John William Goodwin

1853 - 1940

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John William Goodwin

1853 - 1940
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John William Goodwin emigrated to the United States in company with his mother, Maria Argent Goodwin. No accurate record of his baptism has been located. Family records indicate that he was baptized at about 9 years of age by Bishop Ephraim Snyder, somewhere in the vicinity of Park City, Utah. A sea
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Life Information

John William Goodwin

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Died:

Riverside Thomas Cemetery

939-949 State Highway 39
Blackfoot, Bingham, Idaho
United States
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TreeClimber

May 30, 2012
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Ctserr

May 28, 2012

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Baptism of John William Goodwin

Contributor: TreeClimber Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

John William Goodwin emigrated to the United States in company with his mother, Maria Argent Goodwin. No accurate record of his baptism has been located. Family records indicate that he was baptized at about 9 years of age by Bishop Ephraim Snyder, somewhere in the vicinity of Park City, Utah. A search for Ward/Branch records in that area of Utah has been largely fruitless, as has been a search for a journal of Bishop Ephraim Snyder. John William Goodwin was baptized by proxy 15 Nov 1968 in the Salt Lake City Utah Temple.

Trim, Hyrum Pendleton

Contributor: TreeClimber Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Maria Argent is my great-great grandmother. She was born in Orsett, England, in 1831. By 1851, her father had joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Mormons), just 21 years after the Church was organized. Maria's mother, four sisters and a brother were all baptized within the next four years, but her oldest sister never did join. When Maria joined the church, she had been married to William Goodwin for two years, and their son, John William Goodwin, was an infant. During the next four years, her life probably included lots of decisions, since we know the members of the Church in England were encouraged to migrate to Zion. And in 1859, Maria did just that. But her husband was so opposed to her leaving England, that, as the story goes, she had to hide her son on the ship and somehow slip aboard without her husband knowing she was leaving. She and her son sailed to America with her younger sister Emily’s family. In October of 1861, she married Hyrum Pendleton Trim, a sea captain. Hyrum was born in Maine in 1815. When he was 22 years old, he married Mary Ellen Cutter. He joined the Church when he was 27 years old, and as the years passed he and Mary had eight children. Move forward to 1860 - Hyrum is 45 years old and listed on the census in Maine with his wife and children. But, he is also listed on the 1860 census for Michigan. Knowing that Hyrum was a sea captain, one can assume that when the census was taken he was in Michigan working, and his wife put his name on the census in Maine as head of the household. However, by following the census records in Maine, it appears that Hyrum was the head of household until 1896, when his wife listed herself as a widow. That makes sense because Hyrum died in 1892. Since he could not have been living in Maine after he arrived in Utah with the Captain Hansie Company in 1861, a few questions arise. Interestingly, my Maria Argent arrived in Utah with her son in 1859, so she probably met the sea captain in Utah. Whatever the case, they were married by an Elder of the Church in 1861, and then sealed in the Endowment House in Salt Lake in 1876. Two newspaper articles in The Daily Tribune in Salt Lake City, printed in 1885, provided more details about their lives. One was entitled “Very Numerously Married - The Matrimonial Complications of the Trim Family.” Hyrum and Maria were filing for divorce - Hyrum was 70 and Maria was 54. They both admitted in court that they had still married to other persons when they were married in 1861. Hyrum stated that he had converted to Mormonism in Massachusetts and his wife had told him to clear out since she "didn’t want no Mormon", so he left. Maria was filing for divorce from Hyrum and stated that for several years her husband had tried to drive her out of the home and take in a polygamous wife. Hyrum also stated that he was no longer a Mormon. There was a second article concerning the divorce proceedings but it never indicated whether or not a divorce was granted. Since Hyrum and Maria are buried next to each other in Vernal, Utah, perhaps they decided to stay together. Their lives were much like ours. They must have had great hopes for the future when they crossed the plains to be with the saints in Utah. Hyrum went from being a Master Mariner to being a farmer in Vernal, Utah. I can imagine how homesick he must have been for the sea after living in Vernal for years. And Maria had to live with the consequences of taking her son away from his father when he was so young, exactly as happens to so many children in our day due to the high divorce rate. The times change, but the trials seem very familiar. For whatever reason I became so interested with this family, when I was 18 that interest took another strange turn. I became good friends with a girl named Jeri Scott. We were involved in a very serious car accident, and there were months of recuperating involved. As a consequence, her parents began visiting my parents, and on one such visit the conversation somehow revealed that Jeri’s great grandfather was William Goodwin, the young boy that spent a day on the ship waiting for his mother before leaving England behind and sailing to America. I am descended from my great-great grandmother’s second marriage to the sea captain. And Jeri’s family had copies of the letters that William and his father in England exchanged during their lifetime. They never saw each other after the little boy came to America, but they corresponded until his father died.

