John Robertson

23 Oct 1829 - 6 Mar 1906

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John Robertson

23 Oct 1829 - 6 Mar 1906
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John Robertson written by Alice Robertson Snell (granddaughter) of Orem, Utah, 1966 Before relating the life of our grandfather, John Robertson, I will give some data of the ancestors leading up to his birth. Paul Robertson, his grandfather, whose father was also Paul, was born October 30, 1720 at A
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Life Information

John Robertson

Born:
Died:

Spanish Fork City Cemetery

Cemetery Roads
Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah
United States
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amwiens

May 29, 2011
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Catirrel

May 25, 2011

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John Robertson written by Alice Robertson Snell (granddaughter) of Orem, Utah, 1966

Contributor: amwiens Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

John Robertson written by Alice Robertson Snell (granddaughter) of Orem, Utah, 1966 Before relating the life of our grandfather, John Robertson, I will give some data of the ancestors leading up to his birth. Paul Robertson, his grandfather, whose father was also Paul, was born October 30, 1720 at Achavan, Glenisla, Forfarshire, Scotland. His occupation was that of farming, he was the father of five children, three sons and two daughters. His eldest son, William was born on January 7, 1758 at the same place. He married Helen McKenzie. We find them settled at farmers at Muckle Doonie, Parish of Glenisla, Forfarshire, Scotland, where was born to them the following children: James born January 16, 1790 Helen and Isabell (twins) May 4, 1792 John (grandfather's father) July 18, 1793 Margaret born July 8, 1795 William born May 7, 1802 John Robertson commenced business at the Faulds of Derry Burn of Kalrie, Parish of Glenisla, sometime about 1818. He opened a small store and did a carrying business to Dundee, some 20 miles distant. Here he married Elizabeth Edward, born August 29, 1802, daughter of Thomas and Agnes Lindsay Edward. He then started a business in a country tavern and also took up the wool trade, finding a market in Aberdeen and Sterling, where he did a good business for about nine years. Then, with a year of severe sickness and with a large amount of wool on hand and a sudden fall in the market, it brought a Reverse in business as well as a result in his death, leaving his wife with six in the family and nothing for them. Some of her good neighbors did the best they could with the wool and all the creditors with one exception agreed to take the dividend left. One would not agree and a debtor's sale was declared and published, but only that man and the auctioneer came. The auctioneer was her friend and advised her to invite a few of her neighbors in and the sale and on. The neighbors bought her property and gave it back to her and she went on with the business of the tavern. She raised and schooled her children and paid off in full all her are old debtor's, with the exception of him who would not agree to settle and would have, if he could, thrown her on the cold world without a penny, or a meal of victuals for herself and children. There were six boys and one girl. The girl died six weeks after her father, at the age of three months. One of the boys, James was born the date the Prophet Joseph Smith receive the plates, on September 22, 1827. When through with the school the boys were apprenticed. William and Thomas were sent to Dundee, William as an apprentice in the hardware store, (commonly known as an iron monger), and Thomas as a blacksmith. While at Dundee two Mormon Elders visited them, namely, William Gibson and Hugh Findlay. They accepted the gospel message and invited the Elders to their mother's home, and in due course the whole family joined the church in 1849. On the first date of January 1850, the family with Robert McKell, wife and son, started on their journey to America. They traveled by rail to Glasgow. While there they were informed that they couldn't bring the bolts of linen, blankets and cloths which were in their possession, without dividing them into smaller pieces, as high duty would be charged. Two weeks was spent with the Boyack family and with the aid of Marjorie Boyack the material was cut up and put in shape to avoid duty. After arriving in Utah some of the linen was sold two Archie Gardner's family. The linen was of the best and the blankets were of rare quality. One cloth in particular was the pattern of the fowls of the barnyard showing distinctively in around pattern in the center of the cloth the various fowls. On leaving Glasgow they traveled by steamboat to Liverpool. After some delay they set sail with a company of 52 saints on the sailing vessel Argo, and after six weeks of rough voyage, with an experience of nearing shipwreck at Cuba, they arrived safely at New Orleans. On landing, they immediately took passage by riverboat, up the Mississippi River, landing at Council Bluffs. They were well supplied with money as well as supplies as before mentioned, to bring them to Utah and get settled here, but on arriving at Council Bluffs, they were persuaded to remain and by holdings and make more money before journeying on. They ate unfortunately settled on the river bottoms where they all suffered more or less from chills and fever. Finally sorrow knock at their door and they ate were obliged to part with their mother, chief who had so valiantly struggled to rear them, and through her integrity and honesty, cleared from their shoulders the debt of their father. Before leaving Scotland they were advised by those in authority to go as near their destination as their money would allow and the boys always felt that had they obeyed council they would have been comfortably settled in Utah and wouldn't have been deprived of the company of the one they so dearly loved in completing their journey to the Rockies. She was buried on the hillside with nothing to mark her resting place; all trace of the grave has been lost. John Robertson was the fourth son, born October 23, 1829. He left his brothers in 1851 and drove up freight team across the plains for Gilbert and Garnish. He stayed in Salt Lake City and worked for Robert Gardner and his brother's came in 1852, and all were very happy to be reunited. They all moved south and settled in Palmyra in 1855. The next spring they moved to where Spanish Fork now is. The Boyack family had arrived in Spanish Fork and grandpa married Mary Boyack on April 29, 1856. They were the first couple married in Spanish fork after they moved east. The Boyack family numbered 14 and lived in a dugout, and grandpa Boyack said all that were old enough to get married must do so now. Mary was the youngest girl but there were five boys younger than she. Grandma Boyack made a cornmeal " Johnny cake" for the wedding supper, but the boys must be fed first, so the newlywed couple had no supper that night. In a few years the Boyack's built an adobe house. Grandma Robertson cooked on the fireplace for 13 years. Grandma Robertson (Mary Boyack) left her home in Scotland when she was 15 years old, with your parents and brothers and sisters, two gather with the saints in Zion. She was young and full of life and walked every step of the way across the plains, and when they forded the river's she would carry her father that crossed, as he was a small man and getting old. They were all baptized in ice water before they left Scotland. She quite enjoyed the trip and had many chances to marry old men, and sometimes men with already two or three wives, but she waited until she came to Spanish Fork where she met and married John Robertson. When Spanish Fork was divided into four wards the bishopric asked her to be the President of the First Ward Relief Society, but she was very hard of hearing and she refused. A missionary never left but what she shook his hand and left a dollar there, even if it was her last. Grandma was always fond of making cookies and the making of them especially Scotch cakes. Many times when her children have been away and sent her money, the first thing she would do, would be to buy a sack of sugar and mix it into a batch of cookies. When baking them the children all waited around the oven for the first to come out and if grandma was asked if the children bothered her she would say "No, let them alone, I never want to go to heaven if there are no children there." Children never bothered her because she loved them all. She was very kind with the neighbor's children too, and no one ever heard them say an unkind word for they truly lived their religion. John Robertson helped to make the roads and build the bridges and all the improvements of a new city, besides fight the Indians. He fought in the Blackhawk War and the Walker War, and was a Lieutenant. He was stray pound keeper, sexton, water master, policemen and other officers. He served a mission for the church. He brought a walking cane home from Alabama, which he cut from a tree. In later years we all held a Robertson reunion when one of the brother's arrived at the age of 70 years, and they presented him with a gold headed cane with his name printed on the handle. These canes are to be handed down to the next generation and Grant Robertson now has John Robertson's cane and Alice Robertson Snell has her father's cane from Alabama. John Robertson died on March 6, 1906 and Mary Boyack Robertson lived 10 years after that and received a widow's pension for his services in the Walker War. She died May 27, 1915. They were the parents of 13 children, three died in infancy. The other 10 they raised to manhood and womanhood and some died leaving small children they are as follows: Mary Ann Robertson Markham Margaret Robertson Thompson John Grant Robertson Charles Alexander Robertson David Edward Robertson Rhoda Robertson Banks Eliza Robertson Packard Joseph Thomas Robertson Alice Robertson Snell Hyrum Boyack Robertson A sketch of John and Mary Boyack Robertson, (attachment) Written by Alice Robertson Snell In a beautiful place among the rolling hills where the heather grew in Scotland, about 20 miles north of Dundee was the parish of Glenisla, where a widowed mother and six sons lived. She was a keeper of a public Inn on the main road. Hearing the gospel they were soon converted and wanted to gather with the Saints. They left their home about Christmas time and stayed in Liverpool one week waiting for the ship to get ready. They left Liverpool January 1, 1850 in a ship named "Argo". They had to furnish their own food and bedding. They had a large kettle to do their cooking in and when they would go to get a meal someone would always have something to say about it. They were eight weeks on the ocean. From New Orleans they went up the Mississippi River in a boat named the “Uncle Sam" to St. Louis, then up of the Missouri River on a boat named "Robert Camel" to Council Bluffs. They lived here nearby two years and it was here they were all sick with ague and the Mother died. Here were six sons, young men without parents and home but they'd never faltered in the faith nor the journey, but were steadfast and true to their dying day. The children were Thomas, William, James, John, Alex and Charles. John Robertson was the fourth son born October 23, 1829. He left his brothers in 1851 and drove a team across the plains for Gilbert and Garnish. In 1852 a year later the rest of the family started across the plains. They had two yolk of oxen and two cows. They traveled along the Platte River and the buffalo were very numerous and would come in great herds to the river to drink and the teamsters would have to be on the lookout where they would frighten the oxen and cause a stampede. When they were in a good place where there was plenty of wood to burn they would kill a buffalo and dry some of the meat so that it would be better to carry. They arrived in Salt Lake and stayed there the first winter. They were all glad to see their brother and John was just as glad to see them. Heat worked for Robert Gardner in the sawmill at Mill Creek, but in 1855 they all moved south and settled in Palmyra, the next spring they moved farther east where Spanish Fork now is and on April 29, 1856, John Robertson and Mary Boyack were married, the first couple married after they moved up from Palmyra. Her parents lived in a dugout where Second North and First West corner now is (Fereday's Apartment House). They were like everybody else then and not much to eat but grandma made a cornmeal Johnny cake for their wedding supper, there was a number of Boyack boys and they ate first and then the new married couple, it was all eaten and they had no supper. They had 13 children, three died in infancy, three died leaving large families. Grandpa and grandma fought the crickets and the grasshoppers. He fought the Walker Indian War and the Blackhawk Indian War in 1866. He never received a cent for either but grandma received a widow's pension for his services in the Walker War. He served as city marshal and school trustee and was sexton for 16 years. He helped make the roads and bridges. At one time he traded a nice young colt for a sack of flour as flour was scarce he wanted everybody to share of like and while coming home he gave each woman enough to make a pan of biscuits. By the time he got home he had only about a quart of flour, and he was like that all through life always ready to help anybody. There being such a few houses, two or three family's had to live together in the same house. James Miller and his family lived in the same house as grandpa and grandma. He flew filled a mission in Alabama in 1880-1882, win at Alice was a baby and she and has a souvenir that he brought home, and the only relic of his. When the wards were divided he was head teacher and he helped build the First Ward Meeting House. Heat was quite old at this time and his health was not the best but every day he went to the meeting house feeling it was his duty to do so. He couldn't rest unless there seeing that things were going all right. Grandpa could never stand to hear loud, bad language and at one time after listening to a man profane and carry on he turned to him and said, “I don't blame you for spitting it out if I had such awful stuff inside of my body, I did get it out too." Sunny disposition, love for little children sitting on his knees and hearing him sing songs to us. At one time he went after cedar posts and coming back across the ice with his load walking all the way and that night he wrote several songs and homes one which Myrl Robertson Olson read during a recent Blackhawk encampment. He died March 6, 1906. He had a host of friends who attended his funeral services and there were several beautiful flower tributes.

