Joseph Davanzo

1883 - 1947

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Joseph Davanzo

1883 - 1947
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Grave site information of Joseph Davanzo (1883 - 1947) at West Newton Cemetery in West Newton, Westmoreland, Pennsylvania, United States from BillionGraves
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Life Information

Joseph Davanzo

Born:
Died:

West Newton Cemetery

Cemetary Lane
West Newton, Westmoreland, Pennsylvania
United States

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finnsh

May 28, 2011
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Redonionite

January 22, 2017

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Life History for Theodore Beck

Contributor: finnsh Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

HISTORY OF THE LIFE OF THEODORE BECK By his daughter, Dessie Beck Morgan Theodore Beck was born on the 22nd of September 1848 at Saltum, Hjoving, Denmark. He was the fifth son of Stephen Jensen Jacobsen Beck and Inger Krystine Jacobsen. His brothers were Jacob, Peter, Christian, Stephen, and August. After they came to America two more boys and a girl named John, Daniel, and Laura Krystine Beck were born. Theodore’s parents accepted the gospel of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and were baptized in Denmark on 26th February 1857. Their oldest son Jacob was also baptized the same day and Peter was baptized the following year. When Theodore was three years old his parents sold their home in Denmark, bid their loved ones farewell, and came to America. Their baby son, August became very ill while they were on the ocean and died on the 29th of May 1862 and was buried in the Atlantic Ocean. The family came to Lehi, Utah with the pioneers and walked almost the entire distance across the plains. They lived in Lehi, Utah a few years where they suffered many hardships and much poverty. After their son John was born they moved to Alpine, Utah where they built a nice home and established a carpenter business and lived here until the parents died and the children had all married and established homes of their own. Theodore was baptized by Ebenezar Hunter on 1st July 1868 at Alpine, Utah and attended church and school there. He learned to play the violin taking only twelve lessons, but he became a very good violinist. He could change from one tune to another in just a second, and after hearing a tune only once he could play it on his violin. Most of the entertainments were at people’s homes or at church gatherings and dancing was very popular. Theodore became the musician at dances in the communities where he lived in Utah and Idaho. When he was twenty three years old he left Alpine, Utah (taking his violin with him) and went to Milcreek, Utah looking for work. He got employment working for a Mr Briggs, who had a neighbor by the name of Robert Smithies, who was a widower raising his large family alone. Brother Smithies also played the violin, and he loved to have young people come to his home in the evenings. They would slide back the furniture and dance, or make molasses candy and have lots of good times together, so naturally Theodore was invited to join in the fun. When Mrs. Smithies found out Theodore could play a violin, they became great friends. Theodore soon fell in love with the oldest daughter, Elizabeth Ann. They were married on 27 December 1882 by Jim Brown at Alpine, Utah at the home of Theodore’s parents, where they lived in part of the house the first year they were married. They often took Elizabeth’s small sisters to live with them as the father had to work and the older children went to school. One time when they were living in a house belonging to Theodore’s brother Christian, they decided to drive to Alpine to visit Theodore’s parents. Mary wanted to play with Christian’s girls, so they got into the buggy and started off without looking back. When they started off she decided to go too so followed along behind the buggy. A colt also followed the buggy and as long as she could see the colt she felt all right but when they went around a bend then she would cry and run dragging her nice starch bonnet by the strings until she could see the buggy once more. When they arrived Elizabeth went into the house and Theodore went to the barn to put his horses in the shade and feed them. Mary came and crept into the house and up some stair where she could rest. Her throat was so dry from running and crying she started coughing so the women came out to see what the noise was and there sat a tired little girl, so they took her in and gave her a drink and something to eat, and she sat on Elizabeth’s lap all afternoon and had a ride home in the buggy. Theodore always teased her about running a five mile foot race with a colt behind the buggy to Alpine. In June 1884 Theodore and Elizabeth came to Idaho to homestead a farm near Rigby. They traveled three weeks in a wagon with a cow tied behind. All of their possessions were in the wagon and when they arrived in Rigby they only had twenty five cents left. When they crossed the Drybed the water was so high they had to swim the horses and al most lost their team and wagon, but were finally able to get safely across, but lost their twenty five cents, so they started out their new life on their homestead glad to be at the end of their journey, and still have their possessions. They homesteaded one hundred sixty acres of good land three miles east and south of Lorenzo, Idaho in the LaBelle Ward. Land had to be cleared and a house built, also canals and ditches made. Theodore and Elizabeth worked hard to build a one room log house from cottonwood they got off their farm. It had a dirt roof and floor but was warm and they lived here until they were able to build a larger more comfortable house. As other settlers came they took up land further up on the ditch and Theodore became the last one on the ditch and was often at the mercy of some unscrupulous farmers who took his water and his crops suffered year after year for water. They had a deep well where water was drawn up with a bucket or wooden keg tied at each end of a rope which ran through a pulley. The water was poured into buckets to be carried to the house or poured into a wooden trough where the cows and horses came to drink. The trough was made from a large hollowed out cottonwood tree, which was placed on a base. The well also served as a refrigerator for Mother to put her milk, butter and cream in a bucket with a clean cloth tied over it and lowered down the well to keep cool. Dad was always up early in the morning working all day to clear the trees and brush from the land and care for his crops. His barns were built from logs and he always had some cows, horses and pigs to care for and provide meat and milk for the family. He was good to his animals never beating them and feeding them well. Another house was built as the family grew and more room was needed. Trees and flowers were planted to provide shade and beauty to their home. As more people came in to the territory and settled nearby they had their good times, too, mingling together at dances and church activities. Dad always being the musician playing his violin. They would travel as far as twenty five and thirty miles to play for dances in different wards. Sometimes other men played with him as second fiddler and they would be gone all night receiving but a small fee for playing. Their wives and children always went with them. Dad used tobacco for quite a number of years, but when he was very sick with pneumonia he quit and never used it again. For years a saloon was located across the road from their home and only once did Dad go in and drink with some friends. When he had difficulty walking across the street home his boys teased him and he was so embarrassed he never went there again, nor did his sons ever go there. In 1920 a new home was built and they were so happy to move into this new house. They mortgaged their farm and many winters Dad worked in the Rigby Sugar factory, driving in a buggy or sleigh and working on long twelve hour shifts then doing chores morning and nights after he got home and before he left for work to help pay off the mortgage. The even sold forty acres of land to their son Clarence and another forty acres to the daughter Dessie to help clear the other land from debt. Prices were low and water was scarce so there wasn’t much more than a living, and with a large family to provide for it was a slow process trying to pay off the loan. As dance orchestras took over the entertainment Dad missed the social dances he had been accustomed, so when a new dance hall named Riverside Gardens was built a mile from Dad’s farm in May 1925 he liked to walk down the lane two or three times a week to watch the dancers and sometimes dance a few times with friends. The owner gave him a free pass saying he made plenty of money on his sons, who also like to dance. They were sometimes called the dancing Becks, because they loved to dance from the time they were very young while Dad played the violin. Dad made a few trips to Utah to visit his parents and after they had passed away he visited his brothers. He liked to visit and tell of his earlier experiences in Utah when he was young. He was a jolly fellow and liked to tease and play jokes. He would have made a good debater as he surely liked to argue. He enjoyed having his children and grandchildren come home to visit. He would bring up a nice pan of apples from the cellar. Mother would pop corn and the children would dance and play games. Each year the whole family gathered together for Christmas dinner and then they would go to Lorenzo to the dance at night, but as they got older Dad and Mother cared for the children so their married children could go have a good time. In 1929 Mother became ill and had two operations having her arm amputated. This was a great sorrow to Dad and Mother, but he was always willing to help her. He had provided a good home for his family and worked on his farm until he was past seventy years old. On 2nd February 1930 Mother passed away and a few months later on 30th of April 1930 the house caught on fire and burned to the ground. Dad was very sad and heartbroken as he left his farm to live with his son Clarence a few miles away. He later met a woman named Mrs Jones near Rigby and they were married. It wasn’t a happy marriage and after a few moths he went to live with his daughter Viola for several months. He was sick for several months so when he got well, his son, Lester who had married and fixed up the old house on the farm, fixed up a room for Dad and he lived there until he became ill in November and was taken to the L.D.S. Hospital in Idaho Falls where he passed away on 26th November 1931. His funeral services were in the LaBelle Ward and he was buried beside Mother in the Cedar Butte Cemetery on 29th November 1931.

Life History for Theodore Beck

Contributor: finnsh Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

BIOGRAPHY OF THEODORE BECK BY NORMA BECK LARSEN Theodore Beck was born on 22 September 1859 at Saltum,Hjorring, Denmark. He was the fifth son of Stephen Jensen Jacobsen Beck and Inger Krystine Jacobsen. His brothers were Jacob, Peter, Christian, Stephen, born in Denmark. August was born while crossing the ocean and buried at sea. John, Daniel and Laura were born at Alpine, Utah. Theodore's parents accepted the gospel of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints and were baptized in Denmark on 26 February 1857. When Theodore was three years old his parents sold their home and came to America on the ship, Franklin, leaving Germany in April and arriving in New York 29 May 1862, going to Iowa by train and walking across the plains to Utah. Theodore walked beside his mother and wore his shoes out and lost his hat so his hair was bleached white when he got to Utah. They lived in Lehi the first few years and endured many hardships being unable to speak English and work was very scarce. They moved to Alpine to make their home and his father did carpenter work and carried the mail, later his brothers and sisters came to Utah. Theodore was baptized by Ebenezar Hunter on July 28, 1874 at Alpine, Utah and attended church and school there where he grew to manhood. He learned to play the violin taking only twelve lessons, but he became a very good violinist and the .musician at all the entertainments and dances held in the community, usually at the church or in people's homes. He could play a tune after only hearing it played one time. When Theodore was twenty-three years old he left Alpine to look for work and went to Mill Creek, Utah with his violin and suitcase. He worked for a Mr. Briggs who had a neighbor Robert Smithies, raising his large family alone Brother Smithies played a violin and he loved to have the young people come to his home in the evenings They moved the furniture and rolled up the rugs and danced or made molasses candy and had many good times When Mr. Smithies learned Theodore also played the violin they became good friends, so naturally Theodore was invited to join in the fun. He soon came to love the oldest daughter, Elizabeth Ann and they were married on 27 December 1882 by Jim Brown at Alpine, Utah at the home of Theodore's parents and lived in part of their house the first year of their marriage, then they moved to Mill Creek so Elizabeth could help her father with the family. In June, 1884 they moved to Idaho to homestead a farm near Rigby, Idaho. They traveled three weeks in a wagon loaded with their possessions and a cow tied behind, and while crossing the drybed by Rigby they almost lost the wagon and everything they owned. They homesteaded a one hundred sixty acre farm and began clearing cottonwood trees and sage brush. They built a cottonwood log house with dirt roof and floor, where they lived the first few years. The first winter Theodore went to Montana to work and Elizabeth lived alone on the homestead. They bought equipment to farm with and worked hard to plant crops, set out a large orchard and planted a good garden. They raised stock to provide meat and dairy products and chickens for their eggs. They dug a well where .water was drawn up by buckets tied to a rope over a pulley, which also served to keep their milk, butter, cream and eggs cool when they were put in the bucket with a white cloth fastened on top and lowered down into the wall. On 4 August 1887 a son, Claud, was born, the first of their ten children, six sons and four daughters born on their homestead at LaBelle, Idaho. As people settled in the community they had good times going to church, entertainments, and dances and Theodore always played his violin. He played in an orchestra with his family accompanying him in the buggy, sleigh or wagon. The children took music lessons and also played with their father at dances. Later when orchestras were hired for dances Theodore missed this entertainment and when Riverside Gardens was built near his home he often walked to the dances to watch the dancers and visit friends. He built a larger log house with bedrooms upstairs and a lumber addition, then in 1919 they mortgaged their farm to build a new house and were so glad to have a nice home, but they struggled the rest of their lives to pay off the mortgage. Theodore worked hard and was always up early doing chores, but prices were low and they had a large family to support, so it was difficult to make much progress financially. He worked several years at the Rigby sugar factory to make payments on the mortgage on their farm. He made a few visits to Utah to visit his family but after his parents died he didn’t go often, but he missed their association living so far from them. Theodore used tobacco for years but quit when he became ill with pneumonia. He went with Elizabeth and their family to the Logan Temple and were sealed as a family in 26 November 1924. Theodore loved to visit and enjoyed having their children and Elizabeth’s sisters and families come to their home on holidays to have dinner and visit. Elizabeth became ill in 1929 and had two operations, having her arm amputated but the following February she passed away. Theodore was very lonely without his companion and in April 1930 their home burned to the ground, and he was without a home, so he went to live with his son Clarence. He married again but this was not a happy marriage and ended in a divorce a few months later. He lived in one room of the old log house for one year, then he became ill and was taken to Idaho Falls LDS hospital where he passed away October 1931.

