John Leslie Wright

11 Nov 1906 - 4 Oct 2003

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John Leslie Wright

11 Nov 1906 - 4 Oct 2003
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Grave site information of John Leslie Wright (11 Nov 1906 - 4 Oct 2003) at Provo City Cemetery in Provo, Utah, Utah, United States from BillionGraves

Life Information

John Leslie Wright

Born:
Married: 28 Aug 1929
Died:

Provo City Cemetery

610 S State St
Provo, Utah, Utah
United States
Transcriber

Simini

June 9, 2011
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janettelaurie

February 27, 2013
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MsCarolB

April 15, 2020
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gordonz5

April 15, 2020
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hrclancy72

April 4, 2020
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Eva

April 11, 2020
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BillionGravesTPU

June 8, 2011

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Life Story of Walter Edmond Wright

Contributor: Simini Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

LIFE STORY of WALTER EDMOND WRIGHT: In His Words From Virgin City, Washington County, Utah where my parents were born, raised and lived for the first few years of their married life, they to Abraham, Millard, Utah. My two older sisters Laverna and Estella had been born in Virgin City: Laverna on 27 August 1896 and Estella on 20 October 1898. Although we lived in HInckley at the time, another sister, Leatha, was born in Virgin City on 27 November 1900 while my mother was back visiting her parents. The family moved into a little two-room house on the Cannon Farm until they were able to move into the home of my father’s brother, Uncle Alexander Walters Wright, who had been called with his wife, Emma (Reeves) Wright, to New Zealand on a mission for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. There, on the Cannon Farm, the first boy of the family was born on 28 March 1902; he was named Asahel Alexander. My folks, John Edmond (John Eddie) and Mary Jane (Spendlove) Wright, then rented the home of George A. Black, later known as the Alonzo A. Hinckley home, about ¾ miles north of Hinckley. It was in this house that I was born on 22 January 1905. In attendance was Sister Mary Lee, who was a mid-wife and attended most women in the area. There were no doctors there at the time. She went around town in a buggy drawn by a bob-tailed horse for many years. I was named Walter after my mother’s brother whose birthday was two days before mine. Also my Grandmother Wright ‘s maiden name was Walters before she married my Grandfather Alexander Wright. My middle name is Edmond, the same as my father. That spring we moved to a lot that the family purchased in the town of Hinckley, being located on the corner of Main Street and the road that lead to the Millard Academy (later Hinckley High School). We lived in a sheep wagon and tent until my father built our two-room adobe brick house in 1905. Another boy was born into the family on 11 November 1906, making us even in boys and girls. He was given the name of John Leslie Wright. Les, as he was more often called, and I were very close in age and became very close companions throughout our lives. We herded cows together, starting at the south end of town. We would walk down Main Street gathering up cows. The town’s people would have them ready for us until we had between 30 and 40 head to take to the north end of town to pasture for the day. Then in the evening we brought them back and each cow would drop out going to their own home. For this we were paid 5 cents a head each day. Our Stake President had the most cows, but it was always a difficult task to collect from him. At one time there was a cow that we could ride, so we didn’t have to walk all the way. The Slaughter boys would come out on horses as we went by and chase the cows just to see us fall off. We surely thought they were mean. There was another mean boy in our town, A. M. [name has been deleted to protect the guilty], who was a big, big boy and not accepted very well by the other boys. A. M. would watch until we had taken our egg to the store to exchange for candy and then would take the candy from us. Once on Easter we kids took our Easter Baskets up northeast of town to play in the brush were there was an old house called the Scout House. A. M. came and got all the kids to play hide-n-seek. When we were all hiding, he ate all the candy Easter Eggs out of our baskets. He was so mean the 5th grade teacher wasn’t going to promote him. But on the closing day of school, A. M. asked to give the prayer and he asked that the teacher be blessed because she was such a good teacher. She cried and he was promoted. One more boy was added to our family