John William Goodwin written by Ruth Turpin Lowe

Contributor: TreeClimber Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

History Items Gleaned from Turpin Book of Remembrance--2014 John William Goodwin (1853) came to America with his mother (Maria A. Argent-- b 14 Oct 1831) when just a small boy of six or seven years. His father (William Goodwin -- b 1 Aug 1831) did not accept the LDS faith, which his mother had embraced, and, because of this, John William Goodwin was hid in a ship that was to sail to America the next day. While his father was away from home, his mother boarded the ship. On the journey across the plains to join the saints in Salt Lake Valley, Maria Argent Goodwin met a man by the name of Hyrum Pendleton Trim. Later, in 1861, they married in Salt Lake City. John William Goodwin received very little education. Mr. Trim owned and operated a shingle mill, and young john helped at the mill. Mr. Trim insisted that John spend some time each day writing and figuring on some of the shingles with a piece of charcoal. Life was hard and the necessities of life were scant. John wrapped burlap bags about his feet during the winter to keep them from freezing. As a young man, he hauled freight from Park City to Salt Lake City, driving a team of oxen he called Mike and Jerry. On one of these trips, he was to return a man to Salt Lake City who had frozen to death in a sitting position. As he and another driver traveled over the rough hills and hollows, it was difficult to keep their frozen companion from falling off the load. In order to keep him aboard, John and the other driver finally resorted to sitting on his feet. All went well until the sleigh runner hit a large bump, which pitched the body backward and the other driver completely off the load into the snow. This man picked himself up from the snow and laughingly said, "That is the first time I've been thrown by a dead man." On another occasion, John was thrown from his load when a wheel dropped into a deep rut, and two of the wagon's wheels ran over his chest, crushing it. The doctor told his mother that he would have to be buried to his chin in the damp earth to draw out the inflammation. He was thus buried for thirty-six hours. The doctor gave little hope that he would be alright, but he did improve. He was told not to eat any meat or other solid foods, as they would be hard to digest and could bring about his death. One day his mother cooked steaks for dinner, and john begged repeatedly for some but was refused; however, there was a steak left from dinner, and while his mother was out of the house for a pail of water, John got up from his bed and ate the steak. He went into convulsions and had a very high temperature. His mother called for the doctor, and the doctor said, "What is done is done, but if he lives the night through, he will probably recover." And he did and continued to haul freight through Parley's Canyon, up until the time the family moved to Sugar House. John was a great teller of stories, often telling of the days when he was a young man and how the fellows in his crowd would try to outdo one another making outfits for their horses to look their best. One time he got a bolt of green fabric with which he decorated his horses' manes and tails, the harnesses and buggy. And, with the material left over, the girls made bows for their hair. John worked for the railroad as a fireman. On one of their trips, the train stalled in a terrible blizzard. With all the fuel used up, the men tried to keep active to keep from freezing to death, and John told stories to keep their minds active. It was not until the crew was rescued and returned to the roundhouse that they discovered the brakeman frozen stiff in the last car. He was carried to the back room and placed upon a table. The men huddled around a stove to get warm, heard a noise from the back room, rished into the room to find that the brakeman had thawed and his legs had straightened out, causing him to fall from the table. Maybe John's stories helped the men survive their ordeal. While residing in Sugar House, the Goodwin family farmed fruit and berries, which they marketed. They loved their garden and had a beautiful yard filled with flowers and shrubs. [As a little girl, I (Ruth) loved to walk amongst the flowers, taking in the beauty and fragrance--the very essence of Great-Grandmother's garden, which I have never forgotten.] John was a comedian in many ways and was the life of many parties. He and his wife learned to dance the Varsoviene and were called upon to perform on many occasions, winning several prizes for their dance. John was also given a prize for being the homeliest man, and one time he and his wife received recognition [a portrait of themselves] for being the oldest couple and another time for having the largest family. Life was not easy for John and his wife, with much hardship and many sorrows. Misfortune and illness took three of the first five children born to John and Catherine: Complications following whooping cough took "Katie," little John died from an undiagnosed infection, and James died at nine days from infection due to improper cleaning at the time of his birth. I, Ruth, have another memory of my great-grandparents Goodwin: They were both toothless. Their children offered to get dentures for their mother, but she declined. Her reason: it was better to prepare soft food meals for two than soft for her husband and regular for herself. That's got to be a high level of togetherness. John died April 15, 1940 at his home in Thomas, Idaho. He was 87 years old. Catherine died September 13, 1943, at the home of her daughter, Florence Turpin, in Blackfoot, Idaho. She also was 87 years old.

