindness to each friend and neighbor; to seek for faith instead of fame, And to be proud of her good name. A daughter of brave pioneers, She had not time for foolish fears; And found that joy, when each day ended Upon her own good deeds depended. She learned soon after she was eight To darn and mend; for fold clothes straight And, in due time, to cook and sew And all that good housekeepers know. In leisure hours, along with play, She learned to quilt, knit and crochet; And, in her well trained, nimble fingers, Each art and skill, and handcraft lives To bless her family and her friends And, through the years, her work extends In gentleness and dignity To help Relief Society. She's pieced enough quilt tops, we know To reach from here to Jericho; And miles and miles of quilting too Her busy hands found time to do. For all of sixty years or more, She has been adding to her score, At Alton, Orderville and here (St., George) Week after week, year after year, In each Relief Society Wherever she might chance to be; As block teacher and Officer Doing each task assigned to her, Contented with each day's reward Of joy in service of the Lord. She is one of twelve who are living still Who served as President at Orderville. Our pleasure, now, is to present This humble, heartfelt sentiment To Helen Palmer, whose good life As daughter, mother, and as wife Whose many years of kind and gracious serving Are so inspiring, and so deserving. As officers and many members, we Of the 4th Ward Relief Society Present you with this gift and crown, and say "God bless you, Queen Helen, now and always. By Mabel Jarvis-at the request of Vilate Leavitt and Nine Green, Queen Committee for March 7, 1954-Fourth Ward Relief Society, St. George, Utah. A note was added on the bottom: Dear Sister Helen, I count it a privilege and honor to be here for this occasion. You have always been an inspiration. Joseph and Helen went to St. George to work in the temple in the winter until 1936-37 when Ray decided to stay in from the sheep herd and help on the farm. They decided to buy a small house and stay in St George all year. They then built a large apartment house on their lot and had renters to help with living expenses. They also had a garden spot, barn and chicken coop. I remember Grandpa Joseph telling about bringing his team of horses down from Alton. He had to go through the mile-long tunnel in Zion National Park. As they went through the tunnel, the horses’ hooves made such a noise he had a hard time holding them. He rode one and led the other. It was a 100 mile trip. Joseph never owned a car. I remember the time he was going to learn to drive. We were at the meadow milking the cows and he was going to drive back to Alton. As he turned the corner to go up the lane to the house, he was going too fast and pulled back on the steering wheel, calling "Whoa! Whoa!" He went around the corner so fast he tipped over a 10 gallon can of milk that was in the back of the truck. The milk spilled out of the back end of the truck all the way up the lane. After that he said driving was not worth that much milk. He never tried to drive again. Joseph and Helen worked at the temple in St. George for over 20 years, doing the work for many people. Helen had been sending what money she could to England to have research done on her family line. I remember how happy she was when she received 300 names of her ancestors so she could get the temple work done for them. Joseph worked in the baptistery. I can still see Grandma ironing Grandpa's starched white shirts that he wore at the temple with a flat iron heated on her coal and wood stove. At age 82, Helen was having a hard time threading her needle to quilt She had heard of an operation to remove cataracts from a person's eyes that would help them see better. She had never been in a hospital or had anyone take care of her before, but she decided she wanted to have this procedure done. The operation took much longer than she had expected. I was expecting Raymond at the time (the summer of 1957) and I came up to St George to see the doctor. I went by Grandma and Grandpa's home and remember Grandpa sitting alone on the porch looking so sad. Grandma was gone for over two months, and would return in August When Raymond was born on 6 Sep 1957, she was home. She told me "Now you have as many kinds of children as Brigham Young," as Raymond was my first boy after having two girls. It was a great shock to me when Daddy called to tell me Grandma Helen Jane had had a stroke and was taken to Kanab to Aunt Bernice's home. She lived only six more days and passed away on 30 September 1957. I felt I had truly lost a best friend, as Grandma was always there for me and she was a person I could really talk to. This was also hard on my father, Ray, as he still depended so much on her and her advice. Her death also left Grandpa Joseph alone again, which was hard on him. My parents soon found that he couldn't live alone, so they moved down to St George in the fall and spent the winter there with him. Daddy worked in the temple with Grandpa and Mama taught school in Colorado City. During the summers, all three of them moved back to Alton to take care of the farm and the cattle they fed in the summer. Grandpa was very lonely for those 3½ years. In April of 1961 he, too, had a stroke. Mama rushed him to the hospital in Kanab and Aunt Bernice took him to her home there as they couldn't do anything for him in the hospital. He lived another two weeks and died on 15 April. 