John Robertson, Written by Claudia Ferrell

Contributor: amwiens Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

John Robertson, Written by Claudia Ferrell of Granite Bay, California 95746 on June 2008 I'd like to take a chapter out of my mother's genealogy (Vera Robertson Kimball)-she was a Robertson and her grandfather, John Robertson Jr., was from Glenisla, Forfarshire, Scotland --on the Eastside bordering the North Sea--they were very plain and simple folk. They claimed the plan goes back to the Kings of Scotland but by the 1600's the clan was simply tenant farmers with 2-20 milk cows, several ponies and from 20 to a couple hundred sheep or goats. Attached to the Robertson clan were usually a number of cottars or peasants who helped to work the field in return for a couple of cows and enough land to sow of few bushels of oats. There cottages were thick Wald and often consisted of a single room with no window and just a door. They huddled in the winter around a fireplace in the middle of the floor where the smoke escape to a chimney and the sealing--the roof was thatched with straw that was replaced yearly. Often a partition of clay separated the room to shelter the livestock in the bitter winter. Oatmeal and fish, usually haddock--seemed to be their main source of food--and my great-great grandfather, John Robertson Sr. said, “Scotland is a hard country in which to make a living and so we learn to become very thrifty." He always maintained they were not stingy. They were Presbyterian and very religious. In the winter evenings they met in the township to hear or recite poetry and to listen or dance to the harp. Many years back, Mary, Queen of Scots, heard one of the Robertson harpists and that harp is now preserved in the castle at Edinburgh. The bagpipes came in later and the clan became proficient in this as well as the violin and the flute. He developed the business in the wool trade and was successful for about nine years when there was a business reversal due to an overstock of wool--shortly after he became very L and died at age 38, leaving my great-great grandmother Elizabeth Edwards a widow with seven children--my great grandfather was only three. All the creditors of the business agreed to take a proportionate share of the sale of the business except the one who had forced the sale. The sale came and no one showed up except this dissenting creditor and the auctioneer, who advised great-great Grandma Elizabeth to call her neighbors quickly--they came and bought everything and then gave it all back to her and so all her wonderful neighbors paid off part of her business debt. The next couple of years all the older kids found work-the two youngest died. After several years she was finally able to operate an Inn which enabled her to pay off more of her debts and to send her to five living boys to school. While two of the older boys were working out of town they met two Mormon missionaries and were baptized. They then asked them to visit their home and teach the rest of the family who all joined the church. Mormonism was very unpopular at this time and everyone lost their jobs and most of their friends. So on January 1, 1850, they joined with another couple and started for America. They traveled by train to Glasgow where they were told they couldn't take their bolts of linen or their blankets because of export duty--they must beat made into separate articles. They spent two weeks with members of the church so in various articles of clothing--much if it was sold when they arrived in Utah including one item to President Brigham young. They traveled from Glasgow to Liverpool by steamer and after some delay they are, they sailed on the ship Argo along with about 50 other Saints--some returning missionaries. After voyage of six weeks-a great deal of rough weather and a near shipwreck on the banks of Cuba, the arrived in New Orleans. They left New Orleans on the large river steamer and it took them two weeks to go up river to St. Louis. They went from there to Council Bluffs where they had to stay long enough to make enough money for the trip to Utah. One of the brother's became quite ill along with their Mother Elizabeth who succumbed and was buried in Council Bluffs in November 1850 at the age of 48. All traces of her burial place has been lost the five remaining brothers ranging in ages from 19-26 were all un-married at this time.