Goodwin, John William - Life Story

Contributor: TreeClimber Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

I am Anita Green McGehee Johnson, a direct descendant of Maria Argent and her second husband, Hyrum Pendleton Trim. One of life's very interesting coincidences occurred when I was 18 years old. I grew up in Pocatello, Idaho, and got a job at the Ross Park Drive In, met a girl working there named Geri Scott, and we became good friends. We were in an accident and I was home for weeks recuperating. Geri's family came to visit my family (though they had never met before), and for some strange reason the conversation turned to genealogy. It turned out that Geri was descended through Maria Argent and her first husband, William Goodwin - through John William Goodwin. Geri was from the Blackfoot area where John William Goodwin lived during the latter part of his life. Since I was also descended through Maria Argent, that made us almost related, right? I believe Geri's mother said she had copies of the letters John William exchanged with his father in England (although they never met in person). Boy, would I love to read those letters now!) This history has been in my Book of Remembrance for years but I do not know where I got it - so, happy reading. ****************************************************************************************************************** John William Goodwin, the son of William Goodwin and Maria A. Argent, was born 4 February 1853, at Orsett, Essex, England. Maria embraced the teachings of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, but her husband did not accept the faith. Maria was determined to come to America to be with the main body of the Church membership, so while her husband was away from home she took six-year-old John and they hid at the dock in Liverpool for an entire day and night until they could board the ship. After they arrived in New York, a Mr. Keritchalon gave Maria a job as a housekeeper and cook. Mr. Keritchalon gave young John a little red wheelbarrow and told him his job was to pick up all the feathers around the place and put them in a pile – he would be working like his mother. John was pleased to think he had a job, too, so he worked hard to get all the feathers piled up. The wind blew them all over again and John felt bad – he sat down and cried. But Mr. Keritchalon said, “You can pick them up again, can’t you? That’s your job.” John and his mother came across the plains to join the Saints in the Salt Lake Valley. John had to walk, but when his feet got sore he was permitted to ride in Brigham Young’s wagon. While crossing the plains, Maria met Hyrum Pendleton Trim. They were later married in Salt Lake City in October of 1861. Hyrum Pendleton Trim was born November 16, 1815, in Maine, and came to Utah in 1861 in the Capt. Hansie Company. Hyrum was a good fellow and a good father to John, yet John did not like someone else taking his father’s place. The family moved to Snyderville, Utah, where Hyrum owned and operated a shingle mill. The shingles, and also timber that he cut, were used in building the Court House in Salt Lake City, as well as other community buildings. John helped in the mill, although he was just a boy, and received the only education available to him. Hyrum insisted that John spend some time each day writing and figuring on some of the shingles with a piece of charcoal. There were many hardships and even necessary clothing for the family was at a premium. John used burlap bags to bind about his feet during the winter to keep his feet from freezing. When he was 12 years old, John worked at a shingle mill in Parley’s Canyon hauling shingles down to the city. The roads were rough through the canyon and he was very young to be handling a team for heavy work. One day as he was traveling along, one of the wheels of his wagon dropped into a hole, throwing him off the load. Two wheels ran over his chest, crushing it. The doctor told his mother that he would have to be buried to his chin in the damp earth to draw out the inflammation. A hole was dug and he was buried with just his head above ground for 36 hours. He was given a very slim chance of recovering, but as time went on and he did improve, the doctor gave them hope that he might be all right if he was not given any meat or other solid foods to eat because they would be hard to digest and could result in his death. One day his mother was cooking steaks for dinner and John begged repeatedly for some, but was refused. However, there was a steak left from dinner that was put in the cupboard when the table was cleared. While his mother was out of the house for a pail of water, John got out of his bed and ate the steak. He went into convulsions and had a high fever. When his mother discovered what he had done, she was very frightened and called the doctor. When he arrived, the doctor said, “What is done is done, but if he lives the night through he will probably recover.” From that time on, John gained strength and did recover, and he resumed hauling freight through Parley’s Canyon. When John was 15 years old, a man died and John was sent with an ox team to get the casket and bring it back to Snyderville. It took him several days to make the trip and it was midnight when he got home. On the way back he saw something white cross the road, and as he got closer he saw that it was the man that had died. When he got home he described what he had seen and everyone said it was one of the white oxen that had been lost. But his mother asked him how the man had been dressed, and to their surprise he was dressed just like the man that had died. As a young man, he hauled freight from Park City, Utah, to Salt Lake City, using a team of oxen that he called Mike and Jerry. On one return trip to Salt Lake, the load included something rather unusual –a man who had frozen to death in a sitting position. As he and a companion journeyed over the rough hills and hollows with their load of freight, the frozen member of the party rocked back and forth, and at times nearly fell from the load. In order to keep him with them, John’s companion sat on his feet. All went well until the sleigh runner hit a large bump and pitched the body backward, throwing the other man completely off the load and into the snow. He picked himself up from the snow, laughing, and said, “That is the first time I’ve ever been thrown from a sleigh by a dead man.” John often told of the days when he was a young man and how the fellows in his crowd would try to outdo one another in making their outfits and horses look the best. When he recalled one occasion it caused him to laugh. He had bought a whole bolt of green material and braided it in the tail and mane of his horses, and all through the harness and his buggy. The material that was left over he gave to the girls to make bows for their hair. By the time John was 21, he worked as an engineer for the railroad. On one of their trips they were stalled in a terrible blizzard. They used all of the fuel whistling for help. The brakeman was getting very cold and was told to keep moving as much as possible. John began telling stories to keep their minds off the cold until help arrived, and no further notice was given to any particular member of the group. When assistance did arrive, all able hands pitched in to get moving. When they reached the round house they found the brakeman sitting very still. They carried him into the back room of the round house and laid him on a table. The rest of the men huddled around the stove getting warm and talking when suddenly there was a noise from the back room. Rushing into the room, they found the brakeman had fallen off the table. As he thawed, his legs had straightened, causing him to fall off the table, dead. John and Catherine were married in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City on August 24, 1874. They continued living in Sugar House and Catherine worked in the Church. John worked for the railroad and also hauled logs from the canyon. Their first three children were born while living there, but John’s work with the railroad took him to Coalville much of the time, so the family eventually moved to Coalville, Utah. Two more children were added to their family, but misfortune and illnesses of various types took three of their children in a period of two years. Three-year-old Catherine, or Katie as she was called, died from complications following whooping cough. Little John became ill and passed away, and James died when he was only nine days old. All three were buried in Coalville, Utah. The family was despondent and felt they could not live there any longer. They moved back to Sugar House and lived in a small two-room house with the one room dug back into the hill. They had two more children, and their daughter Lois always claimed she was born in a dugout. This home was just west of where the old Utah State Prison stood. The family next moved to a corner lot on 11th East and 11th South. Here John built a larger red brick home for his family and two more children were born while they lived there. John still held his job as Fireman with the railroad. Before long, the corner of the lot was sold to a Mr. Hemsley, and he built a store. A certain Chinaman came regularly through their neighborhood selling his wares, and the boys in the neighborhood, the Goodwin boys included, swiped his wares while he was making his deliveries. Then the boys ran away chanting – “Ching Chong Chinaman, how do you sell your fish? Five cents, ten cents, fifteen cents apiece?” The Chinaman, in rage, chased the boys brandishing a long wicked-looking knife, but he was never able to catch them. Parents of the rascals scolded their sons and retrieved the goods, but on the next delivery date all would be repeated. The family’s red brick home and the rest of the lot was traded to a Mr. Tate for an acre of ground and a red brick home with three rooms and a pantry. The acre was planted to alfalfa and some fruit trees. The many shrubs and flowers about the place remains in the memory of the children as a spot of beauty. Half of this lot was later sold to the eldest son, Avery, who in turn sold it to Edward Turpin. The two co-owners (Avery and Edward Turpin) bought more ground adjoining the rear and side of the original property, and planted an acre of strawberries, as well as many fruit trees, currants, raspberries and gooseberries. It was a lot of hard work for the whole family to keep the berries cultivated and picked. The berries were picked early in the morning before the sun was hot, and again in the evening, then hauled to market during the early hours of the next morning. There was a large Farmer’s Market in Salt Lake City where they obtained a stall and sold their produce. John was a horse trader, often coming home with a different horse than he left with in the morning. It is told that he would leave with a beautiful, well-groomed horse, and return with crow bait that he fattened and trained for the next trade. There were also times when he didn’t do badly at all. The last three members of the family were born in this new home. Their eldest daughter, Florence, was married to Edward Turpin, and they moved into the one-room and pantry portion of the home. They were still living there when their first baby boy (Eddie) was born. In time, this home was also sold and another brick home and lot was purchased in Winder Ward. John went to work as foreman on a ranch for a Mr. Gunn. This man owned the Hotel Utah at the time, and the produce from the farm was used in the Hotel dining room. The scraps from the tables were hauled back to the farm and fed to the pigs, which in turn were also used in the Hotel dining room. Mr. Gunn and a friend were scuffling at the Hotel one day when this friend accidentally struck Mr. Gunn a blow over the area of his heart which caused his death. Wages then were not what they are today – many days John worked long hours for 75 cents to a dollar per day, with nothing but burlap bound around his feet for shoes. He worked at many different occupations to provide for his family – for a time at an ore smelter, and he hauled mahogany wood for his family’s winter fuel and to sell to others for their winter supply. By that time, many of John and Catherine’s children and other members of their family had moved to Idaho, farming in or near the Thomas area. John and Catherine finally decided to join them in 1914, and lived there the rest of their lives, with the exception of one year which they spent in California with two of their sons, Joseph and LeRoy. John was a comedian in many ways and was the life of many parties. He and his wife loved to dance and learned to dance the Varsuveann well, and were called upon to do this dance on many occasions, winning several prizes. Once John was given a prize for being the homeliest man, and they won a joint prize (a portrait of themselves) for being the oldest couple and having the largest family. Their eldest son Avery had a stroke in 1928, died on July 2, 1931, at the age of 55, and was buried in the Thomas Riverside Cemetery in Bingham County, Idaho, on July 5, 1931. Another son, Joseph Edger, and Joseph’s son Lennis were killed on October 2, 1948, on the Arco highway while returning from the Moore L.D.S. Church, which they were building at the time. Their pickup truck went out of control and they were both killed instantly. They were buried on October 7, 1948, in Idaho Falls, Bonneville Co., Idaho. Joseph was 56 years old at the time of his death, and his son Lennis was 18. John William Goodwin died April 15, 1940, at his home in Thomas, Bingham Co., Idaho. He was 87 years old. He was buried on April 21, 1940, at the Thomas Riverside Cemetery. His wife followed him in death three years later on September 13, 1943, at the age of 87. She passed away at the home of her daughter Florence Turpin in Blackfoot, Bingham Co., Idaho, and was buried at the side of her husband. Their son Nathan Abner passed away on May 8, 1956, at Blackfoot, and their daughter Florence Lucretia died on December 4, 1962, at Blackfoot, leaving three daughters and one son still living at the time.