History of Daniel Beck

Contributor: finnsh Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

History of Daniel Beck By Stephen F Beck, nephew From the book “In Memory of the Becks” compiled by Stephen F Beck This history of Uncle Dan, that I will attempt to write will be as I remember him. It will be very vague as I was very young when he passed away. Daniel Beck was born September 24, 1867, at Alpine, Utah, a son of Stephen Jensen Beck and Kerstina Jacobsen Beck, converts to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints from Denmark. These good people emigrated to Utah in 1862. Dan was the youngest son of eight brothers and one sister, Jacob, Peter, Christian, Stephen, Theodore, August, who died crossing the ocean as a baby, John and Laura. Grandfather and Grandmother were proud people and took a pride in rearing their children to become leading citizens among their associates, although, after arriving in Utah it was very difficult for them to do the things they wished for their large family. In Denmark they were trained in a trade and my Grandfather was a good carpenter and Grandmother an excellent seamstress. She made all the clothing and even the suits for her sons. As they wanted to educate their children, they were very happy when they were finally able to send their two youngest children Daniel and Laura to college where they completed a normal teaching course. After leaving college Daniel went to Beaver, Utah to teach school. After teaching in Beaver a few years Daniel became Superintendent of Schools of Beaver County and sent for his sister to come and teach there. They became outstanding citizens of Beaver. It wasn’t long until Dan fell in love with a beautiful girl in Beaver, Hellena Robinson. When he told his brother Jacob that he was in love and was going to get married, Jacob told him he was too young and that he should wait a few years. Buy Dan said, “Well, you wait until you see my girl and then you decide.” And when they saw what a lovely girl he had fallen in love with they certainly did change their minds. Uncle Dan came to our home on Highland from Beaver at a time for his marriage and all the family were very well pleased with his choice. Helena was a tall dark-complexioned, and very beautiful woman. Dan and Hellena remained very much in love and happy until he passed away . Dan was six feet tall and handsome. He had the type of personality that attracted people, so he became a popular man in his new community. Dan held very many positions of trust in Beaver and was very well like. He was at one time Postmaster of Beaver and owned and operated a general store. He helped to organize the Republican party in Beaver and was quite active in the politics of this small town. The education he had received at the Alpine Public School and at the Brigham Young Academy had stood him in good stead and he was able to accomplish a lot of things in a few short years that he was permitted to live. Daniel and Hellena were blessed with a lovely baby boy and they named him Dan after his father and proudly talked of all the children they would have. For three years they were perfectly happy and enjoyed a full life together. But tragedy struck their happy home. This proud and happy father who was looking forward very much to the birth of a new child in their family contracted typhoid fever and passed away November 2, 1897. He left a much bereaved wife and a young son just about three years old. A few months after his death his wife gave birth to a little girl and named her Lena. His family at Alpine greatly mourned his passing and they all traveled to Beaver to attend his funeral. They went on the train to Milford and from Milford thirty miles by stage to Beaver. Dan was only twenty-nine years old. At his death the people of Beaver grieved at the loss of this good man. After Dan died Lena could not see any reason to live and she was very, very lonely. She would pack her trunk and suit cases and come on the train to our home on Highland every summer and remain till fall, as father had a large home and we loved to have her and the children with us. When Aunt Lena visited us we did all we could to console her but every time she was along (alone) for just a few minutes she would just lie on her bed and sob and cry. There was no cure for her heartbreak and when young Daniel was just 10 years old and little sister was seven their mother died. She seemed to be very happy that she was at last going to be with her beloved husband. Her children were raised by her sister, Ann Lowe and her husband who did not have any children of their own. With the help of her folks and my father the children were well taken care of and received all the advantages of schooling and good training. They no doubt have inherited many of the fine qualities and characteristics of their wonderful parents. My father always said that Dan was the only one of the boys that had an education and could have made a great success in life Too bad he had to die so young! We all remember and honor the worth of this wonderful man who lived such a short time with us and did so much. At the time of his death he was a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints. He was baptized when he was ten years old at Alpine on the 5th day of November 1877. His endowment were done the 31st day of May 1950 and he was sealed to his parents on the 9th of October 1951.

Life History of Inger Kirstine Jacobsen Beck

Contributor: finnsh Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Life history of Inger Kirstine Jacobsen Beck By Cora Beck Adamson, Great Grand-daughter From the book: “In Memory of the Becks” compiled by Stephen F Beck Inger Kirstine Jacobsen Beck was born February 15, 1827 in Alborg in the county of Stift, Denmark. She was the daughter of Peter Jacobsen, and Kirstine Marie Jacobsen. Her grandfather on her mother’s side was Jens Orndrup and her Grandmother on her mother’s side was Inger Orndrup. Kirstine was just two years old when her mother died in confinement. Her mother had three children. Her parents’ home was Foulume, Denmark, according to the information that she gave to her granddaughter, Minnie Beck Hicken, while she was still living in Alpine. Her mother was a dressmaker from the time she was old enough to sew and I suppose that it was from her mother that she received her love of sewing. Her mother’s people were well-to-do. Her brother Christian was a tailor, “a perfect tailor too,” she was quick to add. Her brother Peter was a mechanic of wooden shoes. He was a master at his trade. Her stepmother had nine children. Kerstine surely stressed that her own brothers were very good one as a tailor and the other a master at making wooden shoes. Her brother Christian died when he was twenty-nine years old. She was a beautiful woman of twenty years when she met and married Stephen Jensen Beck, son of a village school master. Stephen met Kerstine when he went to her settlement. About the year 1856 Kerstine heard the gospel as revealed to the Prophet Joseph Smith. She recognized its truths and being a diligent student of the Bible she urged the acceptance of the new faith on her husband and other members of his family. By this time they had three sons, Jacob, Peter and Christian. Jacob was born July 20, 1848, Peter on October 10, 1850 and Christian on June 23, 1855. Soon several of them accepted the message and were baptized members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints. She and her husband and their oldest boy Jacob walked four miles through the snow and helped to cut a hole in the ice so they could be baptized. This was on February 26, 1857. On the 24th of May of the same year she gave birth to her fourth son, Stephen. She loved her husband very much and she was proud of him. She always called him “Stebbin”. Her fifth son was born September 22, 1859 and was called Theodore. After being baptized the family began making preparations to come to America and Zion, the gathering place of the Saints in the great western desert. They left home in April, 1862, for Hamburg, Germany and from there embarked on the sail ship “Franklin”. They left Germany Tuesday, April 15, 1862. On May 24, 1862 while on voyage, she gave birth to another little boy and they named him August. But he did not stay with then long for he died and was buried at sea. On the family records it states that this little one was buried in the Atlantic Ocean. Kerstine must have felt very bad about his death because she always talked about this little son and always said that he starved to death as she did not get enough to eat to be able to nurse him and there was not any milk to give him. Over fifty deaths occurred during the sea voyage and as was customary at that time they were rolled in canvas or burlap, weighted, and dumped overboard. The boys were homesick and their experience made a lasting impression on their young lives. The company arrived in New York harbor, May 29th and the next ten days were spent on the train traveling to Florence, Nebraska, which they reached June 9, 1862. They were in Nebraska for over a month, waiting for wagon teams to arrive from Salt Lake City and for the proper organization to take them to the Valley. On July 14th they left Florence with a group of four hundred immigrants with eighty wagons. Captain Christian A Madsen and Ola N Liljenquislt were in charge of the wagon train. How long the tedious ocean trip to the United States, followed by the long train ride across the states to Nebraska and the longer journey by wagon to the mountains must have seemed to this beautiful mother! I’m sure that she tried all she could to make the journey easier for her boys and her husband. It must have been discouraging to make the scanty meals taste good. We know that she must have longed for the day to reach the valley when they would have enough to eat and a good place to stay. All who were well and strong walked across the plains. They were very tired when they finally reached Salt Lake City, September 23, 1862. Shortly after arriving at Salt Lake City they moved down to Lehi. Here in Lehi they spent two hard years. Not speaking the English language very well and being very quiet and very proud they did not make their plight known to anyone so they nearly starved. Many, many times they did not have anything to eat. They had a few fish that the father and the boys were able to catch from Utah Lake. One fall Kerstine took the older boys and went out in the fields to glean some wheat. They worked very hard to gather up a little pile of wheat by the edge of the field. This wheat was left by the men as they cut the wheat with scythes. It was customary to let the women glean the fields for what they could pick up and after Kerstine had gathered up her little pile the farmer came and loaded it on his wagon. She had done all her work for nothing. She was truly heartsick. They even gathered willows from around Utah Lake and wove them into baskets to sell but they could not get anyone to buy them. Brigham Young advised them to move to Alpine. During the time in Lehi, John was born, January 31, 1865. In Alpine Kerstine gave birth to her eighth son, Daniel, on September 24, 1867 and then to her great joy and also the joy of the family, on November 24, 1872 a little girl was born to them. They named her Laura Kerstine. Kerstine was an excellent seamstress and during pioneer days she did all the sewing for her big family, as well as assisting neighbors in making suits for their menfolks. She loved canaries and raised them to sell. One Grandson remembers her knitting woolen covers to hang over the bird cages at night. She loved to read and was a very intellectual woman. She loved to read her Bible and she knew it unusually well. She was a very ambitious woman who had a great desire in her heart to have her children succeed in life. She finally had a chance to send two of her children to college. She was very happy when Dan and Laura could attend the new Brigham Young Academy at Provo. They both studied under Dr. Karl G Maeser. Laura was the youngest girl ever to graduate. Dan and Laura were both school teachers whose ability was recognized. Kerstine would be very happy today if she could know all of her successful and great-great-grandchildren. She set a wonderful pattern for all her descendants to follow. Grandmother became embittered at something that happened in the church at Alpine and said that they did not treat her right. So she would walk six miles to American Fork to attend services at the Presbyterian Church. However her name was never taken from the records of the Latter Day Saints Church. When she was quite old a grandson Gusmore was left in her care and she took care of him through all the children diseases and sent him to school and to church. Gusmore was quite a big handful for this elderly couple to cope with and he brought a lot of unhappiness into their lives. Grandma Beck always had cake or cookies for her grandchildren when they stopped to see her on their way home from school, and she was always glad to see them. After the marriage of her grandson Gus and the death of her beloved “Stebbin” she was left alone and it was decided that she should live with John in American Fork. It was hard for her to live with John and his young growing family so they built a little room out in back for her and it was here that she spent her last few days upon the earth. The last few years of her life her mind was not so keen and it was hard for her to remember things. She had lived a wonderful life and had worked very hard caring for a big family and it is no wonder that she was worn out in body and mind. She died at John’s home on May 11, 1911, three months after her 84th birthday and was buried at the Cemetery at Alpine. Her funeral was held in the Presbyterian Church. I’m sure it must have been a sad funeral when they all remembered that it was Kerstine that first accepted the gospel in Denmark and was baptized in the icy waters of the river. She gave up so much for her church and suffered so greatly when she buried a little baby in the ocean and walked across the plains to Utah. All this she did because she believed in the church and we wonder what made her give up her love for the gospel after she suffered so much for it. Grandmother on a winters day, Sent the children off to school, she showed them the way, Cooked a dish of home dried fruit, Made her husband a Sunday suit, Baked a dozen loaves of bread, Was proud of her new Parlor and made the beds. Taught her daughter how to sew, Never had much of this world’s dough, Read her Bible and went to church we know, Wasn’t ever one to put on a big show. Loved her husband and her big strong boys, Had a lot of this world’s cares and joys. She was great pioneer and no one will ever know or understand how much this wonderful mother went through to leave her children and all her descendants such a valuable legacy.

History of Jacob Stephenson Beck and Dorthe Marie Christensen

Contributor: finnsh Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Jacob Stephenson Beck and Dorthe Marie Christensen (Lath) “In Memory of the Becks” by Stephen F Beck Jacob Stephensen Beck was born in Hune, Hjorring, Denmark, June 28, 1795. His father’s name was Stephen Jensen Koedal. He was born about 1761 at Hune, Hjorring, Denmark. His mother’s name was Bodil Christensen Beck. Beck was her maiden name from which we get the Beck name. However, the family lived on a creek in Denmark and the name Beck means creek in Denmark. Jacob was a very devout Christian, and a priest in the Lutheran Church. He was the father of fourteen children, seven sons and seven daughters. Four of their children, Stephen, Christen and Fredrick, and a daughter name Lucy Marie accepted the gospel of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints (The Mormon Church) and emigrated to America. Stephen and his family came in 1862 and the other three in 1866. It is said that he had a large estate and a large home and was well-to-do. All of their children and families would assemble together during the Christmas season. The name of all his children in their order of birth are as follows: Stephen Jensen Jacobsen Beck born 16 November 1818 Salturn, Hjorring, Denmark Carpenter Gerthe Hanne Beck born 2 May 1820 Christen Jennetius Jacobsen Beck born 14 April 1822Province of Saltom, Denmark Christian Laurtiz Beckborn 20 February 1824Flade, Hjorring, Denmark Hansine Petrine Beckborn 17 December 1825Flade, Hjorring, Denmark Inger Marie Boline Beckborn 20 November 1827Flade, Hjorring, Denmark Carl Adolph Emil Beckborn 17 January 1829Flade, Hjorring, Denmark Fredrick Jacobsen Beckborn 13 February 1831Flade, Hjorring, Denmark Mason Inger Marie Boline Beckborn 12 Mar 1833Flade, Hjorring, Denmark Wilhelmine Marie Beckborn 13 February 1834Flade, Hjorring, Denmark Luck (Lucy) Maria Beck (Bergland)born 7 February 1839Flade, Hjorring, Denmark Peter Beckborn 23 January 1841Flade, Hjorring, Denmark Inger Marie Boline Beckborn 13 November 1844Flade, Hjorring, Denmark Julius Christian Beckborn 6 November 1847Flade, Hjorring, Denmark About the four children that came to America we have compiled only short histories so that the things they did will not be forgotten. This is just a small way that we might pay tribute to the memory of these brave men and women who were such good pioneers and gave up so much for their church. Today the descendants of these four men and women number nearly a thousand and including the married in-laws. They are living in Utah and the surrounding states. They are a wonderful posterity. I am very sure that these proud people who left their home in Denmark and gave up all they had for the church would be happy to know that they left a posterity that is a credit to them. (The information of this family in Denmark was received from Hellen Christensen, a Genealogist in the church Genealogy Society of Utah. We have again engaged her for further research on the Beck Family as she is well acquainted with the Becks in Denmark.)