on 13 August 1910 and he was named Janeus Evan Wright. When our sister LaVell was born on 26 July 1913, I was old enough to remember that we kids took our homemade denim quits and made a bed on top of the haystack. When we climbed down the next morning we were told about our new sister. We were still living in only two rooms with a bed in the kitchen and two double beds in the living room. That made three to a bed. Money was very scarce in my childhood and we children learned life’s lesson of work pretty early. One way we earned our spending money was to receive 2 cents a gopher head, and 5 cents for a pair of rabbit ears. We could go to the show (silent movies) for one matchbox full of dead flies. Dad made us a flycatcher. We would put it over the swill barrel and if we couldn’t get enough flies, we would sweep them out of the windows at the high school where my father was custodian for many years. After the flies were collected at the theater, they were thrown out the back door. Some of the town kids would go out after the show and fill up their matchboxes. I got to see most of the shows without the flies, because I tended Wm. Gardner’s horse and buggy when he came to town once a week to show the films. In the basement of the theater was a dynamo [generator] for the lights. The films were handed turned on a wheel. I ran the shows for a while before and after my marriage. I worked on threshing crews and the drains to earn money for my own clothes from the time I was 12 years old. While still in school at age 17, I went to work in the bees for N. E. [Nephi Ephraim] Miller in Oasis. I would have to ride an old bike to work and then back each evening, a distance of 5 miles [more like 6+ miles] each way. Since the family ate their main meal at noon, my meal at night was usually what was left over from the noonday meal. Many times there wasn’t much. I didn’t attend Primary or MIA very often because we always had so much work and chores to do. Even when we had the time to go to the neighbors to play, we were put to work. In spite of the hard times and hard work, as kids we did have some good times. Mother always saw to that, as she was a very jovial person. For our birthdays, mother always had a cake for us if nothing else. Even the grandkids were so honored until her death. I remember once we planned a surprise party for Leslie. He had been sent to the neighbors. After the kids arrived, Dad went to get him. When he arrived home, he walked in and saw all the kids milling around. He walked straight to the kitchen and asked Mother, “What are these kids doing here?” Just before Christmas, Dad would go after wood and bring back a Christmas tree. We would decorate it and the house with colored paper chains, strings of popcorn and cranberries. One year it snowed before he could go, so he dug up a currant bush, planted it in a bucket and we decorated that. Christmas Eve we children would all sleep in the kitchen and the three older girls were given three matches. They were to strike a match to check and see if it was time to get up to look under the tree to see what Santa had left. By 11:00 pm the matches had been used, so the rest of the night the girls had to climb up on the bed to reach the clock and feel the hands to tell what time it was. Santa Claus would always come around to the home on Christmas Eve and leave a sack of candy for each child. When Les and I were older we decided we should rig up a device to trip him when he came to our house so we could get all his candy. We rigged a wire across the gate and sure enough it worked. He tripped but we were so scared we turned tail and ran as hard as we could. I guess we had a lesson to learn in honesty too. The Tithing House and Yard was located where the old garage in Hinckley is today and not far from our house. It was a meeting place for the town kids to play. Every 10th load of hay or grain, etc. was brought there by the farmers for Tithing and we used to play cops and robbers around the hay and grain. We would keep an eye on the hens as we played. When we saw them laying eggs under the weigh scales, we would go get the eggs and trade them to the store for candy. We had another source to obtain treats. We would take the wagon up to the greasewoods and get a load for Grandma Wright to burn in exchange for cookies. Actually, she was no relation but was Grandma to all in town. We lived across the street from the Milton Moody family who had lots of boys, and Emerald (Em) Moody was a good friend as was Elmer Wright and Bill Reeves, a cousin. Janeus used to hold his breath if things didn’t go his way and we had been told to hold down his tongue when he did. One day when we were making mud pies, Janeus started to hold his breath and I grabbed his tongue, muddy fingers and all. He didn’t hold his breath for long. In our backyard we had five