John Scott

6 May 1811 - 16 Dec 1876

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John Scott

6 May 1811 - 16 Dec 1876
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JOHN SCOTT Born: 6 May 1811, Armagh, Ireland Parents: Jacob and Sarah Warnock Scott Died: 16 Dec 1876, Millcreek, Salt Lake, Utah Arrived in Valley: 24 Sep 1848, Heber C. Kimball Co. Married 1st: Elizabeth Menary [SIC] Date: Trafager [SIC], Canada Born: 10 Sep 1815, Dublin, Ireland Married 2nd: Mary
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Life Information

John Scott

Born:
Died:

Salt Lake City Cemetery

200-250 N St
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah
United States
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jeanniebug

September 23, 2013
Photographer

scholesg

September 18, 2013

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John Scott's Obituary

Contributor: jeanniebug Created: 9 months ago Updated: 9 months ago

Yesterday the remains of Col. John Scott were brought down from Cache Valley in charge of his four sons, and taken on to Salt Lake. Col. Scott was well known throughout this Territory as one of the old “stand bys.” He figured conspicuously in “Mormon” affairs in the days of Nauvoo, and was for many years as active participant in the trials, travels and struggles of the Latter-day Saints. A little over a week ago he was seized with inflammation of the lungs, which culminated in ulceration, and resulted in his death at Millville, Cache County, on Saturday afternoon. The major part of his family being at Mill Creek, south of Salt Lake City, his body was conveyed to that place for the performance of the funeral ceremonies. May he rest in peace. The Deseret News, Ogden Junction Section, December 27, 1876, Salt Lake City, Utah

John Scott-Conquerors of the West

Contributor: jeanniebug Created: 9 months ago Updated: 9 months ago

JOHN SCOTT Born: 6 May 1811, Armagh, Ireland Parents: Jacob and Sarah Warnock Scott Died: 16 Dec 1876, Millcreek, Salt Lake, Utah Arrived in Valley: 24 Sep 1848, Heber C. Kimball Co. Married 1st: Elizabeth Menary [SIC] Date: Trafager [SIC], Canada Born: 10 Sep 1815, Dublin, Ireland Married 2nd: Mary Pugh Date: 1846, Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois Married 3rd: Sarah Ann Willis Date: 24 Mar 1846, Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois Born: 4 Feb 1825, Pittsburg [SIC], Pennsylvania Died: 30 Oct 1890, Millcreek, Salt Lake, Utah John left Ireland with his parents in 1819 and came to Canada where they made a home in Trafager [SIC]. His father taught school for eight years. While there, they met and listened to the Mormon elders and were baptized. In 1838 they moved to Far West, Missouri, where they suffered the persecutions with the others saints. They left Far West in 1840 and settled near Nauvoo. His parents both died while in Nauvoo. John was the only one of the family to go west. His experiences while a body guard to the Prophet Joseph Smith were numerous. He was one who helped bring the bodies of Joseph and Hyrum back to Nauvoo. He was also a Colonel in the Nauvoo Legion. John was a prominent military man in the early days of the L.D.S. Church. Before Brigham Young left Nauvoo, he gave John a call to remain in Nauvoo to help the saints prepare to leave. He went among the non0Mormons gathering old clothing to help fit the saints for the journey. When they finally left, he had three wives, seven children and three wagons. Upon arriving in the Valley, they settled on 100 acres of land south of the city of Millcreek. He helped build the first school in the area on his land. It was called the Scott School. His wife, Mary, was the first teacher. In 1855 he left on a mission to Great Britain. When Johnston’s Army was coming, President Young sent John his release so he could get home to help with the military. It was his second mission there, the other being in 1839. They lived for a time in Millville from 1868 to 1875, when he moved his family to Millcreek. In settling some affairs in Millville, he caught cold and died of pneumonia. He was a faithful member of the church all his life and loved by every one who knew him. Children of 1st wife: Isaac, born: Canada Had for more children Children of 2nd wife: Had one or more Children of 3rd wife: Joseph Lemuel, Born: 16 April 1847, Winter Quarters, Nebraska Married: 27 Nov 1890, Sarah Jane Hemsley Died: 11 Nov 1922, Salt Lake City, Utah Rebecca Ann, Born: 22 Mar 1849 Simeon, Born: 25 May 1851 Zebulon, Born: 1 Dec 1853 William Ruben, Born: 28 Dec 1855 Hannah Marie, Born: 2 Mar 1839 Martha Luzella, Born: 19 Jul 1861 Sarah Melissa, Born: 13 Feb 1864 Benjamin Franklin, Born: 7 Aug 1868 by Vergia Scott Conquerors of the West: Stalwart Mormon Pioneers, by Florence C. Youngberg, Pages 2304-2306

History of Millcreek & the Scott School

Contributor: jeanniebug Created: 9 months ago Updated: 9 months ago

CITY OF SOUTH SALT LAKE When the pioneers first came to the Salt Lake Valley on 24 July 1847, one of the first places considered for settlement was the winding green strip of land that flanked what they soon called Mill Creek. While the primary settlement was on the north end of the valley, Mill Creek was soon settled as irrigation ditches were dug and some of the valley's finest farms, orchards, and dairies were initiated. The plan for Salt Lake City's blocks ended at 900 South, and the area south, to present-day 2700 South, was referred to as the "Big Field," where the pioneers cultivated crops. The land just south of the Big Field was called Mill Creek, after the creek that runs through the area to the Jordan River. The area continued to be sparsely populated agricultural land, with parcels allocated in five- to twenty-acre units, until about 1870. Around that time, local businesses began to develop; they included Husler's Mill, built about 1865 on the bank of Mill Creek on Territory Road, which is today's State Street. Other private, noteworthy developments of that era include Winder Dairy and Calder Park. Winder Dairy is still a prominent name throughout the area today, but it has long since moved to the west side of the Salt Lake Valley. Calder Park soon developed into one of the finest amusement parks between the Missouri River and the Golden Gate. The soggy swampland created by a spring was cleared to form a small lake for boats and amusement. Other attractions developed over time and included a merry-go-round, bridges, a large dance pavilion, a bandstand with a suspended acoustical shell, a racetrack for horses and later motorcycles, bowling lanes, a roller-skating rink, a log flume-type waterslide, and traditional playground equipment. The park passed through different ownerships including the Rapid Transit Street Car Company which ran the park from 1891 to 1902 and extended streetcar service to the park along 700 East and installed electric power throughout the park. At its peak, the park was attracting over 100,000 patrons per season. The LDS Church Granite Stake assumed ownership and changed the name to Wandamere Park. "Wanda" was claimed to be of Indian origin, meaning "beautiful place," while "mere" is Anglo-Saxon and signifies "little lake" or "clear pond." By 1921 interest in the park was diminishing and it was sold to Charles Nibley, who donated the land to Salt Lake City on the condition that it would always remain open park space. That condition was met by transforming the park into a nine-hole golf course which Salt Lake City still operates. Near the turn of the century, the development of infrastructure began to take place. The major dirt roads in the area were covered with **** from nearby smelters and the construction of public buildings such as schools and churches began. Two of these structures remain as historical landmarks. The Scott School was built in 1890 on the northeast corner of 3300 South and 500 East. With various additions made over the years, the schoolhouse evolved to be part of Granite High School and currently functions as the Pioneer Craft House, which continues to play an educational and cultural role in the community. In 1899 the Catholic Church built the Saint Ann's Orphanage and church on the south side of 2100 South between 400 and 500 East. The orphanage was changed into an elementary school in 1955 and currently provides a curriculum for kindergarten through the eighth grades. The Granite Tabernacle was built by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints in 1903 on the northeast corner of 3300 South and State Street. This tabernacle was part of a network of large meeting halls that served the various communities in which they were built. The Granite Tabernacle was considered one of the finest, with a tower rising 133 feet and a dome arching seventy feet over the assembly floor that seated 2,500 people. This landmark building was demolished in 1956. Transportation has long been important to the area of South Salt Lake. The original Pony Express route ran through the area along current State Street from 1860 to 1861. Both the Union Pacific and Denver and Rio Grande Western railroads chose routes through present South Salt Lake. These developments encouraged the growth of businesses and residential neighborhoods in the area. In recent history, the construction of the Interstate highway system brought the junction of I-15 and I-80 to South Salt Lake. The city continues to be an excellent location for many businesses and light industries on account of its central location and access to transportation routes. As the local population increased, the need for public improvements became more important and encouraged a drive for incorporation. On 28 September 1938 area voters approved incorporation by a narrow margin, and the city founders moved to initiate construction of a sanitary sewer system and somewhat later a culinary water system. Present boundaries of the City of South Salt Lake begin immediately south of Salt Lake City at 2100 South between the Jordan River and 500 East. After 2700 South, the eastern border extends to 700 East until it reaches the southern boundary of 3300 South. The residential neighborhoods have been home to many wonderful people over the years and the population has fluctuated between 10,000 and 11,000 people over the last decade. South Salt Lake is organized in seven villages representing the different neighborhoods and historical districts. Each of the villages also has a council as a form of grassroots political involvement; these councils help to plan redevelopment and beautification projects that continue to improve the community. One of the districts is "Center of Industry," signifying the many prominent businesses that have made the area their home. The other six define areas in which families can truly become the city's slogan--a "Community of Neighbors." Greg W. Session History of Pioneer Craft House Established in 1947 Craft House was the centennial gift to the people of Utah - from the people of Utah, commemorating the 100 years since the Mormon Pioneers settled the Salt Lake Valley. This remarkable gift has bound together generations of Utah families through teaching skills that once provided the necessities of life on the American frontier and today provide creative links to the traditions of our pioneer ancestors. Craft House is the home of a priceless puppet collection, traditional looms for weaving, pottery kilns, silver smith and lapidary workshops and a substantial collection of pioneer era art work. One of the many gifts of Craft House is it closeness to the people. Since our humble start on the mezzanine of the old Auerbach’s Department Store in downtown Salt Lake City Craft House has provided a peaceful haven for those with shared interests in Art. When Craft House moved to our present home at the old Scott School we entered a new era of providing homespun education to the children and patrons of Granite School District. This enduring relationship has provided both Granite School District and Craft House with unprecedented opportunities to serve the community through preserving the heritage of pioneer arts and crafts. Countless hours of creative enterprise learned at Craft House have blessed the homes and lives of Utah families in the form of heirloom quality quilts, woven blankets and rugs, stained glass, pottery and silver jewelry and lapidary arts. Our Guilds and faculty teach arts that if it were not for Craft House would be lost. Tatting, silver jewelry, spinning, crochet, are skills commonly practiced in the pioneer era but on today’s endangered list. Come spend some time in our peaceful gardens. Leave the noise and hustle of the outside neighborhood and marvel at our 70 foot tall Redwood trees and our beautiful ancient Sequoia. From our Bamboo to our perennial gardens we are home to the best that nature can provide. No one knows when or how these treasures were planted. Perhaps a group of small school children in the 1870’s maybe it was the Scott family, the first settlers on Mill Creek in 1847. How the gardens began is lost to our memory however their protection has been our continuing sacred trust for over 150 years. Always a sanctuary of learning our little corner of Utah at the busy intersection of 3300 South and 500 East streets is the oldest continually operated school in Utah. We continue today with renewed dedication to preserving Utah’s heritage by teaching yet unborn generations an appreciation and love for traditional Arts and Crafts. A ZAP Tax grant has recently been awarded to Pioneer Craft House, Inc., a non-profit organization, to purchase and preserve the property as a museum and school. The Board of Trustees thanks the City of South Salt Lake, Salt Lake County, The University of Utah and Salt Lake Community College for all their support.

John Scott-History of Utah

Contributor: jeanniebug Created: 9 months ago Updated: 9 months ago

South east Lehi, on a plain about three miles east of Lake Utah, was founded, in 1850, a settlement first known as Battle Creek, and afterward called Pleasant Grove. It was here that the first engagement with the natives occurred. Captain Scott with a band of thirty or forty men started south in pursuit of Indians who had stolen fourteen horses from Orr’s herd, on Wilson Creek, in Utah Valley, and several cattle from Tooele Valley. The band was found encamped on a creek in the midst of willows and dense brushwood in a deep ravine. After a desultory fight of three or four hours, four Indians were killed, but none of the settlers. As was their custom, the women and children of the slain followed the victorious party to their camp. History of Utah, 1540-1886, Settlement & Occupation of the Country, Pages 311 & 312 Eldredge was in command of the second cohort, with John Scott as colonel of the first regiment, Andrew Little major of the first battalion, and Jesse P. Harmon captain of the first company, iifrst battalion, called the silver grays, and composed of men over 50 years of age. History of Utah, 1540-1886, Settlement & Occupation of the Country, Page 442

John Scott- Pioneers & Prominent Men of Utah

Contributor: jeanniebug Created: 9 months ago Updated: 9 months ago

SCOTT, JOHN (son of Jacob Scott and Sarah Warnock of Toronto, Canada). Born May 6, 1811, Armagh, Ireland. Came to Utah 1848, John Scott company. Married Elizabeth Meneary 1836 (daughter of William Meneary and Catherine McMillin), who was born Sept. 10, 1815, Dublin, Ireland. Their children: Isaac b. Feb. 15, 1837, m. Martha Moor; Matilda b. Nov. 1, 1838; Louisa b. March 20, 1840, m. Edward Morgan; Ephraim b. June 6, 1842, m. Sarah Ellen Smithies; John W. b. Nov. 6, 1844, m. Fanny Mariah Ellis, m. Marinda V. Weaver; Elizabeth b. March 15, 1847, m. Robert Smithies: Heber M. b. Nov. 1, 1849, and Sarah C. b. July 4, 1852, died; Josiah b. Aug. 20, 1854, m. Mary E. Walton; Sophia b. Aug. 20, 1857, m. Edward Morgan; Alfonzo b. Jan. 28, 1859, m. Caroline E. Pratt; Alvina b. Jan. 28, 1859, m. Thomas H. Ellis. Family home Mill Creek, Utah. Married Mary Pugh 1844, Nauvoo, Ill. (daughter of Edward Pugh of of Sussex, Eng.). Their children: Hyrum b. July 15, 1846, m. Amelia Morgan; Mary E. b. May 22, 1849, and Eliza A. b. Oct. 20, 1852, m. Peter S. Barson; Lucy J. b. April 19, 1855; Vilate b. May 12, 1861, m. Fred Fowler. Married Sarah A. Willis 1846, who was born Feb. 4, 1825. Their children: Joseph L. b. April 16, 1847, m. Sarah J. Hemsley; Rebecca A. b. March 25, 1849; Simeon W. b. Aug. 25, 1851, m. Martha Ellis; Zebulon b. Dec. 22, 1853; William R. b. Dec. 25, 1855, m. Mary L. Green; Hannah M. b. March 2, 1859, m. John G. Morgan; Martha L. b. July 19, 1861, m. ?? McDonald; Sarah M. b. Feb. 3, 1864, m. Winslow F. Walker; Benjamin F. b. Aug. 7, 1868, m. Rebecca Hemsley. Married Esther Yeates 1860 (daughter of George Yeates and Mary Chance), who was born April 4, 1843, in Worcestershire, Eng., and came to Utah 1859, handcart company. Their children: Brigham b. April 22, 1861, m. Sarah Stoddard; Mary L. April 1863; George T. b. Aug. 20, 1865, m. Esther Lishman; Sarah M. b. Nov. 22, 1867, m. Henry Bair; Esther A. b. Dec. 23, 1869, m. Joseph Bindrup; Fredrick W. b. July 27, 1872, m. Frances Rothrock. Married Angeline Keller (daughter of Alva Keller). Their children: Winfield M. b. April 4, 1872; Mary b. 1874; Jacob F. b. Feb. 19, 1876. Settled at Salt Lake City 1848; moved to Mill Creek 1852; senior president 61st quorum seventies; missionary to Ireland 1854-57. Member Joseph Smith's bodyguard; colonel in Nauvoo Legion. Indian war veteran. Died 1876, Millville, Utah. Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, Early Mormon History 1905, by Frank Esshom, Page 1109 & 1110

John Scott- excerpt from Fate of the Persecutors of the Prophet Joseph Smith

Contributor: jeanniebug Created: 9 months ago Updated: 9 months ago

Excerpt from the chapter: Conspiracy of Nauvoo, By Horace H. Cummings It seems that Joseph, knowing the danger into which the boys had gone, had become so uneasy at their long absence, that he could no longer remain at home, so he and one of his body guards, John Scott, who was the brother to Robert, started out to see if they could discover what had become of them. Perhaps they suspected the boys had been murdered, and that their bodies would be thrown into the stream, as William Law’s house, where the meeting was held, was but a short distance from the river. At all events, they were there under the bank when the boys were liberated, and now glided around close to the water’s edge to the point where the boys were awaiting them. It was a joyful meeting; Joseph seemed delighted to see that the boys had escaped with their lives. The party walked on to a point nearly opposite Joseph’s store, where a board fence came down to the edge of the river, forming, together with the orchard trees and shrubbery, a suitable retreat where they could converse without any danger of being seen or heard. “Let us sit down here,” said Joseph. All four of them entered the secluded retreat, and, when they were seated, he continued: “Boys, we saw your danger and were afraid you would not get out alive, but we are thankful that you got off safely. Now relate to me all that you have witnessed.” The boys then gave him a complete account of all they had witnessed and passed through; repeated to him the oath they had seen and heard administered to some two hundred individuals separately; gave him the names of all they knew that had taken the oath; in short, they gave him a most accurate recital of all they had seen and heard. Joseph and his companion listened very attentively, and, as the boys proceeded, a very grave expression crept over the countenance of the former, showing that a deep anxiety was preying upon his mind. When the recital was finished, a pause of some length ensued. Joseph was very much moved, and at length burst out: “O, brethren, you do not know what this will terminate in!” But proceeded no further, for his feelings were so strong that he burst into tears. In great agitation, Brother John Scott, who was an intimate and trusted friend of Joseph, sprang forward, and throwing his arms around the Prophet’s neck, exclaimed: “O, Brother Joseph! Do you think they are going to kill you? And they fell on each others’ necks and wept bitterly. The scene is difficult to describe. The thought of losing their friend and Prophet by the hands of such a bloodthirsty mob was sufficient to wring their hearts; and those brave men who, but a few moments before, had fearlessly faced death, and scorned the proffered conditions on which their lives might be spared, now wept like children, and mingled their tears with those of their leaders. Joseph was the first to master his feelings, and, raising Brother Scott’s arms from off his neck, he said, in a deep and sorrowful tone: “I fully comprehend it!” He then relaxed into a solemn study, while his brethren anxiously watched the changes of his countenance as if they would read the thoughts and feelings that were preying upon his heart. The scene was painful and impressive. Each moment they expected to hear him say that his work on earth was done, and that he would have to be slain to seal his testimony. After a long silence he finally continued: “Brethren, I am going to leave you. I shall not be with you long; it will not be many months until I shall have to go.” This remark still left them in doubt as to his future fate, but had such significance that Brother Scott again anxiously inquired: “Brother Joseph, are you going to be slain?” Joseph, for some reason, evaded a direct reply, but continued in a tone that told too plainly of the sorrow he felt: “I am going away, and will not be know among this people for twenty years or more. I shall go to rest for a season.”....... Perhaps, in reply to Brother Scott’s question, Joseph was revolving these plans in his mind, and looking forward to the time when he and the Saints would be beyond the reach of persecution; it is now impossible to tell, but he events which followed rather indicate that he foresaw his death. However, he continued in great earnestness:...... The Fate of the Persecutors of the Prophet Joseph Smith, Compiled by N. B. Lundwall, 1952 Pages 92-94