Life Story of John William Goodwin

Contributor: TreeClimber Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

John William Goodwin, the son of William Goodwin and Maria A. Argent, was born 4 February 1853 at Orsett, Essex, England. He came with his mother to America when just a small boy of six or seven years. His father, William Goodwin, a heavy drinker and did not want to affiliate himself with the LDS Church which his wife embraced. Because of this, Maria took her son during the night while her husband was at work, and hid him in the bottom of a ship that was to sail to America, and thus they came to America to be with the main body of the church. After arriving in New York, Maria obtained employment with a Mr. Keritchalon, either in a chicken processing plant or a feather factory. Mr. Keritchalon bought a little red wheelbarrow for John and told him to pick up all the feathers on the ground and haul them to a big pile. This would be his job, and he would be working just like his mother. This pleased the boy to have a wheelbarrow of his own so he worked diligently picking up the feathers. Then a gust of wind would come and blow the feathers all about again. This would make John very angry, and he would sit and cry. Mr. Keritchelon would say, "You can pick them up again, can't you? That is your job." This was his way of keeping the boy busy while his mother worked. It is not known how John and his mother made the trek from New York to Salt Lake Valley. It is told that while on the plains a mother in the company died and was buried on the prairie, leaving a baby girl. Maria was asked to take this baby and care for her on the journey. Maria tied a small piece of bacon to the baby's wrist and she would suck on that. Maria obtained food anyway she could to care for the baby. While on the plains, Maria met a man by the name of Hyrum Pendleton Trim. They were later married in Salt Lake City in October 1861. This family moved to Snyderville, Utah where Hyrum P. Trim owned and operated a shingle mill. These shingles and also timber that he cut were used in building the county court house in Salt Lake City as well as other community buildings. John helped in the shingle mill although he was just a boy. Mr. Trim would insist that John spend some time each evening learning to write and understand math. He did not have paper so they used shingles to write on. They wrote with charcoal, and this was all the education John received. There were many hardships to bear. During the winter, they would wrap burlap bags around their feet to keep them warm. As a young man, John hauled freight from Park City to Salt Lake City by ox team. He named his ox Mike and Jerry. On one of these trips, he was required to take a man who had died and had frozen in a sitting position to Salt Lake. John's companion workers sat on the dead man's feet to keep him on top of the load. As they journeyed over the rough ground with their load of freight and the dead man, they hit a bump and the dead man lurched back and threw the man who had been sitting on his feet into the snow. Whereupon the man laughingly picked himself up and said, "That is the first time I was ever thrown from a sleigh by a dead man!" Another time while hauling a load of shingles from Parley's Canyon to Salt Lake City over very rough roads, John was thrown from his load when one wheel dropped into a deep rut. Two wheels then crushed his chest. The doctor told his mother that he would have to be buried to his neck to draw out the inflammation from his chest. A hole was dug in the mud, and John was buried with just his head sticking out for 36 hours. No one thought he would live, but as he improved, the doctor warned Maria that John should not eat meat or any other solid foods because that would be difficult to digest and would likely bring about his death. One day Maria was preparing a meat dinner for the hired men. John could not ignore the smell of the cooked meat and begged for some to eat, but was refused. One piece of meat was left after dinner and was put in the cupboard. While Maria was out of the house getting a bucket of water, John got out of his bed, got the meat, crawled back into bed, and ate it. He went into convulsions, and he had a high fever. When Maria discovered what he had done, she called the doctor. When he came, he said, "What is done, is done, but if he lives the night through, he will probably be all right." From that time on, John gained strength and recovered. He continued hauling freight through Parley's Canyon until the family moved to Sugar House. It was here in Sugar House that John met Catherine Maria Staker, daughter of William Henry Staker and Catherine Maria Parsons. John believed that young men would try to out do one another in making their outfits and horses look the best. The girls would go with the fellows with the best looking outfits. John bought a whole bolt of bright green material and braided it in the tail and mane of his horse and all through the harness and buggy. The remaining material he gave to the girls to make bows for their hair. He also said that when they went to dances, they took a bushel of grain or a squash or some other produce to pay their dance ticket. They would dance until morning. Every time he picked up his girl for a date, her mother would have two or three bushels of apples to peel, or a cord of wool to card, or corn to be shelled before they could leave. This helped this pioneer mother who was raising her family mostly by herself. That mother was Catherine Maria Parsons Staker. John married her daughter, Catherine Maria, on 24 August 1874 in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City, Utah. John was working for the railroad as a fireman, and his friend, Mr Eldredge, was the brakeman. They continued to live in Sugar House, Utah. Catherine worked in the church, and John continued working for the railroad and hauling logs from the canyons. Three children were born to them while living in Sugar House: William Avery, Florence Lucretia, and Catherine Maria. His work with the railroad took him to Coalville much of the time and away from his family so they decided to move to Coalville. Two more children were born in Coalville: John and James Clarence. Sickness came to them, and three of their children died in just a period of two years: Catherine Maria or "Katie" had whooping cough. She loved dandelions and while she was ill, she kept her mother busy gathering the bright yellow flowers for her. She developed complications and passed away 22 June 1882 when not quite two years old. Little John became ill and passed away 15 February 1883 when only two months and 19 days old. James Clarence was born 6 January 1884, and passed away 17 January 1884 from blood poisoning that developed from improper cleaning at the time of his birth. All three children were buried in Coalville. The family was so alone much of the time there, and after losing the three babies, their mother became so despondent and grieved for her children that John felt they could not live there any longer so he moved his family back to Sugar House. In Sugar House, they lived in a little two-room house. One room was dug back into the hill. Two more children were born there: Nathan Abner and Lois Edna. Lois always claimed that she was born in a dugout. This home was just a short distance west of where the old Utah State Prison stood. John was still working as a fireman on the railroad. On one of his trips, a terrible blizzard stalled the train, and it was getting colder. They had used up all the fuel while waiting for help to come. John noticed that Mr. Eldredge, the brakeman, was getting extremely cold. John told him to keep moving as much as possible. John began telling stories to keep their minds off the terrible cold until help could arrive. When help finally arrived, John noticed that Mr. Eldredge was sitting very still. All hands pitched in to help get out so no more