rows of currant bushes. One row of yellow and one of black were for eating raw and the other rows of yellow, black and red were for bottling, to be used for fruit and pies during the winter. When it came time for bottling we all helped pick our own. Mother and we kids would also go to Abraham to pick for shares. The currant buses held many memories for us. That is also where I went to try smoking paper and bark, as most boys did, only the other boys went out in the shed. We boys played a game of Russian Roulette, where one held a knife pointed down and moved the knife up and down. Another boy would move his hand back and forth on the surface, trying not to get stabbed. Asahel and I were playing one day when I jabbed his hand with the knife. I was scared and took off running through the currant bushes with Asahel after me. He had picked up a hoe. As we met at the other end, he hit me on the head with it, making a deep gash there. My brother Asahel, who had also worked hard all his life to help support the family, was working overtime in Delta at the Sugar Beet Factory during the Christmas holidays. He met with an accident and died before they could take him to the hospital in Salt Lake City. This was 6 January 1918 and he was only 15 years old. The family tended Laverna’s children: Myrlene and Dwight Moody while she worked at school teaching, or Pratt’s Store, or even D. Stevens department store in Delta. Her husband, Bryant, was traveling either with a theatrical group or as a clothing salesman. We had a hive of bees near the currant bushes. When Dwight was two years old, he took a rake and beat on the hives. The bees came out and started stinging him. The harder they stung, the madder he got, and the more he beat on the hive. I remember a little shorthaired dog we had that would go with Dad when he built houses. One day a rabid coyote bit the dog. We had to pen him up but he died. Dad built a coffin and we had a funeral for him and buried him in the currant bushes. When the folks were away Les and I dug him up to see what he looked like. He had mold all over his neck and armpits, etc. We hurriedly nailed the lid back on, covered it up, and sat down and bawled and bawled. I was taught in school by the following teachers: • 1st grade, Wealthy Parker; • 2nd and 3rd grade, Juanita Stout (who taught us songs in Spanish); • 4th grade, Myrtle Wright; • 5th grade, Florence Rassmussen; • part of 6th, Mr. Meeley; • 7th grade Devor Scott (my favorite - he had a way of talking me into doing things); • 8th grade, John Watts. My first year in the Millard Academy, I had to top beets until Christmas as Dad was sick. The two weeks before school was out, I left to work on the drain. I had made a cedar chest for Estella and a dressing table in shop. Although I was the only one to complete my project, I did not get credit as I had quit school too soon. While attending the Millard Academy, there was a girl from Lynndyl named Zola Walker. She lived in Hinckley [during the school year] with her sister Orlene and brother Fay. He had been a friend I played with when they lived in Hinckley before the family moved to Lynndyl. In the summer of 1921, Zola went back to her home in Lynndyl. We still carried on our courtship, although it was much harder to see each other then. Along with Les Walker, who was courting Zola’s cousin, Marjorie Finlinson in Leamington, we managed to get up there every other weekend. Either we would catch a ride on the train or rent a car. It took us a long time to get there as roads were so bad and it was almost daylight when we got back home, just in time to go to work on my bicycle. We were both happy when school started again that fall. It was 1922 that our basketball team went to the State Playoffs after winning the Regional tournament. No, we didn’t win, but had a lot of experiences in many ways. We were just a bunch of green kids in a big city. Most of us had not been to a big city before. The next year was the same, going to Lynndyl and working for Mr. N. E. Miller in the bees. When school started I stayed out two weeks to help in the beets, which made it hard for me to catch up on my schoolwork. Then about Christmas time I was playing ball and got a blister on my toe, which turned to blood poisoning. Again I was out of school for two weeks. By then I was so far behind that when Mr. Miller asked if I would like to go to California to work, I told him I would come right down. I needed the money. I hated to leave my girl, so I asked her to marry me and go with me. We were married 11 February 1924, in Fillmore, Millard, Utah. I went on to California by freight with a load of bees. Zola came a little later on the passenger train. We had a cute little apartment in Colton and made some good friends in the apartment building. One couple was John and Marie Jennings from New Mexico