1961. He was 86½ years old. He was the last one of his brothers and sisters to die, so we know it was a happy reunion for him on the other side, and that he enjoyed being with his wife, Helen again, as well as his parents and brothers and sisters. PATRIARACHAL BLESSING OF JOSEPH PALMER A blessing by Thomas Chamberlain, Patriarch upon the head of Joseph Palmer, son of Zemira and Sally Knight Palmer. Born at Springdale, Washington County, Utah, November 20, 1875. Given at Orderville, Kane County, Utah, July 15, 1900. Brother Joseph, I place my hands upon your head and by virtue and authority of my holy calling seal upon you a patriarchal blessing. Thy lineage is of Ephraim, that choice son of Joseph who was sold into Egypt. Therefore, thou art a legal heir to the Holy Melchizedek Priesthood, and the great blessings the Lord has promised to bestow upon those who are of Ephraim. Our Heavenly Father has a glorious mission for thee to perform upon earth and he will strengthen and assist thee to accomplish thy mission successfully for thou art beloved of the Lord and His blessings will be upon thee and His preserving care about thee and His Holy Spirit will have charge concerning thy welfare and preservation. The prompting influence of the spirit of the Lord will be thy companion to direct and guide thee through life's journey. Therefore, dead brother, diligently heed the promptings of that divine and Holy Spirit and thou wilt not go astray in any of thy undertakings of life. Remain humble; seek the Lord in fasting and prayer and thy mind will be quickened, thine understanding enlarged to comprehend the principles of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. And thou shalt be endowed from powers from on high to proclaim those glorious, saving principles in simplicity and power in the convincing of the honest in heart. You will be an instrument in the hands of the Lord in bringing many precious souls into the fold of Christ. When trials and discouragements assail you, look unto the Lord in faith and he will hear and answer thy petitions and give thee that strength which is necessary to enable thee to stand firm and steadfast in all the changing scenes of mortality. 'Thine enemies shall not prevail against thee nor have power to confound thee in the Lord's ministry for in times of need thou shalt be prompted and inspired and made valiant in the testimony of Jesus, to the confounding of the wicked and the converting of the honest. In all thy journeyings by land and water thou shalt not be forsaken or left to thyself but God's power will be made manifest in thy deliverance from the dangers that assail thee. Thou wilt rejoice greatly in laboring for the salvation of souls in preaching the word of god and in officiating in the ordinances of the gospel in God's holy temples for the living and the dead. Thou wilt be blessed in thy labors and the bounties of earth hall crown thine efforts and thou wilt always be willing to use of thy substance and devote thy lime and talent for the advancing of God's work upon earth. Thou wilt control and direct thy family's affairs in righteousness and perfect harmony will prevail in thy household. Seek and serve the Lord faithfully and thy desires in regard to posterity shall be granted thee. Be prudent and wise in thy ways and manners of living, strictly observing the word of wisdom and thy life shall be prolonged and thy days lengthened upon earth to assist in the redemption of Zion and to take part in the erection of that great and holy temple which is yet to be reared in Zion's center stake. When thou hast finished thine earthly missions thou wilt be saved with the redeemed and have power to come forth in that great resurrection of the just to be crowned with glory, immortality and eternal lives. These blessings, dear brother, and all others that thy heart may desire in righteousness, for the Lord will loosen thy tongue and make thee mighty in performing His works and for the accomplishment of all the righteous desires of thine heart, and these blessings shall be made sure unto thee through faithfulness in keeping the commandments of GOD and I seal them upon thee in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ, Amen. Recorded in Book (A) Pages 266-267 PATRIARCHAL BLESSING OF HELEN JANE ROBERTSON PALMER Orderville Utah January 14, 1920 A blessing given by Haber J. Meeks Patriarch upon the head of Helen Jape (Robert-. son) Palmer daughter of Thomas and Sarah Ann (Cordingly) Robertson born at Kanab Kane Co. Utah March 16, 175. Sister Palmer according to thy request I lay nay hands upon thy head and to the Authority of the Holy Priesthood give unto thee a Patriarchal blessing which I pray the Lord to direct for thy encouragement and comfort, Thou art a daughter of Abraham through the lineage of Ephraim and chosen daughter of whom much is expected, Thou art entitled to all the graces and gifts and privileges promised to thy sex through the new and everlasting Covenant Thine integrity was proven in the spirit world-an& thy mission marked out before thou vast born. The Lord is pleased with the integrity of thins heart and thine life thus far has been approved by Him, Thy devotion to thy duties and callings in the Church have pleased the Lord and thou hast found favor in his sight: Thy trials and afflictions have been sanctified unto thee, thy soul hasp been purged and refined and thy spirit tempered to the harmony with the spirit of the Lord. Thou are entitled to the whisperings of the still small voice which shall guide thy feet and protect thee from the power of the