Letter from John Scott to Parley P. Pratt

Contributor: jeanniebug Created: 9 months ago Updated: 9 months ago

IRELAND Encouraging Prospects for the Spread of Truth in Ireland 29, Great George Street, Belfast October 8, 1856 President Pratt. Dear Brother, I feel pleasure in submitting to you a brief report of the Irish Mission. On the 24th of August last, I met the Dublin Saints in conference, a report of which I directed President Rutledge to forward to you, which I presume you have received; so I will only briefly remark that I rejoice at its present prospects. They have never been so bright there before. A spirit of inquiry is abroad among the people, and the Priesthood are taking advantage of it. Public lectures are being delivered, and everything seems to bear testimony, that the Spirit of Israel’s God is striving with the people, and the scattered of Israel in that region of country are about to be gathered out; in a word, President T. H. Rutledge is doing his duty faithfully, as a man of God, in his high and holy calling, as President of that Conference. Leaving that matter, therefore, I will proceed to give a short report of the Belfast Conference, which came off on the 4th and 5th instant. I met with the Priesthood in our neat little hall to receive the reports of the various Branches. I found a first-rate spirit manifested all through, and a willingness on the part of the brethren to walk up to t he line of duty, that cheered my heart. The reports from the various parts of the Conference are cheering; inquiry; inquiry; and the vigour [sic] (vigor) of strong minds, are being applied to burst the chains of tradition and priestcraft, which have bound them so closely for ages gone by. In the larger part of the Belfast Conference, a good spirit prevails, and the truth is spreading on the right hand and on the left. We have organized a new Branch at Lisburn, six miles from this town, since our last report. On Sunday, 5th instant, we assembled in Conference, and truly I felt to rejoice before my Father in heaven, to see our hall filled with Saints ready to move at a nod and strangers anxiously inquiring. We enjoyed a first-rate time, and felt, and will continue to feel, the teachings, counselings, and prophesyings of the Valley brethren who were with us. I feel here to make honourable [sic] (honorable) mention of President James McGhie, who has in everything carried out my counsels, and as a man of God faithfully acquitted himself of the trust reposed in him. Before the Conference, we introduced the subjects which had engrossed the attention of the Council–sustained the Prophet Brigham, with the various authorities in their order–put every item to the vote, and every vote was unanimous. On Monday evening we closed our Conference, with a soiree, to which Saints and strangers were alike welcome. Our hall was tastefully decorated with appropriate mottoes, wrought with native flowers and evergreens which adorned its walls, while it was filled with cheerful participants in pleasure, And I must say, that though I have attended a number of Conferences and parties, got up in the best style in England and Wales, I never, no never saw, this side of Zion, such union, such oneness, and such congeniality of spirit, in all my travels. Elders Angell and Craig expressed in happy terms their unbounded satisfaction and said they really felt at a loss to draw the line of distinction between it and some of the choice parties they had attended in the Valleys of the mountains. Brother Orson–I am satisfied with my mission; nay more, I rejoice in it. I have a willing people to preside over, and God is blessing our labours [sic] (labors). I have introduced the law of tithing through all the mission, and it would really do your heart good to see them bringing in their mites, and only wishing with tears that they had more to give. Our Tract Society, with its various branches, keeps alive in its mission, and is spreading the written word to hundreds; much good is resulting from its operations, and we hope soon to be able to give you a literal order for the new series. President McGhie, Elder Angell, Craig, and myself, together with all the Irish Saints, join in warmest esteem for yourself, and all those associated with you. Yours in the bond of the everlasting covenant, John Scott Millennial Star, Volume 18, Page 699

