John Mills

24 Jul 1804 - 20 Mar 1876

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John Mills

24 Jul 1804 - 20 Mar 1876
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Arrived in Utah 1850. The following is a history written by Ida Delilah Ashton Ercanbrack and submitted by Donna Ashton Hamblin on February 10, 1988 to the National Society Daughters of the Utah Pioneers. 'John Mills was born Friday July 24, 1804 in Eastern Canada, the son of Matthew and Hannah Boil
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Life Information

John Mills

Born:
Died:

Provo City Cemetery

610 S State St
Provo, Utah, Utah
United States
Transcriber

Hokie374

June 8, 2011
Photographer

CaseyMonc

June 7, 2011

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History of John Mills written by great granddaughter Ida

Contributor: Hokie374 Created: 9 months ago Updated: 9 months ago

Arrived in Utah 1850. The following is a history written by Ida Delilah Ashton Ercanbrack and submitted by Donna Ashton Hamblin on February 10, 1988 to the National Society Daughters of the Utah Pioneers. "John Mills was born Friday July 24, 1804 in Eastern Canada, the son of Matthew and Hannah Boils Mills. He had two brothers and two sisters as follows: Martin Mills born September 3, 1806; Elizabeth Mills born December 22, 1807; Jamima Mills born December 23, 1809 (died Nov. 27, 1811); and Cornelius Mills born October 16, 1812. His parents died within ten days of each other, when he was nine years old, and he lived with his maternal grandparents George and Sarah Boils, in Pickering Township, Eastern Canada. George Boils was a saw mill builder and operator, here John worked with his grandfather and learned the carpenter and mill business. On the 13th of March 1827, he married Jane Sanford, daughter of Solomon and Elenor Barry Sanford. Jane was born April 13, 1808 in Township of Kitley, County of Leeds, Upper Canada. After their marriage they lived with the grandparents and helped him with the work at the mill. They lived there till after the birth of their first child, Sarah Elenor born March 1, 1828. In the month of June 1828, they moved on to a farm where he built a saw mill and where a son, Martin Walderfin was born Aug 30, 1830. He sold this place and moved about ten miles and settled on Duffins Creek and built a home and another sawmill. Timber was plentiful and the country was new and infested with bears, wolves and other wild animals. Here on the 1st day of July 1836, a daughter was born, she was named Barbara Belinda. In 1836, this place was sold with the idea of going to a warmer climate for John's health. At this time they were converted by Elder John Taylor to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. The 6th of Feb of 1837, they with others went to the mill pond and were baptized by Elder John Taylor after having cut a hole through the ice. In about two weeks were confirmed members of the Church by Elder Taylor. In Feb 1838, they left Canada to join the Saints. (I read in a history where this company from Canada suffered from cold and the snow would pack so hard around and in the the wheels of their wagons the oxen and horses couldn't move them so they would have to stop, make fires and melt the snow off before they could go on.) They met or came to the main body of the Saints at Kirtland, Ohio and stopped there for a time, then went to Missouri and arrived at Far West. Here they were driven from their homes by the mob and were unable to go tot the mills for flour on account of the mobs, so the women grated corn on tin graters and ground the grain in coffee grinders by hand to get something to eat. The people became weak and sick on account of exposure and persecution. (Church History says "Far West, Caldwell County, Missouri, from where most of the exiles came was 200 miles, the way the roads ran, to Illinois. The roads were bad and heavy, and the weather extremely cold.") The Mills family, with others, had ague (a form or chills and fever and weakness) and Jane would often fall on her knees on the frozen ground hurting them terribly. In Jane S. Mills story, she says "My hardships seemed more than I could bear, but the Lord did spare our lives and tempered the elements for our sake so that we could bear the cold. Surely he tempers the wind to the