whom we enjoyed very much. Mr. Miller let us take his truck and we got to see some of the countryside as well as made trips to Big Bear Lake [in San Bernardino County, California] and Smiley Lake [cannot find a lake but a Smiley Park in San Bernardino County]. We attended Church at the Colton Branch. My wages were only $90.00 to $150.00 per month during those early years. But for Christmas I managed to give Zola an ivory dresser set and a fur piece (dog fur) to go with a hat she had. They were ordered from the Sears catalog. When it was time to come home, Zola again rode the passenger train and I, with a load of bees, rode the freight train. We lived in a little house of Dad’s on the corner of their property across from the Hinckley High School. I arrived home after going to California again to bring back another load of bees. I hadn’t changed my clothes for six days, having been up for two days and nights spraying the hives with water as we traveled. About every hour the bees would stick their tongues out through the hives and I’d spray with them with water from 25-gallon cans. I got home in the morning but stayed up that night when our little girl was born on 15 July 1924. She was so tiny and cute, and we gave her the name of Shirley. We were still living in the house on Dad’s property across from the Hinckley high school. I guess I managed to get some sleep while on the train because some hobo stole my suit, glasses and class pin, I had to go to Salt Lake City to get some new ones. The next year we went again to Colton to work and we lived in a Mrs. Clark’s house. While there we bought a wicker buggy for Shirley to ride in. When we came back to Delta in the spring, we lived at the south end of the Sugar Factory Row houses. Zola’s parents, William Henry and Annie May (Talbot) Walker, also lived there. They enjoyed Shirley so much. Dad Walker would take Shirley to stay all night and that is the way she was weaned. On 14 July 1926, I took my wife to the Manti Temple to be sealed for “Time and All Eternity.” Also to have our little girl sealed to us. While we were still in the Sugar Factory Row house, we had our first son born to us on 15 November 1927. We named him Derral Walter. We got a home loan from the government and started to build our home on a lot one block west of the train depot in Delta, and moved into it before it was finished. Here another boy blessed our home, on Friday, the 13th of June 1930. We named him Ronald Edmond. Soon after we got home with Ronald, we began to decorate the front bedroom, got some rugs for the front room, and a new sofa and chair. We also got our bathroom fixtures in. It was so good to have a completed house. However (and I/Walter quote), "We have been adding to it ever since." This same year Reed Walker and I leased some bees from Mr. Miller and we took them to California. The family didn’t go that year or again until 1934 because we found there was such a difference in the school systems. Zola did manage to come down for a week or two each year, leaving Shirley and Derral with one of the relatives. In 1939 when we had Ronald with us, we lived in a trailer house in Colton. Ron said, “Mama, don’t have a baby down here. You'll have a little Mexican.” He didn’t like them peeking in our windows. We did wait to have for another child until 2 May 1940 when Wally Ray was born in Delta. In the years of 1931 and 1932, we took the bees only to St. George for Mr. Miller. In the fall of 1932 I was able to buy my own bees and the next spring I took them to Hurricane, Utah for the honey flow. After that we again took the bees to California for the winter. I was in California when they had the terrible flood in 1938. It was really an experience to see all that mud and silt flowing down the streets and into the homes. The honey crops failed the spring and summer of 1941 so I had to find work on the Union Pacific Railroad. World War II broke out 7 December 1941 with the Japanese bombing Pear Harbor. They started to build a Japanese Relocation Camp out west of Abraham and I was able to get work out there as a carpenter. I bought the 80-acre farm owned by Zola’s folks in Sutherland, along with 40 acres from Roy Smith. I began farming along with the bee business until I sold the bees to Ronald in 1948. I have served in several Church positions: • Sunday School Superintendent in the Colton California Branch, and also in the Delta 2nd Ward with John Koiter and Layton Maxfield. • 1st Counselor to Bishop William Bassett, 10 September 1950; with Charles Allen as 2nd Counselor for a while; then Lyle Bunker took his place for the rest of the five years. While in the Bishopric we remodeled the church house and added a cultural hall to our chapel. • High Council for two years until Zola and I were called on a mission to be ... • Temple Workers at the Manti Temple.