Life History of Isadora Jamison, Peter Jacobsen Beck, Margaret Boddison

Contributor: finnsh Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Isadora Jamison, Peter Jacobsen Beck, Margaret Boddison From the book “In Memory of the Becks” compiled by Stephen F Beck Peter Beck, the son of Stephen and Kerstina Jacobsen Beck was born in Virborn, Denmark, October 10, 1850. He was the second son having an older brother Jacob. His parents were converts to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. When young Peter was between the age of eleven and twelve years old he sailed with his father and mother and the other boys from Hamburg, Germany. His younger brothers were Christian, Stephen, and Theodore. There were six hundred other passengers, most of whom were Mormons bound for the same destination. They sailed on the good ship “Franklin” and suffered the many privations incident to steerage passage at that time. The food rations were small and of poor quality, and as a result much sickness prevailed. To use Peter’s own word, “Over fifty deaths occurred during the sea voyage and as was customary at that time they were rolled in canvas or burlap, weighted and dumped overboard. I was a young boy and inexperienced and very homesick and the impression made on my mind of this gruesome sight will never be erased from my memory.” Young Peter Beck met these difficulties with fortitude and a boyish faith in the future. He was blessed with a great heritage; the heritage of a clean sound body, and a keen active mind. The journey of Peter as a young boy from his native land of Denmark was beset by many hardships which were common to the early pioneers of Utah. The long tedious ocean trip to the United States, followed by the trek across the broad expanse of mountain and prairies land by ox teams and horses were long to be remembered. Quoting Peter again, “By this time we started on our journey across the great stretch of country between the Missouri River and Great Salt Lake, I had become more reconciled to conditions, and being a young healthy boy, was beginning to enjoy my experience. The one great drawback was my inability to either talk or understand the English language. Fortunately I formed the friendship of an English boy of about my own age and I rapidly acquired a knowledge of the language. This boy, whose name I cannot now recollect and myself along with all members of the company who were well and strong, walked the entire distance from the Missouri River to Salt Lake City. After a few days in the Valley the family moved to Lehi, Utah. Soon after their arrival, young Peter obtained employment as a sheep herder. He followed this work for some time, and when a young man of eighteen started in the cattle business on a small scale for himself. He prospered in the work and followed it for about ten years. He planted the first trees at what is now known as Saratoga Springs. He was one of the first settlers on Highland. On searching through the old Homestead records in the Federal Building in Salt Lake City we found that Peter Beck took out a Homestead in the year 1878. This homestead consisted of eighty acres of land. At this time Peter was twenty-eight years of age. On one of his trips to Goshen, located on the Southern shore of Utah Lake, he met and courted a young lady, Isadora Jamison, a beautiful girl of face and figure. They were married in the old Endowment House on Temple Square, Salt Lake City on the 29th day of December 1873. They located on Highland bench, where Peter had built a modest home and prospered. To this union, seven children were born, Stephen, Florence, Avery, Martha and William, also a set of twins who died in infancy. When William was a young man of sixteen or seventeen he met with an accident which caused his death. He was stacking hay at the Oscar Bergland ranch at Gunnison, Utah, when a Jackson fork accidentally ran through his kidney. Stephen and Martha left American Fork in their early youth and went to live in Vernal, Utah. Peter Beck and his wife, Isadora, were divorced and later in life Peter Beck, at the age of thirty six, married another good and beautiful woman by the name of Margaret Boddison, who at the age of fourteen was converted to Mormonism in Staffordshire, England and left her parents and brothers and sisters to come to Utah with two Mormon missionaries. She settled in Alpine at the home of Mr and Mrs Benjamin Bates. She was a very lonely and homesick girl and for many years longed for her native land. To this union were born ten children, Laura, Emma, Byron, Teresa, Knord, Calvert, Margaret, Daniel, and Milton and one daughter who died at birth. They lived in Alpine for a few years then moved back to Highland where they built a comfortable brick home. Later in life they purchased the Jackie Robinson home about two miles out of American Fork on the Alpine Road. During the years 1914-15-16 and 17 Peter was under contract with the United States Government to carry mail between American Fork and Topliff. The route was through a stretch of country where in winter the roads were but little better than a trail. It was in November, 1918, that tragedy struck their home. Their young son Dan, who was sixteen years of age, was accidentally shot by one of his companions while they were cleaning a shot gun. He passed away about four weeks after the accident from lockjaw, caused from the buckle of his overall which lodged in his shoulder. Although life went on, the effects of this tragedy could not be erased from their memory and the health of Peter seemed to fail from then on. At the age of 76 he passed away at the family home on February 26, 1926. Peter Beck was retiring in his disposition, but in his quiet unassuming way made many warm friends who loved him for his integrity of purpose and for his clean, upright manner of living. He kept the divinity of the truth of the gospel he embraced in his early youth. At the time of his death he was survived by his wife, Margaret, and twelve children, forty-one grandchildren, and seven great-grandchildren. On December 26, 1928, his wife Margaret passed away at the home of a daughter, Laura Huish at Magna, Utah at the age of sixty. Throughout her life, she made God her confidant. She was faithful to the gospel trusting in God’s wisdom in all things. Two years after her passing tragedy struck the family again. Milton the youngest was struck by a coal truck, while he was crossing the street delivering milk. He died instantly, leaving a wife, Archelous Lavoin, and a small son, Milton Jr. Since this time Stephen, Avery, and Laura have all passed away. Peter Beck and his first and second wives could have not better monument than their children who have all brought credit to their parents.

Life History of Stephen Jensen Jacobsen Beck

Contributor: finnsh Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Stephen Jensen Jacobsen Beck By Stephen F Beck, grandson From book “In Memory of the Becks” compiled by Stephen F Beck Stephen Jensen Jacobsen Beck was born 16 November 1818 at Salturm (Saltum) Hjorring Denmark. A son of Jacob Stephensen Jensen Koedal Beck. Stephen Beck’s father was a deacon in the Lutheran church and Stephen was the oldest child of a family of fourteen children. In his youth he learned the carpenter trade, in which he excelled. He was especially good at cabinet making and finishing. At an early age he went away from home to help build a school house and while there he met Inger Kirstine Jacobsen and brought her to his father’s house where they were married. He was very much criticized for marrying out of his social strata as he was from a tradesman’s family and she was not. He said that she was the one he wanted and could not help but love a beautiful and intelligent girl like her. Grandmother was born February 15, 1827, nine years after grandfather. In about the year 1856 they were contacted by the Mormon missionaries and readily accepted the Gospel of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. They were baptized the 26 February 1857. Many times have I heard them tell of walking four miles in the snow and cold and cutting the ice that they might have the opportunity of being baptized. My father Jacob being their oldest boy was baptized with them. He was only nine at the time. Stephen’s father was a well-to-do man who had a large home. Every Christmas all the married children went home and took their families with them and stayed with their parents for a whole month, feasting and rejoicing. Stephen did well in his carpenter trade and managed to make a comfortable living for his wife and boys. But the desire to come to Zion was so strong in the hearts of him and his wife that they saved all they could and made plans to leave Denmark. With the money they saved and the little that Stephen borrowed from his brother Christian he finally was able to leave his native land and sail for America. He left his parents and most of his family there and it must have been with some misgivings and sorrow that they said good-by because there surely was not any hope of seeing his beloved parents and loved ones again in this life. They gave up a lot for the gospel but they never regretted it. Later, two of his brothers and one sister joined him in Utah. In the early spring of 1862 they set sail on the good ship Franklin with 600 other people. Most of them were Mormons. They were all bound for Utah and they suffered many privations incident to steerage passage on the sailing vessels of that time. The ships were small and they were often very poorly equipped to feed the many passengers. What food they did have was of a very poor quality and was rationed. Many of the Saints died on the way and were buried at sea. They were rolled in burlap and weighted and thrown overboard. They were on the ocean for six weeks and had a hard voyage. Stephen had five sons with him, my father Jacob, age 14, Peter, age 12, Christian, age 7, Stephen, age 5, Theodore, age 3. While on the ocean Grandmother gave birth to another son, August. Grandmother often said that she could not get the proper food to eat in order to nurse him and he starved to death. It was a sad day for these wonderful parents when they buried this little boy in the ocean. After a long voyage they arrived in the New York Harbor May 29, 1862 and immediately left for Florence, Nebraska, by train. They were 10 days on the train and must have marveled at the vastness of the country. And many times I suppose Stephen wondered how far it was to Utah and how long before they would get there. When they reached Florence they were in a hurry to get ready to leave for Utah so they could be in the Salt Lake Valley before it got too late in the fall. They left Florence on July 14, with Captain Christion A Madsen and the Ola N Lillyenquist company. It was a happy day on September 23, 1862, when they arrived in Salt Lake City along with the other 400 immigrants and some 80 wagons that had been their homes for more than two months. They had walked the long distance to Utah. No one rode in the wagons that was able and big enough to walk. They boys had walked the entire distance barefooted and often their feet were very sore. The food had been very scarce and they looked forward to having enough food to eat and a good home to live in when they reached Utah. But it seems that the suffering of this good family of Stephen Beck had just begun. They remained only a short time in Salt Lake City, for they were then sent to Lehi with others of the same company. They lived in Lehi about two years in a small adobe house that had a dirt roof. This poor little home was situated at the south end of Lehi. They were very lonely and homesick many times, often very hungry. There was not much work for a carpenter in Lehi, even a very good carpenter, and Stephen tried very hard to find something to do to get food for his family. They did just about everything but ask for food and they were much too proud to beg for anything to eat. Often they walked down to the lake to catch a few fish to eat. They cut willow branches and wove baskets and went around from house to house trying to sell them. There was not any money in the small town of Lehi and people just could buy the baskets. Even the bishop could not purchase one of them and this disappointed my grandfather very much and for a long time he felt rather bitter about not even being able to sell a basket to the Bishop. Grandfather and Grandmother worked hard with their boys one time to clean a little wheat in one of the farmer’s fields hoping to get enough wheat to make some bread, but just as soon as they got a little pile made, the owner came along, put it in his load and hauled it away. Cruel treatment for such worthy people. While at Lehi another son was born and they named him John. In 1864 they moved to Alpine, Utah, about six or seven miles up the Lehi creek bed to build a home on the north side of this same creek. Here Stephen spent a long time building a lovely home for his family. They built by the bridge that crossed into the town of Alpine. It didn’t take the people of Alpine long to find out the worth of a good carpenter. He helped to build most all their homes and barns and many of them are still standing. His oldest sons had to seek work away from home to help make a living. Jacob and Peter worked hard for different men and received very little pay, often not getting much more than board and room. This family was made very happy, when in 1866 two brothers, Christian and Frederic joined them at Alpine. A sister, Lucy also came but she and her husband journeyed to Sanpete County to make their home. Frederic was a very good mason and Christian was a farmer. At Alpine they were called farmer Beck, mason Beck, and carpenter Beck. Stephen Beck very often did the carpenter work on the homes after his brother Frederic had finished the mason work. They were the main builder of the first meeting house and many other buildings. Stephen Beck finally built himself one of the most commodious homes in Alpine. It was a long large house with a lean the full length of the back part and a porch the full length of the front, facing the street. It had an upstairs in which he had a large carpenter shop where he made cupboards, tables, chairs, and other items of furniture. It was not possible to go to the store and buy furniture at that time so Carpenter Beck was kept very busy, and he enjoyed his work, doing the very best he could. Some grandchildren are exceedingly proud today of the pieces of furniture of their grandfather’s that are in their homes. Coffins were much needed in this new settlement in which to bury loved ones that passed away. My Grandfather built many, many coffins and built them lovingly, for he liked his neighbors and felt a sadness in his heart when they had the misfortune to lose their loved ones. He built the coffins well and charged very little for his work. His skill as a builder of everything will never be forgotten in Alpine. Stephen also did considerable farming on ten acres of land that he planted into gardens and grain and an orchard. Everything they ate had to be raised on their own land. Grandfather had a fine horse and carriage. The carriage was painted a bright color and had two seats. The front seat and the back seat were built so that the two backs were together, one facing the front and the other facing the back. His horse was pure white and there was a pretty little white dog that would sit in the front seat with him. Grandfather was a very ambitious man and often held public jobs. For many years he carried the mail from American Fork to Alpine. The people of Alpine would congregate at the Post Office which was on the front porch of one of the homes and watch for Brother Beck to come around the corner at the end of the long main street with the mail. He was so punctual one could set his watch by Grandfather’s arrival and departure with the mail. Here at their new home they were blessed with two more children, a son Daniel, and my weren’t they proud when they had a baby girl born to them! They named this first and only daughter, Laura. They spent all the money they could make to give their children the schooling and music lessons that they wanted them to have. Stephen and Theodore were each given a violin and a piano was placed in the home for Laura to play. Grandmother Beck was a woman of great courage and convictions. She was an extensive and intensive reader – so much that is was unusual to see her without printed matter or a book in her hands. She appreciated what education could do for her children when she often walked, and sometimes in a snow storm to American Fork with a ham in her arms to give to the Presbyterian Church where her daughter Laura was learning the elements of education. All the children attended elementary school in Alpine and received the best there was at that time. They were very happy when they were able to send Daniel and Laura to the Presbyterian Mission School in American fork and later to the new B Y Academy at Provo. They both graduated as teachers. Daniel went to Beaver to teach and it was a very proud of him. Grandfather and Grandmother were heart broken when at the age of thirty he died, leaving a pregnant wife, Lena, and one son. Later a baby girl was born to Lena. I well remember when they went down to Beaver on the train to Dan’s funeral. This was the hardest sorrow they were ever called upon to bear. Laura taught school for fifty years in different parts of the state and was a rated as a very fine teacher. Beside providing for this large family my grandfather provided a good home for his grandson Gusmore Beck. Grandfather was very strict and insisted that his children do what was right. He taught them to be industrious. Still, boys will always do the things that they want to do anyway. At one time Steve and Theodore and some other boys from Alpine made a dugout under the creek bridge to play in. They were using it to play cards and had a table and chairs there. One day Grandfather caught them playing and told Grandmother the boys were gambling and he didn’t like it. Grandfather had a very good Danish temper and when he got angry he was angry all over. Grandmother told him to destroy it and he said, “You wait, I’ll fix that.” When spring came and the high water came down the creek he went under the bridge to the dugout and threw everything in the room into the high water. The boys weren’t very happy about it but Grandfather felt that he had done the right thing. Steve and Thed, as the two boys were called, were very good at playing their violins. They played for all the dances in Alpine. As is often the case when children are young they get sick. Once when Gusmore was quite small he came down with smallpox. Grandfather and his family were quarantined. Grandfather did not like to be told what to do at any time and so one day after staying in as long as he could stand it he left the house and walked down through the creek to Highland where Jake lived. He said he didn’t have smallpox and he wouldn’t give it to anybody, so he wasn’t going to stay home. He crossed over through the fields and reached Jake’s place just as the family was sitting down to dinner. As he came in the home, we all left the table, as we were afraid of catching the smallpox. Mother gave him his dinner and Mother said he ate a whole pie. After dinner as he was leaving our house our little dog bit him on the leg and he fell down. He got up in a rage and we children stood around the corner of the house laughing at him. He gave the dog a good whipping and then went home the same way he had come, through the fields and along the creek bed. Naturally my grandfather liked to visit with his children but my father never seemed to have time to stop and talk to him. One day passing our home on his way to visit his son Peter he drove up to the barn where I was working and said, “Vere is Yake?” I replied that I did not know. “Vere is he gone?” I said I did not know and he said “Vell when will he be back?” Again I said I didn’t know. This made my short-tempered Grandfather very angry and he said, “Ya don’t know a dammed ting, do ya?” and hit his horse and drove away real fast. My Grandfather and Grandmother always spoke in a broken English and Grandfather was always called “Stebbin” by his wife. He lived a clean, industrious, and conscientious life. He and Grandmother complemented each other with a full realization of life’s responsibilities and with gratitude in their hearts for their new adopted country. On the morning of October 3rd, 1903, after having been feeble for some time, and unable to leave the house Grandfather passed away. He was sitting in his arm chair and Grandmother had just brought his breakfast to him. After eating his breakfast he was putting on his shoes when one fell to the floor. Grandmother went to assist him but found that he was just passing from this life. In one more month he would have been eighty-five years of age. During the last years of Grandfather Beck’s life he built a casket for himself. He built this casket in the upstairs of his home in his workshop. They said it was the very best casket he had ever built. He lined it and it was beautiful and when he had it finished he lay down in it to see if it fit. He knew he was going to die so he was sure he would need a casket and he might just as well built it for himself and do a good job. He had remained true to the gospel that he had accepted as a young man in Denmark. Six years after Grandmother and Grandfather arrived in Utah from their native land they made a trip to Salt Lake City where they were married for time and all eternity in the old endowment house at Salt Lake City. He always did his best to set a good example for his children. As a young boy I can well remember Grandfather bringing a chair to the front of the meeting house and placing it directly in front of the pulpit so that he could hear the speaker, as he had become hard of hearing late in life. “Men are of two kinds, and he was of the kind I’d like to be. Some preach their virtues, and a few express their lives by what they do. That sort was he.”