shorn lamb." From Far West in the month of March 1839, they left and came to Pike County, Illinois and stayed there till the Prophet Joseph Smith escaped from the mob in Missouri and located a gathering place at Nauvoo. They lived at a little town called Nashville until the spring of 1843, sold this place and moved to Nauvoo. Here he worked on the Temple and he, his wife and eldest daughter Sarah Elenor were privileged to enter in and receive their endowments. (Church History -- Endowments were given from December 1845 to Feb 7, 1846). They got their endowments either the latter end of 1845 or early in 1846 according to Jane Mills story. When the exodus from Nauvoo in 1846 commenced they moved to Nashville in Iowa, five miles from Nauvoo to prepare for the journey west, not knowing at the time just where, but west. In October 1846 they traveled to Winter Quarters, where again there was much sickness and many hardships. Many died from hardships and exposure. They stayed here all winter. In the spring of 1847 they moved to Kanesville and lived there until the fall of 1847 when they moved to a place called Bluff Branch, five miles north of Kanesville. (Now called Council Bluff City, Iowa). Here he and Brother Thomas Ashton built a shop to make and repair wagons for those going west. Finding it hard to get enough outfits and provisions to take his family, he left what means he could with the family to come the next spring. So in the spring of 1850, he started to the Valleys of the mountains (now Utah). He drove a team, (probably oxen) and came ahead to make a home for the family who would come. He came to Lehi in 1850 and built the first house there (history of Lehi) where his family joined him on October 6, 1851. The family came with the Morris Phelps Co. He was not satisfied in Lehi and in Jan 1852, he brought his family to Provo and settled by the hill west of Provo River on 12th north, where the main road went on to the Bench and to Salt Lake City. They lived there until June 1853, (Uncle Martin said he never saw so many potatoes turn out of the ground as they raised here.) Then moved into Provo on account of Indian hostilities. They located on the block where the Utah Stake Tabernacle now stands. (At that time the southwest corner and where the Elks Hall is now was a swamp, where cat tails grew. They dug the cattails roots and mixed with bran to make bread.) They lived here until the fall of 1857 when they moved about one and a half miles north where he had built a saw and grist mill, with the help of his son Martin. (On 18th North between 1st and 2nd West where Barbizon is.) Here he sawed lumber some of which went into the old Provo Woolen Mills, the old Tabernacle (now torn down) and many other older buildings. Also he ground corn and wheat into meal and flour. The mill was a large building and the top floor was used as an amusement hall. In Cory Hanks book "Men of the Rockies" he writes "Father (John) Mills pushed, in a wheelbarrow his tools up Provo Canyon, passed Mt. and built the first sawmill at the junction of Pine Creek and Snake Creek in 1859." We have a copy of the application he made to build this mill and also he built a saw mill up Rock Canyon in Provo near the Forks in 1868. He was a good man and worked hard to help build up the new lands he had come to. Here is a copy from a paper he had saved, how men testified as to his character; "To whom it may concern, we the undersigned certify that John Mills is an honest confidential and trustworthy man and a good citizen and worthy of the confidence of all good-men." April 15, 1861 Provo City Utah Territory. Recorder of the Utah Territory, Martin H. Beck, W. T. Moore, Howard Coray, James W. Loveless, George W. Bean, John Riggs, W. B. Pace, Edson Whipple. He also signed all his property, tools and furniture, personal property and everything he had to the Church at the "Consecration of Property" which amounted to $1,196.00 (January 21, 1857) He was ordained a High Priest Mar 16, 1861. He had shares in the Provo Canyon Road and also the Provo Wollen Mills. He made several trips back to the states, sometimes walked. From letters in the family, he went as a Missionary to Canada after coming to Utah. (Sometime around 1862). He had a patriarchal blessing at the City of Joseph, Sept. 1, 1845 by John Smith."