Biographical sketch of John Robertson

Contributor: amwiens Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Biographical sketch of John Robertson made available through courtesy of the International Society Daughters of the Utah Pioneers, Author unknown. John Robertson, born in Scotland on 20 October 1829, he was not quite three years old when his father died, and was about 23 years old when the family left Scotland to come to the United States. Now in America, John left his brothers at Council Bluffs and drove a freight team across the plains for Gilbert and Garnish, he stayed in Salt Lake and worked for Robert Gardner, his brother's joined him in Salt Lake City in 1852 and all were happy to be re-united. Then in 1855 they all moved south to the new settlement of Palmyra, but when Brigham young advised them to move this settlement east because the ground was unfit to build large buildings on, John moved with the rest and became a farmer like most of them. The James and Elizabeth Mealmaker Boyack family from Dundee, Scotland had arrived and started life in Spanish Fork living in a dugout, but there were 14 in the family and grandpa Boyack said that all that could get married at this time should, Mary was the youngest girl but there were five boys younger than she. Mary and John lived within a few miles of each other in Scotland and came halfway around the world to meet and marry, Mary was 16 and John was 26 and they were the first couple to Mary and Spanish Fork. They were married 29 April 1856 and became the parents of 13 children, 10 of whom lived to raise families, the 10 raised 61 children and right there I lost count. John helped build his own home in Spanish fork and probably others, he helped build the roads and bridges necessary and the new community. When grandma serve vegetable soup he would describe it sane " there's tatties intult and ninions intult and neeps intult and carrots intult" and would invariably be asked 'grandpa what's intult'so he would go through the list again and to the children found out that intult meant in-to-it and that the soup contained potatoes, onions, parsnips and carrots. Later when my father called to see my mother on winter evenings when there was but one room kept warm, grandpa always meticulously removed his shoes and set them by the stove, just so, than the socks followed to be laid across the shoes, just so, then the toes were rubbed very slowly and very thoroughly, much to the embarrassment of my mom. Grandpa all raised a few grapes and usually had a barrel of wine each fall and it was sometimes raided in wintertime after the water content had frozen and the alcohol content had gone to the center, the young men would drill through the barrel and the ice and get to the alcohol with a straw. Grandpa are raised sorghum cane for making molasses as did most of the farmers, it was kept in homemade wooden barrels that even had wooden hoops or bands to hold them together, they had very little sugar and molasses was their main sweetener. In my childhood I was often ask (by Grandpa), upon requesting the molasses to the past, 'how can you have molasses when you haven't had any lasses yet?' I think grandpa must've brought the same back with him from the south. Grandpa died 6 March 1906 at age 77, grandma received and Indian War Veterans Widow's pension until she joined him 27th of September 1915 at age 75. I have a shawl the grandma brought from Scotland and gave to me, but as I was less than two when she died, I don't remember her. She loved children as did grandpa. She often stood at the front gate and gave cookies to the schoolchildren that passed. She made Scotch cakes and the best ones were usually reserved for adults and/or company, but the children could have any that were baked too much, my mother's scurried to gather chips and wood to make the fire hot so she could be assured of some burnt cakes, well, not burnt, but well then, they'd been better than none. Scotch cakes are still traditional in our family at Christmastime. Grant Robertson says of grandma, “a grand little woman with a delightfully happy disposition and an amusing feathery scotch brogue. She was always neatly attired in a long ankle length dress with a cute apron and a pocket full of candy beaded cookies. I recall her waiting at the gate for some grandchild to go by on their way home from school and usually we each got a cookie, and if I were alone she often took me in the house to get a note or letter she wanted me to take home and a small glass of excellent homemade wine." This poem was written by grandpa, John Roberson, for his 70th birthday anniversary. My heart's in the Highlands, My heart is not here. My heart's in the Highlands chasing the deer, Chasing the wild deer and following the roe, My heart's in the Highlands wherever I go. Farewell to the Highlands, Farewell to the North, The birthplace of valor, the country of worth. Wherever I wander, wherever I rove, The hills of the Highlands I ever will love. Farewell to the mountains high, covered with snow, Farewell to the (stranths) and green valleys below, Farewell to the land for my forefathers rest, I sacrificed all for home in the west, So I crossed the Atlantic's wild raging main, I viewed the great rivers, the forests, and the plains, I have lived among these mountains covered with snow, I've reaped the rich harvests in the valleys below. Now here is my home in this life giving clime, Here in the land of milk, honey, and wine. Here is the headquarters of peace, light, and truth, Here is the land I sought for in youth, Here is the people that the prophet foretold, Here is the standard of right, and the fold, Here is the people the truth has made free, Here is the gardens of true liberty. My heart's with these people so valiant for right, My hearts with the 'Mormons’ with prospect so bright, My heart's in this latter day program, Piece on the earth and good will to man. John Robertson