Janeus Evan Wright: Name Iterations - Family Horse (Odessa) - Herding Cows

Contributor: Simini Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

JANEUS EVAN WRIGHT: Name Iterations - Family Horse (Odessa) - Herding Cows Written in first-person to Kathy (Wright) Anderson and family. Date is uncertain but between 1948-1992 – see first paragraph. (retyped [with added comments/clarifications] for posting on FamilySearch by Betty R. (Wright) Tucker - grandniece) My name is Janeus Evan Wright. I’m the seventh child of John Edmond and Mary Jane (Spendlove) Wright. I have three older brothers, three older sisters and one younger sister. My oldest sister Laverna and my oldest brother Asahel both died many years ago. The rest of the siblings are still here [Asahel died in 1918, Laverna in 1948 and next sibling, Leatha, in 1992 so written between 1948-1992], getting older and enjoying every bit of it. We are enjoying getting older because the alternative is awful! You’re wondering how I got that Janeus in my name? That was the way I was christened when I was born. My schoolteachers all called me that because that was the way it was spelled, but I never liked the sound of Janeus. So about high school time I decided to change it. I didn’t tell my mother or dad that I was doing it; I just signed my name to school papers and the teacher put my name in the roll book as Janus. I just left out the “E”. I liked the sound of Janus much better than Janeus, so that was my name for the next few years. In history class we were studying ancient Greek history. The history book had pictures of the Greek statues representing the Greek Gods. One of the stone statues had a name of – now get ready for this – Janus. I really got joked about this, being named after a Greek God especially because the Greek God had two faces. One face looked forward and the other face looked backward. Well, two-faced anyway. I learned that this statue was placed in the entrance of each home. One face was to look after and protect all the people in the home. The other face looked out away from the home and was to guard and protect the home from any harm coming from outside the home. I thought the God of Two Faces had a good job to do in the homes of the ancient Greek families but the modern thought of being two-faced didn’t appeal to me. So I was unhappy with my name again. Also, about this time, I was hearing of girls being called Janice. I never thought that I wanted to be called by a girl’s name since there were more girls called Janice than there were boys – namely me. I had to do something about that. Later, while I was attending BYU, my name somehow got down to just “Jay.” I was Jay Wright on most of the school papers. But I had to keep my registration in my full name Janeus Evan. Even later when I went to Huntington to teach school, Granma Mary didn’t go with me until after Christmas so we wrote letters, lots of letters back and forth. I was asking her to come out there and she thought she would rather live in Salt Lake City. While we were writing all these pleading letters, my letters kept coming to me after someone had opened them. I didn’t like that at all. I guess you’d call them love letters (I can’t remember what I said), but didn’t want anybody else to see them. I went to the post office and told them what was happening to my letters. Yes, they knew about the letters having been opened but they had a good reason: they were having a hard time trying to tell which letters were meant for me and which letters were meant for another man in Huntington with the name of James Wright. When you write Janeus or Janus or James in a hurry, they all look like James. From then on my official name was to be J. Evan Wright. I’ve yet to find another name like it or one that is mistaken for it. From then on I was my own person until we applied to the Bureau of Statistics for my birth certificate in preparation for obtaining a visa, a permit to travel outside the United States. I received the copy of my official birth certificate and I couldn’t believe the name I got in 1910. It was James Evan Wright. After all my struggles to correct my name, I had to do it one more time. I had to have my older brothers and sisters sign an order stating that I was one-and-the-same person and that my name should have been Janus Evan Wright, instead of James Evan Wright, which was on the original birth certificate. Now I have a second copy of my birth certificate showing my name spelled correctly. Well, after all that monkey business, I liked to be called Jan. But now I like to be called Granpa Jan. I wanted to be a cowboy once when I was little. I rode a horse, herded cows, and wore a big three-gallon hat and spurs, but not any cowboy boots. We had no money for that. I played cowboy until I grew up to be a big boy but the horse got old in the same time so I had to give up being a cowboy. We got the horse when my two brothers, the horse, and I were very young. We were playing in the yard at home in Hinckley when there came a thunder-like noise in the street. When we got to the street we could see horses, and more horses filling the whole street. There were black horses, brown, yellow, and some of them were spotted with white. It seemed like there were hundreds of them to my little eyes. Maybe there were forty or fifty. Well, twenty-five anyway! As we stood there waiting and watching, a small black, female horse came right over to us. As little young horses are not afraid of anything, it came right up to my brother Walt [Walter Edmond Wright] and sniffed at his fingers. Quick as he could, Walt threw his arms around the horse’s neck and held on. Les [John Leslie Wright] jumped onto the other side and held on there. Both the boys easily held the frightened, new horse. The horse wasn’t frightened for long. It soon calmed down and actually enjoyed the patting we were giving it. I got around to the front and rubbed its nose and patted its neck. It felt so soft and silky. Right then, we decided we wanted that little mare colt. But the real cowboy rode up to us and said, “What are you doing with that colt?” Well, we were just patting it and wishing we could have it. “Well,” he said, “for five dollars you can have it.” Walt raced quickly for dad and returned with five dollars and we had ourselves a pony. She was black, coal-black, except for one white foot and a little speck of white on her face. We had never heard of or read the story Black Beauty or surely we would have named her Black Beauty. Somehow, I never understood how (maybe my older sisters) the name we gave her was Odessa. I thought that was a funny name for a wild mustang. We had to wait for the horse to grow up some before we were able to ride it, so we just made it one of our playmates and took it with us everywhere we went. Of course, we had to feed it at first because it was a little young to be taken from its mother. As it neared two years of age, we started riding it and teaching it to hold a bit in its mouth, the first step in teaching it to turn right or left. As Odessa grew older and stronger, and we grew bolder, we rode her everywhere we went. We took turns so the horse was running somewhere all day long. As I grew older and my turn came, I rode Odessa to herd the family cows. I took them every morning during summer vacation to the canals and roadways and brush area northwest of Hinckley. They would feed along the canals on the clover and grasses, then on brush on the land that wasn’t farmed. After we arrived at the big brush areas, we played cowboy. The cows had plenty of space to roam and so did we, the cow herders. We had time to swim in the canals at least once a day. Later in the afternoon, we’d gather the cows together and start them back towards town, letting them feed a little as they travelled. My dad furnished the horse and one half-sized saddle for me to herd the family cows, but I could take some of the neighbor’s cows for extra pay. The rate of pay for herding one cow for six days was five cents. That’s right! Five cents per week! If I had six cows from the neighbors, I’d have thirty cents Saturday night for the picture show, and maybe a popcorn ball. I always thought Odessa was a smart horse. She seemed to be in competition with us as boys, sometimes trying to make us fall off by stopping quickly when we’d least expect it or by suddenly turning the other direction causing us to fall. She seemed never to do this with girls riding her or little children. I think she knew the difference and seemed to make play out of it. Later on as we left home and Odessa got older, my dad gave her to a young boy if he would herd the cows for the summer. The next year he gave him the saddle too, if he would herd the cows another year. She was a wonderful animal, friend, truly a black beauty. Some people think I can talk to horses, but I’m not too sure about that! I think it’s a false language.