History of Theodore Beck

Contributor: finnsh Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

HISTORY OF THE LIFE OF THEODORE BECK By his daughter, Dessie Beck Morgan Theodore Beck was born on the 22nd of September 1848 at Saltum, Hjorring, Denmark. He was the fifth son of Stephen Jensen Jacobsen Beck and Inger Krystine Jacobsen. His brothers were Jacob, Peter, Christian, Stephen, and August. After they came to America two more boys and a girl named John, Daniel, and Laura Krystine Beck were born. Theodore’s parents accepted the gospel of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and were baptized in Denmark on 26th February 1857. Their oldest son Jacob was also baptized the same day and Peter was baptized the following year. When Theodore was three years old his parents sold their home in Denmark, bid their loved ones farewell, and came to America. Their baby son, August became very ill while they were on the ocean and died on the 29th of May 1862 and was buried in the Atlantic Ocean. The family came to Lehi, Utah with the pioneers and walked almost the entire distance across the plains. They lived in Lehi, Utah a few years where they suffered many hardships and much poverty. After their son John was born they moved to Alpine, Utah where they built a nice home and established a carpenter business and lived here until the parents died and the children had all married and established homes of their own. Theodore was baptized by Ebenezar Hunter on 1st July 1868 at Alpine, Utah and attended church and school there. He learned to play the violin taking only twelve lessons, but he became a very good violinist. He could change from one tune to another in just a second, and after hearing a tune only once he could play it on his violin. Most of the entertainments were at people’s homes or at church gatherings and dancing was very popular. Theodore became the musician at dances in the communities where he lived in Utah and Idaho. When he was twenty three years old he left Alpine, Utah (taking his violin with him) and went to Milcreek, Utah looking for work. He got employment working for a Mr Briggs, who had a neighbor by the name of Robert Smithies, who was a widower raising his large family alone. Brother Smithies also played the violin, and he loved to have young people come to his home in the evenings. They would slide back the furniture and dance, or make molasses candy and have lots of good times together, so naturally Theodore was invited to join in the fun. When Mrs. Smithies found out Theodore could play a violin, they became great friends. Theodore soon fell in love with the oldest daughter, Elizabeth Ann. They were married on 27 December 1882 by Jim Brown at Alpine, Utah at the home of Theodore’s parents, where they lived in part of the house the first year they were married. They often took Elizabeth’s small sisters to live with them as the father had to work and the older children went to school. One time when they were living in a house belonging to Theodore’s brother Christian, they decided to drive to Alpine to visit Theodore’s parents. Mary wanted to play with Christian’s girls, so they got into the buggy and started off without looking back. When they started off she decided to go too so followed along behind the buggy. A colt also followed the buggy and as long as she could see the colt she felt all right but when they went around a bend then she would cry and run dragging her nice starch bonnet by the strings until she could see the buggy once more. When they arrived Elizabeth went into the house and Theodore went to the barn to put his horses in the shade and feed them. Mary came and crept into the house and up some stair where she could rest. Her throat was so dry from running and crying she started coughing so the women came out to see what the noise was and there sat a tired little girl, so they took her in and gave her a drink and something to eat, and she sat on Elizabeth’s lap all afternoon and had a ride home in the buggy. Theodore always teased her about running a five mile foot race with a colt behind the buggy to Alpine. In June 1884 Theodore and Elizabeth came to Idaho to homestead a farm near Rigby. They traveled three weeks in a wagon with a cow tied behind. All of their possessions were in the wagon and when they arrived in Rigby they only had twenty five cents left. When they crossed the Drybed the water was so high they had to swim the horses and al most lost their team and wagon, but were finally able to get safely across, but lost their twenty five cents, so they started out their new life on their homestead glad to be at the end of their journey, and still have their possessions. They homesteaded one hundred sixty acres of good land three miles east and south of Lorenzo, Idaho in the LaBelle Ward. Land had to be cleared and a house built, also canals and ditches made. Theodore and Elizabeth worked hard to build a one room log house from cottonwood they got off their farm. It had a dirt roof and floor but was warm and they lived here until they were able to build a larger more comfortable house. As other settlers came they took up land further up on the ditch and Theodore became the last one on the ditch and was often at the mercy of some unscrupulous farmers who took his water and his crops suffered year after year for water. They had a deep well where water was drawn up with a bucket or wooden keg tied at each end of a rope which ran through a pulley. The water was poured into buckets to be carried to the house or poured into a wooden trough where the cows and horses came to drink. The trough was made from a large hollowed out cottonwood tree, which was placed on a base. The well also served as a refrigerator for Mother to put her milk, butter and cream in a bucket with a clean cloth tied over it and lowered down the well to keep cool. Dad was always up early in the morning working all day to clear the trees and brush from the land and care for his crops. His barns were built from logs and he always had some cows, horses and pigs to care for and provide meat and milk for the family. He was good to his animals never beating them and feeding them well. Another house was built as the family grew and more room was needed. Trees and flowers were planted to provide shade and beauty to their home. As more people came in to the territory and settled nearby they had their good times, too, mingling together at dances and church activities. Dad always being the musician playing his violin. They would travel as far as twenty five and thirty miles to play for dances in different wards. Sometimes other men played with him as second fiddler and they would be gone all night receiving but a small fee for playing. Their wives and children always went with them. Dad used tobacco for quite a number of years, but when he was very sick with pneumonia he quit and never used it again. For years a saloon was located across the road from their home and only once did Dad go in and drink with some friends. When he had difficulty walking across the street home his boys teased him and he was so embarrassed he never went there again, nor did his sons ever go there. In 1920 a new home was built and they were so happy to move into this new house. They mortgaged their farm and many winters Dad worked in the Rigby Sugar factory, driving in a buggy or sleigh and working on long twelve hour shifts then doing chores morning and nights after he got home and before he left for work to help pay off the mortgage. The even sold forty acres of land to their son Clarence and another forty acres to the daughter Dessie to help clear the other land from debt. Prices were low and water was scarce so there wasn’t much more than a living, and with a large family to provide for it was a slow process trying to pay off the loan. As dance orchestras took over the entertainment Dad missed the social dances he had been accustomed, so when a new dance hall named Riverside Gardens was built a mile from Dad’s farm in May 1925 he liked to walk down the lane two or three times a week to watch the dancers and sometimes dance a few times with friends. The owner gave him a free pass saying he made plenty of money on his sons, who also like to dance. They were sometimes called the dancing Becks, because they loved to dance from the time they were very young while Dad played the violin. Dad made a few trips to Utah to visit his parents and after they had passed away he visited his brothers. He liked to visit and tell of his earlier experiences in Utah when he was young. He was a jolly fellow and liked to tease and play jokes. He would have made a good debater as he surely liked to argue. He enjoyed having his children and grandchildren come home to visit. He would bring up a nice pan of apples from the cellar. Mother would pop corn and the children would dance and play games. Each year the whole family gathered together for Christmas dinner and then they would go to Lorenzo to the dance at night, but as they got older Dad and Mother cared for the children so their married children could go have a good time. In 1929 Mother became ill and had two operations having her arm amputated. This was a great sorrow to Dad and Mother, but he was always willing to help her. He had provided a good home for his family and worked on his farm until he was past seventy years old. On 2nd February 1930 Mother passed away and a few months later on 30th of April 1930 the house caught on fire and burned to the ground. Dad was very sad and heartbroken as he left his farm to live with his son Clarence a few miles away. He later met a woman named Mrs Jones near Rigby and they were married. It wasn’t a happy marriage and after a few moths he went to live with his daughter Viola for several months. He was sick for several months so when he got well, his son, Lester who had married and fixed up the old house on the farm, fixed up a room for Dad and he lived there until he became ill in November and was taken to the L.D.S. Hospital in Idaho Falls where he passed away on 26th November 1931. His funeral services were in the LaBelle Ward and he was buried beside Mother in the Cedar Butte Cemetery on 29th November 1931.