John Scott-Record of his Ancestors & Descendanta

Contributor: jeanniebug Created: 9 months ago Updated: 9 months ago

A SKETCH OF THE LIFE OF JOHN SCOTT By Sarah M. Scott Walker, daughter of John Scott and Sarah Ann Willis John Scott was born in Armagh, Ireland, the 6th May, 1811. The father of John Scott was Jacob Scott, born August 14, 1782, in Londonderry, Ireland. He married Sarah Warnock. She was born in Armagh, Ireland, August 10, 1779. They were married June 6, 1804, in Armagh, Ireland, by the Reverend Thomas Cummings of the Presbyterian Church. To them were born eight children, four boys and four girls, John Scott being the oldest son. They left Ireland April 5, 1819, coming to Canada. They arrived in Quebec in May. There Jacob (John’s father) after moving to Toronto and then to Markham County, taught school in Trafalgar for eight years. He received one hundred dollars bounty from the British Government for teaching, besides the subscribe fees of the parents of his pupils. They owned 100 acres of land in Trafalgar, Canada, given by the government to all British subjects who were actual settlers. They resided in Trafalgar eighteen years. He built a large house there and named in Ebenezer Hall. It was a beautiful home. The Mormon Elders were called to preach the gospel in that part of Canada. John was married to Elizabeth Menary in his father’s home (Ebenezer Hall). They had one son born in Canada, named him Isaac. Elizabeth was born in Dublin, Ireland, 10 September 1815. They were both baptized in Canada. Jacob Scott and his entire family were converted and baptized. They then moved to Far West, Missouri, on September 2, 1838, passing through great persecution with the Saints. They left Far West, Missouri May 18, 1840, locating about Nauvoo about five miles on Monday, August 9, 1841. This was close to the Mississippi River. There Sarah died. She was buried in Nauvoo. Jacob Scott died January 2, 1845. He lived a life of true holiness and devotion to God. He was buried in Nauvoo. Just before he died he bore strong testimony of the truthfulness of the Gospel to his family. John Scott was the only one of his family to come to Utah with the Saints. While living in Nauvoo John was ordained a Seventy and became President of Tenth Quorum of Seventies in Nauvoo. He had a brother, Jacob die while living in Nauvoo. His brothers and sisters were Ann, Jane, Mary, John, Isaac, Robert, Sarah and Jacob. While living in Nauvoo John accepted the Doctrine and the Revelation of Celestial and plural marriage. Also while living in Nauvoo he married Mary Pugh and Sarah Ann Willis. John Scott was chosen one of Joseph Smith’s body guards, which position he held until the Prophet’s martyrdom. He often related experiences he had with the Prophet. How he loved the Prophet and would have gone through even death for him. John Scott is spoken of in the “One Hundred Years of Mormonism”, also in the Essentials of Church History” which relate some of the experiences he shared with the Prophet. He also held the rank of Colonel in the First Regiment, Second Cohort of the Nauvoo Legion. When the Prophet was martyred, John Scott went with others to get their bodies to bring to Nauvoo. He also helped with their burial. After the Prophet’s death there was great confusion over who should be President of the Church. John Scott and his three wives; Elizabeth, Mary and Sarah all bore testimonies of the transfiguration of Brigham Young. So they had no doubts in their minds. They knew by this that Brigham Young was the man in the right place. The following is taken from Heber C. Kimball’s History: “On February 18, 1846, the companies were being organized and made ready to start to the Rocky Mountains. In the exodus from Nauvoo they secured, altogether, about 400 wagons. All were heavily loaded with not over half the number of teams necessary for a rapid journey. Most of the families were provided with provisions to do several months. Colonel Steven Markham and about 100 pioneers were sent in advance of the main body to prepare the roads. Colonel John Scott and about 100 men and artillery and Hosea Stout with about 100 men acted as police guards, armed with rifles. On the morning of March 1, they were notified to be ready to start at noon. They reached the Missouri River about the middle of June. Here they found the Pottawatomie and the Omaha Indians friendly. It was then that the call came for 600 men to go to Mexico to fight. They were mustered out. The Mormon Battalion started out about the middle of July. The idea of the Saints going to the Rocky Mountains for that season was now abandoned. (John Scott was very prominent as a military man in the early days of the Church.) The Camp of Israel prepared to go into Winter Quarters. (This name was given to their winter settlement on the Missouri River.) This place is now known as Florence, Nebraska. President Brigham Young requested John Scott to take this as a mission to remain one more year to assist in helping to see that the pioneers were properly equipped for traveling across the plains; all that were going to ?? his company. He did this and he also went on a mission among the Non-Mormons to gather and collect old clothing to help fit the Saints out for traveling. While at this work he converted three people to the Gospel. This year John received the following orders from Brigham Young. The following is framed and in the Museum in the Tabernacle Block, put thee by Sarah M. Walker: February 19, 1847 Lieutenant Colonel John Scott, You are hereby commanded to immediately put in perfect order the canon equipment, carriages, and appendages, belonging thereto that are under your command, whereof fail not, and make return of this order with your doings thereon. Head Quarters Winder Quarters Brigham Young, Lieut. Gen. of the Legion P.S. You are also authorized to call on any or all of the commanding officers to assist you in the repairs. B. Y. A.A. Rockwood, A. D. Camp This information was received from Apostle Joseph F. Smith John Scott and his family started west the 30th May, 1848, in Heber C. Kimball’s company. Mary Scott and Sarah Ann Scott drove a mule team across the plains. They took turns driving. President Heber C. Kimball’s company was organized by selecting Henry Pack captain of 50’s. They also had captains of 10’s. John Scott was captain over 10 wagons. In this company were 662 people, 226 wagons, 57 horses, 25 mules, 737 oxen, 284 cows, 150 loose cattle, 243 sheep, 5 ducks, 96 pigs, 299 chickens, 17 cats, 52 dogs, 3 hives of bees, 3 doves, and 1 squirrel. They arrived in the valley 24 September, 1848. They had wonderful experiences on this journey. Elizabeth had five small children. Mary had one. Sarah had one. Father’s wagons were entirely surrounded with Indians at one time. They were saved by a white man that was with the Indians who knew John Scott and went to school with him in Canada. The Indians had captured him and compelled him to live with them. He had some influence with the Indians. John was transferred from the Tenth Quorum of Seventies to the Senior President of the Sixty First Quorum of Seventies. They moved south of the city on 100 acres of land. There, through his influence and help, a school house was built. They named it the Scott School. John’s wife, Mary, taught school here as I remember. She was the first teacher. On Friday, April 6, 1855, John Scott received a call to go as a missionary to Great Britain. He obeyed the call and left his families to face the hardships of building up a new country and of enduring the famine. During the summer the grasshoppers did serious damage, destroying nearly everything that was growing, in many parts of Utah. They had to withstand this and weigh and measure the flour according to the number of children in the family. This was done every week. They had to gather roots and sego lily bulbs to help with the living. Sarah Anne did fancy hand sewing for people that were better off. She made shirt bosoms, collars, etc., for a few pounds of flour per day. Anything and everything they did to keep their children from going hungry. When President Young received word that Johnston’s army was on the road to Utah, he sent John Scott his release and told him to come home as speedily as possible. He arrived home January 19, 1858. Isaac and Ephraim, two of his sons, were called into service. This took the family’s help, as their main help and protection were the two sons – until their father arrived home from his mission. These were his oldest sons. They moved to Provo with the Saints until the trouble was over. Finally the President of the United States called off the threatened attack on the Mormons and President Young told the people to return to their homes. The soldiers were allowed to pass through the valley through Salt Lake City and take up their quarters at Camp Floyd. The Elders who labored with John Scott and came home with him were: Elder Orson Pratt, Ezra T. Benson, John A. Ray, John M. Kay, William Miller and others. They came to San Francisco from England. They left for Great Salt Lake City by way of San Bernardino, reaching the city January 19, 1858. (From Church History) This was his second mission to Great Britain. He was called and went with some of the twelve apostles in 1839. The people had become almost destitute of clothing by now, but a market was found at the soldiers’ camp for their produce, thereby circulating money and enabling the people to supply themselves with clothing, shoes and other necessities. After things settled down peacefully, people engaged in farming and other ways to make a living for their families. John Scott went to Southern Utah to protect the settlers from Indians on several occasions. He believed that kindness was the best way to handle the Indians. He believed that if they were treated kindly and even fed it was better than fighting them. He was always kind to them. He had many friends among them. About 1868 John Scott moved his last family to Millville, Utah. Some of them are living in Logan at present, the children of Esther Yates Scott. I also wish to add here that father had a large family, and one to be proud of. Elizabeth was a wonderful woman, kind and gentle to the whole family, sharing her love and sacrificing for all. The same could be said or written of the others. The children, brothers and sisters, were kind and loving with each other. They were united. This is as I remember our family, and I think correct. In 1875, Father came back to Mill Creek to live on account of Elizabeth’s poor health. He went back to Millville to settle his business there. While on this trip he caught a severe cold which developed into pneumonia. He died December 16, 1876. His funeral was held in the Mill Creek Ward. The speaker were: President John Taylor, George Q. Cannon and Joseph F. Smith. All spoke of his noble character and of the good he had accomplished for his church and the community where he lived. They told of him being a man of great faith; how people would send for miles for him to come to administer to the sick. He was loved by all who knew him. He was always ready to help and give comfort and cheer to those in distress and those in worse circumstances than himself. His life was a blessing to his family and friends. John’s father had five brothers and four sisters. James came to Canada, lived and died there. One uncle came to the United States. He was the father of General Winfield Scott. After the war in Mexico General W. Scott sent his sword to his cousin, John Scott. The family has it at the present time. John Scott was buried in the Salt Lake City Cemetery. John Scott had five wives: Elizabeth Meneary, Mary Pugh, Sarah Ann Willis, Roxey Angeline Keller and Esther Yates. He had 36 children. It is said that times were such, that one time he traded 40 acres of land to buy shoes all around for his family. Ephraim Scott was the fifth child and second son of John Scott and Elizabeth Meneary. He was born 6 June, 1842, Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois. He married Sarah Ellen Smithies, who was born 5 July, 1847, near the Platte River, while crossing the plains. She was the daughter of James Smithies and Nancy Knowles or Knowels. Ephraim and Sarah Ellen were married 9 November, 1867. He died 26 May, 1898, Menan, Idaho. She died 23 January, 1917, Menan, Idaho. Their children: 1. Sarah Melvina Scott, born 29 August, 1868, Salt Lake City, Utah. Md. Elias Merrill 15 January, 1889. 2. Mary Merinda Scott, born 13 June, 1870, Salt Lake City, Utah. Md. Ephraim Lawson 24 April, 1888. Died 25 September, 1927. 3. Ephraim Moroni Scott, born 11 September, 1873, Salt Lake City, Utah. Md. Hannah Sophia Ostrom 18 December, 1907. Died 10 May 1942. 4. Anna Eliza Scott, born 19 January, 1872, Salt Lake City, Utah. Died 22 October, 1872. 5. James Heber Scott, born 6 October 1875, Mill Creek, Utah. Md. Maud Bybee 31 December, 1900. 6. John Robert Scott, born 25 October 1877, Mill Creek, Utah. Md. Luella Campbell 4 June 1900. Died 30 January, 1950, Emmett, Idaho. 7. Louisa Dealia Scott, born 31 October 1879, Mill Creek, Utah. Md. Daniel Neville 1905. 8. Isaac Clarence Scott, born 5 December 1881, Mill Creek, Utah. Md. Nettie Poole 1906. 9. Alice May Scott, born 22 May 1884, Mill Creek, Utah. Md. Pleasant W. DaBelle 11 March 1903. 10. Josiah Alfonzo Scott, born 6 December 1887, Menan, Idaho. Md. Emma Priest 2 April 1913. 11. Mable Sophia Scott, born 31 October 1890, Menan, Idaho. Md. Clarence McMurtrey 1909. We have records of the family of Jacob Scott and Sarah Warnock, also the five families of John Scott. For copies of the above, write us and we will be glad to send you one. Leslie J. and Edith Scott, M. Rt., Emmett, Idaho. LIFE AND EXPERIENCES OF JOHN SCOTT By his daughter Sarah M. Scott Walker John Scott, the son of Jacob Scott and Sarah Warnock, was born the 6th day of May 1811, in Armagh, Ireland. He emigrated from Ireland to Canada with his parents, brothers and sisters, leaving Ireland the 5th of April 1819. They landed in Quebec, Canada some time in May. From there they moved to Toronto, from there to Markham County. His father taught school there one year. He was paid by the British government. The following year they moved to Trafalgar on one hundred acres of land given them by the government. This was given to all British subjects and actual settlers. They resided in Trafalgar nearly eighteen years. His father built a nice home in Trafalgar and named it Ebenezer Hall. He also made other large improvements. On April 15, 1836, John Scott and Elizabeth Meneary were married in his father’s home (Ebenezer Hall). Elizabeth Meneary was born in Dublin, Ireland, September 10, 1815. While living in Canada their oldest son was born and named Isaac. Elder Russel, one of Canada’s pioneer missionaries of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, came to Churchville, a village three miles from where they lived, and held meetings. Jacob Scot embraced the gospel, and after this, his entire family came into the church, Ann, Jane, Mary, John, Isaac F., Sarah, Jacob, and Robert T. Scott. John Scott was baptized on May 6th, 1836, at Churchville, Canada, by Isaac Russel. His wife Elizabeth was baptized the same day. The next year John Scott and wife and son, and his father’s entire family made arrangements to move with the Saints to Farr West, Missouri. Jacob Scott sold his home to William Cauthria. They left Canada on June the 7th, 1838, and arrived in Farr West, Missouri on September 2, 1838, passing through great hardships and persecutions with the Saints at that time. They left Farr West, Missouri, May 18, 1840, locating in Nauvoo, Illinois. John Scott was ordained a Seventy and became President of the Tenth Quorum of Seventies, when they were first organized at Nauvoo. He accepted the doctrine and the revelation on celestial and plural marriage, and while living in Nauvoo, he took for his plural wives Mary Pugh on the 3rd of February 1845 and Sarah Ann Willis, March 24, 1846. Mary Pugh was born November 10, 1822 in England. Sarah Ann Willis was born February 4, 1825 in Pittsburg, Alleghany County, Pennsylvania. John Scott obeyed this principle as it was revealed to the Prophet Joseph Smith. While living in Nauvoo, his father, mother, and brother, Jacob all died and were buried in the Nauvoo Cemetery. They all died faithful members of the church. Jacob Scott, just before he died, called his family around him and bore a strong testimony to the truthfulness of the gospel. John Scott was chosen one of the Prophet Joseph Smith’s bodyguards, which position he held until the Prophet’s martyrdom. He very often related his experiences with the Prophet to his family and told how he loved the Prophet and would have went through even death for him. He also held the position of Colonel in the first Regiment, 2 Cohort of the Nauvoo Legion. In the spring of 1844 a very bitter and strong feeling was aroused against the Prophet among many of his brethren in and around Nauvoo, and some who held high positions in the church, and were supposed to be the Prophets best friends, turned against him. They sought by various means to do him injury. Some sought to even take his life. They were continually plotting to take his life. At length this wicked feeling became so strong among a certain class, that they resolved to form an organization or combination that would enable them to accomplish their wicked purpose. Concerning some of the secret meetings of this society of traitors and their designs against the Prophet, we have a detailed account given by Denison T. Harris and Robert Scott, brother to John, who were young men at this time. They had both been invited to a secret meeting, by Austin Cowles and William Law. They had been told something about the general purposes and warned not to breathe a word concerning it to a soul, except Harris’s father who might come if he wished. The Elder Harris, after being told by his son, decided to tell the Prophet and ask his advice. Joseph told him not to go himself but to let his son go. The first meeting was held at William Law’s house on a Sabbath afternoon. There were many present. The time was spent in denouncing the fallen Prophet, and urging the necessity of organizing. A meeting was called for the following Sunday. The boys reported to Joseph what they had seen and heard, and were requested by them to attend again. The second meeting was similar to the first. The boys reported to the Prophet, and were requested to attend the third meeting. This time, however, the Prophet, had considerable apprehensions concerning the young men’s safety; but he said he hardly thought their blood would be shed, though under no considerations were they to take any of their oaths. So they went, feeling that they might never return alive. The door was guarded by armed men. There were, however admitted. And organization was effected. Francis Higbee, a justice of the peace, sat at the head of the table administering the oath to each person as they came up. Which was blood curdling. They had to swear to do all in their power for the destruction of Joseph Smith and his party. Among the number were three women, heavily veiled, one of whom was weeping. When everyone else had sworn and signed, the boys were approached and asked to do the same. They were coaxed amid general attention. They quietly but firmly refused. Then they were threatened; but still they would not be sworn. You know to much now, was the general cry and you must join or die. But they were firm. Knives were drawn and guns cocked and men rushed upon them from all parts of the room which they occupied. But they were protected by calmer feelings of some of the leaders. It was suggested that the room where they were at that time, was an improper place to commit such a deed; the attention of some passerby might be attracted. So they started for the cellar. On their way, however, someone suggested the possibility of their being discovered. For the boys parent’s know where they were. This turned the tide, and the young men were dismissed, after being warned that if they ever divulged what they had heard they would be killed. On approaching the bank of the river, they discovered that the Prophet and Robert Scott’s brother, John Scott were hidden there. William Law’s house was only a short distance from the river. The boys had guards sent with them almost to the river, and the guards placed a strict injunction upon the boys never to reveal anything they had seen or heard at these meetings and declared if they did any member of the conspiracy would kill them at first sight. It was a joyful meeting. Joseph seemed delighted to see that the boys had escaped with their lives. The party walked on to a point nearly opposite Joseph’s store, where a board fence came down to the edge of the river, forming together with the orchard, trees, and shrubbery a suitable retreat where they could converse, without any danger of being seen or heard. “Let us sit down her”, said the Prophet Joseph. All four of them entered the secluded retreat and when they were seated he continued “Boys we saw your danger and were afraid you would not get out alive, but we are thankful that you did get away safely and now relate to me all that you witnessed.” The boys then gave them a complete account of all they had seen and passed through, repeated to them the oath they had seen administered to some two hundred individuals separately, and give them the names of all they knew who had taken part or who had taken the oath. Joseph and his companion John listened very attentively and as the boys proceeded, a very grave expression crept over the countenance of the former, showing that a deep anxiety was preying upon his mind. When the recital was finished, a pause of some length ensued. Joseph was much moved and burst out “Oh brethren, you do not know what this will terminate it.” But he preceded no further for his feelings were so strong that he burst into tears. In great agitation, Brother John Scott who was an intimate and trusted friend of Joseph’s sprang forward, throwing his arms around the Prophet’s neck exclaimed; “Oh, Brother Joseph, do you think they are going to kill you?’ Then they fell on each other’s knees and wept bitterly. Joseph evaded a direct reply but continued in a tone that told too plainly of the sorrow he felt. “I am going away, and will not be known among this people for twenty years or more. I shall go to rest for a season perhaps. In reply to Brother John Scott’s question, the Prophet was revolving plans in his mind and looking forward to the time when he and the Saints would be beyond the reach of persecution and could seek shelter behind the barriers of the Rocky Mountains. After this he called a company of volunteers to explore the great west and find a suitable place for the Saints to settle. Some of his brethren begged him not to desert the place in such a time of trouble and danger and at their importunity he returned to Nauvoo, after he had started across the river. We all know the result. The persecutions of the Saints became so bitter that finally in the years 1844, the Prophet and his brother, Hyrum, were induced to surrender themselves to the officers of the law and were cast into prison. Here they remained until later. At the Carthage Jail, on the 27th of June 1844, at about 5 o’clock p.m. a bloodthirsty mob came and shot the Prophet through an upstairs window and killed Hyrum also. The persecutions of the Saints still continued until they were compelled to leave their homes and to try and find refuge west of the Rocky Mountains. They were led by Brigham Young, successor to the Prophet Joseph Smith. Brother John Scott and his three wives, Elizabeth, Mary, and Sarah, all bore testimonies of the transfiguration of President Brigham Young after the martyrdom of the Prophet Joseph and Hyrum. They were in attendance at the meeting held August 8, 1844. President Brigham Young addressed the congregation speaking with great power and the people were thoroughly convinced that the authority and power of the Presidency was with the apostles. When he first arose to speak, the people were greatly astonished for President Young stood transfigured before them and they beheld the Prophet Joseph Smith and heard his voice as natural, it sounded to them as when he was living. It was a manifestation to the Saints that they might recognize the correct authority. This is the testimony, which John Scott and his three wives bore time and time again to their children. Eliza R. Snow commemorated the extraordinary ??? in this verse: Brigham Young, the Lord’s anointed, Loved of heav’n and fear’d of hell Like Elijah’s on Elisha, Joseph’s mantle on him fell. John and Elizabeth, by this time had several small children, a daughter named Matilda, was born at Farr West, Missouri, September 6, 1838. Louisa, March 20, 1940, at Bloomfield, Illinois. Ephraim was born June 6, 1842; John W. was born November 6, 1844. This is an extract from the Life of Heber C. Kimball, explaining the Exodus from Nauvoo: Some of the advance companies left Nauvoo about February 1, 1946, crossing the Mississippi River. They camped on Sugar Creek. By February 17, 1846, evacuation of Nauvoo had begun in earnest. An exile nation going forth like Israel from Egypt into the wilderness, there to worship God in their own appointed way. On the 18th of February 1846, the companies were being organized and made ready to start to the Rocky Mountains. All together they comprised about four hundred wagons, all heavily loaded with not over half the number of teams necessary for a rapid journey. Most of the families were supplied with provisions for several months. Colonel Stephen Markham and about one hundred pioneers to prepare the roads in advance of the main body. Colonel John Scott with a hundred men and artillery and Colonel Hosea Stout with about one hundred men acted as police guards armed with rifles. On the morning of March 1st, they were notified to be ready to start at noon. It was a faithful and a pure people that journeyed westward to find another promised land. They reached the Missouri River about the middle of June and received a friendly welcome from the Pottawattamie Indians and the Omaha Indians. While here word was brought to headquarters that a United States Army officer with a squad of soldiers, had arrived at Mt. Pisgah, with a requisition for five hundred men to be furnished by the Mormons to enter the army and to March to California to take part in the war against Mexico. It was their county’s call, and although every man was needed for a bulwark of defense still they must respond. Even the women had been tending stock and driving teams owing to the limited number of men available. Should they part with the few men they had? What must be done? On the first of July, Captain James Allen, the recruiting officer went in council with President Brigham Young and others. They resolved to raise the number of troops that had been called for. President Young went to Mt. Pisgah a distance of one hundred and thirty miles and in three days he returned and reported the force mustered, organized and ready to march. The Mormon Battalion started out for the West about the middle of July. William H. Walker and his brother, Edwin Alker, being numbered among them. They left their friends, relatives, telling their wives to go on to the Rocky Mountains with the Saints. In the sorrow of parting they said if their lives were preserved they would return to them out in the West where the Saints were going to make their future homes. The project of the Pioneers going to the Rocky Mountains that season was now abandoned, and the Camp of Israel prepared to go to Winter Quarters. This was the name given to their winter settlement on the Missouri River, five files above Omaha. Today it is know as Florence, Nebraska. It was fortified with breast work, stockade and block houses, after the fashion of the frontier. Such was their winter home. On January 14, 1847, agreeable to instructions, the Saints began to prepare for their journey to the mountains. Early in April the Pioneers started from Winter Quarters, numbering one hundred and forty-eight souls including three women and three children. President Brigham Young, leaving Elders Pratt and Taylor in charge and Elder Orson Hyde, he requested Colonel John Scott to take this for a mission and to remain until the following years. He did this and also went on a mission among non-members of the church and collected old clothing to help fit the Saints up for traveling. While doing this he also was the means of converting three souls to the Gospel. Brother John and Edward Morgan and their mother. They came to Utah later. Edward Morgan married his daughters Louisa and Sophia. While living in Winter Quarters his wife, Elizabeth, gave birth to a daughter which they named Elizabeth, born March 15, 1847. Mary his other wife had a son born at Council Bluffs, Iowa, July 15, 1846, which they named Hyrum, and Sarah had a son born at Winter Quarters, Nebraska, on April 16, 1847, named Joseph Lemuel. This year John Scott received the following orders from President Young: February 19, 1847 Lieutenant Colonel John Scott, You are hereby commanded to immediately put in perfect order the canon equipment, carriages, and appendages, belonging thereto that are under your command, whereof fail not, and make return of this order with your doings thereon. Head Quarters Winder Quarters Brigham Young, Lieut. Gen. of the Legion P.S. You are also authorized to call on any or all of the commanding officers to assist you in the repairs. B. Y. A. A. Rockwood, A. D. Camp In the summer or spring of 1848 his company started across the plains, his families accompanying him with their small children. Mary and Sarah Ann taking charge of one wagon and mule team. They taking turns driving. They passed through many hardships on their journey at one time being entirely surrounded by hostile Indians. It looked like a battle with the Indians that could not be avoided. When all at once a man among the Indians came to the front and called John Scott. He proved to be a white man that the Indians had taken prisoner at one time and had remained among them and seemed to have a great influence with the Indians and the trouble was stopped by him. John Scott had known him in Canada having attended the same school as he. They went on unmolested and praising the Lord for their deliverance. They landed in Salt Lake valley the same year. The following year some of the settlers were having trouble with the Indians, although President Young believed in treating the Indians kindly. President Brigham Young then called Colonel John Scott to organize a company to go to fight the Indians on February 29, 1849. The company was organized complete by order of Brigham Young then although Brother Scott firmly believed the Indians could and should be won over by good treatment and kindness and thought it even better to feed the Indians then to fight them. He was always a good friend to the Indians, receiving them into his house many times to talk to them, advising them and preaching to them. But he obeyed council and started with his company for Utah Valley. The following is a copy of his experience as reported by… On the 29 February 1849, the company was organized complete and started for Utah Valley. (The company was called on the 28, organized on the 29 and left for Salt Lake City the afternoon of the 29) From Salt Lake City about 10 miles at Orris Herd Ground on Willow Creek. They arrived about 2 hours before sundown. (Say nine o’clock) Provisions at the time were very scarce in the territory, and they had but little food. They were obliged to purchase beef which cost $45.00. On the first of March they cut up the beef, packed it on the miles, and broke up camp, about 9 a.m. About 11 a.m. we arrived at the pass in the Wasatch Range which forms the divide between Great Salt Lake and Utah County. At that time there was only a dangerous Indian trail over the pass and the company were four hours getting over, loading their animals. However four of the pack mules with the meat missed their footing and rolled down the precipice about 100 feet. The mules received no very serious injuries. They camped the evening of March 1st at American Fork at 9:30. P.S. This night there was a very severe snow storm with strong piercing wind. Nine of the company had their ears and face frozen. The entire company was kept up nearly all night by the continual alarms of attack by the Indians. Their camps were seen in various places all night. Twenty took up the line of march about 9 a.m. and reconnoitered the bottom lands in the tall grass and cane brakes but found no Indians. They camped on Provo Bottom about twelve miles from American Fork but had traveled at least 50 miles just as they were about to camp, they saw some Indians approaching. They came and had a talk with Divnick B. Huntington and Barney Ward, the two interpreters we had with us, and then returned to Little Chiefs encampment. We remounted and proceeded to the Indian camp about one half a mile distance, and then found Little Chief and his entire band. He ordered his squaws and children to take to the brush and prepare for action. After some difficulty, the interpreter was able to talk with him and assured him that we were friends to al peaceable Indians. Upon this the pipe of peace was passed around, and a council of war was held. Little Chief and several of his warriors were present. In that council we required that his two sons should accompany us as hostages of his integrity to all which he agreed with very great reluctance. On the third of March about midnight we took up the line of march and forded the Provo River near the mouth of the canyon, a very dangerous stream. Then rode to within a mile of what is now called Battle Creek. The company was here divided into four platoons, and ordered to place themselves in suitable location on the four sides of the Indian camp. They could see their dim camp fires, visible in the distance. Here we watched for daylight. As the day broke the Indians discovered us and took to the thickets, and fired upon us, as long as they had any ammunition. We then through the interpreter, begged of them to cease their hostilities, and to make friends, but they utterly refused and used every endeavor to escape to the mountains. As soon as they refused all offers of peace, the order for an attack was given. The following battle lasted two hours. The Indians were upon a small island covered with dense scrub cottonwood, and willows in Battle Creek Canyon, and we were obliged to attack them from the heights in a most exposed situation. Many of the men received numbers of Indian arrows in their clothing. One man had 13 arrows sticking through his clothes after the defeat of the Indians. We had at last an opportunity to attack them hand to hand in the brush before they would be routed out. The Indians left four of their warriors dead on the field. How many more were killed or wounded we cannot learn. The battle being ended, we returned to our camp, one mile from Battle Creek. We should here state that during the action a very splendid blooded mare belonging to the Indson L. Stoddard broke away from him, saddled and bridled, and ran into the mountains and was never heard of afterward or recovered. About 10 a.m. we took up the line of march for Great Salt Lake City, and camped at Orris her ground on Willow Creek about 10 p.m. The fourth of March we arrived in Salt Lake City, about 2 o’clock p.m. and after making a report of the expedition the general of the company was dismissed. There were four commissioned officers, and 6 non-commissioned officers, and forty privates. General John Scott and Curtis E. Bolton W.H.W. After his arrival in Salt Lake Valley he was transferred from the tenth quorum of seventies to be Senior President of the 61st quorum of seventies. He located on 160 acres of land on the Mill Creek, which was called Mill Creek Ward. There through his influence and help a school was built. He saw the great necessity of sending the children of the Latter-day Saints to school. This school was called the Scott School and his wife Mary taught school in this house. She had received her education in England. On Friday the 6th of April 1855, he received a call to go on a mission to Great Britain. He obeyed the call, and left his home and family and loved ones to face the hardships of building up a new country and of enduring the suffering and famine. During the summer the grasshoppers did serious damage to crops destroying nearly everything green in many parts of Utah. His family having to weigh or measure out the flour according to the number children, and this was done every week. Sometimes they had to go out and gather roots and sego lilies to help with the living. He went out and filled his mission until he received an honorable release. His missionary work was done in England and Ireland. He was called to be president of the Irish conference and labored in the city of Dublin, Belfast and many places in Ireland. On January 2nd he had delivered over ten thousand tracts in Ireland alone. He labored first in London, England on July 8, 1856, he left Liverpool for Dublin, Ireland. While on this mission, he was with E. T. Benson, Orson Pratt for six weeks, Ja. Ryon, John Kay, Wm. Miner, D. D. Rays, Miles Rambey, Thomas Bullcok. Most of the time that he was in England he spent with E. T. Benson. While he was in North Wales he was with John Ray. While in Ireland he met Brother J. D. McAlster. The following is an experience he passed through while laboring in Ireland: He and his companion was eating dinner at a certain house when he became suddenly suspicious because the lady of the house kept insisting on their eating more potatoes. Because she insisted on their eating more he refused the second time, but his companion did not notice this and he ate quite heartily of the potatoes. After leaving the house they were walking through the woods and he and his companion became violently sick, so much that they had to stop and pray and he not being so sick as his companion was healed and also himself. It was thoroughly apparent to them both that poison had been put into the potatoes. At the time this happened, John W. Scott, his won, a very small boy who was living at Mill Creek, Utah was sitting by the creek under a tree and he saw all that which I have just related concerning his father and his companion. He came into the house and related what he saw in the vision and how this woman had administered poison to them, while pretending to be their friend. And the very next letter that came to the family related the circumstances just as the boy had told it to his family. This was a great testimony to the family of the goodness of God to his children and this helped them to endure trials and tribulations, which they had to pass through. A verse which he sent to Sarah A. Scott while in Ireland on his mission: The Wish Be thy coming years, my friend, Gilded by the sun of joy, May no darksome cloud descent, Life’s fair prospects to destroy. O’er the circling social scene May no blighting sorrows fall; Be but in the distance seen Storms of woe, which threaten all. Choicest stores of earthly good Still around thy dwelling rest, And the love of Israel’s God Ever make thy spirit blest Just a short while before he departed from this life, John W. Scott related this circumstance and testified to the truthfulness of this testimony. To members of the family, Lucy J. Scott Park and Hannah A. Scott Morgan. He said that he really saw this in a vision. While John Scott was still on his mission his wife Sarah A. had a son born 28th of December 1855 which she named William Rueben. When President Brigham Young received work that Johnston’s Army was on the road to the Valley he sent John Scott this release from his mission and also the other missionaries. They were all asked to return as speedily as possible. He arrived in Salt Lake City on 19th of January 1858. The following is a proclamation from Governor Young, Lieutenant General Daniel H. Wells of the Nauvoo Legion established headquarters at the Narrows in Echo Canyon, a defile rugged and steep where a few men could hold an army to this point about twelve hundred and fifty men from several companies of militia. They were ordered to report and maintain the pass by force of arms against any attempted invasion. Isaac and Ephraim Scott, being the oldest sons were called into service. This took the family’s main help and protection away from them while their father was on his mission. The family had to move to Provo with the Saints. While John Scott was on his mission he gathered genealogy of his ancestors in Ireland, thinking to do their work in the Temple for their salvation. He had the misfortune to lose his traveling bag. It was either lost or taken by mistake and he thus lost the records of his people which he was never able to get again. Shortly after his return from his mission he married Esther Yeates for his fourth wife. He was married by President Young 1860. Sometime after this he moved his last two wives to Millville, Utah, where he resided most of the time until the summer of 1876. Then on account of the illness of his first wife Elizabeth, he came back to Mill Creek, his first home. In December 1876 he went back to Millville to visit his family there and while there he contracted a severe cold, which developed into pneumonia. In less than a week he departed from this life, this being on the 16th day of December 1876. He bore a faithful testimony to the truthfulness of the Gospel to those of his family that were at his bedside. He died in full fellowship in the church. His funeral was held in the Mill Creek ward, his old home and he was buried in the Salt Lake City Cemetery. There was present at the services and also those who did the speaking: President John Taylor, George Q. Cannon and Joseph F. Smith. All spoke of his sterling qualities and noble character and also of the good things he had accomplished in the church and the community where he had lived. They told of his ever being ready at all times to obey the counsel of those in authority. Brother John Scott was a man of great faith. In the early settlement of Utah people would send for miles to get him to go and administer to the sick. He was loved by his brethren and sisters for his pleasant and cheerful ways. He was always ready to give cheer and comfort to those in distress. His life was a blessing to his family and to his friends. His entire life was devoted to the church, always when opportunity came, he was ready and did testify that he knew that Joseph Smith was a true Prophet of God. He had five wives, all splendid and honorable women. They lived the lives of good Latter-day Saints and they were faithful. Their examples could well be followed by their children. Elizabeth, the first wife was always called Mother by the entire family and she was in deed a second mother. When the children were young every member of the families would meet together in one large room in her part of the house for the evening prayers. Here John would have his families sing a hymn and then they would have the family prayer. After this was done they would all go to their own homes and perhaps the smaller ones would play awhile before retiring, while the older ones would spend the evening in various ways, some sewing, some knitting, and some reading. Four of his wives have followed him into the Great Beyond. Their deaths are as follows: Elizabeth December 24, 1886, Mary January 5, 1905, Sarah Ann October 30, 1890 and Esther April 21, 1920. The first three wives were buried in the Salt Lake City Cemetery and Esther Scott was buried in Millville, Cache County, Utah. John Scott was the only member of his father’s family that came West with the Latter-day Saints, the rest remained in the East. His father had five brothers and four sisters. James came to Canada and lived and died there. Some went to Manchester, England, and one came to the United States, the father of General Winfield Scott. After the war with Mexico, General Winfield Scott sent his sword to his cousin John Scott. Who in turn gave it to Alfonzo Scott, his youngest brother. It is now in the possession of Ephraim Scott’s son, James Scott, who is living at Annis, Idaho This record would not be complete without mentioning an incident in the life of Joseph L. Scott, son of Sarah Ann. While a baby he became very sick, his life hanging on a thread as it were. All were watching and waiting for the end to come, when all at once President Heber C. Kimball came into the house and walking over to where he was in his mother’s arms and he laid his hands upon the child and blest him, telling him that he would recover and that the time would come when he would stand at the head of his father’s family in doing the Temple work for the salvation of the dead. He recovered rapidly and in after years, when the temple work was started for the dead he was the oldest living son of John Scott, and was told by President Lund that he should put his name on record as the recognized heir of the Scott Family, this bringing to pass the blessing pronounced on his head by President Heber C. Kimball. It is necessary to have an heir to the work, but not meaning that the heir is honored anymore than the rest of the family that do the work for the dead. This is just a means of identifying this work from other Scott families that may be doing temple work for their dead ancestors. Several members of the family have received wonderful testimonies of the truthfulness of the Gospel. On the tenth of October 1869, Rebecca A. Scott, who was on a visit to Visalia, California, at her grandparents Benjamin and Hannah Willis’s home, wrote home to her mother Sarah Ann and said: “Dear Mother, Please tell Father I have seen a vision. I saw the prettiest place in all the world, the Lakes of Killarney in Ireland.” I know that he will be pleased to hear this. Rebecca died shortly after returning home from California on the 25th August 1870 at Mill Creek, Utah. In speaking of her vision, we have all heard no doubt of the Lake of Killarney, the stores of their rare beauty are not exaggerated. Erin abounds in ruins, both ancient and modern. Where the River Shannon flows there are many beautiful scenes and views along the banks of this historic stream. Ireland is noted for its remarkable scenery. Hyrum Scott had a wonderful testimony that the spirit lives after death. He related it many times over and over again to his family, just before he died. The following is a testimony of Joseph Scott. He and Hannah had been baptized for all the names of their mother’s people they could find. A few days after this as he was sitting eating his dinner a short way from the other men. He had been working on a water ditch when a man came to him and asked him why he was not baptized for him too. Joseph then asked him what his name was but he disappeared before telling him. On the following day at the same time he came again and said; “Yesterday you asked me my name, today I will give it to you.” He told him what it was and Joseph wrote it down so that he could do the temple work. Again the person disappeared as before. On the year of 1909, August 24, the children and grandchildren of John Scott met in the LaBell Meeting House in LaBell, Idaho and organized into a family organization. The object in doing this was to honor their pioneer parents. Also for the purpose of doing work for the salvation of the dead ancestors. Hyrum Scott was chosen and sustained as president of the John Scott family organization. Hannah M. Morgan was chosen as secretary and treasurer. Later at a reunion held at Annis, Idaho, Sarah M. Walker was chosen and sustained as correspondence secretary and treasurer for life, by a motion of Hyrum Scott. This was in the year of 1910. Her duties were to gather genealogy and look after temple work. Through the blessings of the Lord she has been able to get a copy of Grandfather Jacob Scott’s records of his family. The temple work is now done for all of them. From the Genealogical Society of Utah, she has received 767 names of the Scott’s of Ireland. Through the united efforts of members of the family and their willing support the temple work for this number will soon be completed. This is a glorious work for the salvation of our dead. Ancestors of our father John Scott. This is written for the benefit of the Scott Family by the fourth daughter of Sarah Ann Willis Scott. January 1925. The Wives and Children of John Scott First wife: Elizabeth, mother of twelve children: Isaac, Matilda, Louisa, Ephraim, John William, Elizabeth, Heber M., Sarah C., Josiah, Sophia, Alfonzo and Alvina. Second wife: Mary, mother of five children: Hyrum, Mary E., Eliza A., Lucy J. and Vilate. Third wife: Sarah Ann, mother of nine children: Joseph L., Rebecca A., Simeon W., Zebulon, William R., Hannah M., Matilda L., Sarah M., and Benjamin F. Fourth wife: Esther, mother of seven children: Brigham, Mary L., George T., Sarah Marinda, Esther Ann, Frederick and Daniel. Fifth wife: Roxey A., mother of three children: Winfield M., Mary A. and Jacob T. This makes thirty-six in all. Eighteen sons and eighteen daughters. In 1908, I had a dream which gave me a testimony of temple work and the necessity of it: I dreamed of a man coming to my home and he spoke to me and said, “I have come to you to see if you will see that my temple work is done for me.” I asked him why he had come to me about his temple work and he answered and said, “Because your name is Sarah and that is an old family name.” He then walked to the table and seemed to pour our something, a large pile of names written on small strips of cardboard. They were piled in a high rounding pile, and after he had done this, he turned to me and said, “Look, all of these people are waiting for you to do their temple work.” I then asked him how I could get the genealogy of these people. He answered and said, “In the bottom of an old trunk you will find many of these names.” Then I asked him what his name was and he said, “My name is Henderson.” I then awoke. This dream impressed me, it was so real it did not seem like a dream. I told my dream to my husband and told him I know of now man by the name of Henderson, who was related to me, but that I would write to Hannah as she had what few records my mother had of her people, and see if she knew of such a man being related to us. I did this and her answer came back. William Henderson married our Great Aunt Sarah Willis. In the bottom of my mother’s old trunk we found a bundle of letters with genealogy of her people. Henderson’s name was there and we also found, as he had said, that Sarah was an old family name on both sides of our family. Signed, Sarah Scott Walker Hyrum Scott’s Testimony As related to Hannah Morgan He was standing at Salt Lake City or rather at Mill Creek Ward, Utah, at the time he said, “Myself and some of my brothers naming the one, were going to the city and were standing on the Scott School House corner, waiting for Joseph Scott to arrive, when I fell, they all thought I was apparently dead. My spirit left my body and I gazed at it lying there on the ground. I was seized with the thought that I would like to see my family before I ascended to the Great Beyond. My spirit immediately began moving rapidly towards my home in Idaho. It didn’t seem any effort at all for me to go. I just glided along in the air at an immense speed. The landscape looked very familiar to me, I knew all the towns as I passed through. When I arrived at Willow Creek, Idaho, I saw a messenger approaching me from a southeastern direction. He was dressed in a white robe and had along beard. When I saw him, the thought came to me that he was going to stop me from going home, and being very desirous that such thing should not occur, I pulled the little line that held my spirit to my body and tried to break it. The messenger then asked me what I was trying to do, and I told him and he said, if you had broken it, you never could have went back to your body and you work on earth is not finished yet, for if I entered the house I could never go back to my body. So I promised and he accompanied me. I saw right through the walls of the house; saw my wife and children, and a sick little boy that my wife was attending; saw one of my brother-in-laws, who was cutting down trees close by the house. My spirit then returned to my body. How I entered my body, I do not know, but I was gone just 15 minutes. This was written by Sarah M. Walker June 1, 1926. Original typist Erva Sayer