Time Line -John Mills and Jane Sanford And Barbara Belinda Mills and William Wallace Haws

Contributor: Hokie374 Created: 9 months ago Updated: 9 months ago

John Mills and Jane Sanford And Barbara Belinda Mills and William Wallace Haws 1 Jul 1836 - Daughter Barbara Belinda Mills was born in Duffin’s Creek, Pickering Township, Leeds, Upper Canada. February 1837 - John and Jane Mills were taught the Gospel by John Taylor and joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints two years after their daughter’s birth. The family moved to Kirtland, Ohio and later to Far West, Missouri to be with the Saints. They suffered sorrow, sickness, and hunger due to mob persecution. 1838 - John Mills and his wife, Jane left their quiet home in Canada, going to Kirtland, Ohio, and from there moved to Nauvoo, Illinois, where the family was neighbors to Joseph Smith, the prophet. 6 Feb 1845 - Barbara Belinda Mills was baptized. Barbara was baptized in the Mississippi River by Lorenzo Young. 1846 – The Mills family left Nauvoo with the exodus (including their ten-year-old daughter, Barbara) and started west. They crossed the Mississippi on the ice and spent the winter in Kanesville, Iowa. 1847 – The Mills family moved to Council Bluffs where they lived in a dugout where they remained until the family established a home in what is now Lehi, Utah, in the spring of 1851. 1850 - Barbara's father went to Utah to secure a home for the family. 1851 - Barbara, her mother, brother, and nephew traveled with the Morris Phelps Wagon Company and arrived in the Salt Lake Valley on September 28, 1851, then moved to Provo Again the family moved, this time to Provo Canyon where John Mills operated a sawmill at the time of the outbreak of the Black Hawk War when they, with others of the community, were driven into Provo City by the Indians. December 1853 - Barbara Mills married William Wallace Haws ( Born: 18 Feb 1835, Green Township, Wayne, Illinois) of Provo. She became the mother of eight children, knitted and wove the clothing for her entire family, and cared for the many chores, which fell to the lot of the pioneer homemaker. William and Barbara had the following children: Hannah Jane, 6 Sep 1854 William Wallace, 20 Sep 1856 George Martin, 15 Dec 1858 Sarah Elenor "Ellen," 13 Mar 1861 John Gilbert, 16 Feb 1864 Mary Angeline "Ann," 13 Apr 1867 Rhoda Matilda, 14 Jan 1870 Millie Mary "May," 18 May 1873 They lived with Barbara's parents for three years until they could get their own home. The grasshoppers made things difficult the first two years, but they survived. When word came of Johnston's Army, William was made captain and sent to Echo Canyon. He was soon made major. William was often gone serving in the army to fight Johnston's Army, working away from home, and serving a mission. Barbara was left to care for the children and the farm. Barbara would knit, weave, and sew the clothing for her family with her own sewing machine. In 1858, William sold his home and purchased another lot where he built a house. 11 Feb 1858 - Barbara was endowed in the Endowment House. 1871 – William Wallace was called on a mission. Upon his return, he sold his home and worked for the Salt Lake Police. 8 November 1875 - William married second wife, Martha Barrett (Born: 13 Mar 1859 in Pontypool, Mammouth, England; Died: 2 September 1916, SLC, UT) in Salt Lake City, Utah. Children of William and Martha JOHN WALLACE, b. 21 Feb 1878. D. 19 Feb 1902. CHARLES JAMES, b. 15 Apr 1881. D. 7 Aug 1906. JOSEPH FOREST, b. 19 Dec 1882. D. 17 May 1968. LAURA PHOEBE, b. 10 Feb 1885. D. 16 Oct 1964. WILLIAM GILBERT, b. 24 Mar 1887. D. 20 May 1955. ERASTUS SNOW, b. 10 May 1889. D. 13 Aug 1969. CHLOE, b. 2 Feb 1891. D. 14 Nov 1965. MARY (twin), b. 3 Aug 1894. D. 28 Jan 1989. MARTHA (twin), b. 3 Aug 1894. D. 6 May 1984. 1879 - William Wallace Haws took his two wives and children and moved from Provo to Arizona, their destination being Showlow settling on a ranch that was on the main freight road. They brought with them a large herd of milch cows and with two yoke of oxen and a tem of horses hauled everything they owned overland, a two-month journey at that time. Because of the lack of feed for their cattle the couple went to the “Forks of the Road” where the road from St. Johns and Showlow connected with the road to Fort Apache. Barbara would often feed the mail carrier and invited the freighters to camp at her place. She made cheese and butter. She raised chickens for the eggs. These items were sold to support the family. They camped there awhile and then moved on to