STEPHEN JENSEN JACOBSEN BECK: By Stephen F. Beck – Grandson

Contributor: finnsh Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

STEPHEN JENSEN JACOBSEN BECK By Stephen F. Beck – Grandson Stephen Jensen Jacobson Beck was born 16 November 1818 at Salturm, Hjorring, Denmark. A son of Jacob Stephensen Beck who was the son of Stephen Jensen Koedel Beck. Stephen Beck’s father was a deacon in the Lutheran Church and Stephen was the oldest child of a family of fourteen children. In his youth he learned the carpenter trade, in which he excelled. He was especially good at cabinet making and finishing. At an early age he went away from home to help build a school house and while there he met Inger Kirstine Jacobsen and brought her to his father’s house where they were married. He was very much criticized for marrying out of his social strata as he was from a tradesman’s family and she was not. He said that she was the one he wanted and he could not help but love a beautiful and intelligent girl like her. (Grandmother was born February 15, 1827, nine years after grandfather. In about the year 1856 they were contacted by the Mormon Missionaries and readily accepted the gospel of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. They were baptized the 16 February 1857. Many times have I heard them tell of walking four miles in the snow and cold and cutting the ice that they might have the opportunity of being baptized. My father Jacob being their oldest boy was baptized with them. He was only nine at the time. Stephen’s father was a well-to-do man who had a large home. Every Christmas all the married children went home and took their families with them and stayed with their parents for a whole month, feasting and rejoicing. Stephen did well in his carpenter trade and managed to make a comfortable living for his wife and boys. But the desire to come to Zion was so strong in the hearts of him and his wife that they saved all they could and made plans to leave Denmark. With the money saved and the little that Stephen borrowed from his brother Christian he finally was able to leave his native land and sail for America. He left his parents and most of his family there and it must have been with some misgivings and sorrow that they said goodbye because there surely was not any hope of seeing his beloved parents and loved ones again in this life. They gave up a lot for the gospel but they never regretted it. Later, two of his brothers and one sister joined him in Utah. In the early spring of 1862 they set sail on the good ship Franklin with 600 other people. Most of them were Mormons. They were all bound for Utah and they suffered many privations incident to steerage passage on the sailing vessels of that time. The ships were small and they were often very poorly equipped to feed the many passengers. What food they did have was of a very poor quality and was rationed. Many of the Saints died on the way and were buried at sea. They were rolled in burlap and weighted and thrown overboard. They were on the ocean for six weeks and had a hard voyage. Stephen had five sons with him, my father Jacob, age 14, Peter, age 12, Christian, age 7, Stephen, age 5 and Theodore, age 3. While on the ocean Grandmother gave birth to another son, August. Grandmother often said that she could not get the proper food to eat in order to nurse him and he starved to death. It was a sad day for these wonderful parents when they buried this little boy in the ocean. After a long voyage they arrived in the New York Harbor May 29, 1862 and immediately left for Florence, Nebraska, by train. They were ten days on the train and must have marveled at the vastness of the country. And many times I suppose Stephen wondered how far it was to Utah and how long before they would get there. When they reached Florence they were in a hurry to get ready to leave for Utah so they could be in the Salt Lake Valley before it got too late in the fall. They left Florence on July 14, with Captain Christian A. Madsen and the Ola N. Lillyenquist Company. It was a happy day on September 23, 1862 when they arrived in Salt Lake City along with the other 400 immigrants and some 80 wagons that had been their homes for more than two months. They had walked the long distance to Utah. No one rode in the wagons that were able and big enough to walk. The boys had walked the entire distance barefooted and often their feet were very sore. The food had been very scarce and they looked forward to having enough food to eat and a good home to live in when they reached Utah. But it seems that the suffering of this good family of Stephen Beck had just begun. They remained only a short time in Salt Lake City, for they were then sent to Lehi with others of the same company. They lived in Lehi about two years in a small adobe house that had a dirt roof. This poor little home was situated at the south end of Lehi. They were very lonely and homesick many times, often very hungry. There was not much work for a carpenter in Lehi, even a very good carpenter, and Stephen tried very hard to find something to do to get food for his family. They did just about everything but ask for food and they were much too proud to beg for anything to eat. Often they walked down to the lake to catch a few fish to eat. They cut willow branches and wove baskets and went around from house to house trying to sell them. There was not any money in the small town of Lehi and people just could not buy the baskets. Even the Bishop could not purchase one of them and this disappointed my grandfather very much and for a long time he felt rather bitter about not even being able to sell a basket to the Bishop. Grandfather and Grandmother worked hard with their boys one time to clean a little wheat in one of the farmer’s fields hoping to get enough wheat to make some bread but just as soon as they got a little pile made, the owner came along, put it on his load and hauled it away. Cruel treatment for such worthy people. While at Lehi another son was born and they named him John. In 1864 they moved to Alpine, Utah, about six or seven miles up the Lehi creek bed to build a home on the north side of this same creek. Here Stephen spent a long time building a lovely home for his family. They built by the bridge that crossed into the town of Alpine. It didn’t take the people of Alpine long, to find out the worth of a good carpenter. He helped build most all their homes and barns and many of them are still standing. His oldest sons had to seek work away from home to help make a living. Jacob and Peter worked hard for different men and received very little pay, often not getting much more than board and room. This family was made very happy, when in 1866 two brothers, Christian and Frederic joined them at Alpine. A sister, Lucy, also came but she and her husband journeyed to Sanpete County to make their home. Frederic was a very good mason and Christian was a farmer. At Alpine they were called farmer Beck, mason Beck and carpenter Beck. Stephen Beck very often did the carpenter work on the homes after his brother Frederic had finished the mason work. They were the main builders of the first meeting house and many other buildings. Stephen Beck finally built himself one of the most commodious homes in alpine. It was a long large house with a lean the full length of the back part and a porch the full length of the front, facing the street. It had an upstairs in which he had a large carpenter shop where he made cupboards, tables, chairs, and other items of furniture. It was not possible to go to a store and buy furniture at that time so Carpenter Beck was kept very busy, and he enjoyed his work, doing the very best he could. Some grandchildren are exceedingly proud today of the pieces of furniture of their grandfather’s that are in their homes. Coffins were much needed in this new settlement in which to buy loved ones that passed away. My grandfather built many, many coffins and built them lovingly for he liked his neighbors and felt sadness in his heart when they had the misfortune to lose their loved one. He built the coffins well and charged very little for his work. His skill as a builder of everything will never be forgotten in Alpine. Stephen also did considerable farming on ten acres of land that he planted into gardens and grain and an orchard. Everything they ate had to be raised on their own land. Grandfather had a find horse and carriage. The carriage was painted a bright color and had two seats. The front seat and the back seat were built so that the two backs were together, one facing the front and the other facing the back. His horse was pure white and there was a pretty little white dog that would sit in the front seat with him. Grandfather was a very ambitious man and often held public jobs. For many years he carried the mail from American Fork to Alpine. The people of Alpine would congregate at the Post Office which was on the front porch of one of the homes and watch for Brother Beck to come around the corner at the end of the long main street with the mail. He was so punctual one could set his watch by Grandfather’s arrival and departure with the mail. Here at their new home they were blessed with two more children, a son Daniel, and my weren’t they proud when they had a baby born to them! They named this first and only daughter, Laura. They spent all the money they could make to give their children the schooling and music lessons that they wanted them to have. Stephen and Theodore were each given a violin and a piano was placed in the home for Laura to play. Grandmother Beck was a woman of great courage and convictions. She was an extensive and intensive reader-so much that it was unusual to see her without printed matter or a book in her hands. She appreciated what education could do for her children when she often walked, and sometimes in a snow storm to American Fork with a ham in her arms to give to the Presbyterian Mission School where her daughter Laura was learning the elements of education. All the children attended elementary school in Alpine and received the best there was at that time. They were very happy when they were able to send Daniel and Laura to the Presbyterian Mission School in American Fork and later to the new B.Y. Academy at Provo. They both graduated as teachers. Daniel went to Beaver to teach and they were very proud of him. Grandfather and Grandmother were heart broken when at the age of thirty he died, leaving a pregnant wife, Lena, and one son. Later a baby girl was born to Lena. I well remember when they went down to Beaver on the train to Dan’s funeral. This was the hardest sorrow they were every called upon to bear. Laura taught school for fifty years in different parts of the state and was rated as a very fine teacher. Besides providing for this large family, my grandfather provided a good home for his grandson, Gusmore Beck. Grandfather was very strict and insisted that his children do what was right. He taught them to be industrious. Still, boys will always do the things that they want to do anyway. At one time. Steve and Theodore and some other boys from Alpine made a dugout under the creek bridge to play in. They were using it to play cards and had a table and chairs there. One day grandfather caught them playing and told grandmother the boys were gambling and he didn’t like it. Grandfather had a very good Danish temper and when he got angry he was angry all over. Grandmother told him to destroy it and he said. “You wait, I’ll fix that.” When spring came and the high water came down the creek, he went under the bridge to the dugout and threw everything in the room into the high water. The boys weren’t very happy about it but grandfather felt that he had done the right thing. Steve and Thed, as two of the boys were called, were very good at playing their violins. They played for all the dances in Alpine. As is often the case when children are young they get sick. Once when Gusmore was quite small, he came down with smallpox. Grandfather and his family were quarantined. Grandfather did not like to be told what to do at any time and so one day after staying in as long as he could stand it, he left the house and walked down through the creek to Highland where Jake lived. He said he didn’t have smallpox and he wouldn’t give it to anybody, so he wasn’t going to stay home. He crossed over through the fields and reached Jake’s place just as the family was sitting down to dinner. As he came in the home, we all left the table, as we were afraid of catching the smallpox. Mother gave him his diner and Mother said he ate a whole pie. After dinner as he was leaving our house, our little dog bit him on the leg and he fell down. He got up in a rage and we children stood around the corner of the house laughing at him. He gave the dog a good whipping and then went home the same way he had come, through the fields and up along the creek bed. Naturally, my grandfather likes to visit with his children but my father never seemed to have time to stop and talk to him. One day passing our home on his way to visit his son Peter, he drove up to the barn where I was working and said, “Vere is Yake?” I replied that I did not know. “Vere is he gone?” I said I did not know and he said, “Vell, when will he be back?” Again I said I didn’t know. This made my short-tempered grandfather very angry and he said, “Ya don’t know a damned ting, do ya?” And hit his horse and drove away real fast. My grandfather and grandmother always spoke in a broken English and grandfather was always called “Stebbin” by his wife. He lived a clean, industrious, and conscientious life. He and grandmother complemented each other with a full realization of life’s responsibilities and with gratitude in their hearts for their new adopted country. On the morning of October 3rd, 1903, after having been feeble for some time, and unable to leave the house, grandfather passed away. He was sitting in his arm chair and grandmother had just brought his breakfast to him. After eating his breakfast he was putting on his shoes when one fell to the floor. Grandmother went to assist him but found that he was just passing from this life. In one more month he would have been eighty-five years of age. During the last years of Grandfather Beck’s life, he built a casket for himself. He built this casket in the upstairs of his home in his workshop. They said it was the very best casket he had every built. He lined it and it was beautiful and when he had it finished he lay down in it to see if it fit. He knew he was going to die so he was sure he would need a casket and he might just as well build it for himself and do a good job. He had remained true to the gospel that he had accepted as a young man in Denmark. Six years after Grandmother and Grandfather arrived in Utah from their native land they made a trip to Salt Lake City where they were married for time and all eternity in the old Endowment House at Salt Lake City. He always had time to attend his meetings and did his best to set a good example for his children. As a young boy I can well remember Grandfather bringing a chair to the speaker, as he had become hard of hearing late in life. “Men are of two kinds, and he was of the kind I’d like to be. Some preach their virtues, and a few express their lives by what they do. That sort was he.”

Stephen Jensen Beck & Inger Kirstene Jacobsen Posted 25 Feb 2010 by BCreer13 on ancestry