John Scott-The Contributor

Contributor: jeanniebug Created: 9 months ago Updated: 9 months ago

January 31st, 1850, Colonel John Scott, and Captain Geo. D. Grant, in special orders No. I, were ordered each to raise fifty mounted volunteers and proceed to Fort Utah. Colonel Scott refused to obey the order and Colonel Andrew Lytle was detailed in his stead. These officers were directed to quell hostilities, but to avoid all unnecessary bloodshed. The Contributor, By Junius F. Wells, The Nauvoo Legion, Pages 122 Upon the return of General Wells to the city, a court-martial was ordered for the trial of Colonel John Scott, for disobedience of orders and for using language calculated to discourage the men from going on the Utah expedition. Colonel Scott was sentenced to be cashiered. The Contributor, By Junius F. Wells, The Nauvoo Legion, Pages 124

John Scott-Utah Since Statehood

Contributor: jeanniebug Created: 9 months ago Updated: 9 months ago

The site of Pleasant Grove, in the northern part of Utah County was first visited in August, 1850, by a party from Salt Lake City. The settlement then formed was first called Battle Creek, on account of a skirmish between a band of Indians and Captain Scott's company. The natural advantages soon attracted settlers and in 1853the town was laid out by George A. Smith and Ezra T. Benson, the population then numbering about seventy-five families. The town was incorporated on January 19, 1855, and at the first municipal election Henson Walker was chosen mayor. The first city council was composed of Duncan McArthur, John Brown, Shadrach F. Driggs, William J. Hawley and Elijah Mayhew, aldermen; John G. Holman, Lewis Harvey, Samuel S. White, William S. Seely, Nathan Staker, William G. Sterrett, John G. Wheeler, Lewis Robinson and William F. Reynolds, councilors. Utah Since Statehood, Historical and Biographical, Volume I, Chapter XXVI, Cities & Incorporated Towns, Pleasant Grove

John Scott-excerpt from William Clayton-Missionary, Pioneer & Public Servant

Contributor: jeanniebug Created: 9 months ago Updated: 9 months ago

During this period of unrest and trouble, many of the leading citizens of Nauvoo were hauled into the Court of Hancock County on charges of treason. William Clayton was among those arrested and was brought before Justice Barnes in the court at Carthage. Others of the group also under arrest were Daniel Spencer, Orson Spencer, Willard Richards, John Taylor, W. W. Phelps, Charles C. Rich, Alpheus Cutler, Reynolds Cahoon, John Scott, Hosea Stout, and Edward Hunter. Dr. Backman, one of the witnesses against them, was called in and stated that he had known none of the men, but had been forced to sign the affidavit against them. With this testimony, the court discharged the brethren according to law. William Clayton - Missionary, Pioneer, and Public Servant, By Paul E. Dahl, 1959, Cedar City, Utah