notice was given to the brakeman until they reached the round house. By then, he was stiff so they packed him into a back room and laid him on a table. The men sat around the fire warming and telling stories when a sudden noise caused them to investigate in the back room. The brakeman had thawed and his legs straightened causing him to tumble off the table. Many hardships and trying times were experienced on the railroad in those early days. The family moved from the small two-room house to a corner lot on 11 East and 11 South in Sugar House. Here Grandfather built a larger red brick home for his family. He still worked as a fireman on the railroad. Two more children were born: George Anson and Joseph Edgar. The family did not live there long. The corner of the lot was sold to a Mr. Hemsley on which he built a store. The store obscured their home, and there was a canal running from corner to corner through the lot. They kept a couple of cows and a calf on this lot. A Chinaman used to come through the neighborhood selling vegetables, etc. and the boys in the neighborhood, the Goodwin boys included, would swipe his wares while he was delivering at the houses, then run away chanting: "Ching Chong Chinaman, how do you sell your fish? Five cents, ten cents, fifteen cents a piece?" The Chinaman, in his anger, would chase them, brandishing a long, wicked-looking knife. He was never able to catch the rascals, and the scolding from their parents wasn't sufficient treatment to bring results, and it would be repeated again the next time he came around. The home and lot were traded to a Mr. Tate for an acre of ground and a red brick home with three rooms and a pantry. The day the family moved to this home in Holladay, the two elder boys, Avery and Nathan, drove the cows and calf, while John and Catherine took their furniture and supplies on a wagon. The mud was deep, nearly to the hubs of the wheels, and it took all day to make the trip of only a few miles. Joseph Edgar sat between his father and mother on the high seat and sang to the top of his lungs all the way: "Ta Ra Ra Ra Boom De Ay." This acre of ground was planted in alfalfa with only a few fruit trees on it when the Goodwin family moved there. The house stood well back from the street with a footpath to the front door. At the beginning of the path and on the right grew a sweetbrier bush. Lois remembered it especially for the lovely perfume it wafted into the air when it blossomed. To the left of the path stood a large lilac and near the house were two French lilac trees. A lovely old-fashioned flower garden grew along the right side of the path. Lois remembered one clump of red peonies and another of white chrysanthemums in that garden, along with a large variety of flowers that blossomed through the growing season. There was one pie cherry tree in the center of the lawn and two apple trees in back of the house with a large grassy play area for the kids and their neighborhood friends. Later John and Ed Turpin bought another acre of ground that joined the original acre on the right. John sold half of this acre to his eldest son, Avery, who, in turn, sold it to Ed Turpin. Another strip of land was purchased by John and Ed that joined the rear, and John bought still another strip to the rear and side of his original purchase. All of his new land was planted in fruit trees and berries. He grew an acre of strawberries. The rest was planted in peaches, apricots, quince, nectarine, cherries, apples, prunes, plums, as well as gooseberries, currants, and raspberries. It was a lot of hard work for the family to keep the berries picked and cultivated, and it called for early and late working hours for the whole family. Berries had to be picked before the sun became hot and again in the evenings as long as they could see to pick. They were hauled to market during the early wee hours the next morning. There was a Farmer's Market in Salt Lake City where farmers could obtain a stall to display their produce for sale. John was quite a horse trader and would often return with a different horse than he left with in the morning. This was most upsetting to his wife. It was told that he would leave with a beautiful animal and come home with just crow-bait that he would fatten and train for the next trade. Sometimes he didn't do so badly. Three more children were born to them in this home: Genevieve Pearl, Alvin LeRoy, and Vera Amanda. Their oldest daughter, Florence, married Ed Turpin and moved into the one room and pantry part of the home, and were living there when their first son, Eddie, was born. This left just the two front rooms for John and Catherine and their large family. There was a saying, "If there is room in the heart, there was room in the house." They didn't lack for room in the heart. In time, this home was sold and another brick home and lot purchased in Winder Ward. John worked as foreman on a ranch owned by Mr. Gunn. Mr. Gunn managed the Hotel Utah at the time, and the produce from his farm was used in the hotel dining room. The scraps from the dining tables were hauled back to the farm and fed to the pigs that were also used for the dining room. Mr. Gunn offered John all he had if he could take the beautiful red hair from his daughter Genevieve's head and make it grow on his own. He was completely bald. Mr. Gunn paid good wages and kept John busy the year around. He kept working for Mr. Gunn until Mr. Gunn died. Mr. Gunn and a friend were scuffling one day, and Mr. Gunn was struck in the chest. A blood clot formed causing his heart to fail. After that, wages were not always so good. John worked at times for 75 cents to a dollar per day, and with no shoes. He knew how to appreciate the better times. While working in Holladay, John and his sons, Avery and Nathan along with Ed Turpin, worked at an ore smelter, and they hauled mahogany wood for their winter fuel. Some of the older children and their families moved to Idaho, and John and Catherine wanted to go also to be with their children. In 1915, they made another move to Idaho and settled in the Thomas area. They lived there for the rest of their lives with the exception of one year that they spent in California with two of their sons, Joseph Edger and Alvin LeRoy. John was quite a comedian and was the life of many parties. He and Catherine liked to dance the varsovienne, and were called upon to dance at many public parties. They took the prize as best dancers on several occasions. He was also given the prize for being the homeliest man--taken in the spirit of fun. His prize at the Old Folks party was a pocket knife. The same year, the Hones Studio gave them a portrait of themselves for being the oldest couple at the party and for having the largest family. Their eldest son, Avery, died 2 July 1931 and was buried 5 July 1931 at Thomas Riverside Cemetery, Bingham County, Idaho. He lived three years after suffering a stroke. He was 55 years at the time of his untimely death. Another son, Joseph Edger and his son, Lennis, were killed 2 October 1948 on the Arco highway when returning from work on the Moore, Idaho, LDS church they were building. Their pickup truck went out of control, and they were both killed instantly. They were buried 7 October 1948 in Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho. Joseph was also 55 years old, and his son was just 18. John died 15 April 1940 at his home at Thomas, Idaho. He was 87. He was buried 21 April 1940 at the Thomas-Riverside Cemetery. His wife, Catherine, followed him three years later on 13 September 1943. She was at the home of her daughter, Florence Turpin, in Blackfoot, Idaho. She is buried at the side of her husband. She was also 87 years old. At the time Grandpa John passed away, he had eight children living, 65 grandchldren (five had died), 65 great-grandchildren (four had died). At the time Grandma Catherine passed away, she had eleven grandsons in the armed services in World War II.