Contributor: finnsh Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Stephen Jensen (Jacobsen) Beck & Inger Kirstine Jacobsen “And it shall come to pass in the last days, …the mountain of the Lord’s house shall be established in the top of the mountains, and shall be exalted among the hills, and all nations shall flow into it. And many people shall go and say, Come ye, and let us go up to the mountain of the Lord, to the house of the God of Jacob; and he will teach us of this ways, and we will walk in his paths…” Isaiah 2:2-3 The oldest of fifteen children, Stephan Jensen (Jacobsen) Beck was born November 16, 1818 at Saltum, Proestegaard Hjarring, Denmark, to Dorthe Marie Christiansen and Jacob Stephansen Beck, a schoolteacher and Lutheran parish clerk. We know little of Stephan’s early life. As he matured he became a “large, strong,” man, generous and industrious. On the 9th of April 1848, when he was thirty, he married Inger Kirstine Jacobsen. Born in Alstrup, Aalborg, Denmark, on the 15th of February 1827, Kirstine was one of three children born to Kirsten Marie Jensdatter (Jensen) and Peder Jacobsen. Stephan, a very fine carpenter and cabinet maker, was from a tradesman’s family and she was not – though a beautiful and intelligent girl – and Stephan was criticized for marrying out of his “social stratum.” Stephan’s father was well to do. Each Christmas he invited his married children and their families to come to his large home for a “whole month of feasting and rejoicing.” Within ten years of the Beck’s marriage, a series of events began that were to emphatically (and eternally) change not only their lives but also those of their descendants for many generations. Sent by President Brigham Young from Salt Lake City, Utah, “Apostle Erastus Snow of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and his associates established themselves permanently as the founders of the Scandinavian Mission; the first branch of the mission was organized in Copenhagen in September of 1850 and then attention was paid to the city of Aalborg… The missionaries there met with considerable opposition in the beginning and in 1851 the Saints were subject to much persecution and mobbing. On one occasion their meeting hall was almost destroyed and many were ill treated by the mob. Nearly all the windows in the private dwellings of the Saints were broken.” In spite of this resistance, however, the Aalborg branch was organized in November of 1850 and “was for many years one of the most flourishing in Europe.” The following November the Aalborg Conference of the Scandinavian Mission, containing the “Aalborg, Bronderslev, Frederikshavn and Hjorring branches,” came into being. The city of Aalborg, “had about 20,000 inhabitants in 1850” The population has grown significantly. Land and methods and industries have improved and today, a century and a half later, “Danish fields and villages are laid out in geometric patterns in the Tutland region along the North Sea Coast. The intensely cultivated fields radiate out from cozy villages. The rest of Scandinavia does not have Denmark’s fertile soils, but all Scandinavian countries share the Danish tradition of painstakingly frugal employment of the land to raise quality livestock and dairy cattle, grains and vegetables.” With the organization of the Aalborg Conference and the translation of the Book of Mormon in to the Danish language (also in 1851) the stage for the Beck drama was set and many changes of scenery were to follow. Kirsten listened attentively to the missionaries. A diligent student of the Bible, she was the first to be converted and urged her husband and sons to accept the new faith. On February 26, 1857, Stephan, Kirstine, and their eldest sons, Jacob and Peter who were 9 and 7 at the time, walked “four miles in the cold and snow” to a place where ice was broken for their baptisms. Stephan “did well in his carpenter trade” in Denmark but had a strong desire to be with other members of the Church in the United States. With money he had saved and sums he borrowed from the Perpetual Emigrating fund and from his brother Christian, Stephen, Kirstine and their family joined a starting company of 210 Saints headed by a Jens Christian Anderson Weibye and because of our present knowledge of the subsequent ocean voyage and overland trek is much greater than it otherwise would be. Jens kept the records, handled the money, and kept everyone informed of the preparations. He also cut out canvas for tents, leather for suitcases and material for sleeping bag covers and bags, which the emigrants could then sew together. He helped obtain water casks and tin ware for eating purposes. They did not intend to leave Denmark unprepared. “More emigrants left Scandinavia for Zion in 1862 than in any other year, a total of 1,556.” It is also interesting to note from the complete list of ships carrying emigrants from Europe during April and May of 1862 that a total of 3,589 Latter-day Saints sailed from Hamburg, Liverpool and Le Havre – all landing in New York Harbor. Most of the survivors of these groups joined with emigrants from other areas to make a total of 5,536 Saints to leave Florence, Nebraska, that summer in anticipation of reaching the Salt Lake Valley before the winter began. The steamer “Albion” sailed from Aalborg on April 6, 1862, with (the Beck’s and) over 400 Saints…(Were they celebrating the organization of the Church exactly 32 years before?)” The ship reached Kiel in Holstein on the eve of the 7th… The journey was then continued April 8th to Altona (port) and Hamburg… In the evening the emigrants went on board the “Franklin” which was anchored in the Elbe River waiting for them and other passengers. Jens gives the following account:“We went on board the ‘Franklin’ in the evening of Tuesday (April 8th) and I was appointed to locate the emigrants in their bunks below deck. These bunks, 160 in number, were so wide that three persons could easily have room in one of them side by side. After getting our baggage in order, we received our rations of provisions. These consisted of beef, pork, peas, beans, potatoes, pearl barley, rice, prunes, syrup, vinegar, pepper, coffee, tea, sugar, butter, rye bread, sea biscuits, water, flour, salted herring, salt, and oil (for the lamps). We lighted 11 lanterns every night, 6 of which belonged to the ship and 5 to the emigrants. We hired an extra cook in Hamburg for 90 rigsdaler (dollars), and besides him two of our brethren served as assistant cooks. We thus had our dinners nicely cooked in about the following routine, viz., Sunday we had sweet soup Monday, pea soup Tuesday and Wednesday, rice Thursday, pea soup Friday, barley mush Saturday, herring and potatoes ”The “Franklin” was a large American sailing vessel operated by Captain Robert Murray. The ship set sail on April 15, 1862, from Hamburg with 413 emigrating Saints. They were under the charge of Christian August Madsen, an Elder returning home. On board the ship the company was organized into eight districts. Jens F. Mortensen was appointed baggage master; Anthon H. Lund, interpreter; and Christian Anderson, captain of the guard. Jens continues:“Some of the emigrants carried the measles with them from home and the disease soon spread to all parts of the ship so that no less than 40 persons, mostly children, were attacked at once. Many of the emigrants were also suffering with diarrhea, which caused very much weakness of body. We lost the appetite for sea biscuits but learned to soak them in water or tea from 8 to 12 hours, which softened them so that they could become more palatable. The sick were served twice a day with porridge made from barley, rice or sago, and almost every day pancakes could be had by the hundreds for the sick who could not eat the ‘hard tack’ (sea biscuits). Wheat bread was also baked for some of the old people.” “We held a council meeting every night and the sanitary conditions of the ships apartments were attended with great care. Three times a week the decks were washed and twice a week the ship was thoroughly fumigated by burning tar. A spirit of peace prevailed and very few difficulties occurred. The captain and crew were good-natured and obliging, and so were the cooks who even served the sick when they were not on duty.” “We held at times meetings of worship on the upper or lower decks and every morning at 5 o’clock the signal for rising was given by the clarinet, or accordion. At 7 am and 9 pm a similar signal was sounded calling the Saints to assemble in their several districts for prayer. Most every day we amused ourselves a short time by dancing on the deck to music played by some of our brethren or members of the crew. We could thus have had an enjoyable time had it not been for the sorrow occasioned by the many sick and dying among us on account of the measles.” “Up to this date (May 27th) 3 adults and 43 children under eight have died, nearly all from the measles. During the last few days the chicken pox has also broken out among us and four cases have already developed.”The bodies of those who died were wrapped in canvas or burlap, weighted and dropped overboard – an agonizing experience. One of Stephan’s sons, Peter, later said: “I was a young, inexperienced and homesick boy. And the impression upon my mind caused by this gruesome sight will never be erased from my memory.” Jens reports further:“We have had head winds most of the time; otherwise we could have been in New York before now for the ‘Franklin’ is a first-class ship. We have been very little troubled with sea sickness.” “On Thursday, May 29th, in the forenoon, the ‘Franklin’ arrived at New York. The emigrants were placed on a transport steamer to be landed at Castle Garden, but on arriving at the wharf they were not permitted to go ashore because of some cases of measles yet existing among them. After 18 of the sick had been taken to the hospital, the rest were returned to the ‘Franklin” and there remained on board two more nights and a day. Finally, on May 31st, they were landed at Castle Garden where they were met by Elders Charles C. Rich (of the Council of the Twelve), John Van Cott and other Brethren. The Beck’s were listed in the “Franklin” Roster as: Name Age Actual names and ages Steffen Jensen Beck 35 Stephan Jensen Beck 44 Inger Kirstene Beck 32 Inger Kirstine 35 Jacob Seffensen Beck 11 Jacob Stephansen 13 Peder Jacobsen Beck 9 Peter Jacobsen 11 Christen Jacobsen Beck 4 Christian Mathias 6 Theodor Jacobsen Beck infant Theodore 2 Steffen Jacobsen Beck 3 Stephen 5 So Stephan and Kirstine had started out with five sons. Kirstine, though tired and worn, presented him with yet another during the voyage. Jens recorded the birth thus:“Tuesday, the 22 (of May) at 6 o’clock in the morning Brother Steffen Jensen Beck’s wife of Aalborg Conference gave birth to a son after one hour’s sickness who was named Christian August Baek. It took place very quietly.” (There is a discrepancy as to the date of August’s birth. The family group sheet lists is as May 24.)There was also another entry in Jens’ diary: “June 13: Steffen Jensen’s Beck’s of Aalborg, Chr. August 1/6 year old ‘svaekkelse’ (a weakening or wasting away)”(This Weibye record indicates August’s death after the ocean voyage. Beck’s, SFB, alludes to an ocean burial and the Family Group Sheet lists death while “Crossing Atlantic.) Among the 48 persons who died in the ‘Franklin’ company during the voyage was Brother Jens Andersen from Veddum, Aalborg Conference, who, with his own means had assisted 60 or 70 poor saints to emigrate. He died on the North Sea on April 25th soon after the ship had left Cuxhaven…In all 62 of the company died between Hamburg and Salt Lake City. “Then they set out on foot through the streets of New York for the train station past jeering observers. Jens noted the children who pointed at them and hooted, ‘Jews! Jews! Jews!’ Many immigrants of the time were received less warmly than they might have expected on America’s shores” They left “New York, May 31st at 9 pm by extra railway train to Albany where they arrived the next morning. (June 1st). From there the journey was continued by train via Syracuse, Rochester, Niagara, Windsor, Detroit, and Chicago to Quincy, Illinois, and thence by steamboat across the Mississippi river to Hannibal, Missouri, and again by train to St. Joseph, Missouri, where they arrive June 6th. The following day they boarded the steamboat, ‘Westwind’ and left St. Joseph at 10 pm… The company arrived at Florence, Nebraska, on Monday, June 9th at 10 pm.” “Enroute they marveled at the Missouri (River), casually sweeping trees and other objects downstream.” On Tuesday, June 10th the emigrants pitched their tents a short distance north of Florence, and again marveled at a display of thunder, lightening and rain: “We Danes have never seen such a storm, for the sky was almost like an ocean of fire.” Here orderly arrangements were made for wagons, oxen, food, and other necessities. Jens helped emigration agent Joseph W. Young record the provisions each person received – not only such expected items as flour, dried apples, and axle grease, but also glasses to protect the eyes from the dust on the trail, something undoubtedly welcome a month later when the trail was so dusty that one could not see the third wagon ahead or behind. The Beck’s left Florence with The Christian August Madsen Company “composed of 264 persons, 40 wagons, 14 horses, 174 oxen, 99 cows, 37 heifers, 7 calves, 6 dogs, and 10 chickens, and brought along 22 tents, 32 cooking stoves, 5 revolvers and 37 rifles. Hans C. Hansen was captain of the guard and Jens C. A. Weibye secretary for the company, which was divided into six divisions with the following brethren as captains: Soren Larsen, Jens C. A. Weibye, Niels Mortensen (Lynge), Thomas Lund, Lauritz Larsen and Chr H. Cron. They joined another company in charge of Elder Ola N. Liljenquist, and Elder John Van Cott was placed as general leader of both companies, which broke camp at Florence July 14, 1862. The Liljenquist company counted about 40 wagons with it quota of persons, animals, etc… The first few days some difficulty was experience as the oxen, who were not used to Scandinavian orders and management, would often follow their own inclination to leave the road and run away with the wagons, but after some practice on the part of their inexperienced teamsters, the difficulty somewhat disappeared. The journey from Florence was via Elkhorn River, Loup Fork, Wood River, Willow Lake, Rattlesnake Creek, Fort Laramie, Upper Platte Bridge, Devils Gate, South Pass, Green River, etc. “Capt. Chr. A. Madsen advised us to take along several needful articles, which we did, and we were well organized when we began the journey from Florence. To begin with, we traveled only a few miles each day, which was a good thing for us, who were unaccustomed to drive oxen. We generally had good campgrounds and only occasionally we had to camp where we could not obtain water. As a rule there was an abundance of grass for the oxen, and at times also sufficient fuel to be found, but a great part of the way the sisters had to content themselves with cooking over fires made from sunflower stems and buffalo chips. Nearly all able-bodied men and women had to walk most of the way; some of the rode in the wagons only across the larger rivers, while they would wade across the smaller streams like the men. Sometimes the women and children were carried across the streams by the men when it was feared the oxen could not pull the wagons with their heavy loads. We did exactly what our leaders told us to do, and consequently everything went well for us, for we could not read in books how and what to do, either on the voyage across the ocean (which took 51 days) or on the journey across the plains. (which lasted 71 days). On the journey across the Plains, the weather was generally fair and a good spirit prevailed among us. The health of the company was also good as a rule and only one death occurred on the Plains. We always kept up a guard and lost but a few head of cattle.” “Fair” Beck records that the Beck’s “had walked the long distance to Utah. No one rode in the wagons that was able and big enough to walk. The boys had walked the entire distance barefooted and often their feet were very sore. While most of the groups of wagons rotated positions during the trek, Jen’s ten were to remain near the front so that he could have time to write in his journal in the evenings. Captain Christian A. Madsen felt it important that a good record be kept of the journey. That observant journal is detailed without being tedious. Jens described the events of the trip, the scenery, and their campsites. He even recorded the hour and minute they arrived at landmarks and drew simple sketches of them. He described the unruliness of new oxen, the immigrants gift-giving and trading with friendly Indians, and a rather mild grasshopper infestation. (Here there are about 5 grasshoppers so every four square feet). Rather than crossing over to the south side of the Platte River at Fort Laramie, as the Pioneer company of 1847 had done, and then crossing it again at present day Casper, this company continued on the north side of that river, according to Jen’s diary. Only one person died between Florence and Salt Lake City, and the trip came to a happy end when Danish Saints met the company in Parley’s Canyon with greetings and fruit from Zion. As they reached the City September 23, 1862 many of their acquaintances welcomed them. What a trip! But their joys – and their suffering – were not yet over. The Beck’s remained only a short time in Salt Lake City. They were sent on to Lehi by the Church authorities with others of the same where they lived in a small adobe house with a dirt roof located in the southern part of the town. Want and weariness continued to follow them. They were homesick and often hungry. They were lonely, not being able to speak the English language well enough to communicate their needs. There was little work for even a good carpenter and Stephan found it hard to feed his family. Too proud to ask for food they often walked to Utah Lake to catch fish. Cutting willow branches from which they wove baskets, they went from door to door in an effort to sell them but the townspeople rarely had money with which to buy – even those who wanted to help – even their Bishop. At one time they gleaned in one of the fields of a farmer hoping to get enough wheat to grind for bread but the owner came along, put it on his load and hauled it away. But their blessings continued. In January of 1865 the Beck’s welcomed another son named John. That year, again answering a call to help build up a new territory, they moved to Alpine which was about seven miles up the Lehi Creek bed. Here, on the north side of the creek and near a bridge, which crossed into the town, Stephan commenced building a home. As they watched him work, it did not take the townspeople long to recognize his skill and he was called upon to assist building many of their homes and barns, a number of which may still be seen today. Kirstine was an excellent seamstress. She made clothing for her family and sewed for the neighbors, even making suits for men. She raised canaries and sold them. She was a lover of good books and obviously happy when she could find the time to read. Kirstine subsequently became embittered toward members of the church in Alpine. Though her name was never taken from the records, she began walking a distance of six miles to attend services in the American Fork Presbyterian Church. Stephan was made happy when, in 1866, a sister, Lucy, and two brothers came from Denmark. Lucy became a resident of Sanpete County but the brothers remained in Alpine and made their homes there. Frederic was a mason and Christian a farmer. The three Beck brothers soon came to be known as “Carpenter Beck, Mason Beck and Farmer Beck.” They were the main builders of the first meetinghouse and many other structures. Finally, Stephan was able to build himself one of the most beautiful homes in Alpine. A long house with a lean-to the full length of the back and a porch the full length of the front, it was an ideal family home. In the upstairs he included a carpenter shop. Here he built cupboards, tables, chairs and other furniture. There were no stores from which to purchase furniture at that time so Carpenter Beck was kept busy. He also built coffins for many he had known and some he had not known, building well but charging little. His house, still standing but probably soon to be razed to make room for a commercial building since it now is in a business area, was of distinctive architecture, the idea for which he probably brought from Denmark. Stephan planted his ten acres with fruit trees, grain and a garden. Almost everything the family ate was grown on their land. He had a painted carriage with two seats back-to-back. His horse was white – and so was the little dog that rode with him on the front seat. Stephan held a number of public jobs and carried the mail from American Fork to Alpine. Rain or shine, people congregated on the front porch of the “Post Office” (some say this was part of the old Co-Op Store) and watched for “Brother Beck” to come around the corner at the end of Main Street with the mail. He was so dependable and punctual one could set his watch, almost by arrival and departure times. Good times continued and in 1868 Stephan and Kirstine were blessed with their last son, Daniel; and then, in 1871, at last! a daughter, Laura. By this time they were able to afford schooling and music lessons. They delighted in providing a piano and violins; and later, talented violinists for programs and dances in Alpine and numerous other towns. They were obviously happy when their two youngest could attend Brigham Young Academy study under Dr. Karl G. Maeser, often referred to as the “Father of Utah Education.” Does Dame Fortune hand out hardships and near-breaking struggles to folks she wants to succeed? The Beck’s did not give one so capricious the credit but thanked, each day, a Higher Power. Years went by. They worked and they worshipped – but sometimes they mourned. Sadness also must be experienced. After launching out in the field of education (he had been the County Superintendent of Schools in Beaver, Utah) and while he was postmaster, Daniel, their youngest son, died in that city in November of 1897. Stephan and Kirstine were comforted by his worthwhile achievements and in the continued association and accomplishments of their seven remaining children. Laura was to teach school for fifty-three years, being well trained in a profession her parents had hardly known. Stephan attended Church regularly. In his last years, because he was hard of hearing, he sat near the pulpit in an old fashioned armchair called a “congress chair.” Stephen was rather strict. Still, boys will be boys… At one time two of his sons with their friends built a dugout under the creek bridge. Here they had a roughly put-together table and chairs – and played cards. Stephan caught them. He could work up a good Danish temper when angry and this time he was angry all over. After his discovery of this “evil” he stormed in to Kirstine and said: “You wait. I’ll fix that!” Spring came and also the high water under the bridge. The boys were not pleased when Stephan dumped everything in their hideaway, cards included into the rushing stream. And that was that. In the last years, he lived, “Stebbin” – as Kirstine affectionately called him – built a casket for himself. It was beautiful, probably the best of his carpentering career. When it was finished he laid himself in it to make sure it fit. It was waiting, then, on October 13, 1903. Having been feeble for some time and unable to leave the house, he sat in his armchair and ate the breakfast Kirstine had prepared for him. Then, he was putting on his shoes. One fell to the floor…Within six weeks he would have been eighty-five. His grandson, Stephen Feramorz Beck, used this quotation in tribute to him: “Men are of two kinds. And he Was of the kind I’d like to be. Some preach their virtues, and a few Express their lives by what they do. That sort was he.” Kirstine lived in American Fork with her son John, and his family after Stephan’s death. She died on May 11, 1911, at the age of eighty-four. We look back – and up! – to these stalwarts with a profound admiration and gratitude not elicited through inheritance or bloodlines but through their own talents, drive and ambition. The common denominators of their lives and their accomplishments were perseverance, faith, and trust in the Almighty. Those qualities helped mightily in the building up of Zion. “In living our lives let us not forget that the deed of our fathers and mothers are theirs, not ours; that their works cannot be counted to our glory; that we claim no excellence and no place because of what they did; that we must rise by our own labor, and that labor failing we shall fall.“We have no honor, no reward, no respect, nor special position or recognition, no credit because of what our fathers were or what they wrought. We stand upon our own feet in our own shoes.“There is no aristocracy of birth in this Church; it belongs equally to the highest and the lowliest.”- J. Reuben Clark, Jr. (Apostle)