Willow Springs. Mrs. Haws became acquainted with many of the Indians who frequently passed their home and they were always friendly toward her. Once, while she was at Fort Apache where she had been called to aid an ill friend, Indians attacked the fort, killed one soldier and wounded another. Then the Haws family decided to move again and Barbara went back to Utah to visit, while her husband searched for a new home. 1883 - Indian troubles caused them to move to Pima, Arizona and soon she was left to make a living for herself and youngest child, as the older ones were all married. Because of the persecutions of polygamy, William moved to Mexico with his second wife hoping to send for the rest of his family. He married a third wife and stayed in Mexico. 1 March 1888 – William Wallace married 3rd wife, Gertrudis Guaneros (Born: abt 1845; Died: 1929) Children of William and Gertrudis ELIZABETH, b. 17 Nov 1888. ALMA, b. 14 Jul 1891. 1907. GERTRUDIS, b. 8 Aug 1893. D. 9 Jul 1894. Barbara would visit Mexico whenever circumstances allowed. She would supply them with clothing and other items they needed. It was hard for Barbara to accept the law of plural marriage, which took him into Old Mexico where he lived until his death on March 6, 1895 March 6, 1895 – William Wallace Haws: died of pneumonia in Mexico in Colonia Pacheco, Chihuahua, Mexico Her granddaughter, Annie Haws Burrell, wrote the following: “When my father was called to be bishop in Colonia Pacheco, Grandma came down to see us often and always brought some of her other grandchildren from Arizona with her. We loved her and looked forward to her visits as she always had such interesting stories to tell. She would manage to get some sugar and lard, which at that time were luxuries, and make us cookies and pies. Many times she would take us on a long nature walk and we would have a picnic. Often Grandma Haws, my mother and Aunt Etta, who lived with us, measured off yards and yards of yarn and then would see which one could knit theirs first, as they had to knit all the stockings we wore. Grandma could not read so it was a pleasure for her when Aunt Etta would read to her and to my mother as they knitted. I loved to hold her skein of yarn as she wound it into a ball. “ I have heard her tell of living neighbors to the Prophet Joseph Smith and playing with his children. She said many times she sat on his knee as his own children did. She remembered when word came that Joseph and Hyrum were killed and their bodies were laid by a low window in their home. In this manner you could see them twice, once as you passed through the room and again from the outside as you passed the window. Grandma was very independent and walking was her surest way of going the six-mile trip from Pima to Central and on to Thatcher, always taking a short cut up the railroad track. She pieced quilts for people, made over a hundred for one lady on shares and by doing so was able to give all her grandchildren a hand-sewn pieced quilt, which today are family treasures. “Grandma Haws, as everyone called her, lived with me in Safford, Arizona during her last years and my children often speak with reverence of the time when ‘Great Grandma’ came to stay with us. She had an accident, which made her bedfast the last two years of her life. She calmly went to sleep and died April 1, 1936, just three months before she would have been one hundred years of age. Four of her children survived her, as did 80 grandchildren, 266great-granchildren and 28 great-great-grandchildren.” Funeral services for Mrs. Haws were held in the Pima church. The choir sang three songs and Harvey Mangum said a beautiful prayer. Eva Lines gave a talk on her recollection of Mrs. Haws and told of her wonderful life. Ben Blake gave a history of the life and accomplishments of Mrs. Haws and her activities in the communities in which she lived. Elder Spencer Kimball sang the love song, “Tired” and gave a short talk on the wonderful things that had happened in the world during Mrs. Haws’ long and interesting life. The benediction was pronounced by Joseph H. Lines. Burial was made in the Pima cemetery and the grave was dedicated by Arthur Lines. Amanda Haws Mantle Barbara loved the Church and lived for it. She had an accident that left her bedfast the last two years of her life, then passed away at the age of ninety-nine. 30 Mar 1936 - Barbara Belinda Mills Died in Pima, Graham, Arizona, USA 1 Apr 1936 - Barbara Belinda Mills was buried in Pima, Graham, Arizona, USA 6 Mar 1952 - Sealed to parents on in the Mesa Arizona temple.