Letter written by William Goodwin to his son John William Goodwin.

Contributor: TreeClimber Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

When John William Goodwin was a small boy, his mother took him to America. Father and son never saw each other again, but they managed to correspond over the years. This letter was copied from the original by Lois Edna Goodwin Hawker, a daughter of John William Goodwin. Baker Street Orsett, England 5 July 1875 Dear Son: You cannot think the pleasure I felt at receiving a letter after an absence of so long a time. It seems to me like a dream, not that I had forgotten you, for I have thought of you in the day and in the night. When I have been sleeping my mind has been upon you and I know now that you have not forgotten me. I wish I could see you now in the state of manhood. I can picture you in my mind when as a little child running about with me. The days of your childhood are quite fresh to me as when you were with me. I should like to see you once more, I dare say I shall never reach you, but we cannot tell what changes may take place in life. One thing may God's blessings be with you and that you will be able to face all the obsticles that you may meet with. Dear son, I feel quite proud to hear that you were married, not because a married life is all pleasant, but because it is a position where in a man ought to place himself providing he can meet with a good partner that will try and make your life a comfort to you. Please give my love to your wife and tell her I felt most happy at receiving a few lines of acknowledgment for the love she has for you, and I hope you can have the enjoyment of each other for many years. Dear son, there is a great deal of alteration in our place now to what there was when you went away, for there is always plenty of work and few to do it. There is so much emegration. My Father and Mother think you have forgotten them as you did not mention them in your letter. They are quite well and wish to be remembered to you. Dear Son, I feel anxious to write to you so I shall not wait to get my picture this time, but will write you again before long, then I will send it when I hope to have yours in return. I was sorry to hear your grandfather has had his arm broken off, but am glad he is doing well. Please give my respects to them when you see them. Now I must conclude hoping you are both quite well, as I am glad to say it leaves me at present. From your affectionate Father, William Goodwin