Robertson Family History, written by Janell Robertson Cask

Contributor: amwiens Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Robertson Family History, written by Janell Robertson Cask, 10 May 2005. Grantsville, Utah 84024 John Robertson Jr. Was born October 23, 1829 - died March 6, 1906; he lived 76 years. John Robertson was born to John Robertson Sr. and Elizabeth Edwards on October 23, 1829, in Faulds, Glenisla, Forfarshire, Scotland. John was the fifth child born into the family of eight children listed in order of birth: William 1824, Thomas 1825, Peter 1826, James 1827, John 1829, Alexander 1831, Margaret 1832, and Charles Ogilvie 1837. Elizabeth met and married John Robertson. John was in the 'carry business’ in the wool trade. He would haul the wool to market and make money on the sale of it. He prospered until 1832, when sickness and the glutted wool market brought financial ruin. He died soon thereafter on July 17, 1832, leaving Elizabeth with a family of six sons and a baby daughter. The daughter and one son died in infancy. John Jr. was not quite three years old at the time of his father's death. Mother Elizabeth operated an Inn which enabled her to send her sons to school, and to pay off all her debts. William and Thomas were working at Kirkeldy, when they met the two Mormon missionaries and joined the Church. Upon returning home they sent the missionaries to their home and it was not long until the whole family joined the Church. John was 18 years old when he was baptized on February 25, 1848. Mormonism was very unpopular and as a result they lost their friends and found it difficult to get employment. On January 1, 1850 they started for America and the "Valley of the Mountains". They travel to Glasgow, and the Liverpool, England. Then on the ship, Argo, they landed at New Orleans. On a large river steamer, the Uncle Sam, they started for St. Louis. From there they went to Council Bluffs, Iowa where they remained to make enough money to take them to Utah. They settled in the river bottoms and found work. They felt this was a mistake because they took sick with chills and fever. Mother Elizabeth died at the age of 48 and was buried there on the hillside with nothing to mark her grave. She died November 1850. Because of financial reasons the six brothers could not continue on together but came as each could, not arriving at the same time to Salt Lake City. John left his brothers at Council Bluffs and drove a wagon across the plains to Utah for Gilbert and Garnish in 1851. His brother's joined him in Salt Lake the next year. John work at the sawmill in Mill Creek for Robert Gardner the second winter in his life in Utah. The next spring he moved with the others to Palmyra, and the following spring moved east to Spanish Fork. John met Mary Mealmaker Boyack in the new settlement. Mary Mealmaker Boyack was born to James Boyack and Elizabeth Mealmaker on February 23, 1840, in Dundee, Forfarshire, Scotland. She was born into a family of the 11 children. As the children grew up they met the missionaries and joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The Boyack family came to Utah in the 1850's and settled in Spanish Fork, Utah. When Mary married John Robertson they had the distinction of being the first couple married in this new settlement, April 29, 1856. John was 26 and Mary was 16 years of age. The Boyack family lived in a dugout with all 13 family members. The father, James, counseled his daughters to get married as soon as possible to make more room for the rest of the family. The mother, Elizabeth, made cornmeal Johnny cake for the wedding supper but by the time the sons had eaten, there was none left for the newlyweds! John built an adobe house on First East in Spanish fork. They raised their 13 children there. Mary Ann was born on May 13, 1857; Elizabeth Jane was born on January 15, 1859, she only lived nine months; Margaret was born on November 7, 1860; Hannah was born and died in August of 1862; John Grant was born on January 24, 1864; Charles Alexander on March 23, 1866; and James Boyack was born and died on September 2, 1868; David Edward was born on August 28, 1869; Rhoda on February 24, 1872; Eliza on August 26, 1874; Joseph Thomas on January 29, 1877; Alice on May 25, 1879; and Hyrum on October 21, 1884. Genealogical Line: Susan Kidd - Enid Robertson - John Dewey Robertson – Charles Alexander Robertson – John Robertson Jr. John Robertson written by Alice Robertson Snell (granddaughter) of Orem, Utah, 1966 Before relating the life of our grandfather, John Robertson, I will give some data of the ancestors leading up to his birth. Paul Robertson, his grandfather, whose father was also Paul, was born October 30, 1720 at Achavan, Glenisla, Forfarshire, Scotland. His occupation was that of farming, he was the father of five children, three sons and two daughters. His eldest son, William was born on January 7, 1758 at the same place. He married Helen McKenzie. We find them settled at farmers at Muckle Doonie, Parish of Glenisla, Forfarshire, Scotland, where was born to them the following children: James born January 16, 1790 Helen and Isabell (twins) May 4, 1792 John (grandfather's father) July 18, 1793 Margaret born July 8, 1795 William born May 7, 1802 John Robertson commenced business at the Faulds of Derry Burn of Kalrie, Parish of Glenisla, sometime about 1818. He opened a small store and did a carrying business to Dundee, some 20 miles distant. Here he married Elizabeth Edward, born August 29, 1802, daughter of Thomas and Agnes Lindsay Edward. He then started a business in a country tavern and also took up the wool trade, finding a market in Aberdeen and Sterling, where he did a good business for about nine years. Then, with a year of severe sickness and with a large amount of wool on hand and a sudden fall in the market, it brought a Reverse in business as well as a result in his death, leaving his wife with six in the family and nothing for them. Some of her good neighbors did the best they could with the wool and all the creditors with one exception agreed to take the dividend left. One would not agree and a debtor's sale was declared and published, but only that man and the auctioneer came. The auctioneer was her friend and advised her to invite a few of her neighbors in and the sale and on. The neighbors bought her property and gave it back to her and she went on with the business of the tavern. She raised and schooled her children and paid off in full all her are old debtor's, with the exception of him who would not agree to settle and would have, if he could, thrown her on the cold world without a penny, or a meal of victuals for herself and children. There were six boys and one girl. The girl died six weeks after her father, at the age of three months. One of the boys, James was born the date the Prophet Joseph Smith receive the plates, on September 22, 1827. When through with the school the boys were apprenticed. William and Thomas were sent to Dundee, William as an apprentice in the hardware store, (commonly known as an iron monger), and Thomas as a blacksmith. While at Dundee two Mormon Elders visited them, namely, William Gibson and Hugh