Conspiracy of Nauvoo John Scott

Contributor: jeanniebug Created: 9 months ago Updated: 9 months ago

Conspiracy of Nauvoo. The Contributor, Volume 5- (John Scott) THOSE who have read the life of Joseph Smith the Prophet, must be familiar with the fact that from his earliest boyhood he was ever the object of bitter persecution. Notwithstanding the numerous published accounts of mobbing’s, driving’s, bodily injuries, aggravating accusations, mock trials, and murderous attempts upon his life which he endured, and with which the people are familiar, there are, no doubt, many events and trials yet hidden from the world in the bosoms of his most familiar friends, which may have caused him far greater agony than many of those with which the public are acquainted. Among these the following narrative may be classed, as it has never before been published, and the facts it contains may have had an important influence in hastening, if not really accomplishing, the death of the Prophet. Early in the spring of 1844 a very strong and bitter feeling was aroused against Joseph, among many of his brethren in and around Nauvoo; and some who held high positions in the Church and were supposed to be his best friends, turned against him and sought by various means in their power to do him injury. Many murmured and complained, and some of the more wicked, even watched their opportunity to take his life, and were continually plotting to accomplish that end. At length this wicked feeling became so strong and general, among a certain class, that it was resolved to form an organization, or secret combination that would better enable them to accomplish their wicked purposes. Accordingly a secret meeting was appointed to take place in the new brick house of William Law, Joseph's first counselor, on a certain Sabbath, and invitations to attend it were carefully extended to members of the Church whom it was thought were disaffected, or in sympathy with these wicked views and desires. Among those who received invitations to attend this meeting was Brother Denison L. Harris, now the Bishop of Monroe, Sevier County, Utah, then but a young man of seventeen years of age. Austin A. Cowles, at that time a member of the High Council, was one of the leaders in this wicked movement, and being a near neighbor and on intimate terms with Brother Harris, he had given young Denison an invitation to the secret meeting, and told him also to invite his father, but to be sure and not breathe a word about it to anyone else, as it was to be a profound secret. Denison was much perplexed over the invitation he had received, and certain things that Brother Cowles had told him; and while sitting on his father's woodpile, thinking them over and wondering what he had better do, another young man, named Robert Scott, who lived but a short distance away, came over, sat down on the log, and the two began to converse upon various subjects, such as generally engage the conversation of young men of their age. It seems they had been intimate companions for several years; and they had not conversed long before each discovered that the other had something on his mind which troubled him, but which he did not like to reveal. Finally, one proposed that, as they had always been confidants, they now exchange secrets, on condition that neither should reveal what the other told him. Both readily agreed to this, and when each had told the cause of his anxiety, it proved to be the same-both had received an invitation to the same secret meeting. Robert Scott, having been reared by William Law, seemed to be almost a member of his family, and on this account had been invited by him to attend the meeting. "Well, Den," said Robert, after a short pause, are you going to attend the meeting?" "I don't know," replied Denison, "are you?" "I don't know whether to go or not," said Robert, "suppose we go in the house and tell your father of his invitation, and see what he says about it. "They entered the house and consulted for some time with Denison's father, Emir Harris, who was a brother of Martin Harris, one of the three witnesses of the Book of Mormon. They informed him of his invitation to the same meeting, and told him many other things that Brother Cowles had told Denison. He decided to go at once and lay the whole matter before the Prophet Joseph Smith, who was then in Nauvoo, and ask his advice. He immediately went to Joseph's house, a distance of about two and a half miles, and informed him of the whole affair. Joseph listened with interest until he had finished, when he said: "Brother Harris, I would advise you not to attend those meetings, nor pay any attention to them. You may tell the boys, however, that I would like to have them go, but I want them to be sure to come and see me before the meeting takes place. I wish to give them some counsel." Subsequent events showed the wisdom of Joseph in advising Brother Emir Harris not to attend the meeting and selecting young men to do the work he wished to have accomplished. Brother Harris returned and told the boys what Joseph desired them to do, and they readily agreed to comply with his request. Accordingly, on the next Sunday before the secret meeting took place, Robert and Denison called at the house of Joseph to learn what he wished them to do. He told them he desired that they should attend the meeting, pay strict attention, and report to him all their proceedings, at the first favorable opportunity. He moreover cautioned them to have as little to say as possible, and to avoid giving any offence. They attended the meeting as desired. There were quite a number present, and the time was mostly occupied in planning how to get at things the best, and effect an organization. Strong speeches were also made against the Prophet, and many lies were told to prejudice the minds of those present against him. This portion of the proceedings was not a difficult task, for the element of which the audience was composed was only too susceptible to such evil impressions, and those who spoke were eminently successful in producing the desired impressions, and arousing the feelings of enmity toward the Prophet, that they might wish to use in accomplishing his overthrow. It seems that the immediate cause of these wicked proceedings was the fact that Joseph had recently presented the revelation on Celestial Marriage to the High Council for their approval, and certain members were most bitterly opposed to it, and denounced Joseph as a fallen Prophet, and were determined to destroy him. The meeting adjourned to convene again on the following Sabbath, and the two young men were invited to attend the next one also, but were cautioned not to tell a soul of what had transpired at the first one. At the first suitable opportunity they called upon Joseph, related to him what had taken place, and gave him the names of those who had taken part in the proceedings. The leading members among the conspirators, for such they really were, were William and Wilson Law, Austin A. Cowles, Francis and Chauncey Higbee, Robert Foster and his brother, two Hicks brothers, and two merchants, Finche and Rollinson, who were enemies to the Church. After hearing their report and asking several questions, which they answered to the best of their knowledge, Joseph said: "Boys, I would like you to accept their invitation and attend the second meeting. But come to me again next Sunday, before their meeting convenes, as I may have something more to say to you before you go." At the expiration of a week they again went to see Joseph, who gave them the necessary advice, after which they went to the meeting. This time the conspirators were still more vehement in their abusive remarks about Joseph. New crimes that he had committed had been discovered, and the old ones were much magnified. Their accusations were not only against him, but against his brother Hyrum and other prominent men in Nauvoo. There seemed to be no end to the wickedness of which these good men were accused, as most of the time until a late hour was occupied by different ones in denouncing and accusing Joseph and his friends of the most heinous crimes. Before the meeting adjourned, however, it was agreed that they should all endeavor to work the matter up as much as possible during the week, that something definite might be accomplished towards effecting a more complete organization without further delay. The meeting was to convene again on the following Sunday. As the boys had kept quiet and said nothing against any of their proceedings, it was supposed, of course, that they were in sympathy with the movement, and an invitation was accordingly extended for them to attend the next meeting. As on the previous occasion, the young men watched a fitting opportunity of reporting to Joseph without arousing the suspicions of any that attended the meeting. He listened attentively to the recital of all that had taken place at the second meeting, after which he said: "Boys, come to me again next Sunday. I wish you to attend the next meeting also." The boys promised to do so, and left the room. They kept the meetings and their connection with them, however, a profound secret from the rest of their friends, and at the appointed time again went to the house of Joseph to receive their usual instructions. This time he said to them, with a very serious countenance: "This will be your last meeting; this will be the last time that they will admit you into their councils. They will come to some determination. But be sure," he continued, "that you make no covenants, nor enter into any obligations whatever with them. Be strictly reserved, and make no promise either to conspire against me or any portion of the community. Be silent, and do not take any part in their deliberations." After a pause of some moments, he added: "Boys, this will be their last meeting, and they may shed your blood, but I hardly think they will, as you are so young. If they do, I will be a lion in their path! Don't flinch. If you have to die; die like men; you will be martyrs to the cause, and your crowns can be no greater. But," said he, again, "I hardly think they will shed your blood." This interview was a long one. Joseph's sensitive feelings were touched by the faith, generosity and love manifested by these young men in their willingness to undertake such a hazardous enterprise at his bidding. He blessed them and made them precious promises for their sacrifice, and told them if their lives were taken their reward would be all the greater. After leaving Joseph's house with his sincere wishes for their safety, the boys waited anxiously for the time of meeting to arrive. They fully realized the dangers into which they were about to plunge themselves, yet they did not shrink. They knew it was their duty, and they determined to attempt it at all hazards. They were now familiar with the names of the persons conspiring against Joseph, the object they had in view, and many of their plans for accomplishing that object. Moreover, they were supposed by the would-be-murderers to be in perfect sympathy with all their hellish designs; and if, by any circumstance, they should arouse the suspicion that they were present at Joseph's request, or even with his knowledge, their lives in such a crowd would, indeed, be of little value. They determined to trust in the Lord and die rather than betray the Priesthood. Their feelings may perhaps be imagined as the time of meeting drew near, and they started off in the direction of William Law's house, where it was to be held. They certainly displayed faith that every young man in Israel should cultivate. On arriving at the rendezvous they found to their surprise and discomfiture, that the entrance to the house was guarded by men armed with muskets and bayonets. After being scrutinized from head to foot, and carefully cross-questioned, they succeeded in passing the guards and gaining admittance. From this it will be seen that great care was taken to prevent any person from entering, except those whom they knew to be of their party, and ready to adopt any measures that might be suggested against the Prophet Joseph. On entering they found considerable confusion and much counseling among the members of the conspiracy. All seemed determined that Joseph should die, yet objections were raised by some to each of the plans proposed. The Prophet was accused of the most wicked acts, and all manner of evil was spoken of him. Some declared that he had sought to get their wives away from them, and had many times committed adultery. They said he was a fallen Prophet, and was leading the people to destruction. Joseph was not the only one against whom they lied. His brother Hyrum and many of the leading men in Nauvoo were accused of being in league with him and sharing his crimes. In these counseling’s and planning’s, considerable time was spent before the meeting was called to order, and anything definite commenced. The boys, however, followed Joseph's instructions, and remained quiet and reserved. This seemed to arouse the suspicions of some that they were not earnestly in favor of their wicked purposes, and some of the conspirators began to take especial pains to explain to the young men the great crimes that Joseph had committed, and the results that would follow if his wicked career were not checked, with a view to convincing them that their severe measures against Joseph were for the best good of the Church, and persuading them to take an active part with them in accomplishing this great good. The two boys, however, sat together quietly, and would simply answer their arguments by saying that they were only young boys, and did not understand such things, and would rather not take part in their proceedings. As before stated, Brother Scott had been reared in the family of William Law, and the latter pretended great friendship for him on that account, and was very anxious to explain to him the object of the proposed organization, and induce him to join. He would come around and sit beside Robert, put his arm around his neck, and persuade argue, and implore him to join in their effort to rid the Church of such a dangerous impostor. At the same time Brother Cowles would sit beside Brother Harris in the same attitude, and labor with him with equal earnestness. The boys, however, were not easily convinced. Still, in their replies and remarks, they carefully tried to avoid giving the least offence or arousing any suspicions regarding the true cause of their presence. They said they were too young to understand the "spiritual wife doctrine," of which Joseph was accused, and many of the other things that they condemned in the Prophet. Joseph had never done them any harm, and they did not like to join in a conspiracy against his life. "But," they would urge, "Joseph is a fallen Prophet; he receives revelations from the devil, and is deceiving the people, and if something decisive is not done at once to get rid of him, the whole Church will be led by him to destruction." These and many other arguments were vainly brought forth to induce the boys to join them, but they still pretended not to understand nor take much interest in such things. At length they ceased their persuasions, and, things having developed sufficiently, they concluded to proceed with the intended organization. An oath had been prepared which each member of the organization was now required to take. Francis Higbee, a justice of the peace, sat at a table in one end of the room and administered the oath to each individual separately, in the following manner: The candidate would step forward to the table, take up a Bible, which had been provided for the purpose, and raise it in his right hand, whereupon the justice would ask him in a solemn tone, "Are you ready?" And, receiving answer in the affirmative would continue in a tone and manner that struck awe to the minds of the boys as they listened: "You solemnly swear, before God and all holy angels, and these your brethren by whom you are surrounded, that you will give your life, your liberty, your influence, your all, for the destruction of Joseph Smith and his party, so help you God!" The person being sworn would then say, "I do," after which he would lay down the Bible and sign his name to a written copy of the oath in a book that was lying on the table, and it would be legally acknowledged by the justice of the peace. The boys sat gazing upon this scene, wondering how intelligent beings who had once enjoyed the light of truth could have fallen into such depths of wickedness as to be anxious to take such an oath against the Prophet of God and his faithful followers. They also felt no little uneasiness concerning their own fate, and almost dreaded the moment when the last one should have taken the oath. At length that portion of the business was accomplished, and about two hundred persons had taken the oath. Among that number were three women, who were ushered in, closely veiled to prevent being recognized, and required to take the same oath. Besides doing this, they also testified that Joseph and Hyrum Smith had endeavored to seduce them; had made the most indecent and wicked proposals to them, and wished them to become their wives. After making affidavit to a series of lies of this kind, they made their exit through a back door. One of the women, whom the boys suspected as being William Law's wife, was crying, and seemed to dislike taking the oath, but did so as one who feared that the greatest bodily injury would surely follow a refusal. After the oath had been administered to all but the two boys, Law, Cowles and others again commenced their labors to get them to take it, but met the same success as before. Arguments, persuasions, and threats were in turn used to accomplish their desire, but in vain. They exhausted their ingenuity in inventing arguments, lies, and inducements to get the boys to unite with their band. "Have you not heard," said they, the strong testimony of all present against Joseph Smith? Can a man be a true Prophet who would commit adultery? He is a fallen Prophet, and is teaching the people doctrines that his own imagination or lustful desires have invented, or else he received that revelation from the devil. He will surely lead the whole Church to destruction if his career is not stopped. We can do nothing with him by the law, and for the sake of the Church we deem it our solemn duty to accomplish his destruction and rescue the people from this peril. We are simply combining and conspiring to save the Church, and we wish you to join us in our efforts, and share the honors that will be ours. Come, take the oath and all will be well." "Oh, we are too young," they replied, "to understand or meddle with such things, and would rather let others who are older and know more do such work. We came to your meetings because we thought you were our friends and gave us a kind invitation. We did not think there was any harm in it, but if you will allow us to go now we will not trouble any more of your meetings. Joseph Smith has never done us any harm, and we do not feel like injuring him." "Come, boys," said another of the crowd, "do as we have done. You are young, and will not have anything to do in the affair, but we want you should keep it a secret, and act with us; that's all." "No," replied the boys in a firm but cool tone, as they rose to leave, "we cannot take an oath like that against any man who has never done us the least injury." They would gladly have passed out and escaped the trouble they saw brewing for them; but, as they feared, they were not allowed to depart so easily. One of the band exclaimed in a very determined voice: "No, not by a d-d sight! You know all our plans and arrangements, and we don't propose that you should leave in that style. You've got to take that oath, or you'll never leave here alive." The attention of all was now directed to the two boys, and considerable confusion prevailed. A voice in the crowd shouted, "Dead men tell no tales!" whereupon a general clamor arose for the boys to take the oath or be killed. Even their pretended friends, Cowles and Law, turned against them. "If you do not take that oath," said one of the leading members, in a blood curdling tone, "we will cut your throats." The looks and conduct of the rest showed plainly that he had spoken only what they were ready to execute. It was evident the mob were eager for blood. That moment certainly must have been a trying one, but it seemed that fear had suddenly vanished from the bosoms of the two boys, and they coolly but positively again declared that they would not take that oath nor enter into any other movement against the Prophet Joseph. The mob was now enraged, as they thought they were betrayed, and it was with the greatest difficulty that the leaders succeeded in keeping them from falling upon the boys and cutting them to pieces. The leaders, however, were no less determined that the boys should die, but as the house in which the meeting was held stood but a short distance back from the street, they thought it better to be more quiet about it, lest some one might be passing and discover what was going on. Order was at last restored, when it was decided to take the boys down into the cellar, where the deed could be more safely accomplished. Accordingly, a guard, with drawn swords and bowie knives, was placed on either side of the boys, while two others, armed with cocked muskets and bayonets, at their backs, brought up the rear as they were marched off in the direction of the cellar. William and Wilson Law, Austin Cowles, and others, accompanied them to the cellar. Before committing the murderous deed, however, they gave the boys one more chance for their lives. One of them said: "Boys, if you will take that oath your lives shall be spared; but you know too much for us to allow you to go free, and if you are still determined to refuse, we will have to shed your blood." But the boys, with most commendable courage, in the very jaws of death, once more rejected the only means that would save their lives. At this juncture, when it seemed that each moment would end the earthly existence of these two noble young men, a voice from some one in the crowd, as if by Divine interposition, called out just in time to save their lives: "Hold on! Hold on there! Let's talk this matter over before their blood is shed!" and with great difficulty some of the more cautious ones succeeded in quieting those whose anger and excitement prevented them from weighing well what they were on the verge of committing, and considering the consequences that would inevitably follow. Thus the instantaneous death of the boys was prevented, while the crowd retired to the further end of the room and consulted earnestly together, in so low a tone, however, that the boys could not hear what they said. It was evident, however, that they were nearly equally divided in their views of the feasibility of putting the boys to death. Some appeared to be enraged and fully determined to shed their blood, while others were equally resolved to prevent the cruel deed. During the discussion the boys distinctly heard one of them say: "The boys' parents very likely know where they are, and if they do not return home, strong suspicions will be aroused, and they may institute a search that would be very dangerous to us. It is already late, and time that the boys were home." This was a very important consideration, as well as a very unexpected circumstance in favor of the boys. Hope rose high in their breasts as the discussion continued, and one by one of the more excited conspirators was silenced, if not convinced, until at length the tide turned in favor of the boys, and it was decided that they should be released. Some openly, and many in their feelings, opposed this resolution, as they considered it as unsafe to liberate the boys to reveal all their plans, as to kill them and get them out of the way. A strong guard was provided to escort them to a proper distance lest some of the gang might kill them before they made their escape. They placed a strict injunction upon the boys not to reveal anything they had seen or heard in these meetings, and declared if they did any member of the conspiracy would kill them at first sight. This caution and threat were repeated several times in a way that gave the boys to understand that they meant all they said, and would just as leave slay them as not if they suspected anything had been revealed by them. Everything being ready, the boys started off in charge of the guard. Right glad were they to once more gain the open air with so good a prospect for their lives, and they breathed a sigh of relief and satisfaction when they were out of sight of the house in which they had endured such great peril. They took an unfrequented road town toward the Mississippi River, which runs around one side of Nauvoo. Some of the guards were very much dissatisfied with the way the tables had turned, and, when they had got a safe distance from the house, they halted to consider if it would not be best to slay the boys on their own responsibility. They would gladly have murdered them if they could have done so with any hopes of having the deed remain undiscovered; but, after some discussion, they contented themselves by reiterating the cautions and threats that had been given to the boys before starting. They continued their march until within a few rods of the river, when they halted, and one of the guards said: "Well, I guess we have gone about far enough, and had better turn back." Then turning to the boys, he continued, "Boys, if you ever open your mouths concerning anything you have seen or heard in any of our meetings; we will kill you by night or by day wherever we find you, and consider it our duty." "Oh, don't fear on that account," replied the boys, anxious to allay their uneasiness, lest they still might take a notion to slay them and cast their bodies into the river, "we can see that it is greatly to our advantage and necessary to our peace and safety to keep silent concerning these things." "I'm glad you've got sense enough to see it in that light," was the rejoinder in a tone that indicated his mind was somewhat relieved. During this conversation, one of the boys looking towards the river, to his great surprise, saw a hand rise into view from behind the bank and beckon for them to come that way. The guards, after admonishing them once more to be silent, and telling them their lives depended upon their keeping the secret, turned to retrace their steps just as one of the boys, anxious to put them at ease as much as possible, said to his companion: "Let's go down to the river." "Yes," returned the guard, evidently pleased with that arrangement; "you had better go down to the river." The reader will readily understand that the meeting had lasted until a late hour in the afternoon and the conspirators had already detained the boys so long that they were afraid their parents and friends, some of whom perhaps knew where the boys had gone, would become anxious and begin to suspect foul play, and possibly might institute a search which would prove exceedingly disadvantageous to the conspiracy. The boys therefore very adroitly proposed to go to the river, so if they were found there it would be sufficient explanation for their long absence. The guards perceived the idea instantly, and it pleased them, for it indicated to them that the boys wished to keep the secret, and avoid being questioned too closely. The boys started off on a run toward the river, but, lest the guards should watch them, and discover the presence of Joseph, whose hand it was they had seen above the bank, they directed their course to a point about a quarter of a mile beyond where Joseph was, knowing that he would follow them. On reaching the river, they stepped down the bank and there awaited the arrival of the Prophet, while the guards returned to the meeting. It seems that Joseph, knowing the danger into which the boys had gone, had become so uneasy at their long absence that he could no longer remain at home, so he and one of his body guard, John Scott, who was the brother to Robert, started out to see if they could discover what had become of them. Perhaps they suspected the boys had been murdered, and that their bodies would be thrown into the stream, as William Law's house, where the meeting was held, was but a short distance from the river. At all events they were there under the bank when the boys were liberated, and now glided around close to the water's edge to the point where the boys were awaiting them. It was a joyful meeting; Joseph seemed delighted to see that the boys had escaped with their lives. The party walked on to a point nearly opposite Joseph's store, where a board fence came down to the edge of the river, forming, together with the orchard trees and shrubbery, a suitable retreat where they could converse without any danger of being seen or heard. "Let us sit down here," said Joseph. All four of them entered the secluded retreat, and when they were seated he continued: "Boys, we saw your danger and were afraid you would not get out alive, but we are thankful that you got off safely. Now relate to me all that you have witnessed." The boys then gave him a complete account of all they had witnessed, and passed through; repeated to him the oath they had seen and heard administered to some two hundred individuals separately; gave him the names of all they knew that had taken the oath; in short they gave him a most accurate recital of all they had seen and heard. Joseph and his companion listened very attentively, and, as the boys proceeded, a very grave expression crept over the countenance of the former, showing that a deep anxiety was preying upon his mind. When the recital was finished a pause of some length ensued. Joseph was very much moved, and at length burst out: "O, brethren, you do not know what this will terminate in!" But proceeded no further, for his feelings were so strong that he burst into tears. In great agitation, Brother John Scott, who was an intimate and trusted friend of Joseph, sprang forward and throwing his arms around the Prophet’s neck, exclaimed: "O, Brother Joseph! do you think they are going to kill you?" and they fell on each other's necks and wept bitterly. The scene is difficult to describe. The thought of losing their friend and Prophet by the hands of such a bloodthirsty mob was sufficient to wring their hearts; and those brave men who but a few moments before had fearlessly faced death, and scorned the proffered conditions on which their lives might be spared, now wept like children and mingled their tears with those of their leader. Joseph was the first to master his feelings, and, raising Brother Scott's arms from off his neck, he said, in a deep and sorrowful tone: "I fully comprehend it!" He then relaxed into a solemn study, while his brethren anxiously watched the changes of his countenance as if they would read the thoughts and feelings that were preying upon his heart. The scene was painful and impressive. Each moment they expected to hear him say that his work on earth was done and that he would have to be slain to seal his testimony. After a long silence he finally continued: "Brethren, I am going to leave you. I shall not be with you long; it will not be many months until I shall have to go." This remark still left them in doubt as to his future fate, but had such significance that Brother Scott again anxiously inquired: "Brother Joseph, are you going to be slain?" Joseph, for some reason, evaded a direct reply, but continued in a tone that told too plainly of the sorrow he felt: "I am going away and will not be known among this people for twenty years or more. I shall go to rest for a season." This reply did not clear away their doubts any more than the former one, but it was evident he intended to leave the people and keep hid more closely than he ever had done, or else, with prophetic vision, he discerned the final outcome of his enemies' efforts, and, through compassion, forbore to crush the spirits of his brethren by telling them plainly the whole truth. Subsequent events leave us still in doubt as to the real purport of his words. The dark clouds of persecution from enemies without, fearfully augmented by traitors from within, grew so threatening toward the close of the Prophet's life, that he saw something must be done for the safety of himself and the people. He therefore conceived the idea of moving the Saints once more, and this time far beyond the cruel blasts of persecution, and seek shelter behind the barriers of the Rocky Mountains. He called for a company of volunteers to explore the great West and find the most suitable place for the Saints to settle. Quite a number volunteered and began to make preparations for the journey. It is a well known fact that just previous to surrendering himself to be taken to Carthage, Joseph got into a boat and started across the river, evidently to evade his enemies. He intended to keep out of their hands until this company had procured a suitable outfit for such an undertaking, when he would have accompanied them. Some of his brethren, however, begged him not to desert the people in such a time of trouble and danger, and at their importunity he returned to Nauvoo, and we all know the result. He was induced to surrender himself to the officers of the law, was cast into prison, and there cruelly murdered by a bloodthirsty mob. Perhaps in reply to Brother Scott's question, Joseph was revolving these plans in his mind and looking forward to the time when he and the Saints would be beyond the reach of persecution; it is now impossible to tell, but the events which followed rather indicate that he foresaw his death. However, he continued in great earnestness: "They accuse me of polygamy, and of being a false Prophet, and many other things which I do not now remember; but I am no false Prophet; I am no impostor; I have had no dark revelations; I have had no revelations from the devil; I made no revelations; I have got nothing up of myself. The same God that has thus far dictated to me and directed me and strengthened me in this work, gave me this revelation and commandment on celestial and plural marriage, and the same God commanded me to obey it. He said to me that unless I accepted it and introduced it, and practiced it, I, together with my people, would be damned and cut off from this time henceforth. And they say if I do so, they will kill me! Oh, what shall I do? If I do not practice it, I shall be damned with my people. If I do teach it, and practice it, and urge it, they say they will kill me, and I know they will. But," said he, "we have got to observe it. It is an eternal principle and was given by way of commandment and not by way of instruction." It will be seen from these outbursts of his soul what a conflict was going on in his mind, and those who knew his sensitive and generous spirit can only imagine the agony that he endured. Persecution and imprisonment from the hand of an enemy would be passed by almost unnoticed when compared with these murderous thrusts from the daggers of alienated friends. Death, to a man who was so familiar with the unseen world and the happiness to be enjoyed there, was stripped of its terrors. His fear of simply losing his life caused him little anxiety. But his whole soul was in the work, which the Lord had given him to do, and such bloodthirsty opposition to a commandment of God among his brethren caused the greatest anxiety and grief. His greatest trials are no doubt hid deepest from our view. The consultation lasted for a long time before they separated to their homes, and impressions were made on the minds of our two young heroes that will last forever. They got an insight into the life of the Prophet and the nature of the work he had to perform that had never before entered their imaginations. Their love for him and the cause in which he was laboring was increased, and gladly would they have laid down their lives to have saved his. Before separating, however, Joseph placed a seal upon the boys' lips, and made them promise that they would not reveal what had transpired that day to a living soul-not even to their own fathers, for at least twenty years. The object of placing this injunction upon them no doubt was for their own safety, as their lives would probably have been taken if any of the conspirators should ever find but that any of their proceedings had been revealed. The boys kept their promise, and now, after a lapse of so many years, these important facts, which throw light upon many of the acts and sayings of Joseph Smith, which his brethren could never before fully understand, are revealed and placed with other important records in the archives of the Church. The muse of history, too often blind to true glory, has handed down to posterity many a warrior, the destroyer of thousands of his fellowmen, and left us ignorant of the valorous deeds of real heroes, whose lot chanced to be more humbly cast; but in that day, when all men's actions will be revealed upon the housetops, we shall no doubt see the names of Denison L. Harris and Robert Scott among the world's heroes as stars of no small magnitude. "Fact is stranger than fiction," and in value they cannot be compared. I respectfully submit the above narrative, which is a true recital of events that actually transpired. The manuscript has been carefully scrutinized by proper authorities who are satisfied of its authenticity and have approved its publication, as an important and accurate item of history connected with the Church. Horace Cummings. That which is elevating and ennobling in its tendency is necessarily true.