Catherine Maria Staker

Contributor: TreeClimber Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Catherine Maria Staker was born 25 February 1856, the third child of William Henry Staker and Catherine Maria Parsons. She was born at Sugar House, Utah, and was blessed on 28 March 1856 by A. C. Smoot. She started school at six years of age, but schoolng was very limited as there were no graded schools in those early days in Utah. Her daughter, Lois, remembers how her mother taught herself to write. She was asked to be secretary of the Relief Society, and was given the promise that if she would be prayerful and work diligently, she would be able to teach herself to write and keep the records. She would sit at the kitchen table in the dim lamp light long after the family had retired for the night, and labor to form each letter separately and then join them together. After many hours of practice, she learned to join the letters together as she wrote each word. Catherine was married to John William Goodwin in the Old Endowment House in Salt Lake City on 24 August 1874. She was 18-1/2 years old at the time of her marriage. Before her marriage, she worked in the old paper mill at the mouth of Big Cottonwood Canyon. Her wage was small, but it did help her mother with raising the family. Catherine's father had married a second wife and was living with her and their family at Rockport on the Weber River. This left the first wife and family to mostly care for themselves; each member was required to work hard for the good of all. Catherine was given a Patriarchal Blessing by Mosiah Hancock on 16 July 1902. Mosiah Hancock was a traveling patriarch. His home was in Arizona, but once a year he walked from Arizona to Salt Lake City to attend conference. On this trip, he came to the door of the Goodwin family asking for a place to spend the night and for something to eat. Lois described him as being dressed very crudely, with a rope tied about his waist as a belt to hold up his trousers. He looked more like a bum than a patriarch. Catherine at the time was very ill due to boils about her body. One boil located in her groin was especially painful. Patriarch Hancock noticed the difficulty she had and late that evening after most of the family had retired, he was still sitting up. She was wishing he would go to bed so she could do likewise, but as they sat not even talking much, he finally asked if he might give her a blessing. She consented and her daughter Lois was asked to act as scribe. Almost immediately after taking his hands from her head, the boil on her groin broke and the drainage ran down her leg, relieving the pain considerably. From then on, she improved and the boils left her. Catherine enrolled in the Relief Society when about 15 years of age and was made a teacher the year of 1898. On 25 August 1914, she was appointed to the office of assistant secretary in the Big Cottonwood Ward, and was later set apart as counselor in the Primary in the same ward. She moved from Utah to Idaho with her husband and family on 8 June 1915 and was again set apart as secretary of the East Thomas Relief Society and also acted as treasurer of the same organization. She was set apart as secretary of the East Thomas Genealogical Society on 5 March 1922. The promise made to her was literally fulfilled as she truly did learn to write. Once when she lived in Holladay, she had to go to Sugar House and get her husband who was working there. It was the first time she had ever harnessed and hooked a horse to a buggy. She put the collar on upside down and fastened it under the horses neck, then put the rest of the harness on and hooked it to the buggy. When she got to Sugar House, John was very angry when he saw what she had done. He told her that she could have choked the horse. John loved his horses. He had a violent temper, and Catherine took many beatings from his hands. Catherine had a great deal of faith and through her faith, she did much good among the sick--not only with her own family but among her neighbors and friends as well. She believed very strongly in fasting and prayer. She used this means very often in healing the sick. She believed in keeping records and allowed many people to copy her genealogy records. At a time when most people were still driving horses on a buggy or wagon, John and Catherine had a Model T Ford. It was a special treat for the grandchildren to go with their grandparents in their car. They lived in their little home in Thomas with bleeding hearts, zinnias, and peonies around their door until the time of John's death. After that, Catherine lived with her children until she passed away on 13 September 1943.

History Written by Catherine Maria Staker Goodwin

Contributor: TreeClimber Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

My Mother, Ethel Hawker Crockett Park, gave me a copy of a handwritten history by her Grandmother, Catherine Maria Staker Goodwin. I thought perhaps I could type Catherine's personal history into Family Tree. She was self-taught about reading and writing so she could fulfill her church callings thus the early part of her personal history needs many corrections, and I thought "do I type it as written or correct the spelling and grammar?" Rather than waiting until I had time to do such a task, I decided to only include her memories about the 1918 flu epidemic. The story starts on 29 May 1918: "Our son A. L. Roy was married to Hazel Hemingway, and on 4 September 1918, he left for Camp Lewis Washington on his way to the World War I. He was released 29 May 1919, arriving home just a few days after their first baby boy (Duwayne) was born. At this time, Hazel was staying with us while Roy was gone. The flu broke out, and her mother contracted the disease and died. Hazel was also sick with the flu. I was down to the Bishop's working on her mother's burying clothes, and I told the folks I was going to see Hazel before I went home. I went and talked with her through the window. I told her I was coming to the funeral the next day, and then I would come in and stay until she got better. That was the first I went to work with the flu--mostly among my own family. My husband, John, and baby girl, Vera, were the next, and before they recovered, daughter Lois Hawker and family were all stricken with the disease, and they sent for me to come. But I had John (husband) and Vera down so I could not go. So I went and got George to go to Salt Lake and take care of them. When he got there, they were so bad that he sent right back for Rilla (his wife). It took them both, day and night, to take care of them. They were there quite awhile, and before they got over the flu, they contracted the measles and were quaranteed. Lois stayed in the house to care for the children, and Robert was outside doing the chores. The family just recovered from the measles when they were quaranteed again with Scarlet Fever. Their Bishop sent a telegram to say that someone would have to come to care for them as he could not get anyone to go into the house. So the next morning I took the train [from Thomas, Idaho] and arrived in a snow storm. Before I had gone to care for Lois and family, I had been out to Genevieve's to care for her and Francis and baby Roland; they also had the flu and were very sick for a while. As soon as i could leave Lois and family, I went home and found everything covered in snow drifts." From history of Robert and Lois Hawker: "Robert moved his family to Idaho on 1 April 1919. In June of that same year, the first boy was born to the family. Because of the difficult time Lois had with the flu, Samuel was born in a very weakened condition and was called a "blue baby" by the doctor. Lois' mother (Catherine Goodwin) left her family to come help care for Lois and the new baby." The following article from the Deseret News, March 22, 1997, may be of interest: "Source of Deadly 1918 Flu Pinpointed." By analyzing viral genes from lung tissue preserved for 79 years, researchers have determined that the 1918 flu epidemic that killed 20 million people worldwide was caused by a virus from American pigs. In a study published Friday in the journal Science, researchers at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology said they found the virus traces in tissue taken from the autopsy of an Army private who died of the flu in 1918. He was one of about 700,000 people killed by the epidemic in the United States. Dr. Jeffery K. Taubenberger, leader of the research team, said that the genetic pattern of the virus shows that although it is closely related to "swine" flu, the 1918 influenza virus is unlike any other flu bug. "This is the first time that anyone has gotten a look at this virus which killed millions of people in one year, making it the worse infectious disease episode ever," he said. "It does not match any virus that has been found since." Another expert praised the work and said that it may help science get ready for what some believe will be an inevitable return of the deadly form of flu. "Eventually we will have another influenza pandemic," said Robert Webster, a virologist and flu specialist at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis. Now we are in a better position to combat it. If it comes back, we can design a vaccine based on that genetic sequence." Analyzing the 1918 virus, he said, will help science learn why it was so deadly and virulent. Other researchers attempted to isolate the 1918 virus, but Taubenberger's team is the first to succeed. Although the disease that caused the worldwide epidemic was called "Spanish flu," the virus apparently was a mutation that evolved in American pigs and was spread around the globe by U.S. troops mobilized for World War I, said Taubenberger. The Army private whose tissue was analyzed contracted the flu at Fort Jackson, S.C. For that reason, Taubenberger and his colleagues suggested the virus be known as Influenza A/South Carolina. Army doctors in 1918 conducted autopsies on some of the 43,000 servicemen killed by the flu and preserved some specimens in formaldehyde and wax. Taubenberger said his team sorted through 30 specimens before finding enough cirus in the private's lung tissue to partially sequence the genes for hemagglutinin and neuraminidase, two key proteins in flu virus. "The hemagglutinin gene matches closest to swine influenza viruses, showing that this virus came into humans from pigs." The finding supports a wide-spread theory that flu viruses from swine are the most virulent for humans. Two other flu viruses spread all over the world since 1918--Asian flu in 1957 and the Hong Kong flu in 1968--and both mutated in pigs. Most experts believe that flu viruses reside harmlessly in birds, where they are genetically stable. Occasionally, a virus from birds will infect pigs. The swine immune system attacks the virus, forcing it to change genetically to survive. The result is a new virus. When this new bug is spread to humans, it can be devastating, said Taubenberger.