Findlay. They accepted the gospel message and invited the Elders to their mother's home, and in due course the whole family joined the church in 1849. On the first date of January 1850, the family with Robert McKell, wife and son, started on their journey to America. They traveled by rail to Glasgow. While there they were informed that they couldn't bring the bolts of linen, blankets and cloth which were in their possession, without dividing them into smaller pieces, as high duty would be charged. Two weeks was spent with the Boyack family and with the aid of Marjorie Boyack the material was cut up and put in shape to avoid duty. After arriving in Utah some of the linen was sold two Archie Gardner's family. The linen was of the best and the blankets were of rare quality. One cloth in particular was the pattern of the fowls of the barnyard showing distinctively in around pattern in the center of the cloth the various fowls. On leaving Glasgow they traveled by steamboat to Liverpool. After some delay they set sail with a company of 52 saints on the sailing vessel Argo, and after six weeks of rough voyage, with an experience of nearing shipwreck at Cuba, they arrived safely at New Orleans. On landing, they immediately took passage by riverboat, up the Mississippi River, landing at Council Bluffs. They were well supplied with money as well as supplies as before mentioned, to bring them to Utah and get settled here, but on arriving at Council Bluffs, they were persuaded to remain and by holdings and make more money before journeying on. They ate unfortunately settled on the river bottoms where they all suffered more or less from chills and fever. Finally sorrow knock at their door and they ate were obliged to part with their mother, chief who had so valiantly struggled to rear them, and through her integrity and honesty, cleared from their shoulders the debt of their father. Before leaving Scotland they were advised by those in authority to go as near their destination as their money would allow and the boys always felt that had they obeyed council they would have been comfortably settled in Utah and wouldn't have been deprived of the company of the one they so dearly loved in completing their journey to the Rockies. She was buried on the hillside with nothing to mark her resting place; all trace of the grave has been lost. John Robertson was the fourth son, born October 23, 1829. He left his brothers in 1851 and drove up freight team across the plains for Gilbert and Garnish. He stayed in Salt Lake City and worked for Robert Gardner and his brother's came in 1852, and all were very happy to be reunited. They all moved south and settled in Palmyra in 1855. The next spring they moved to where Spanish Fork now is. The Boyack family had arrived in Spanish Fork and grandpa married Mary Boyack on April 29, 1856. They were the first couple married in Spanish fork after they moved east. The Boyack family numbered 14 and lived in a dugout, and grandpa Boyack said all that were old enough to get married must do so now. Mary was the youngest girl but there were five boys younger than she. Grandma Boyack made a cornmeal " Johnny cake" for the wedding supper, but the boys must be fed first, so the newlywed couple had no supper that night. In a few years the Boyack's built an adobe house. Grandma Robertson cooked on the fireplace for 13 years. Grandma Robertson (Mary Boyack) left her home in Scotland when she was 15 years old, with your parents and brothers and sisters, two gather with the saints in Zion. She was young and full of life and walked every step of the way across the plains, and when they forded the river's she would carry her father that crossed, as he was a small man and getting old. They were all baptized in ice water before they left Scotland. She quite enjoyed the trip and had many chances to marry old men, and sometimes men with already two or three wives, but she waited until she came to Spanish Fork where she met and married John Robertson. When Spanish Fork was divided into four wards the bishopric asked her to be the President of the First Ward Relief Society, but she was very hard of hearing and she refused. A missionary never left but what she shook his hand and left a dollar there, even if it was her last. Grandma was always fond of making cookies and the making of them especially Scotch cakes. Many times when her children have been away and sent her money, the first thing she would do, would be to buy a sack of sugar and mix it into a batch of cookies. When baking them the children all waited around the oven for the first to come out and if grandma was asked if the children bothered her she would say "No, let them alone, I never want to go to heaven if there are no children there." Children never bothered her because she loved them all. She was very kind with the neighbor's children too, and no one ever heard them say an unkind word for they truly lived their religion. John Robertson helped to make the roads and build the bridges and all the improvements of a new city, besides fight the Indians. He fought in the Blackhawk War and the Walker War, and was a Lieutenant. He was stray pound keeper, sexton, water master, policemen and other officers. He served a mission for the church. He brought a walking cane home from Alabama, which he cut from a tree. In later years we all held a Robertson reunion when one of the brother's arrived at the age of 70 years, and they presented him with a gold headed cane with his name printed on the handle. These canes are to be handed down to the next generation and Grant Robertson now has John Robertson's cane and Alice Robertson Snell has her father's cane from Alabama. John Robertson died on March 6, 1906 and Mary Boyack Robertson lived 10 years after that and received a widow's pension for his services in the Walker War. She died May 27, 1915. They were the parents of 13 children, three died in infancy. The other 10 they raised to manhood and womanhood and some died leaving small children they are as follows: Mary Ann Robertson Markham Margaret Robertson Thompson John Grant Robertson Charles Alexander Robertson David Edward Robertson Rhoda Robertson Banks Eliza Robertson Packard Joseph Thomas Robertson Alice Robertson Snell Hyrum Boyack Robertson Genealogical Line: Susan Kidd - Enid Robertson - John Dewey Robertson – Charles Alexander Robertson – John Robertson Jr. A sketch of John and Mary Boyack Robertson, (attachment) Written by Alice Robertson Snell In a beautiful place among the rolling hills where the heather grew in Scotland, about 20 miles north of Dundee was the parish of Glenisla, where a widowed mother and six sons lived. She was a keeper of a public Inn on the main road. Hearing the gospel they were soon converted and wanted to gather with the Saints. They left their home about Christmas time and stayed in Liverpool one week waiting for the ship to get ready. They left Liverpool January 1, 1850 in a ship named "Argo". They had to furnish their own food and bedding. They had a large kettle to do their cooking in and when they would go to get a meal someone would always have something to say about it. They were eight weeks on the ocean. From