John Scott

Contributor: jeanniebug Created: 9 months ago Updated: 9 months ago

John Scott, oldest of eight children born to Jacob Scott and Sarah Warnock, was born 6 May 1811 in Armagh. Ireland. He emigrated to Canada with his parents, brothers and sisters, leaving Ireland 5 April 1819. They landed m Quebec, Canada, sometime in May. From there they moved to Toronto, then to Markham County. John's father taught school there one [eight] year. He received one hundred dollars bounty from the British Government for teaching, besides the subscription fees from the parents of his pupils. The following year, the family moved to Trafalgar on one hundred acres of land-given them by the Government. This was given to all British subjects who were actual settlers. They resided in Trafalgar nearly eighteen years. John's father built a nice home in Trafalgar and named it Ebenezer Hall. John Scott married Elizabeth Meneary on 15 April 1836 in Ebinezer Hall. Elizabeth Meneary was born in Dublin, Ireland, 19 Sep 1815. She immigrated to Canada with her parents sometime between 1819 and 1822 (according to the birth of other children.) While still living in Canada, their first son, Isaac, was born on 6 May 1837. John and Elizabeth were baptized members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints at Churchville, Canada, a village three miles from where they lived, by Isaac Russell. The next year they, along with the other members of the Jacob Scott family, made arrangements to move with the Saints to Far West, Missouri. They left Canada 7 June 1838, arriving in Far West on 2 Sept 1838. They suffered much persecution with the Saints living in Far West at the time. They were forced to leave their homes and land and move to Nauvoo 18 May 1840. John’s parents both died and were buried during the time they lived in Nauvoo. He also lost one brother, Jacob. John Scott was called to Great Britain on his first mission in 1839 and went with some of the Twelve apostles. He was ordained a Seventy and became President of the tenth quorum of Seventy when they were first organized at Nauvoo. He accepted and adopted the doctrine and the revelation on celestial and plural marriage as it was revealed to the Prophet Joseph Smith. While living in Nauvoo, he took for his plural wives Mary Pugh on 3 Feb 1845 and Sarah Ann Willis 24 March 1846. John and Elizabeth were endowed in the Nauvoo temple on 16 December 1845. They were sealed on 23 January 1846. Mary Pugh was born 10 Nov 1821 in Strefford, Herefordshire, England. Mary had attended school at Dilwyn Commons. Afterward she attended Eardisland School, and a private school at Haven Eilwyn. Her father was a mason and also spent part of his time as a farmer. She had a good education, attending private schools, and was taught tailoring by a private governess, so she was a splendid seamstress. Her father and mother were well to do and had a lovely home. It was then that she first heard Mormonism preached and she knew it to be true. She obeyed her impulse and joined the church, being baptized at Stratford, England. At the risk of all earthly comforts and at the age of 21, she left father, mother, home and land and sailed to the United States. She reached Nauvoo in the year 1842, without money, relatives or even acquaintances. But saying “this people is my people, and their God, my God,” as Ruth of old, she felt perfectly at home with them and when she was sick, she was comforted and cared for. Sarah Ann Willis was born 4 Feb 1825 in Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. Her parents were very religious and Sarah was well founded in the Bible, it being her reader at school. Her parents and whole family joined the L.D.S. Church, but her parents refused to acknowledge Brigham Young as successor to the Presidency of the Church and remained in the East when the Saints moved to the Rocky Mountains. Only Sarah and her brother John, of her family were to remain in the church. John died while crossing the plains to Utah in 1856. Sarah’s parents came west as part of the Gold Rush to California and passed through Salt Lake City and did not stop to see her. Years later her father came to Utah when he was about 80 years old and announced that he had decided to go back, sell out and come to Utah and rejoin the church. He went back to Visalia, California, but he never lived to come back again. Sarah never saw her mother again after leaving Nauvoo. John was chosen as one of the Prophet Joseph Smith's body guards, which position he held until the Prophet’s martyrdom. He very often related his experiences with the Prophet to his family and told how he loved Joseph and would have gone through death for him. He also held the position of colonel in the First Regiment, Second Cohort of the Nauvoo Legion. He was very prominent as a military man in the early days of the church. When the Prophet and his brother Hyrum were martyred, John Scott went with others to get their bodies to bring them back to Nauvoo and he then helped with the burial. After the Prophet's death, there was great confusion over who should be President of the Church. John Scott and his three wives, Elizabeth, Mary and Sarah, all bore testimonies of the transfiguration of Brigham Young at the meeting held on August 8, 1844. President Young addressed the congregation speaking with great power. When he first rose to speak, many were astonished for they beheld and heard the Prophet Joseph Smith. It was a manifestation to the Saints so that they might recognize the correct authority. They had no doubt in their minds that Brigham Young was the man the Lord had chosen to be his prophet. They often bore testimony to their children and others. From Heber C. Kimball's history we learn that “on 18 February 1846, the companies were being organized and made ready to start to the Rocky Mountains. In the exodus from Nauvoo, they secured about four hundred wagons, all heavily loaded. There were not half the number of teams necessary for a rapid journey. Most of the families were provided with the provisions to do several months. Colonel Steven Markham and about one hundred pioneers were sent in advance of the main body to prepare the roads. Colonel John Scott with about one hundred men and artillery and stout horses and Josea Stout with about one hundred men acted as police guards, armed with rifles. On the morning of March 1, they were notified to be ready to start at noon. They reached the Missouri River about the middle of June. Here they found the Pottawatoma and the Omaha Indians friendly.” It was then that the call came for 600 men to go to Mexico to fight. They were mustered out and “The Mormon Battalion" started on their trek about the middle of July. The idea of the Saints going to the Rocky Mountains for that season was now abandoned. The Camp of Israel prepared to go into Winter Quarters. This name was given to their winter settlement on the Missouri River. This place is now known as Florence, Nebraska. President Brigham Young requested John Scott to remain one more year to assist those who would be in the next companies in preparing to be properly equipped for traveling across the plains. He did this and also went on a mission among the non-Mormons to gather and collect old clothing to help the Saints for traveling. While at this work he converted three people to the Gospel. John received the following orders from Brigham Young: Feb. 18 1847 Lieutenant Colonel John Scott: You are hereby commanded to immediately put in perfect order the Cannon equipment, carriages and appendages, belongings thereto that are under your command, wherefore fail not, and make return of this order with you doings thereon. Head Waters Winter Quarters Brigham Young, Lieutenant General of the Legion P S you are also authorized to call on any or all of the commanding officers to assist you in the repairs. A P Rockwood, A.D. Camp (Received by Apostle Joseph F. Smith. This order is on display at the Church Historical Museum, Salt Lake City) John Scott and his family started West 30 May, 1848, in Heber C. Kimball’s company. He was the only child of his family to move West with the Saints. John was chosen as Captain over 10 wagons. Mary and Sarah Ann took turns driving a team of mules. Elizabeth had five small children. She gave birth to a child while at Winter Quarters. Mary had a child born at Council Bluffs. Sarah Ann also had a son at Winter Quarters. The company consisted of 662 people, 226 wagons, 57 horses, 25 mules, 737 oxen, 284 cows, 52 dogs, 3 hives of bees, 3 doves, 150 loose cattle, 243 sheep, 5 ducks, 96 pigeons, 299 chickens, 17 cats and 1 squirrel. At one time John Scott's wagons were surrounded by Indians. They were saved by a white man who had some influence with the Indians. The man had been captured by the Indians and had been compelled to live with them. He had known John Scott while they attended school together in Canada. They arrived in the Salt Lake Valley 24 September 1848. After their arrival in Salt Lake Valley, John was transferred from the tenth Quorum of the Millcreek Ward. There, through his influence and help, a school was built. It was named the Scott School and his wife, Mary, was the first teacher. This building still stands in Salt Lake City and today is known as the Pioneer Craft House on 33rd South. He built two-roomed log cabins for each wife. On several occasions, John Scott was sent to Southern Utah to protect the settlers from the Indians. Even though he believed that kindness was the best way to handle the Indians, he was obedient to those in authority. He believed that if the Indians were treated kindly and even fed, it was better than fighting them. He was always kind to them and had many friends among them. He often invited them into his own home to talk to them, advise them, or to preach to them. February 1849 was the beginning of the Utah Indian Wars. John was Captain of the first of three battles, Battle Creek near Pleasant Grove. His report of the battle is included at the end of this history. On Friday, April 6, 1855, John received a call to go on his second mission to Great Britain. He obeyed the call and left his families to face the hardships of building up a new country and of enduring the famine, During the summer the grasshoppers did serious damage, destroying nearly everything that was growing in many parts of Utah. They endured this and many other hardships. Every week flour was weighed and measured according to the number of children in the family. They gathered roots and sego lily bulbs for food. Anything and everything was done to keep their children from going hungry. Mary taught school. Sarah Ann did custom sewing for those who could afford it, and then made exchange for flour. Elizabeth took care of all the children. While serving his mission in Ireland he and his companion were eating dinner at a certain house when he became suddenly suspicious of the lady of the household. She kept insisting they eat more potatoes. After leaving the house, they were walking through the woods, and he and his companion became violently sick, so much so they had to stop and pray. John, not being so sick as his companion, prayed and called on the Lord until he and his companion were healed. It was thoroughly apparent that poison had been put into the potatoes. At the time of this experience, John William Scott, his ten year old son in Millcreek, was sitting by a creek under a tree. He saw a vision of all his father was experiencing in Ireland. He came into the house and related the vision of a woman poisoning him while pretending to be a friend. The very next letter related the experience just as he had witnessed. John was called to be the President of the Irish Conference on July 8, 1856. He labored in the city of Dublin, Belfast. On January 2 he delivered over 10,000 tracts in Ireland. He kept a personal journal with notes of his mission to Europe. (copy available) When President Young received word that Johnson's Army was on its way to Utah, he sent John Scott his mission release and told him to come home as speedily as possible. He arrived home by way of San Francisco on 19 Jan 1858. The Elders who labored and came home with him were: Elder Orson Pratt, Ezra T. Benson, John Ray, John McKay, William Miller and others. John's two oldest sons, Isaac and Ephraim, had been called into service. They had been the family’s main help and protection while their father was serving on his mission to England. When John arrived home, he moved the family to Provo with the Saints until the trouble was over. The soldiers received the order from the U.S. President to pass through Salt Lake without an attack. The Saints allowed this and the men took up quarters at Camp Floyd. The Saints had become almost destitute for clothing by now, but a market was found at the soldier's camp where the men bought produce. This circulated the money and enabled the people to supply themselves with clothing, shoes, and other necessities. After things settled down peacefully, people engaged in farming and other ways to make a living for their families. In 1860, after his return from his second mission, John and Esther Yeates, his fourth wife, were married by President Brigham Young. She had emigrated to the United States when she was sixteen, leaving family, friends, and a sweetheart behind for the sake of the gospel. She traveled from Florence, Nebraska to Salt Lake City with the handcart company in 1859 suffering much hardship along the way. The story is told of John’s premonition to marry Esther. He was checking over the names of immigrants who had arrived in Salt Lake City with this certain handcart company. He came to the name Esther Yeates. He told those with him that she was to be his next wife. They were married a year later. John Scott married Roxey Angelnne Keller (fifth wife) in 1868. Angeline was born 29 April 1851 in MilIcreek, Utah. She was the daughter of Alva Keller and Roxey Lucina Elliot. She witnessed the destruction caused by the crickets and grasshoppers. She was just six years old when Johnson's Army was a threat to their safety. Alva took his family to Alpine for protection until they could return to their home. Though she was seventeen and John was fifty-seven, her parents encouraged the marriage. Mattie, a grand-daughter, could remember her mother and grandmother laughing about how Esther used to give the first three wives such a bad time. When it came time for washing, they all used the same boiler to heat water and to wash their clothes. They would hand wash clothes by putting lye and soap in the water. Each could get good suds and they would see how white their clothes were. So, to get even with Esther (so to speak), the three first wives would take turns sneaking around and tossing a little salt into the water. Esther couldn't get suds and of course her clothes would look dingy. She would grumble and cry to John about it. After their joke, they did tell Esther what was causing her problems. John moved his last two wives and their children to Millville, Cache County, Utah, where he resided most of the time until the summer of 1876. Because of the illness of his first wife, Elizabeth, he moved back to Millcreek. In December 1876, he went to Millville to visit his family and contracted a severe cold, which developed into pneumonia. In less than a week he departed from this life on 16 Dec 1876. He was staying at the home of his son, John William Scott. Before he died, he bore a faithful testimony to the truthfulness of the gospel to those of his family who were at his bedside. He died in full fellowship in the Church. His funeral was held in the Millcreek Ward, his old home. He was buried in the Salt Lake Cemetery. His wives were all splendid and honorable women. They lived the lives of good Latter Day Saints and they were faithful. Their examples could well be followed by their posterity. Elizabeth, the first wife has always been called "Mother" by the entire family. She was in every deed a second mother. No sacrifice was too large for her when it came to her husband or his families. When the children were young, every family member would meet together in one large room in her part of the home for the evening prayers. Here John would have them sing a hymn and then they would have the family prayer. The younger children would be put to bed while the older ones would play games, knit, sew or read. The children, brothers and sisters, were kind and loving with each other. They were united. There were 36 children in all, 18 sons and 18 daughters. Among those to attend and speak at John's funeral service were President John Taylor, George Q. Cannon and Joseph F. Smith. All spoke of his sterling qualities and noble character and also of the good things he had accomplished in the Church and communities where he had lived. He had provided well for his family. At one time, it is said that he sold 40 acres of land to buy shoes for each of his wives and children. He was loved by his brethren and sisters for his pleasant and cheerful ways. He was always ready to give cheer and comfort to those in distress. Many times people would send for him to come and administer to their sick. This he would do, covering many miles at times. He was a man of great faith. His life was a blessing to his family and friends. His entire life was devoted to the Church and whenever the opportunity came, he testified that he knew that Joseph Smith was a true Prophet of God. John Scott is mentioned in the books: Hundred Years of Mormonism, and Essentials of Church History Also, John was with the Prophet Joseph when his brother, Robert Scott, reported the Nauvoo Conspiracy which follows this history. Scott, Edith Colburn, History and Descendants John Scott-Jacob Scott Walker, Sarah M., daughter, A Sketch of the life of John Scott.