Life timeline of John William Goodwin

1853
John William Goodwin was born in 1853
John William Goodwin was 8 years old when American Civil War: Fort Sumter surrenders to Confederate forces. The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865. As a result of the long-standing controversy over slavery, war broke out in April 1861, when Confederate forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina, shortly after U.S. President Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated. The nationalists of the Union proclaimed loyalty to the U.S. Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States, who advocated for states' rights to expand slavery.
John William Goodwin was 24 years old when Thomas Edison announces his invention of the phonograph, a machine that can record and play sound. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
John William Goodwin was 30 years old when Eruption of Krakatoa: Four enormous explosions destroy the island of Krakatoa and cause years of climate change. The 1883 eruption of Krakatoa in the Dutch East Indies began in the afternoon of Sunday, 26 August 1883, and peaked in the late morning of Monday, 27 August when over 70% of the island and its surrounding archipelago were destroyed as it collapsed into a caldera. Additional seismic activity was reported to have continued until February 1884, though reports of seismic activity after October 1883 were later dismissed by Rogier Verbeek's investigation into the eruption. The 1883 eruption was one of the deadliest and most destructive volcanic events in recorded history. At least 36,417 deaths are attributed to the eruption and the tsunamis it created. Significant additional effects were also felt around the world in the days and weeks after the volcano's eruption.
John William Goodwin was 45 years old when Spanish–American War: The Treaty of Paris is signed, officially ending the conflict. The Spanish–American War was fought between the United States and Spain in 1898. Hostilities began in the aftermath of the internal explosion of the USS Maine in Havana Harbor in Cuba, leading to US intervention in the Cuban War of Independence. American acquisition of Spain's Pacific possessions led to its involvement in the Philippine Revolution and ultimately in the Philippine–American War.
John William Goodwin was 52 years old when Albert Einstein publishes his first paper on the special theory of relativity. Albert Einstein was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics. His work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. He is best known to the general public for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2, which has been dubbed "the world's most famous equation". He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect", a pivotal step in the development of quantum theory.
John William Goodwin was 59 years old when The British passenger liner RMS Titanic sinks in the North Atlantic at 2:20 a.m., two hours and forty minutes after hitting an iceberg. Only 710 of 2,227 passengers and crew on board survive. RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early hours of 15 April 1912, after colliding with an iceberg during its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City. There were an estimated 2,224 passengers and crew aboard, and more than 1,500 died, making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history. RMS Titanic was the largest ship afloat at the time it entered service and was the second of three Olympic-class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line. It was built by the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast. Thomas Andrews, her architect, died in the disaster.
John William Goodwin was 75 years old when Walt Disney character Mickey Mouse premieres in his first cartoon, "Plane Crazy". Walter Elias Disney was an American entrepreneur, animator, voice actor and film producer. A pioneer of the American animation industry, he introduced several developments in the production of cartoons. As a film producer, Disney holds the record for most Academy Awards earned by an individual, having won 22 Oscars from 59 nominations. He was presented with two Golden Globe Special Achievement Awards and an Emmy Award, among other honors. Several of his films are included in the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress.
John William Goodwin was 77 years old when Great Depression: In a State of the Union message, U.S. President Herbert Hoover proposes a $150 million (equivalent to $2,197,000,000 in 2017) public works program to help generate jobs and stimulate the economy. The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s. It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century. In the 21st century, the Great Depression is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline.
John William Goodwin died in 1940 at the age of 87
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for John William Goodwin (1853 - 1940), BillionGraves Record 1274722 Blackfoot, Bingham, Idaho, United States

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