John Beck

Contributor: finnsh Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

John Beck Taken from book "In Memory of the Becks" by Stephen F Beck. John Beck was born of honest, upright parents. His father, Stephen Y Beck, and his mother, Kerstina Jacobsen Beck, were Mormon converts from Denmark. In 1862 they with their young family embarked on a sail boat and crossed the Atlantic Ocean to America. Their children were, Jacob, Peter, Christian, Stephen, Theodore, and August. The baby, August, died on the voyage and was buried in the sea. The Beck’s settled in Lehi, Utah. As strangers in a strange land, they had a new language to learn, and a home to secure. They started from the bottom. Their first home was a log house with a dirt floor. Here their son, John , was born January 31, 1865. Stephen, Christian and Frederick, the three Beck Brothers, were noted for their unity, industry, and integrity. Stephen was a carpenter, Christian a farmer, and Frederick a brick layer or mason. They had learned their trades in Denmark where each had served his apprenticeship in a thorough, painstaking manner. The LDS Church authorities called these three brothers to move their families from Lehi to Alpine. This was actually a mission call for them to build up Alpine, a hamlet in the hills north of American Fork. There’s a Mormon hymn that says “Sacrifice brings for the blessings of Heaven.” Stephen Y Beck now built a big adobe house of two stories. It stood on the left side of the street as you come up from American Fork to Alpine. John was three years old, and this new house was a great event in his childhood. In that same home his only sister Laura was born; also his brother Daniel. His mother would shelter her baby in a shock of wheat while she spent the day gleaning in the harvest wheat fields. She was extremely energetic. For example when her husband would go sheep shearing early each spring, she’d go too. She would tie the legs of the sheep and shear thirty head of sheep each day. This was an outstanding feat for a woman. She was light on her feet and alert, and she was always up and doing. It was hard for others to keep pace with her. How did the mother manage all the work both inside and outside? Often at noon on a hot summer day she would take up a pan of cool clabber milk from the cellar. She had previously sifted flour into it to make it go farther. On occasion she sprinkled sugar and cinnamon over the thick yellow cream. It surely tasted good. Once when John was eight years old, he spent a day helping Henry Moyle plant corn. At noon Brother Moyle took up a pan of clabber from the cool cellar. The cream on the surface was yellow and thick. Brother Moyle ate clabber from one side of the pan then he gave John a spoon and he ate clabber from the other side. This was all they had for dinner. It was a good meal, rich in vitamins, (although the term vitamin was never mentioned.) John’s father Stephen J Beck, built many of the first houses in Alpine. As soon as John could take hold of a hammer, he worked along with his father. In due time, John learned to be a good carpenter. Whenever anyone died, Stephen had to stop and make a coffin. His charge for this service was reasonable indeed. John used to go barefooted during spring, summer and fall. He kept his up until he was past thirteen years. It didn’t seem to bother him until he hired to haul ore for his brother Jake. Then he’d wrap his feet in gunny sacks. He was often alone in the canyon. He didn’t exactly like it but he had to learn to “grin and bear it.” Once when John and Jake were up in American Fork Canyon, they escaped an onrushing flood by driving into Baker’s Canyon and finding their way home. It was their only recourse, as they had to look out for their teams as well as themselves. A flood in the canyon amid loud rolling thunder and bolts of lightning can be exciting. John’s mother would card wool and spin and weave. She sewed his suit for Sunday. He wore it year in and year out until it was patch upon patch. It was an honor to wear a patched suit in the pioneer era. John always went to Sunday School, but he learned more of the scripture from his mother than from Sunday School. She knew her Bible. She had a remarkable memory. She seemed to know the scripture by heart. John’s father too was very devout. Each spring after he’d plowed and harrowed and sown his grain, he’d kneel in prayer in the field and ask God to let it grow. John attended school during the midwinter months. He couldn’t say much for that school. If a boy came late, he had to stand in front of the others with hands extended while the teacher rapped them with a stick. If he defied the teacher by laughing, he got the worst of it. But not all education is in the school room. He learned more from his parents. John’s mother continued her Bible reading. At the age of eighty she could read without glasses. She had renewed sight, or second sight as they called it. At the age of seven-five years, John’s father received his third set of teeth – not artificial – but real teeth. As a youth in Alpine, John had many friends. His gang of boys had fun. One time an eccentric citizen had the gang arrested and put into jail for having played an innocent game of “steal the sticks” after dark on his street. This cranky old man accused them of having disturbed the peace. The town’s folk could see the unfairness of it all and they at once signed a petition for the “gangs’ release. Meanwhile, good folk were bringing excellent meals to the boys in jail. One of their number, Jed Wilkins, was a musician and he taught them a song they all like very much to sing. They made their week in jail a jolly get-together and a pleasure. At the age of twelve, John became the proud owner of his first horse. He always loved horses and he knew how to treat them well and train them. All his life he owned handsome horses. Men came from miles around to get him to judge or appraise horses that were for sale. His judgment never failed. Indeed he was considered the best of judges. Instead of a car, a young man had to own a shiny buggy and a handsome horse. To go buggy riding on Sunday afternoon after church was an enjoyable pastime. On the Fourth of July the young men and their girlfriends would be chosen to ride their handsome horses in the parade at nine o’clock in the morning to start the celebration. Each young man was supposed to look out for his partner and her horse. At intervals there sounded a cannon salute loud enough to startle a horse and throw an inexperienced rider from the saddle. Rides to the canyon and rides to the lake, picnics and dances in summer, dances and house-parties in winter, made a round of pleasure for the young folk. John belonged to the Alpine Glee Club. Other members were Dan Beck, Julius Beck, James Beck, Sam Strong and Dave Strong. They harmonized well and they were often asked to sing on ward programs, especially during Christmas holidays and on the Fourth of July, and the Twenty Fourth, Pioneer Day. These two celebrations were outstanding summer events observed with patriotic zeal by every man, woman and child. A pioneer community made their holidays colorful and lively. Everyone put his best foot forward and made of the day a supreme success with a cannon salute at sunrise, a parade during the forenoon, and a program engaging the most talented persons. Sports and prizes came in the afternoon and a big dance at night. At the age of nineteen John and his friends were attending dances in American Fork, Lehi and Pleasant Grove. They had enlarged their social circle to include many acquaintances. The “Young Men’s Hall” in American Fork, was a favorite place – a smooth floor and fine music. “On with the dance” came with glad accord from these lively young hearts. On a certain occasion, John saw a young lady on the dance floor, a graceful girl, wearing her hair in two long black braids. He glimpsed at her often during that particular waltz. Afterwards he sought out a friend who introduced him to lovely smiling Evelyn Bates. From that moment John was her devoted lover. When John was age twenty, and Evelyn eighteen, they were married in Lehi by George Webb, Justice of the Peace on July 5, 1886. He proudly brought her to Alpine to live and she was welcomed into the community. During three months John worked for his brother Jake for good wages, one dollar and twenty-five cents a day. He peddled garden produce also. It took a day to load a covered wagon with fresh garden products – peas by the peck, new potatoes, turnips in bunches, carrots, onions, radishes, lettuce, crates of raspberries and strawberries and red English currants. Later in the season came melons, tomatoes, peaches, pears, grapes, and apples. To help load John’s wagon was a big weekly project for Evelyn. He’d be gone for four or five days. He was a good peddler and he would reach home with an empty wagon and a well filled purse. The farmers with whom he traded for supplies were never uneasy concerning their pay, for John Beck’s integrity was never questioned. Each spring for twenty years, John went sheep shearing. He could shear a hundred head in a day. This meant excellent earnings. His family was well supplied with all the things necessary for growing happy children. His children were, Bertha, Lydia, Ilda, John L. Lucille, Alta, LeGrand, Harold, Deseret (Dessie). The name “Deseret” given the last born child signifies the devotion of the parents to their Zion or Deseret. She was doubtless named for the song “In Our Lovely Deseret”. However she’s always been called “Dessie”. In 1909, John movedhis family to American fork. They had a nice home at 129 East 2nd North Street. For ten years, John was road supervisor for Utah County. Men came from various places throughout Utah to secure his verdict or O.K. on the horses they were buying. His judgment never failed them. John didn’t need a gymnasium in which to develop his muscles. All his life, he ploughed, cut timber, and mined. He did all the excavating for the building of the J C Penney Store. This was an immense project for one man single-handed. He was true to a trust. When old man Tynge died, he took charge of his burial at sunrise on the hill near the mine. This had been Tynge’s request. It took eight men to carry him back. They also brought old man Murphy to preach the sermon at sunrise. Everything was done to fulfil Mr. Tynge’s request even at the price of great exertion on the part of John Beck and the other seven friends. On February 16, 1928, great sorrow came to the home of the Beck’s. The wife and mother died quite suddenly. Her passing was a shock to the entire family, especially to Dessie who the only one left at home. After her funeral, the home was lonesome indeed; nothing could fill the void. “Hundreds of stars in the evening sky – Hundreds of shells on the shore together Hundreds of birds that go winging by – Hundreds of lambs in the summer weather. Hundreds of dewdrops to greet the dawn – Hundreds of bees in the purple clover, Hundreds of butter cups on the lawn, But only one Mother the wide world over” On October 1, 1928, John Beck married Elizabeth Rockwell. She was the daughter of O Porter Rockwell, who was well known to early Latter Day Saints. She had experienced loneliness over the years. She became a devoted wife and a cheerful, stepmother. She died in February, 1933 April 1, 1936, John married Alice Forbes Crosby, daughter of Joseph B Forbes, a pioneer educator of American Fork, Utah, March 3, 1937, John entered the Salt Lake Temple where he was sealed by LDS Temple workers to the wife of his youth, for all eternity. Other important sealings also took place for him and his family that day. At the time of John’s death, he had twenty-four grandchildren and four great grandchildren. He died on Thursday December 5, 1940. “For high or low there’s but one test. It’s that each man shall do his best. Who lives with all the strength he can Shall never die in debt to man.”

Laura Beck Hooton and Samuel Hooton

Contributor: finnsh Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Laura Beck Hooton was born in Alpine, Utah on November 24, 1871. She was the only daughter of Stephen and Kirstine Jacobsen Beck, who were converts to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints from Denmark. She was the youngest in the family of seven older brothers, Jacob, Christian, Peter, Theodore, Stephen, John and Daniel. Her early education was obtained in what schools there were at that time. One time she attended the Presbyterian boarding school in American fork. She used to tell how her mother would carry a sack of flour from Alpine to pay her tuition. At the age of seventeen she received her teaching certificate from the Brigham Young Academy at Provo, Utah in the year 1888. Karl G Maeser, often referred to as the “Father of Utah Education,” was the principle of that institution. Laura entertained her children and grandchildren with stories about the grand old man, who spoke with a heavy German accent. Two of her favorite stories were: At that time students had drawer in which to keep their school supplies, most people wore under-clothing which were also referred to as drawers. One morning Brother Maeser came into class greatly agitated and said, “Students, I have lost my roll book. Will you all please look in your drawers.” Part of the time that Laura was at the academy, Dan, who was just older than she, was also there. One day Professor Maeser recited a poem. Then he said, “Brudder Beck, I van you to do the poem joost like I did.” Dan said, “Just like you did?” and the professor said “Yes, joost like I did.” Dan did so, much to the merriment of the class and the mortification of his sister. Dan and Laura were great pas and had a lot of fun together. When she received her teaching certificate, Laura was sent by Brother Maeser in a covered wagon to Panguitch to teach her first students. This was her first assignment and her teaching career lasted fifty three years. Subsequently she taught in Fairview, where Guy Wilson was principal, and then went to Beaver where her brother Dan was residing. While teaching there she met and married Samuel Hooton on August 28, 1895. Samuel had come to Utah with his mother and two brothers in a handcart company in 1859. To this union were born two children, a son Samuel Beck Hooton and ad daughter, Arlene. Dan and Laura were both musicians and sang in many quartets and choruses. When Dan died November 2, 1897 Laura missed him very much. They both lived in Beaver and were together so much in all the things that they did. Laura was very active in community and church affairs. She was president of the East Ward Primary for twenty-five years. She was Sunday school chorister and assistant superintendent and was ward chorister. She was an accomplished pianist and produced many operettas for the church and community, and, also, gave music lessons. I, her daughter, can still hear her calling "no" from the kitchen when I hit a wrong note on the piano while practicing in the parlor. When her son was thirteen, tragedy entered her home. On a Halloween day, while coming home from school for lunch he was run down by a speeding automobile and died about two hours later. Laura then went back to teaching steadily and did not stop until she retired at the age of seventy. In 1921 her husband died suddenly. She then left Beaver with her daughter, who was then sixteen, and came to South Jordan and Copperfield, and went on producing operettas and working in the church and endearing herself to the people of those communities. She often visited at Alpine with her brothers and their families. Every time she came to Alpine or American Fork for a visit she would take one of her nieces back with her. She took John's daughter Bertha with her for a long time and then Lydia and Lucille. And later Lucille married John Murdock of Beaver. They made their home in Beaver. During World War II a young G. I. on leave from the Pacific, came to call on her. He told her that during the long nights in the jungle he often thought of her because "she was the nicest teacher he ever had." On her seventy-fifth birthday she told a reporter, in answer to the question, "What makes a good teacher?" "That a good teacher must love all children, brilliant and retarded, active and quiet, clean or dirty." She never taught any other grade except the first. In between times she brought up her daughter to believe in the virtues that she believed in and saw that she went through college and had the advantage of a musical education. She adored her two grandchildren, Laura, a namesake and Jeffery. Their early years are filled with memories of their grandmother singing songs and telling stories. She also started both of them upon their reading careers. To her daughter she left a memory of love and independence and the value of work. She could not stand to see anyone stay in bed in the daytime. If you said that you did not feel well, as many people believe early in the morning, her stock answer was, "Well get up, and work it off." Sure enough, most of the time, you can. However, if you were really ill, her tenderness and anxiety were all around you. She was always very independent and one of the last coherent things she said, when told she was being taken to the hospital, was that there was fifty dollars in her purse to pay for the ambulance. On her seventy-fifth birthday, she was given an open house at the home of her daughter, Arlene, who had married Dr. Lewis D. Joseph of Sandy. One hundred and fifty friends and relatives and former students greeted the sprightly little lady and paid great respect to the dear little teacher. Freda Jensen, Primary Supervisor of the Jordan School District, said this is in a card. "You have always been an inspiration to me because of your ability as a teacher, your ever willingness to learn new things and your youthful spirit." No history would be complete without telling how she looked. She was five foot three inches, brown hair streaked with grey, twinkling blue eyes, and a lovely complexion. She was meticulous and well groomed and dressed. She had tiny hands and feet. She was very proud. Her philosophy was love, work and service and standing on your own two feet. She died at the age of 77 in Sandy, Utah, at the home of her daughter on March 28, 1949. Funeral services were conducted by Bishop Max A. Mumford. She was buried in Beaver. "She was a teacher, very many years, she said to me, and if she wearied of the daily grind, we never knew. For she kept smiling—As school teachers do. And I cannot recal just what her methods were Nor what her methods were that brought, Achievement to us. The one thing I remember she was kind.