evil one. In faith thou shall walk before the Lord, thou shalt be healed of thine infirmities and weaknesses and thy fifes work shall be accomplished in righteousness, It is thy privilege to teach the youth of Zion and thy teachings shall bear fruit unto the salvation of many souls. Thou shalt find pleasure in visiting the sick and needy and thy labors shall be abundantly regarded. It is thy privilege to labor in the House of the Lord, His Holy Temples, for the salvation of the dead, Thou shalt do a great Work for thy fathers house, lanes shall be revealed unto thee by Heavenly messengers and thou shalt witness the speaking in Lounges; the interpretation there of and many manifestations of the power of the Lord,. Thou shalt become a queen and Priestess unto the most High God. Approach thy mission with a cheerful heart, for the Lord shall bear thee up and strengthen thee for thy work. I seal this blessing upon thy head in obedience to the covenants thou Nast made and I seal thee up against the power of the destroyer unto the day of redemption, to come forth in the morning of the first resurrection. In the name of Jesus Christ Amen. Heber J. Meeks Patriarch

Life timeline of Joseph Palmer

Joseph Palmer was born on 20 Nov 1874
Joseph Palmer was 13 years old when The Great Blizzard of 1888 struck the northeastern United States, producing snowdrifts in excess of 50 ft (15 m) and confining some people to their houses for up to a week. The Great Blizzard of 1888 or Great Blizzard of '88 was one of the most severe recorded blizzards in the history of the United States of America. The storm, referred to as the Great White Hurricane, paralyzed the East Coast from the Chesapeake Bay to Maine, as well as the Atlantic provinces of Canada. Snowfalls of 10 to 58 inches fell in parts of New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, and sustained winds of more than 45 miles per hour (72 km/h) produced snowdrifts in excess of 50 feet (15 m). Railroads were shut down, and people were confined to their houses for up to a week. Railway and telegraph lines were disabled, and this provided the impetus to move these pieces of infrastructure underground. Emergency services were also affected.
Joseph Palmer was 18 years old when Electrical engineer Nikola Tesla gives the first public demonstration of radio in St. Louis, Missouri. Nikola Tesla was a Serbian American inventor, electrical engineer, mechanical engineer, physicist, and futurist who is best known for his contributions to the design of the modern alternating current (AC) electricity supply system.
Joseph Palmer was 29 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
Joseph Palmer was 40 years old when Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife, Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, were assassinated by a Yugoslav nationalist named Gavrilo Princip in Sarajevo, sparking the outbreak of World War I. Archduke Franz Ferdinand, Archduke of Austria-Este was a member of the imperial Habsburg dynasty, and from 1896 until his death the heir presumptive (Thronfolger) to the Austro-Hungarian throne. His assassination in Sarajevo precipitated Austria-Hungary's declaration of war against Serbia, which in turn triggered a series of events that resulted in Austria-Hungary's allies and Serbia's declaring war on each other, starting World War I.
Joseph Palmer was 46 years old when The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified, guaranteeing women's suffrage in America. The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibits the states and the federal government from denying the right to vote to citizens of the United States on the basis of sex. It was adopted on August 18, 1920.
Joseph Palmer was 65 years old when World War II: Nazi Germany and Slovakia invade Poland, beginning the European phase of World War II. World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most global war in history; it directly involved more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. In a state of total war, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.
Joseph Palmer was 71 years old when World War II: Combat ends in the Pacific Theater: The Japanese Instrument of Surrender is signed by Japanese Foreign Minister Mamoru Shigemitsu and accepted aboard the battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay. The Pacific War, sometimes called the Asia-Pacific War, was the theater of World War II that was fought in the Pacific and Asia. It was fought over a vast area that included the Pacific Ocean and islands, the South West Pacific, South-East Asia, and in China.
Joseph Palmer was 78 years old when Jonas Salk announced the successful test of his polio vaccine on a small group of adults and children (vaccination pictured). Jonas Edward Salk was an American medical researcher and virologist. He discovered and developed one of the first successful polio vaccines. Born in New York City, he attended New York University School of Medicine, later choosing to do medical research instead of becoming a practicing physician. In 1939, after earning his medical degree, Salk began an internship as a physician scientist at Mount Sinai Hospital. Two years later he was granted a fellowship at the University of Michigan, where he would study flu viruses with his mentor Thomas Francis, Jr.
Joseph Palmer died on Apr 1961 at the age of 87
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Joseph Palmer (20 Nov 1874 - Apr 1961), BillionGraves Record 45437075 Kanab, Kane, Utah, United States

Loading