Time Line -John Mills and Jane Sanford And Barbara Belinda Mills and William Wallace Haws

Contributor: Hokie374 Created: 9 months ago Updated: 9 months ago

John Mills and Jane Sanford And Barbara Belinda Mills and William Wallace Haws 1 Jul 1836 - Daughter Barbara Belinda Mills was born in Duffin’s Creek, Pickering Township, Leeds, Upper Canada. February 1837 - John and Jane Mills were taught the Gospel by John Taylor and joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints two years after their daughter’s birth. The family moved to Kirtland, Ohio and later to Far West, Missouri to be with the Saints. They suffered sorrow, sickness, and hunger due to mob persecution. 1838 - John Mills and his wife, Jane left their quiet home in Canada, going to Kirtland, Ohio, and from there moved to Nauvoo, Illinois, where the family was neighbors to Joseph Smith, the prophet. 6 Feb 1845 - Barbara Belinda Mills was baptized. Barbara was baptized in the Mississippi River by Lorenzo Young. 1846 – The Mills family left Nauvoo with the exodus (including their ten-year-old daughter, Barbara) and started west. They crossed the Mississippi on the ice and spent the winter in Kanesville, Iowa. 1847 – The Mills family moved to Council Bluffs where they lived in a dugout where they remained until the family established a home in what is now Lehi, Utah, in the spring of 1851. 1850 - Barbara's father went to Utah to secure a home for the family. 1851 - Barbara, her mother, brother, and nephew traveled with the Morris Phelps Wagon Company and arrived in the Salt Lake Valley on September 28, 1851, then moved to Provo Again the family moved, this time to Provo Canyon where John Mills operated a sawmill at the time of the outbreak of the Black Hawk War when they, with others of the community, were driven into Provo City by the Indians. December 1853 - Barbara Mills married William Wallace Haws ( Born: 18 Feb 1835, Green Township, Wayne, Illinois) of Provo. She became the mother of eight children, knitted and wove the clothing for her entire family, and cared for the many chores, which fell to the lot of the pioneer homemaker. William and Barbara had the following children: Hannah Jane, 6 Sep 1854 William Wallace, 20 Sep 1856 George Martin, 15 Dec 1858 Sarah Elenor "Ellen," 13 Mar 1861 John Gilbert, 16 Feb 1864 Mary Angeline "Ann," 13 Apr 1867 Rhoda Matilda, 14 Jan 1870 Millie Mary "May," 18 May 1873 They lived with Barbara's parents for three years until they could get their own home. The grasshoppers made things difficult the first two years, but they survived. When word came of Johnston's Army, William was made captain and sent to Echo Canyon. He was soon made major. William was often gone serving in the army to fight Johnston's Army, working away from home, and serving a mission. Barbara was left to care for the children and the farm. Barbara would knit, weave, and sew the clothing for her family with her own sewing machine. In 1858, William sold his home and purchased another lot where he built a house. 11 Feb 1858 - Barbara was endowed in the Endowment House. 1871 – William Wallace was called on a mission. Upon his return, he sold his home and worked for the Salt Lake Police. 8 November 1875 - William married second wife, Martha Barrett (Born: 13 Mar 1859 in Pontypool, Mammouth, England; Died: 2 September 1916, SLC, UT) in Salt Lake City, Utah. Children of William and Martha JOHN WALLACE, b. 21 Feb 1878. D. 19 Feb 1902. CHARLES JAMES, b. 15 Apr 1881. D. 7 Aug 1906. JOSEPH FOREST, b. 19 Dec 1882. D. 17 May 1968. LAURA PHOEBE, b. 10 Feb 1885. D. 16 Oct 1964. WILLIAM GILBERT, b. 24 Mar 1887. D. 20 May 1955. ERASTUS SNOW, b. 10 May 1889. D. 13 Aug 1969. CHLOE, b. 2 Feb 1891. D. 14 Nov 1965. MARY (twin), b. 3 Aug 1894. D. 28 Jan 1989. MARTHA (twin), b. 3 Aug 1894. D. 6 May 1984. 1879 - William Wallace Haws took his two wives and children and moved from Provo to Arizona, their destination being Showlow settling on a ranch that was on the main freight road. They brought with them a large herd of milch cows and with two yoke of oxen and a tem of horses hauled everything they owned overland, a two-month journey at that time. Because of the lack of feed for their cattle the couple went to the “Forks of the Road” where the road from St. Johns and Showlow connected with the road to Fort Apache. Barbara would often feed the mail carrier and invited the freighters to camp at her place. She made cheese and butter. She raised chickens for the eggs. These items were sold to support the family. They camped there awhile and then moved on to