John Scott’s report of Indian battle of Battle Creek

Contributor: jeanniebug Created: 9 months ago Updated: 9 months ago

“On the 29, February 1849, the Company was organized complete, and started for Utah Valley. (The company was called on the 28, organized on the 29, and left Salt Lake City in afternoon of the 29.) Camped from Salt Lake City about 10 miles at Orris Herd Ground on Willow Creek. We arrived about 2 hours before sundown and had but little food. Were obliged to purchase beef which cost $45. On the first of March cut up the beef, packed it on the mules and broke up camp about 9 a.m. At 11 a.m. we arrived at the pass in the Wasatch Range which forms the divide between Great Salt Lake and Utah County. Only a dangerous Indian trail crosses over the pass and the company was four hours getting over leading the animals. Four of the pack mules with the meat missed their footing, and rolled down the precipice, about 300 feet. The mules received no very serious injuries. Camped the evening of March 1 at American Fork 9:30 p.m. This night there was a very severe snow storm with a strong piercing wind. Nine of the company had their ears and faces frozen. The entire company was kept up nearly all night by the continual alarms of attack by the Indians. Their campfires were seen in various places all night. 22 took up line of march about 9 a.m. and reconnoitered the bottom lands in the tall grass and cane breaks, but found no Indians. Camped on Provo Bottom about twelve miles from American Fork but had traveled at least 50 miles. Just as we were about to camp, saw some Indians approaching. They came and had a talk with Dimick B. Huntington and Barney Ward, the two interpreters we had with us. They returned to Little Chief’s encampment. We remounted and proceeded to the Indian Camp about one half mile distance. Found Little Chief and his entire band. He ordered his squaws and children to take to the brush and prepare for action. After some difficulty the interpreter was able to talk with him and assured him that we were friends to all peaceable Indians. Upon this, the pipe of peace was passed around, and a council of war was held. Little Chief and several of his warriors were present. In that council we required that his two sons should accompany us as hostages of his integrity to all which he agreed with very great reluctance. On the third of March about midnight we took up the line of march and forded the Provo River near the mouth of the canyon, a very dangerous stream. We rode within a mile of what is now called Battle Creek. The company was here divided into 4 platoons, and ordered to place themselves in suitable location on the four sides of the Indian camp. They could see their dim campfires visible in the distance. Here we watched for daylight. As the day broke, the Indians discovered us and took to the thickets, and fired upon us as long as they had ammunition. We then, through the interpreter, begged them to cease their hostilities, and to make friends, but they utterly refused and used every endeavor to escape to the mountains. As soon as they refused all offers of peace, the order for an attack was given. The following battle lasted two hours. The Indians were upon a small Island, covered with dense scrub cotton wood and willows in Battle Creek Canyon. We were obliged to attack them from the heights in a most exposed situation. Many of the men received numbers of Indian arrows in their clothing. One man had 13 arrows sticking through his clothes after the defeat of the Indians. We had at last an opportunity to attack them hand to hand in the brush before they would be routed out. The Indians left four of the warriors dead on the field. How many more were killed or wounded we cannot learn. The battle being ended, we returned to our camp, one mile from Battle Creek. About 10 a.m. we took up the line of march for Great Salt Lake City, and camped at Orris Herd Ground on Willow Creek about 10 p.m. The fourth of March we arrived in S. L. City about 2 o’clock p.m. and after making a report of the expedition the general of the company was dismissed. There were four commissioned officers, and six non-commissioned officers, and forty privates. John Scott and Curtis E. Bollon

John Scott

Contributor: jeanniebug Created: 9 months ago Updated: 9 months ago

LIFE AND EXPERIENCE OF JOHN SCOTT By his daughter Sarah M. Scott Walker John Scott, the son of Jacob Scott and Sarah Warnock, was born the 6th day of May 1811 in Armagh, Ireland. He emigrated from Ireland to Canada with his parents, brothers and sisters, leaving Ireland the 5th of April 1819. They landed in Quebec, Canada, some time in May. From there they moved to Toronto, from there to Markham County. His father taught school there one year. He was paid by the British government. The following year they moved to Trafalgar on one hundred acres of land given them by the Government. This was given to all British subjects and actual settlers. They resided in Trafalgar nearly eighteen years. His father built a nice home in Trafalgar and named it Ebenezer Hall. He also made other large improvements. On April 15, 1836, John Scott and Elizabeth Menary were married in his father's home (Ebenezer Hall). Elizabeth Menary was born in Dublin, Ireland, September 10, 1815. While living in Canada their oldest son was born and named Isaac. Elder Russel, one of Canada's pioneer missionaries of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, came to Churchville, a village three miles from where they lived and held meetings. Jacob Scott embraced the gospel and after this his entire family came into the church, Ann, Jane, Mary, John, Isaac F., Sarah, Jacob, and Robert T. Scott. John Scott was baptized on May 6, 1836, at Churchville, Canada by Isaac Russell. His wife Elizabeth was baptized the same day. The next year John Scott and wife and son, and his father's entire family made arrangements to move with the Saints to Farr West, Missouri. Jacob Scott sold him home to William Cauthria. They left Canada on June 7, 1838, and arrived in Farr West, Missouri on September 2, 1828, passing through great hardships and persecutions with the saints at that time. They left Farr West, Missouri, May 18, 1840, locating in Nauvoo, Illinois. John Scott was ordained a Seventy and became president of the tenth quorum of seventies, when they were first organized at Nauvoo. He accepted the doctrine and revelation on celestial and plural marriage and while living in Nauvoo took for his plural wives Mary Pugh, February 3, 1845 and Sarah Ann Willis, March 24, 1846. Mary Pugh was born November 10, 1822. in England. Sarah was born February 4, 1825, in Pittsburgh, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. John Scott obeyed this principle as it was revealed to the Prophet Joseph Smith. While living in Nauvoo, his father, mother, and brother Jacob all died and were buried in the Nauvoo cemetery. They all died faithful members of the church. Jacob Scott just before he died, called his family around him and bore a strong testimony to the truthfulness of the gospel. John Scott was chosen one of the Prophet Joseph Smith's bodyguards, which position he held until the prophet's martyrdom. He very often related his experiences with the Prophet to family and told how he loved the Prophet and would have went through even death for him. He also held the position of Colonel in the first Regiment, 2 Cohort of the Nauvoo Legion. In the spring of 1844 a very bitter and strong feeling was aroused against the Prophet among many of his brethren in the around Nauvoo, and some who held high positions in the church, and were supposed to be the Prophets best friends, turned against him. They sought by various means to do him injury. Some sought to even take his life. They were continually plotting to take his life. At length this wicked feeling became so strong among a certain class, that they resolved to form an organization or combination that would enable them to accomplish their wicked purpose. Concerning some of the secret meetings of this society of traitors and their designs against the Prophet, we have a detailed account given by Denison T. Harris and Robert Scott, brother of John, who were young men at this time. They had both been invited to a secret meeting, by Austin Cowles and Wm. Law. They had been told something about the general purposes and warned not to breath a word concerning it to a soul, except Harris's father who might come if he wished. The older Harris, after being told by his son, decided to tell the Prophet and ask his advice. Joseph told him not to go himself but to let his son go. The first meeting was held a William Law's house on a Sabbath afternoon. There were many present. The time was spent in denouncing the fallen Prophet, and urging the necessity of organizing. A meeting was called for the following Sunday. The boys reported to Joseph what they had seen and heard, and were requested by him to attend again. The second meeting was similar to the first. The boys reported to the Prophet, and were requested to attend the third meeting. This time, however, the Prophet had considerable apprehensions concerning the young men's safety; but he said he hardly thought their blood would be shed, though under no considerations were they to take any of their oaths. So they went, feeling that they might never return alive. The door was guarded by armed men. They were however admitted. Organization was effected. Francis Higbee, a justice of the peace, sat at the head of the table administering the oath to each person as they came up, which was bloodcurdling. They had to swear to do all in their power for the destruction of Joseph Smith and his party. Among the number were three women, heavily veiled, one of them was weeping. When everyone else had sworn and signed, the boys were approached and asked to do the same. They were coaxed amid general attention. They quietly but firmly refused. Then they were threatened; but still they would not be sworn. You know too much now, was the general cry and you must join or die. But they were firm. Knives were drawn and guns cocked and men rushed upon them from all parts of the room which they occupied. But they were protected by calmer feelings of some of the leaders. It was suggested that the room where they were at that time, was an improper place to commit such a deed; the attention of some passerby might be attracted. So they started for the cellar. On their way, however, someone suggested the possibility of their being discovered. For the boys parent's knew where they were. This turned the tide, and the young men were dismissed, after being warned that if they every divulged what they had heard they would be killed. On approaching the bank of the river, they discovered that the Prophet and Robert Scott's brother John Scott were hidden there. William Law's house was only a short distance from the river. The boys had guards sent with them almost to the river, and the guards placed a strict injunction upon the boys never to reveal anything they had seen or heard at these meetings and declared if they did any number of the conspiracy would kill them at first sight. It was a joyful meeting. Joseph seemed delighted to see that the boys had escaped with their lives. The party walked on to a point nearly opposite Joseph's store, where a board fence came down to the edge of the river, forming together with the orchard, trees, and shrubbery a suitable retreat where they could converse, without any danger of being seen or heard. "Let us sit down here", said the Prophet Joseph. All four of them entered the secluded retreat and when they were seated he continued, "Boys, we saw your danger and were afraid you would not get out alive, but we are thankful that you did get away safely and now relate to me all that you witnessed." The boys then gave them a complete account of all they had seen and passed through, repeated to them the oath they had seen administered to some two hundred individuals separately, and gave him the names of all they knew who had taken part or who had taken the oath. Joseph and his companion, John, listened very attentively and as the boys proceeded, a very grave expression crept over the countenance of the former, showing that a deep anxiety was preying upon his mind. When the recital was finished, a pause of some length ensued. Joseph was much moved and burst out "Oh, brethren, you do not know what this will terminate in." But he proceeded no further for his feeling were so strong that he burst into tears. In great agitation, brother John Scott, who was an intimate and trusted friend of Joseph's, sprang forward, throwing his arms around the prophet's neck exclaimed, "Oh, brother Joseph, do you think they are going to kill you?" Then they fell on each other's necks and wept bitterly. Joseph evaded a direct reply but continued in a tone that told too plainly of the sorrow he felt. "I am going away, and will not be known among this people for twenty years or more. I shall go to rest for a season perhaps. In reply to Brother John Scott's question, the Prophet was revolving plans in his mind and looking forward to the time when he and the Saints would be beyond the reach of persecution and could seek shelter behind the barriers of the Rocky Mountains. After this he called a company of volunteers to explore the great west and find a suitable place for the Saints to settle. Some of his brethren begged him not to desert the people in such a time of trouble and danger and at their importunity he returned to Nauvoo, after he had started across the river. We all know the result. The persecutions of the Saints became so bitter that finally in the year 1844, the Prophet and his brother Hyrum, were induced to surrender themselves to the officers of the law and were cast into prison. Here they remained until later. At the Carthage jail on the 27th of June 1844 at about 5 o'clock p.m. a bloodthirsty mob came and shot the Prophet through and upstairs window and killed Hyrum also. The persecutions of the Saints still continued until they were compelled to leave their homes and to try and find refuge west of the Rocky mountains. They were led by Brigham Young, successor to the Prophet Joseph Smith. Brother John Scott and his three wives, Elizabeth, Mary and Sarah, all bore testimonies of the Transfiguration of President Brigham Young after the martyrdom of the Prophet Joseph and Hyrum. They were in attendance at the meeting held August 8, 1844. President Brigham Young addressed the congregation speaking with great power and the people were thoroughly convinced that the authority and power of the Presidency was with the apostles. When he first arose to speak, the people were greatly astonished for President Young stood transfigured before them and they beheld the Prophet Joseph Smith and heard his voice as natural, it sounded to them as when he was living. It was a manifestation to the Saints that they might recognize the correct authority. This is the testimony, which John Scott and his three wives bore time and time again to their children. John and Elizabeth, by this time had several small children, a daughter named Matilda, was born at Farr West, Missouri, September 6, 1838. Louisa, Marsh 20, 1840, at Bloomfield, Illinois. Ephram was born June 6, 1842, John W. was born November 6, 1844. This is an extract from the Life of Heber C. Kimball, explaining the exodus from Nauvoo: Some of the advanced companies left Nauvoo about February 17, 1846, evacuation of Nauvoo had begun in earnest. An exile nation going forth like Israel from Egypt into the wilderness, there to worship God in their own appointed way. On the 18th of February 1846, the companies were being organized and made ready to start to the Rocky Mountains. All together they comprised about four hundred wagons, all heavily loaded with not over half the number of teams necessary for a rapid journey. Most of the families were supplied with provisions for several months. Colonel Stephen Markham and about one hundred Pioneers to prepare the road in advance of the main body. Colonel John Scott with a hundred men and artillery and Colonel Hosea Stout with about one hundred men acted a police guards armed with rifles. On the morning of March 1st, they were notified to be ready to start at noon. It was a faithful and a pure people that journeyed westward to find another promised land. They reached the Missouri River about the middle of June and received a friendly welcome from the Pottawattamie Indians and the Omaha Indians. While here word was brought to headquarters that a United States Army officer with a squad of soldiers had arrived at Mt. Pisgah with a request for five hundred men to be furnished by the Mormons to enter the army and to march to California to take part in the war against Mexico. It was their country's call and although every man was needed for a bulwark of defense still they must respond. Even the women had been tending stock and driving teams owing to the limited number of men available. Should they part with the few men they had? What must be done? On the first of July, Captain James Allen, the recruiting officer went in council with President Brigham Young and others. They resolved to raise the number of troops that had been called for. President Young went to Mt. Pisgah a distance of one hundred and thirty miles and in three days he returned and reported the force mustered, organized and ready to march. The Mormon Battalion started out for the West about the middle of July. William H. Walker and his brother Edwin Walker being numbered among them. They left their friends, relatives, telling their wives to go on to the Rocky Mountains with the Saints. In the sorrow of parting they said if their lives were preserved they would return to them out in the West where the Saints were going to make their future homes. The project of the Pioneers going to the Rocky Mountains that season was now abandoned, and the Camp of Israel prepared to go to winter quarters. This was the name given to their winter settlement on the Missouri River, five miles above Omaha. Today it is known as Florence, Nebraska. It was fortified with breast works, stockade and block houses, after the fashion of the frontier. Such was their winter home. On January 14, 1847, agreeable to instructions, the Saints began to prepare for their journey to the mountains. Early in April the pioneers started from Winter Quarters, numbering one hundred and forty-eight souls including three women and three children. President Brigham Young, leaving Elders Pratt and Taylor in charge and Elder Orson Hyde, he requested Colonel John Scott to take this for a mission and to remain until the following year to assist in helping see that the companies of pioneers were properly equipped for traveling across the plains for they were going the following year. He did this and also went on a mission among non-members of the church and collected old clothing to help fit the Saints for traveling. While doing this he also was the means of converting three souls to the gospel. Brother John and Edward Morgan and their mother. They came to Utah later. Edward Morgan married his daughters Louisa and Sophia. While living in Winter Quarters his wife Elizabeth gave birth to a daughter which they named Elisabeth, born March 15, 1847. Mary his other wife had a son born at Council Bluffs, Iowa, July 15, 1846, which they named Hyrum, and Sarah had a son born at Winter Quarters, Nebraska on April 16, 1847 named Joseph Lemuel. This year John Scott received the following orders from President Young: Lieutenant Colonel John Scott, You are hereby commanded to immediately put in perfect order the cannon, equipment, carriages and appendages belonging thereto, that are under your command. Whereof fail not and make return of this order with your doings therein. Head Waters Winter Quarters 19 February 1847 Brigham Young (Lieut. General of the Legion) P.S. You are also authorized to call on any or all of the commanding officers to assist you in the repairs. B.Y. A.P. Rockwood A de Camp In the summer or spring of 1848 his company started across the plains, his families accompanying him with their small children. Mary and Sarah Ann taking charge on one wagon and mule team. They taking turns driving. They passed through many hardships on their journey at one time being entirely surrounded by hostile Indians. It looked like a battle with the Indians that could not be avoided. When all at once a man among the Indians came to the front and called John Scott. He proved to be a white man that the Indians had taken prisoner at one time and had remained among them and seemed to have a great influence with the Indians and the trouble was stopped by him. John Scott had known him in Canada having attended the same school as he. They went on unmolested and praising the Lord for their deliverance. They landed in Salt Lake Valley the same year. The following year some of the settlers were having trouble with the Indians, although President Young believed in treating the Indians kindly. President Brigham Young then called Col. John Scott to organize a company to go fight the Indians on February 29,1849. The company was organized complete by order of Brigham Young although Brother Scott firmly believed the Indians could and should be won over by good treatment and kindness and thought it ever better to feed Indians than to fight them. He was always a good friend to the Indians, receiving them into his house many time to talk to them, advising them and preaching to them. But he obeyed council and started with his company for Utah Valley. The following is a copy of his experiences as reported by On the 29 February 1849, the company was organized complete and started for Utah Valley. (This company was called on the 28, organized on the 29 and left Salt Lake City the afternoon of the 29.) They arrived about 2 hours before sundown (say nine o'clock) provisions at the time were very scarce in the territory, and they had but little food. They were obliged to purchase beef which costs $45.00. On the first of March they cut up the beef, packed it on the mules, and broke up came, about 9 A.M. About 11 A.M. we arrived at the pass in the Wasatch range which forms the divide between Great Salt Lake and Utah County. At that time there was only a dangerous Indian trail over the pass and the company were hour hours getting over, leading their animals. However four of the pack mules with the meat missed their footing and rolled down the precipice about 300 feet, the mules received no very serious injuries. They camped the evening of March 1st at American Fork at 9;30. P.S. This night there was a very severe snow storm with a strong piercing wind. Nine of the company had their ears and face frozen. The entire company Ws kept up nearly all night by the continual alarms of attack by the Indians. Their camps were seen in various places all night. Twenty took up the line of march about 9 a.m. and reconnoitered the bottom lands in the tall grass and cane brakes but found no Indians. They camped on Provo Bottom about twelve miles from American Fork but had traveled at least 50 miles. Just as they were about to camp they saw some Indians approaching. They came and had a talk with Divnick B. Huntington and Barney Ward, the two interpreters we had with us, and then returned to little Chiefs encampment. We remounted and proceeded to the Indian camp about one half a mile distance, and then found Little Chief and his entire band. He ordered his squaws and children to take to the brush and prepare for action. After some difficulty, the interpreter was able to talk with him and assured him that we were friends to all peaceable Indians. Upon this the pipe of peace was passed around, and a council of war was held. Little Chief and several of his warriors were present. In that council we required that his that his two sons should accompany us as hostages of his integrity to all which he agreed with very great reluctance. On the third of March about midnight we took up the line of march and forded the Provo River near the mouth of the canyon, a very dangerous stream. Then rode to within a mile of what is now called Battle Creek. The company was here divided into four platoons, and ordered to place themselves in suitable location on the four sides of the Indian camp. They could see their dim camp fires, visible in the distance. Here we watched for daylight. As the day broke the Indians discovered us and took to the thickets, and fired upon us, as long as they had any ammunition. We then through the interpreter, begged of them to cease their hostilities, and to make friends, but they utterly refused and used very endeavor to escape to the mountains. As soon as they refused all offers of peace, the order for an attack was given. The following battle lasted two hours. The Indians were upon a small island covered with dense scrub cottonwood, and willows in Battle Creek Canyon, and we were obliged to attack them from the heights in a most exposed situation. Many of the men received numbers of Indian arrows in their clothing. One man had 13 arrows sticking through his clothes after the defeat of the Indians. We had at last an opportunity to attack them hand to hand in the brush before they would be routed out. The Indians left four of their warriors dead on the field. How many more were killed or wounded we cannot learn. The battle being ended, we returned to our camp, one mile from Battle Creek. We should here state that during the action a very splendid blooded mare belonging to Indson L. Stoddard broke away from his saddled and bridled, and ran into the mountains and was never hear of afterward or recovered. About 10 a.m. we took up the line of march for Great Salt Lake, and camped at Orris her ground on Willow Creek about 10 p.m. The fourth of March we arrived at Salt Lake City, about 2 p.m. and after making a report of the expedition the general of the company was dismissed. There were four commissioned officers, and 6 non-commissioned officers, and forty privates. General John Scott and Curtis E. Bolton W.H.W. After his arrival in Salt Lake Valley he was transferred from the tenth quorum of seventies to be Senior president of the 61st Quorum of Seventies. He located on 160 acres of land on the Mill Creek. Through his influence and help a school house was built. He saw the great necessity of sending the children of the latter Day Saints to school. This school was called the Scott school and his wife Mary taught school in this house. She had received her education in England. On Friday the 6th of April 1855, he received a call to go on a mission to Great Britain. He obeyed the call, and left his home and family and loved ones to face the hardships of building up a new country and of enduring the suffering and famine. During the summer the grasshoppers did serious damage to crops destroying nearly everything green in many parts of Utah. His family having to weigh or measure out the flour according to the number of children, and this was done every week. Sometimes they had to go out and gather roots and sego lilies to help with the living. He went and filled his mission until he received an honorable release. His missionary work was done in England and Ireland. He was called to be president of the Irish conference and labored in the city of Dublin, Belfast and many places in Ireland. On January 2nd he had delivered over ten thousand tracts in Ireland alone. He labored first in London, England on July 8, 1856, he left Liverpool for Dublin Ireland. While on this mission, he was with E.T. Benson, Orson Pratt for six weeks, Ja. Ryon, John Kay, Wm. Miner, D.D. Rays, Miles Rambey, Thomas Bullock. Most of the time that he was in England he spent with E.T. Benson. While he was in North Wales he was with John Ray. While in Ireland he met Brother J.D. McAlster. The following is an experience he passed through while laboring in Ireland: He and his companion were eating dinner at a certain house when he became suddenly suspicious because the lady of the house kept insisting on their eating more potatoes. Because she insisted on their eating more he refused the second time, but his companion did not notice this and he ate quite heartily of the potatoes. After leaving the house they were walking through the woods and he and his companion became violently sick, so much that they had to stop and pray and he not being so sick as his companion was healed and also himself. It was thoroughly apparent to them both that poison had been put into the potatoes. At the time this happened, John W. Scott, his son, a very small boy who was living at Mill Creek, Utah, was sitting by the creek under a tree and he saw all that which I have just related concerning his father and his companion. He came into the house and related what he saw in the vision and how this woman had administered poison to them, while pretending to be their friend. And the very next letter that came to the family related the circumstances just as the boy had told it to his family. This was a great testimony to the family of the goodness of God to his children and this helped them to endure trials and tribulations, which they had to pass through. A verse which he sent to Sarah A. Scott while in Ireland on his mission: The Wish Be thy coming years, my friend, Gilded by the sun of joy, May no darksome cloud descent, Life's fair prospects to destroy. O'er the circling social scene May no blighting sorrows fall; Be but in the distance seen Storms of woe, which threaten all. Choicest stores of earthly good Still around thy dwelling rest, And the love of Israel's God Ever make they spirit blest. Just a short wile before he departed from this life, John W. Scott related this circumstances and testified to the truthfulness of this testimony. To members of the family, Lucy J. Scott Park and Hanah M. Scott Morgan. He said that he really saw this in a vision. While John Scott was still on his mission his wife Sarah A. had a son born 28th of December 1855 which she named William Rueben. When President Brigham Young received word that Johnstons army was on the road to the valley he sent John Scott this release from his mission and also the other missionaries. They were all asked to return as speedily as possible. He arrived in Salt Lake City on 19th of January 1858. The following is a proclamation from Governor Young, Lieutenant General Daniel H. Wells of the Nauvoo Legion established headquarters at the Narrows in Echo Canyon, a defile and rugged and steep where a few men could hold an army to this point about twelve hundred and fifty men from several companies of Militia. They were ordered to report and maintain the pass by force of arms against any attempted invasion. Isaac and Ephriam Scott, being the oldest sons were called into service. This took the family's main help and protection away from them while their father was on his mission. The family had to move to Provo with the Saints. While John Scott was on his mission he gathered genealogy of his ancestors in Ireland, thinking to do their work in the Temple for their salvation. He had the misfortune to lose his traveling bag. It was either lost or taken by mistake and he thus lost the records of his people which he was never able to get again. Shortly after his return from his mission he married Esther Yeates for his fourth wife. He was married by President Young 1860. Sometime after this he moved his last two wives to Millville, Utah, where he resided most of the time until the summer of 1876. Then on account of the illness of his first wife Elizabeth, he came back to Mill Creek, his first home. In December 1876 he went back to Millville to visit his family there and while there he contracted a severe cold, which developed into pneumonia. In less than a week he departed from this life, this being on the 16th day of December 1876. He bore a faithful testimony to the truthfulness of the Gospel to those of his family that were at his bedside. He died in full fellowship in the church. His funeral was held in the Mill Creek ward, his old home and he was buried in the Salt Lake City Cemetery. Those who spoke at his funeral were President John Taylor, George Q. Cannon and Joseph F. Smith. All spoke of his sterling qualities and noble character and also of the good things he had accomplished in the church and the community where he had lived. They told of his ever being ready at all times to obey the counsel of those in authority. Brother John Scott was a man of great faith. In the early settlement of Utah people would send for miles to get him to go and administer to the sick. He was loved by his brethren and sisters for his pleasant and cheerful ways. He was always ready to give cheer and comfort to those in distress. His life was a blessing to his family and to his friends. His entire life was devoted to the church, always when opportunity came, he was ready and did testify that he knew that Joseph Smith was a true Prophet of God. He had five wives, all splendid and honorable women. They lived the lives of good Latter Day Saints and they were faithful. Their examples could well be followed by their children. Elizabeth, the first wife was always called Mother by the entire family and she was in every deed a second mother. When the children were young every member of the families would meet together in one large room in her part of the house for the evening prayers. Here John would have his families sing a hymn and then they would have the family prayer. After this was done they would all go to their own homes and perhaps the smaller ones would play awhile before retiring, while the older ones would spend the evening in various ways, some sewing, some knitting, and some reading. Four of his wives have followed him into the Great Beyond. Their deaths are as follows: Elizabeth, Dec. 24, 1886; Mary, January 5, 1905; Sarah Ann, 30 October, 1890; Esther, 21 April, 1920. The first three wives were buried in the Salt Lake Cemetery and Esther Scott was buried in Millville, Cache County, Utah. John Scott was the only member of father's family that came West with the Latter-Day Saints, the rest remained in the East. His father had five brothers and four sisters. James came to Canada and lived and died there. . Some went to Manchester, England, and one came to the United States, the father of General Winfield Scott. After the war with Mexico, General Winfield Scott sent his sword to his cousin John Scott. When John Scott died, it was given to his oldest son, Isaac Scott, who in turn gave it to Alonzo Scott, his youngest brother. It is now in the possession of Ephram Scott's son James Scott, who is living in Annis, Idaho. This record would not be complete without mentioning an incident in the life of Joseph L. Scott, son of Sarah Ann. While a baby he became very sick, his life hanging on a thread as it were. All were watching and waiting for the end to come, when all at once President Heber C. Kimball came into the house and walking over to where he was in his mother's arms and he laid his hands upon the child and blest hem, telling him that he would recover and that the time would come when he would stand at the head of his father's family in doing the temple work for the salvation of the dead. He recovered rapidly and in after years, when the temple work was started for the dead he was the oldest living son of John Scott, and was told by President Lund that he should put his name on record as the recognized heir of the Scott family, this bringing to pass the blessing pronounced on his head by President Heber C. Kimball. It is necessary to have an heir to the work, but not meaning that the heir is honored anymore than the rest of the family that do the work for the dead. This is just a means of identifying this work from other Scott families that may be doing temple work for their dead ancestors. Several members of the family have received wonderful testimonies of the truthfulness of the Gospel. On the tenth of October 1869, Rebecca A. Scott, who was on a visit to Visalia, California, at her grandparents Benjamin and Hannah Willis's home, wrote home to her mother Sarah Ann and said: "Dear mother, Please tell father I have seen a vision. I saw the prettiest place in all the world--the Lakes of Killarney in Ireland." I know that he will be pleased to hear this. Rebecca died shortly after returning home from California on the 25th of August 1870 at Mill Creek, Utah. In speaking of her vision, we have all heard no doubt of the Lake of Killarney, the stories of their rare beauty are not exaggerated. Erin abounds in ruins, both ancient and modern. Where the River Shannon flows there are many beautiful scenes and views along the banks of his historic stream. Ireland is noted for its remarkable scenery. Hyrum Scott had a wonderful testimony that the spirit lives after death. He related it many times over and over again to his family just before he died. The following is a testimony of Joseph Scott. He and Hannah had been baptized for all the names of their mother's people they could find. A few days after this as he was sitting eating his dinner a short way from the other men. He had been working on a water ditch when a man came to him and asked him why he was not baptized for him too. Joseph then asked him what his name was but he disappeared before telling him. On the following day at the same time he came again and said; "Yesterday you asked me my name, today I will give it to you." He told him what it was and Joseph wrote it down so that he could do the temple work. Again the person disappeared as before. On the year of 1909, August 24, the children and grandchildren of John Scott met in the LaBell Meeting House at LaBell Idaho and organized into a family organization. The object in doing this was to honor their pioneer parents. Also for the purpose of doing work for the salvation of the dead ancestors. Hyrum Scott was chosen and sustained as president of the John Scott family organization. Hannah M. Morgan was chosen as secretary and treasurer. Later at a reunion held at Annis, Idaho, Sarah M. Walker was chosen and sustained as correspondence secretary and treasurer for life by a motion of Hyrum Scott. This was in the year of 1910. Her duties were to gather genealogy and look after temple work. Through the blessings of the Lord she has been able to get a copy of Grandfather Jacob Scott's records of his family. The temple work is now done for all of them. In 1908, Sarah had a dream which gave her a testimony of temple work and the necessity of it: I dreamed of a man coming to my home and he spoke tome and said: "I have come to you to see if you will see that my temple work is done for me." I asked him why he had come to me about his temple work and he answered and said: "Because your name is Sarah and that is an old family name." He then walked to the table and seemed to pour out something, a large pile of names written on small strips of cardboard. They were piled in a high rounding pile, and after he had done this, he turned to me and said: "Look, all of these people are waiting for you to do their temple work." I then asked him how I could get the genealogy of these people. He answered and said: "In the bottom of an old trunk you will find many of these names.: Then I asked him what his name was and he said, "My name is Henderson." I then awoke. This dream impressed my, it was so real it did not seem like a dream. I told my dream to my husband and told him I know of no man by the name of Henderson, who was related to me, but that I would write to Hannah as she had what few records my mother had of her people, and see if she knew of such a man being related to us. I did this and her answer came back. William Henderson married out Great Aunt Sarah Willis. In the bottom of my mother's old trunk we found a bundle of letters with genealogy of her people. Henderson's name was there and we also found, as he had said, that Sarah was an old family name on both sides of our family. Singed---Sarah Scott Walker Hyrum Scott's Testimony As related to Hannah Morgan He was standing at Salt lake City or rather at Mill Creek Ward Utah at the time he said: "Myself and some of my brother were going to the city and were standing on the Scott School House corner, waiting for Joseph Scott to arrive, when I fell, they all thought I was apparently dead. My spirit left my body and I gazed at it lying there on the ground. I was seized with the thought that I would like to see my family before I ascended to the Great Beyond. My spirit immediately began moving rapidly towards my home in Idaho. It didn't seem any effort at all for me to go. I just glided along in the air at an immense speed. The landscape looked very familiar to me, I knew all the towns as I passed through. When I arrived at Willow Creek, Idaho, I saw a messenger approaching me from a south eastern direction. He was dressed in a white robe and had a long beard. When I saw him, the thought came to me that he was going to stop me from going home, and being very desirous that such thing should not occur, I pulled the little line that held my spirit to my body and tried to break it. The messenger then asked me what I was trying to do, and I told him and he said, if you had broken it, you never could have went back to your body and your work on earth is not finished yet, for if I entered the house I could never go back to my body. So I promised and he accompanied me. I saw right through the walls of the house; saw my wife and children, and a sick little boy, that my wife was attending; saw one of my brother-in-laws, who was cutting down trees close by the house. My spirit then returned to my body. How I entered my body, I do not know, but I was gone just 15 minutes.