New Orleans they went up the Mississippi River in a boat named the “Uncle Sam" to St. Louis, then up of the Missouri River on a boat named "Robert Camel" to Council Bluffs. They lived here nearby two years and it was here they were all sick with ague and the Mother died. Here were six sons, young men without parents and home but they'd never faltered in the faith nor the journey, but were steadfast and true to their dying day. The children were Thomas, William, James, John, Alex and Charles. John Robertson was the fourth son born October 23, 1829. He left his brothers in 1851 and drove a team across the plains for Gilbert and Garnish. In 1852 a year later the rest of the family started across the plains. They had two yolk of oxen and two cows. They traveled along the Platte River and the buffalo were very numerous and would come in great herds to the river to drink and the teamsters would have to be on the lookout where they would frighten the oxen and cause a stampede. When they were in a good place where there was plenty of wood to burn they would kill a buffalo and dry some of the meat so that it would be better to carry. They arrived in Salt Lake and stayed there the first winter. They were all glad to see their brother and John was just as glad to see them. Heat worked for Robert Gardner in the sawmill at Mill Creek, but in 1855 they all moved south and settled in Palmyra, the next spring they moved farther east where Spanish Fork now is and on April 29, 1856, John Robertson and Mary Boyack were married, the first couple married after they moved up from Palmyra. Her parents lived in a dugout where Second North and First West corner now is (Fereday's Apartment House). They were like everybody else then and not much to eat but grandma made a cornmeal Johnny cake for their wedding supper, there was a number of Boyack boys and they ate first and then the new married couple, it was all eaten and they had no supper. They had 13 children, three died in infancy, three died leaving large families. Grandpa and grandma fought the crickets and the grasshoppers. He fought the Walker Indian War and the Blackhawk Indian War in 1866. He never received a cent for either but grandma received a widow's pension for his services in the Walker War. He served as city marshal and school trustee and was sexton for 16 years. He helped make the roads and bridges. At one time he traded a nice young colt for a sack of flour as flour was scarce he wanted everybody to share of like and while coming home he gave each woman enough to make a pan of biscuits. By the time he got home he had only about a quart of flour, and he was like that all through life always ready to help anybody. There being such a few houses, two or three family's had to live together in the same house. James Miller and his family lived in the same house as grandpa and grandma. He flew filled a mission in Alabama in 1880-1882, win at Alice was a baby and she and has a souvenir that he brought home, and the only relic of his. When the wards were divided he was head teacher and he helped build the First Ward Meeting House. Heat was quite old at this time and his health was not the best but every day he went to the meeting house feeling it was his duty to do so. He couldn't rest unless there seeing that things were going all right. Grandpa could never stand to hear loud, bad language and at one time after listening to a man profane and carry on he turned to him and said, “I don't blame you for spitting it out if I had such awful stuff inside of my body, I did get it out too." Sunny disposition, love for little children sitting on his knees and hearing him sing songs to us. At one time he went after cedar posts and coming back across the ice with his load walking all the way and that night he wrote several songs and homes one which Myrl Robertson Olson read during a recent Blackhawk encampment. He died March 6, 1906. He had a host of friends who attended his funeral services and there were several beautiful flower tributes. Genealogical Line: Susan Kidd - Enid Robertson - John Dewey Robertson – Charles Alexander Robertson – John Robertson Jr. Biographical sketch of John Robertson made available through courtesy of the International Society Daughters of the Utah Pioneers, Author unknown. John Robertson, born in Scotland on 20 October 1829, he was not quite three years old when his father died, and was about 23 years old when the family left Scotland to come to the United States. Now in America, John left his brothers at Council Bluffs and drove a freight team across the plains for Gilbert and Garnish, he stayed in Salt Lake and worked for Robert Gardner, his brother's joined him in Salt Lake City in 1852 and all were happy to be re-united. Then in 1855 they all moved south to the new settlement of Palmyra, but when Brigham young advised them to move this settlement east because the ground was unfit to build large buildings on, John moved with the rest and became a farmer like most of them. The James and Elizabeth Mealmaker Boyack family from Dundee, Scotland had arrived and started life in Spanish Fork living in a dugout, but there were 14 in the family and grandpa Boyack said that all that could get married at this time should, Mary was the youngest girl but there were five boys younger than she. Mary and John lived within a few miles of each other in Scotland and came halfway around the world to meet and marry, Mary was 16 and John was 26 and they were the first couple to Mary and Spanish Fork. They were married 29 April 1856 and became the parents of 13 children, 10 of whom lived to raise families, the 10 raised 61 children and right there I lost count. John helped build his own home in Spanish fork and probably others, he helped build the roads and bridges necessary and the new community. When grandma serve vegetable soup he would describe it sane " there's tatties intult and ninions intult and neeps intult and carrots intult" and would invariably be asked 'grandpa what's intult'so he would go through the list again and to the children found out that intult meant in-to-it and that the soup contained potatoes, onions, parsnips and carrots. Later when my father called to see my mother on winter evenings when there was but one room kept warm, grandpa always meticulously removed his shoes and set them by the stove, just so, than the socks followed to be laid across the shoes, just so, then the toes were rubbed very slowly and very thoroughly, much to the embarrassment of my mom. Grandpa all raised a few grapes and usually had a barrel of wine each fall and it was sometimes raided in wintertime after the water content had frozen and the alcohol content had gone to the center, the young men would drill through the barrel and the ice and get to the alcohol with a straw. Grandpa are raised sorghum cane for making molasses as did most of the farmers, it was kept in homemade wooden barrels that even had wooden hoops or bands to hold them together, they had very little sugar and molasses was their main sweetener. In my childhood I was often ask (by Grandpa), upon requesting the molasses to the past, 'how can you have molasses when you haven't had any lasses