Willow Springs. Mrs. Haws became acquainted with many of the Indians who frequently passed their home and they were always friendly toward her. Once, while she was at Fort Apache where she had been called to aid an ill friend, Indians attacked the fort, killed one soldier and wounded another. Then the Haws family decided to move again and Barbara went back to Utah to visit, while her husband searched for a new home. 1883 - Indian troubles caused them to move to Pima, Arizona and soon she was left to make a living for herself and youngest child, as the older ones were all married. Because of the persecutions of polygamy, William moved to Mexico with his second wife hoping to send for the rest of his family. He married a third wife and stayed in Mexico. 1 March 1888 – William Wallace married 3rd wife, Gertrudis Guaneros (Born: abt 1845; Died: 1929) Children of William and Gertrudis ELIZABETH, b. 17 Nov 1888. ALMA, b. 14 Jul 1891. 1907. GERTRUDIS, b. 8 Aug 1893. D. 9 Jul 1894. Barbara would visit Mexico whenever circumstances allowed. She would supply them with clothing and other items they needed. It was hard for Barbara to accept the law of plural marriage, which took him into Old Mexico where he lived until his death on March 6, 1895 March 6, 1895 – William Wallace Haws: died of pneumonia in Mexico in Colonia Pacheco, Chihuahua, Mexico Her granddaughter, Annie Haws Burrell, wrote the following: “When my father was called to be bishop in Colonia Pacheco, Grandma came down to see us often and always brought some of her other grandchildren from Arizona with her. We loved her and looked forward to her visits as she always had such interesting stories to tell. She would manage to get some sugar and lard, which at that time were luxuries, and make us cookies and pies. Many times she would take us on a long nature walk and we would have a picnic. Often Grandma Haws, my mother and Aunt Etta, who lived with us, measured off yards and yards of yarn and then would see which one could knit theirs first, as they had to knit all the stockings we wore. Grandma could not read so it was a pleasure for her when Aunt Etta would read to her and to my mother as they knitted. I loved to hold her skein of yarn as she wound it into a ball. “ I have heard her tell of living neighbors to the Prophet Joseph Smith and playing with his children. She said many times she sat on his knee as his own children did. She remembered when word came that Joseph and Hyrum were killed and their bodies were laid by a low window in their home. In this manner you could see them twice, once as you passed through the room and again from the outside as you passed the window. Grandma was very independent and walking was her surest way of going the six-mile trip from Pima to Central and on to Thatcher, always taking a short cut up the railroad track. She pieced quilts for people, made over a hundred for one lady on shares and by doing so was able to give all her grandchildren a hand-sewn pieced quilt, which today are family treasures. “Grandma Haws, as everyone called her, lived with me in Safford, Arizona during her last years and my children often speak with reverence of the time when ‘Great Grandma’ came to stay with us. She had an accident, which made her bedfast the last two years of her life. She calmly went to sleep and died April 1, 1936, just three months before she would have been one hundred years of age. Four of her children survived her, as did 80 grandchildren, 266great-granchildren and 28 great-great-grandchildren.” Funeral services for Mrs. Haws were held in the Pima church. The choir sang three songs and Harvey Mangum said a beautiful prayer. Eva Lines gave a talk on her recollection of Mrs. Haws and told of her wonderful life. Ben Blake gave a history of the life and accomplishments of Mrs. Haws and her activities in the communities in which she lived. Elder Spencer Kimball sang the love song, “Tired” and gave a short talk on the wonderful things that had happened in the world during Mrs. Haws’ long and interesting life. The benediction was pronounced by Joseph H. Lines. Burial was made in the Pima cemetery and the grave was dedicated by Arthur Lines. Amanda Haws Mantle Barbara loved the Church and lived for it. She had an accident that left her bedfast the last two years of her life, then passed away at the age of ninety-nine. 30 Mar 1936 - Barbara Belinda Mills Died in Pima, Graham, Arizona, USA 1 Apr 1936 - Barbara Belinda Mills was buried in Pima, Graham, Arizona, USA 6 Mar 1952 - Sealed to parents on in the Mesa Arizona temple.