Mormon Pioneer Overland Trail

Contributor: jeanniebug Created: 9 months ago Updated: 9 months ago

(This is taken from "The Life Story of Mary Pugh Scott" from Carol Cornwall Madsen's book, "Journey to Zion: Voices from the Mormon Trail" 1997, 399-402. It can also be found online at the Church History Library, Pioneer Trails, under Mary Pugh Scott.) "We went into Winter Quarters, now called Florence. John was called on a special mission to stay one more year and help prepare all for the trip. Finally May 30, 1848, John Scott and family started in Heber C. Kimball's Company. John was Captain over 10 wagons. His (Kimball) company included 662 people-266 wagons-150 loose cattle-25 mules-737 oxen- 57 horses-299 chickens-96 pigs-52 dogs-17 cats-3 hives of bees-3 doves-1 squirrel. Rules of the camp: 1. Noise and confusion will not be allowed after 8 p.m. 2. Camp will be called by trumpet for Prayer meeting morning and night 3. Arise at 4:30 a.m. Assembly for prayers 5:30 a.m. 4. Card playing will not be allowed. 5. Dogs must be tied up at night. 6. Profane language will not be tolerated. 7. Each man will help driving the cattle. 8. Rate of travel for Oxen 3 miles an hour. (The corral made by wagons will not be broken until all of the cattle have been yoked.) "John's responsibility for ten wagons made it difficult at times to help his own Families. Elizabeth in one wagon had sons, John William 4, Ephraim 6, and Isaac 11, Daughters Louisa 8, Matilda 10, and a new baby Elizabeth. Mary had a son, Hyrum 22 months old and Sarah 23 years old had a son, Joseph L. 11 months old in her arms. Here we two, who have been raised in luxury, are bravely trying to drive a Mule Team across the plains, holding our Babies. We take turns driving. You can just imagine we three women climbing in and out over wagon wheels to cook on the camp fire and wash clothes. "We sleep in our Camp wagons or on the Ground along the swampy river bottoms. John helped a lot before leaving going among Non Mormons and asking for clothes, bedding and money for those who had everything in the world taken from them. He also Converted three people to our Gospel. I am now 27 years old and trying hard to be a good wife. We cook in a camp kettle, it is an iron pot with three legs. "It had a heavy lid and could be set right on the beds of coals and biscuits corn bread or cake could be put in, then a shovel full of coals was put on top to bake them. Some who had no kettles cooked on hot rocks to do their baking. Some of our meals were just broiled meat and bread. Other times all we had to eat was water gruel (a very thin mush) One Wedding dinner on the plains consisted of fresh bread baked in a skillet, fresh butter and a piece of meat. "Milk and cream could be placed in a churn in the morning and by night you could have a pat of butter by the jolting wagon over rough trails. An English Emigrant whose sense of smell had left him due to age, was one day hungrily out looking for food, found a strange animal and killed it. (It was furry and black and white.) He skinned and proudly brought it to camp. It was a skunk and to his amazement everyone fled as he approached and for some days he was an outcast. "Our daily exertions made hunger a constant companion. The quantity of food was limited and meals were usually scant. At other times fish was caught in streams and ducks, geese, turkeys and prairie chickens were shot. The men hunted for buffalo, Elk and deer and these added to our daily diet. Pig weeds, thistles and other greens were gathered at times and cooked to add variety. And some times if several Buffalo were shot the Saints would stop over for a day or two and we cut the meat in strips. "This we dried for future meals. Some places an abundance of wild red and black currants and sometimes gooseberries were gratefully gleaned. Some of the Children while walking wore a bag and picked up buffalo chips and sticks to make fires for the evening meals. As soon as we camped everyone tried to share in the labors. Some carried water and gathered wood for tires. Big high sagebrush was used and in timber country we burned wood. But all was not desolation on the long journey. "We enjoyed the smell of the pretty wild roses. At some places beautiful wild flowers of all hues could be seen and we enjoyed the singing of the birds. Young girls tended weary babies until they could be fed and put to sleep. After prayers the camp retired for the night, with camp fires burning and the lights of lanterns in the wagons. The looing (lowing) of the cattle, bleating of the sheep mingled with the neighing of the horses in the corrals of wagons. (This is continued in Part 2)

Mormon Pioneer Trail Part 2

Contributor: jeanniebug Created: 9 months ago Updated: 9 months ago

(This is a continuation of the Mary Pugh Scott story of crossing the Plains. I have put it under John Scott as he was there with his wives and children) "The howling of coyotes and wolves on distant hills and prairies mingled with the Half Hour Cry of the Faithful Guards, 'All is well' 'All is Well.' Right. "There was always the dread of crossing dangerous streams and rivers. Yet many plucky women gathered up their skirts and waded right throu7gh them. Some times large herds of Buffalo crossed our path, so many that at times we had to wait one hour or two while they clumsily lumbered by. And there was always the danger of meeting Indians, some friendly and others hostile and dangerous and they almost always demanded some of our scant food supply. On day we nearly lost our lives. "On day due to a delay, our Family Wagons got separated from the main body of the Saints. Suddenly we were completely surrounded by a big band of wild Indians who enjoyed scalping people just for the fun of it. We sat terrified and motionless with fear praying silently that we would some way be spared a tragic end. Yelling and shouting wildly they rode around us. We shook with fear not daring to move or speak. They came closer and closer. Then they Gathered in a big group. "They held a big 'Pow-Wow' minutes seemed like hours as we tried to keep our children quiet. They gestured and yelled louder and we grew more frightened as our fate seemed so hopeless. Again I breathed a prayer, 'Father I am so young, will I have to die here on the plains with my Family, now we are so near the need of our journey? Will I never see Zion after I have given my all for my religion?' Then some of the Indians slid off their ponies and as they came nearer we saw a young white man. "He had been captured by them and forced to live with them-but he had recognized John Scott as a boy he had gone to school with in Canada. He begged and pleaded with the Indians to spare our lives and he finally persuaded them to go away. It was a miracle from God we always thought after, and today we owe all of our lives to that brave young man's pleadings and to our kind Heavenly Father. Once during the journey the authorities gave John Ten gallons of whiskey to pacify the Indians. They were on the warpath at that time. "At last we neared the end of the long, long journey, as we enter the Valley of the Mountains and look out over the vast land of Zion. I am dismayed by the very immensity of the view. The boundless Silence and I see miles of sagebrush everywhere. Behind us now are the heart aches and many thousands of silent tears, that fell on the long unknown trail. I remember my dear home in England, of the flowers and trees and beautiful surroundings at that safe place. "And I am home sick for my Dear Mother and Father. But just as I have covered those endless hundreds of miles, so now I will begin work with renewed Faith, begin the task of building a good home in this new wilderness."

Life timeline of John Scott

1811
John Scott was born on 6 May 1811
John Scott was 14 years old when The Erie Canal opens: Passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie. The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System. Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.
1825
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John Scott was 21 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
1831
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John Scott was 29 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
1840
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John Scott was 48 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
1859
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John Scott was 50 years old when American Civil War: Fort Sumter surrenders to Confederate forces. The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865. As a result of the long-standing controversy over slavery, war broke out in April 1861, when Confederate forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina, shortly after U.S. President Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated. The nationalists of the Union proclaimed loyalty to the U.S. Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States, who advocated for states' rights to expand slavery.
1861
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John Scott died on 16 Dec 1876 at the age of 65
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for John Scott (6 May 1811 - 16 Dec 1876), BillionGraves Record 5249743 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States

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