yet?' I think grandpa must've brought the same back with him from the south. Grandpa died 6 March 1906 at age 77, grandma received and Indian War Veterans Widow's pension until she joined him 27th of September 1915 at age 75. I have a shawl the grandma brought from Scotland and gave to me, but as I was less than two when she died, I don't remember her. She loved children as did grandpa. She often stood at the front gate and gave cookies to the schoolchildren that passed. She made Scotch cakes and the best ones were usually reserved for adults and/or company, but the children could have any that were baked too much, my mother's scurried to gather chips and wood to make the fire hot so she could be assured of some burnt cakes, well, not burnt, but well then, they'd been better than none. Scotch cakes are still traditional in our family at Christmastime. Grant Robertson says of grandma, “a grand little woman with a delightfully happy disposition and an amusing feathery scotch brogue. She was always neatly attired in a long ankle length dress with a cute apron and a pocket full of candy beaded cookies. I recall her waiting at the gate for some grandchild to go by on their way home from school and usually we each got a cookie, and if I were alone she often took me in the house to get a note or letter she wanted me to take home and a small glass of excellent homemade wine." This poem was written by grandpa, John Roberson, for his 70th birthday anniversary. My heart's in the Highlands, My heart is not here. My heart's in the Highlands chasing the deer, Chasing the wild deer and following the roe, My heart's in the Highlands wherever I go. Farewell to the Highlands, Farewell to the North, The birthplace of valor, the country of worth. Wherever I wander, wherever I rove, The hills of the Highlands I ever will love. Farewell to the mountains high, covered with snow, Farewell to the (stranths) and green valleys below, Farewell to the land for my forefathers rest, I sacrificed all for home in the west, So I crossed the Atlantic's wild raging main, I viewed the great rivers, the forests, and the plains, I have lived among these mountains covered with snow, I've reaped the rich harvests in the valleys below. Now here is my home in this life giving clime, Here in the land of milk, honey, and wine. Here is the headquarters of peace, light, and truth, Here is the land I sought for in youth, Here is the people that the prophet foretold, Here is the standard of right, and the fold, Here is the people the truth has made free, Here is the gardens of true liberty. My heart's with these people so valiant for right, My hearts with the 'Mormons’ with prospect so bright, My heart's in this latter day program, Piece on the earth and good will to man. John Robertson Genealogical Line: Susan Kidd - Enid Robertson - John Dewey Robertson – Charles Alexander Robertson – John Robertson Jr. John Robertson, Written by Claudia Ferrell of 4723 Abbey Hill, Granite Bay, California 95746 on June 2008 I'd like to take a chapter out of my mother's genealogy (Vera Robertson Kimball)-she was a Robertson and her grandfather, john Robertson, was from Glenisla, Forfarshire, Scotland --on the Eastside bordering the North Sea--they were very plain and simple folk. They claimed the plan goes back to the Kings of Scotland but by the 1600's the clan was simply tenant farmers with 2-20 milk cows, several ponies and from 20 to a couple hundred sheep or goats. Attached to the Robertson clan were usually a number of cottars or peasants who helped to work the field in return for a couple of cows and enough land to sow of few bushels of oats. There cottages were thick Wald and often consisted of a single room with no window and just a door. They huddled in the winter around a fireplace in the middle of the floor where the smoke escape to a chimney and the sealing--the roof was thatched with straw that was replaced yearly. Often a partition of clay separated the room to shelter the livestock in the bitter winter. Oatmeal and fish, usually haddock--seemed to be their main source of food--and my great-great grandfather, John Robertson said, “Scotland is a hard country in which to make a living and so we learn to become very thrifty." He always maintained they were not stingy. They were Presbyterian and very religious. In the winter evenings they met in the township to hear or recite poetry and to listen or dance to the harp. Many years back, Mary, Queen of Scots, heard one of the Robertson harpists and that harp is now preserved in the castle at Edinburgh. The bagpipes came in later and the clan became proficient in this as well as the violin and the flute. He developed the business in the wool trade and was successful for about nine years when there was a business reversal due to an overstock of wool--shortly after he became very L and died at age 38, leaving my great-great grandmother Elizabeth Edwards a widow with seven children--my great grandfather was only three. All the creditors of the business agreed to take a proportionate share of the sale of the business except the one who had forced the sale. The sale came and no one showed up except this dissenting creditor and the auctioneer, who advised great-great Grandma Elizabeth to call her neighbors quickly--they came and bought everything and then gave it all back to her and so all her wonderful neighbors paid off part of her business debt. The next couple of years all the older kids found work-the two youngest died. After several years she was finally able to operate an Inn which enabled her to pay off more of her debts and to send her to five living boys to school. While two of the older boys were working out of town they met two mormon missionaries and were baptized. They then asked them to visit their home and teach the rest of the family who all joined the church. Mormonism was very unpopular at this time and everyone lost their jobs and most of their friends. So on January 1, 1850, they joined with another couple and started for America. They traveled by train to Glasgow where they were told they couldn't take their bolts of linen or their blankets because of export duty--they must beat made into separate articles. They spent two weeks with members of the church so in various articles of clothing--much if it was sold when they arrived in Utah including one item to President Brigham young. They traveled from Glasgow to Liverpool by steamer and after some delay they are, they sailed on the ship Argo along with about 50 other Saints--some returning missionaries. After voyage of six weeks-a great deal of rough weather and a near shipwreck on the banks of Cuba, the arrived in New Orleans. They left New Orleans on the large river steamer and it took them two weeks to go up river to St. Louis. They went from there to Council Bluffs where they had to stay long enough to make enough money for the trip to Utah. One of the brother's became quite ill along with their Mother Elizabeth who succumbed and was buried in Council Bluffs in November 1850 at the age of 48. All traces of her burial place has been lost the five remaining brothers ranging in ages from 19-26 were all un-married at this time.