Ella Henrietta Beck Martin

Contributor: finnsh Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Ella Henrietta Beck Martin By Cleone Cleghorn taken from book “In Memory of the Becks” by Stephen F Beck. Nestled below rugged mountains, which rise as a fortress to ever shield its villagers from harm, lies the little city of Alpine, Utah. It was in this peaceful community that Ella Henrietta Beck was born, April 7, 1871. She was the fourth child in a family of seven born to Fredrick and Henricka Hansen Beck. Her older brothers and sisters were: Emma, Julius and Janius, and the younger ones were: Francis, Fredrick and Henry. Fredrick died in childhood. Ella lived to be the last original member of the Fredrick Beck family. Grandpa Beck, a mason by trade, along with his two brothers Christian, a farmer, and Stephen, a carpenter, were natives of Denmark. After their conversion to the Latter Day Saints Church they left their comfortable homes, relatives, and friends and all their earthly possessions and in a company of saints with Andrew Jensen as their Captain brought their families to Utah. The ocean voyage in the sailing vessel “Kenilworth,” began May 20, 1866 and covered a period of nine weeks. Another nine weeks crossing the plains with ox teams brought them to Salt Lake City in October 1866. Grandpa and Grandma Beck and their three children, Emma, Julius and Janius remained in Salt lake City for two years, then in 1868 came to Alpine where the remainder of their lives was spent and where four more children were born to them. Many of the homes built by Grandpa Beck in those early days are still standing and occupied at the present time. The original home he built for his own wife and family has served as a home for three generations of his posterity. It was in this adobe home Mother was born. As a child, Mother’s days were not carefree for she, too, knew the trials and hardships of a pioneer family. She helped care for the younger children and I’ve often heard her tell of the one hour after the noon meal was over she had in which to play. She helped herd cows too on the “High Bench” some distance from her home, barefooted, and she told us how the stones and rough trails would hurt her feet. She had but one pair of shoes and they were kept for special occasions. Her lunch, while herding the cows, would be only bread. As a young girl, Mother took advantage of all opportunities offered in an educational, religious and social way. She was blessed with the gift of wit and humor and with her fun-loving disposition she was popular with both young and old. She loved music and had a sweet soprano voice and she loved to sing in the ward choir which she did for a long time. Grandmother taught her daughters the value of knowing how to work and the art of home-making. How to sew, how to cook and this training along with her own natural aptness made Mother a homemaker, a seamstress and a cook of rare ability. It seemed this preparation helped her greatly and made it much easier for Mother as a homemaker and mother to care for her own home and family with the meager means which she had. She was married to Esdras martin in the Salt Lake Temple by john R Winder, February 12, 1896 and they were the parents of three sons and three daughters. Soo after their marriage, they went to Colorado where Dad worked on a ranch and she was employed as cook for the ranch hands. Then they moved to American Fork where their first child, Huron Esdras, was born December 21, 1896 and later for about four years they made their home in Scipio. Two more of their children were born there. Erma was born March 22, 1898 and Glen Beck was born February 19, 1900. After that they came to Alpine which was their home for many, many years. Here Inez was born November 17, 1903, Cleone was born December 13, 1906 and Angus Jay born June 23, 1909. Inez died November 23, 1915 of ruptured appendix and Angus Jay died April 4, 1910 of scarlet fever. These deaths were heartaches indeed of our parents. After Grandfathers’ death on December 18, 1906 Dad and Mother moved into the old home and cared for Grandmother until she passed away December 18, 1915. Mother served on the Old Folks committee in the Alpine ward for many years and was one of its most valuable members. Perhaps her most outstanding characteristic was her willingness to help others with no thought of herself No day was too long nor nights too dark if she could be of service to one in need. As a Mother she was an ideal in our lives. She never sought a public position herself but was found in the background making it possible for others. She taught us the principles of right living and encouraged us in every way to be of service in the church organizations. While she enjoyed to the last moments of her life, a good joke we never heard fall from her lips a story that was not clean. Our friends were always welcome in our home and Mother kept a home that was immaculate and inviting to all of us. Her bread and pastries were enjoyed too by both her family and friends. She gave freely of her limited means to help every worthy cause, in fact she loved to work, help and give. It was her life. In 1924 she gave up housekeeping and made her home with my husband and me the greater part of the time. She was with the other children for a few weeks at a time and wherever she chose to go she received a hearty welcome and was counted as one of the family. She was helpful, congenial and jovial and never interfered with family affairs. She was generous to a fault with her grandchildren and seemed never to miss an opportunity to make every special occasion in their lives a little brighter by a thoughtful gift. They all idolized her and as one of them said, “She was like a grandmother out of a story book.” Her health began to fail in the fall of 1943 and she steadily grew weaker. She had her one great desire and wish fulfilled, never to be a burden on her children and she was only bedfast one or two days. When Mother passed away it left a vacancy in the hearts of her children and grandchildren that no other can fill and while the years of her greatest activity had passed we felt a source of strength and security in her presence. She was 73 years old when she passed away, February 4, 1944. God sent his choicest spirit upon the earth to dwell, That she might teach his children and of His love would tell, Her heart was full of goodness so loving and so kind And we could meet with millions; but never would we find A Pal that we could talk to and trust from day to day. For in our hours of sorrow, she made our hearts feel gay. And never could we hope to find or feel there is another For God has blessed us most of all, He made this soul our Mother, So when God calls us back to Him, we pray our reward will be, A place beside our Mother, in sweet Eternity.

Henricka Hansine Hanson Beck

Contributor: finnsh Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Henricka Hanson Beck Written by her Granddaughter Orleen Beck Taken from the book “In Memory of the Becks” by Stephen F Beck Henricka Hansen was born in Aalborg in Denmark, February 10, 1833. She married Fredrick Beck March 23, 1856 in her native land among her friends and home people. Having heard the gospel, she together with her husband evidenced their faith in the same way by being baptized the 27th of December 1865, into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The following spring the spirit of gathering was strongly made manifest in their little home. Preparations and final departure were made by this worthy couple and their three children, Julius Conrad, Emma, and Janus J for Utah, the home of the Saints. The journey took four and one-half months. Eight weeks and three days on the water and nine weeks on the ocean with all of its attendant dangers and the lack of food. They suffered greatly from the heat in New York and some of the people died from heat exhaustion. They were rushed by cattle cars to Omaha, but still it took them fourteen days to reach there. It is hard to imagine what this mother went through for the gospel. I am sure her heart must have ached for a nice clean bed and some good food for her three little children. I wonder how she kept them clean those long, hard months on the boat and the fourteen days on the train. They were nine weeks on the plains and they came to Utah with the Captain’s company and used an ox team belonging to William Bateman. They reached the Salt Lake Valley in October 1866. After making a home in Salt Lake City for two years they came out to Alpine to live. Fredrick’s brother Stephen was making his home in Alpine at this time. Quiet and unassuming with a heart full of humility, she was a woman who made friends and retained them throughout prosperity and poverty alike. Sacrificing much for the gospel’s sake made her realize how dear it was to her and she extended her knowledge of the principles so they were blended and intermingled with her every living day. The greatest thing that can be said of her is, she was a great Latter Day Saint. It has been said, she was a good friend and neighbor, which is praise indeed and a true index of her righteous living. Among the saints she will be blessed because she lived her religion as she knew it. She taught her children both by example and by precept. She was indeed a good pioneer mother. She was the mother of seven children, Emma, Julius, Janius, Ella Henrietta, Francis, Fredrick, and Henry.

Fredrick Beck

Contributor: finnsh Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Fredrick Beck Taken from book “In Memory of the Becks” by Stephen F Beck Frederick was born in or near Fredricks Haven, Denmark, February 13, 1831. He was the seventh child in a family of 15. There were 10 sons. His father was Stephen Jensen Beck who was a minister in the Lutheran Church. He completed a common school education at the age of fourteen. For five years thereafter he was apprenticed to a mason and he as a very good mason. He served in the war of 1864 between Denmark and Germany. Two companions were shot down by his side. Shortly after returning to his home, he heard of the Mormons through some friends and was curious to hear them. He was converted to the church the first time he heard their Gospel. He and his wife were baptized on January 28, 1865. The following spring with the help of his brother Christian they were able to leave for Utah. On May 20, 1866, they left parents, relative and friends and the native land they loved and commenced their journey to Utah. They crossed the Atlantic on the ship “Kendelworth”. It was an old sailing ship and the journey was a long, timesome one, and they had three small children. They were often hungry and the food they did get was of very poor quality. They also suffered much from lack of good water. They were nine weeks on the ocean and the ship caught fire three times while they were on it. When they reached the New York Harbor the ship was condemned. Upon reaching New York it was so hot that quite a few of the company died from the heat and the rest were rushed by freight cars to Omaha, Nebraska to escape the heat. Here they rested for a week while arrangements were made to get the equipment to make the long, hard journey across the plains. Equipment was scarce and it was necessary for all those that were old enough and able to walk. They were on the plains about nine weeks reaching Salt Lake City in October . The only fuel they had on the plains to cook with was buffalo chips. They met many bands of hostile Indians along the way. On one occasion they stopped for the night and the Captain had the wagons make a circle this particular night. He then called the people together and forbade anyone to go outside the circle. This was the very spot he told them, where one of the bloodiest battles ever fought between white man and Indian had occurred. On another occasion where the town of Laramie, Wyoming, now lies they stopped for the night. Early in the afternoon after they had cooked their meal they left their cooking utensils beside the camp fire and in the distance they saw a band of Indians riding horseback toward their camp. When they got quite close they stopped and talked to each other. Suddenly two whipped up their horses and rode through the camp scattering pots and kettles. The rest of the Indians talked with Captain Rawlings and told him if they were Brigham’s people they would not harm them . They arrived in Salt Lake City in October, 1866, under the command of the Captains. Church historian, Andrew Jensen crossed the plains in their company. They lived in Salt Lake City for nearly two years and then moved out to Alpine. Fredrick Beck was a faithful, honest, hardworking man and was loved by all who knew him. He was a farmer and a brick layer by trade, when he got the nickname of “Mason Beck” . He served as city councilman during the years of 1883-1884. Samuel W Brown was Mayor, with R T Booth, Stephen Moyle, William J Strom and Ephriam Nash as other councilmen and Angus Vance as recorder. Again he served during 1885-1886 with Samuel W Brown, Mayor, and R E Both, Stephen Moyle, W J Strong, Albert Marsh, councilman, and James W Vance, recorder. Seven children blessed their home: Julius Conrad, born November 3, 1860 in Aalborg, Denmark, died November 21, 1929 in Alpine; Emma Beck McDaniel, Janus J, born June 8, 1864; Fredrick born January 20, 1868; Ella H born April 7, 1871; Fransian, born April 25, 1873, and Joseph Henry, born April 7, 1875. Fredrick Beck died November 21, 1906 in Alpine, Utah.

Life timeline of Joseph Davanzo

1883
Joseph Davanzo was born in 1883
Joseph Davanzo was 12 years old when George VI of the United Kingdom (d. 1952) George VI was King of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Commonwealth from 11 December 1936 until his death in 1952. He was the last Emperor of India and the first Head of the Commonwealth.
1895
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Joseph Davanzo was 22 years old when Albert Einstein publishes his first paper on the special theory of relativity. Albert Einstein was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics. His work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. He is best known to the general public for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2, which has been dubbed "the world's most famous equation". He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect", a pivotal step in the development of quantum theory.
1905
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Joseph Davanzo was 31 years old when Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife, Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, were assassinated by a Yugoslav nationalist named Gavrilo Princip in Sarajevo, sparking the outbreak of World War I. Archduke Franz Ferdinand, Archduke of Austria-Este was a member of the imperial Habsburg dynasty, and from 1896 until his death the heir presumptive (Thronfolger) to the Austro-Hungarian throne. His assassination in Sarajevo precipitated Austria-Hungary's declaration of war against Serbia, which in turn triggered a series of events that resulted in Austria-Hungary's allies and Serbia's declaring war on each other, starting World War I.
1914
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Joseph Davanzo was 46 years old when Babe Ruth becomes the first baseball player to hit 500 home runs in his career with a home run at League Park in Cleveland, Ohio. George Herman "Babe" Ruth Jr. was an American professional baseball player whose career in Major League Baseball (MLB) spanned 22 seasons, from 1914 through 1935. Nicknamed "The Bambino" and "The Sultan of Swat", he began his MLB career as a stellar left-handed pitcher for the Boston Red Sox, but achieved his greatest fame as a slugging outfielder for the New York Yankees. Ruth established many MLB batting records, including career home runs (714), runs batted in (RBIs) (2,213), bases on balls (2,062), slugging percentage (.690), and on-base plus slugging (OPS) (1.164); the latter two still stand as of 2018. Ruth is regarded as one of the greatest sports heroes in American culture and is considered by many to be the greatest baseball player of all time. In 1936, Ruth was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame as one of its "first five" inaugural members.
1929
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Joseph Davanzo was 56 years old when World War II: Nazi Germany and Slovakia invade Poland, beginning the European phase of World War II. World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most global war in history; it directly involved more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. In a state of total war, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.
1939
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Joseph Davanzo died in 1947 at the age of 64
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Joseph Davanzo (1883 - 1947), BillionGraves Record 1993 West Newton, Westmoreland, Pennsylvania, United States

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