Biography of John Mills

Contributor: Hokie374 Created: 9 months ago Updated: 9 months ago

John Mills was born in Easter Canada 24 July 1804, son of Mathew and Hannah Boils Mills. When John was only 9 years old his parents died within ten days of each other. John lived with different people until the age of 16 when he went to live with his grandparents Boils and learned the carpentry trade also the mill trade. At the age 23 John married Jane Sanford 13 March 1827. They ran mills at different places finally settling on Duffin Creek in Canada where they built a home and a saw mill. The country was new and wolves, bear and other wild animals roamed freely. It was here that they were converted to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and they were all baptized by Elder John Taylor 6 Feb 1837 in the Millpond through a hole cut in the ice. In Feb 1838 they left Canada to join the Saints in U.S.A. The snow would pack so hard in the wagon wheels that the horses and oxen could not pull the wagons. They had to make a fire and melt the snow out before they could go on. They stopped at Kirtland, Ohio then Far West, Missouri. They were driven from their home and suffered from lack of food and exposure. In March of 1839 they went to Pike County, IL and stayed until the Prophet Joseph Smith located a place called Nauvoo. In their travels they met up with the Thomas Ashton Family and became good friends. They both worked on the Nauvoo Temple. Thomas helped build the Mormon boat "Maid of Iowa". When the exodus from Nauvoo began they went to Nashville, Iowa, then to Winter Quarters where they lived in dug out, much suffering was endured and many people died. In the spring 1847 they went to Kanesville moving on to Council Bluffs in the fall. While Mary Ashton was ill she asked her friend Eleanor Mills if she would marry her husband Thomas Ashton and take care of her children. While in Kanesville Thomas Ashton and John Mills set up a shop to make and repair wagons for the trip west. After Thomas wife Mary died, Jane Mills and her daughter Eleanor took care of the children. On 23 Sept 1849 Thomas Ashton and Sarah Eleanor Mills were married fulfilling the wish of Thomas first wife Mary. Here in Kanesville, 18 Aug 1850, Eleanor gave birth to a son naming him John Mills Ashton after her father, but Eleanor was not to live to raise little John. She passed away 3 Sept 1850. Her mother took care of the Thomas Ashton children until Thomas married Eleanor's cousin Arminta Lawrence 17 Feb 1851. They took Mary and Joseph, the children of Thomas first marriage, while Jane kept her grandson John to raise. Both families worked hard to prepare for the trip west. John Mills got the opportunity of driving a team for a merchant Livingston, so he started west in the A.O. Smoot Company to come ahead and prepare for his family to come later. He arrived in Salt Lake in Oct 1850. In Feb 1851 he went to Lehi, Utah where he helped to lay out the town. The rest of John Mills Family along with Thomas Ashton family prepared to leave for the west in the spring. They made their own wagons and outfitted them with provisions needed. The Mills wagon had one yoke of 4 year old steers on the tongue, two yoke of cows and one yoke of 2 year old steers for leaders. The Missouri river was so high that they couldn't cross until 27 June 1851. They joined the Morris Phelps Company and headed west. About 150 miles out one of the oxen gave out and had to be left behind. So they put in the milk cow that had been brought along to furnish milk for little John who was just 13 months old and was carried on his grandmothers hip most of the way. They arrived in Salt Lake City 27 Sept 1851 all in good shape. The old cow had helped pull the wagon and furnished the milk all the way here. She became such a valued friend of the family that when she grew so old and her teeth were so worn down that she couldn't graze grass, Jane Mills made her a pot of corn meal porridge everyday, and it was a sad day when the old cow died. They all went to Lehi where Thomas Ashton and his family settled and stayed the rest of their lives. The John Mills family went on to Provo in 1852 taking John Mills Ashton with them and raising him as their own. taken from http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=12162548, accessed 16 May 2014, no author noted

Life timeline of John Mills

1804
John Mills was born on 24 Jul 1804
John Mills was 15 years old when Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles founds Singapore. Sir Thomas Stamford Bingley Raffles, FRS was a British statesman, Lieutenant-Governor of British Java (1811–1815) and Governor-General of Bencoolen (1817–1822), best known for his founding of Singapore and the British Malaya.
1819
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John Mills was 21 years old when The Erie Canal opens: Passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie. The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System. Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.
1825
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John Mills was 27 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
1831
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John Mills was 36 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
1840
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John Mills was 55 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
1859
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John Mills was 65 years old when Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton founded the National Woman Suffrage Association, breaking away from the American Equal Rights Association which they had also previously founded. Susan B. Anthony was an American social reformer and women's rights activist who played a pivotal role in the women's suffrage movement. Born into a Quaker family committed to social equality, she collected anti-slavery petitions at the age of 17. In 1856, she became the New York state agent for the American Anti-Slavery Society.
1869
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John Mills died on 20 Mar 1876 at the age of 71
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for John Mills (24 Jul 1804 - 20 Mar 1876), BillionGraves Record 12180 Provo, Utah, Utah, United States

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