Life Timeline of John Robertson

1829
John Robertson was born on 23 Oct 1829
John Robertson was 2 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
1831
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John Robertson was 11 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
1840
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John Robertson was 30 years old when Charles Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
1859
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John Robertson was 40 years old when Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton founded the National Woman Suffrage Association, breaking away from the American Equal Rights Association which they had also previously founded. Susan B. Anthony was an American social reformer and women's rights activist who played a pivotal role in the women's suffrage movement. Born into a Quaker family committed to social equality, she collected anti-slavery petitions at the age of 17. In 1856, she became the New York state agent for the American Anti-Slavery Society.
1869
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John Robertson was 45 years old when Winston Churchill, English colonel, journalist, and politician, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1965) Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill was a British politician, army officer, and writer, who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. As Prime Minister, Churchill led Britain to victory in the Second World War. Churchill represented five constituencies during his career as Member of Parliament (MP). Ideologically an economic liberal and British imperialist, he began and ended his parliamentary career as a member of the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955, but for twenty years from 1904 he was a prominent member of the Liberal Party.
1874
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John Robertson was 58 years old when The Great Blizzard of 1888 struck the northeastern United States, producing snowdrifts in excess of 50 ft (15 m) and confining some people to their houses for up to a week. The Great Blizzard of 1888 or Great Blizzard of '88 was one of the most severe recorded blizzards in the history of the United States of America. The storm, referred to as the Great White Hurricane, paralyzed the East Coast from the Chesapeake Bay to Maine, as well as the Atlantic provinces of Canada. Snowfalls of 10 to 58 inches fell in parts of New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, and sustained winds of more than 45 miles per hour (72 km/h) produced snowdrifts in excess of 50 feet (15 m). Railroads were shut down, and people were confined to their houses for up to a week. Railway and telegraph lines were disabled, and this provided the impetus to move these pieces of infrastructure underground. Emergency services were also affected.
1888
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John Robertson was 66 years old when George VI of the United Kingdom (d. 1952) George VI was King of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Commonwealth from 11 December 1936 until his death in 1952. He was the last Emperor of India and the first Head of the Commonwealth.
1895
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John Robertson died on 6 Mar 1906 at the age of 76
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for John Robertson (23 Oct 1829 - 6 Mar 1906), BillionGraves Record 4052 Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States

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