Life Story of Walter Edmond Wright

Contributor: janettelaurie Created: 2 years ago Updated: 5 months ago

LIFE STORY of WALTER EDMOND WRIGHT: In His Words From Virgin City, Washington County, Utah where my parents were born, raised and lived for the first few years of their married life, they to Abraham, Millard, Utah. My two older sisters Laverna and Estella had been born in Virgin City: Laverna on 27 August 1896 and Estella on 20 October 1898. Although we lived in HInckley at the time, another sister, Leatha, was born in Virgin City on 27 November 1900 while my mother was back visiting her parents. The family moved into a little two-room house on the Cannon Farm until they were able to move into the home of my father’s brother, Uncle Alexander Walters Wright, who had been called with his wife, Emma (Reeves) Wright, to New Zealand on a mission for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. There, on the Cannon Farm, the first boy of the family was born on 28 March 1902; he was named Asahel Alexander. My folks, John Edmond (John Eddie) and Mary Jane (Spendlove) Wright, then rented the home of George A. Black, later known as the Alonzo A. Hinckley home, about ¾ miles north of Hinckley. It was in this house that I was born on 22 January 1905. In attendance was Sister Mary Lee, who was a mid-wife and attended most women in the area. There were no doctors there at the time. She went around town in a buggy drawn by a bob-tailed horse for many years. I was named Walter after my mother’s brother whose birthday was two days before mine. Also my Grandmother Wright ‘s maiden name was Walters before she married my Grandfather Alexander Wright. My middle name is Edmond, the same as my father. That spring we moved to a lot that the family purchased in the town of Hinckley, being located on the corner of Main Street and the road that lead to the Millard Academy (later Hinckley High School). We lived in a sheep wagon and tent until my father built our two-room adobe brick house in 1905. Another boy was born into the family on 11 November 1906, making us even in boys and girls. He was given the name of John Leslie Wright. Les, as he was more often called, and I were very close in age and became very close companions throughout our lives. We herded cows together, starting at the south end of town. We would walk down Main Street gathering up cows. The town’s people would have them ready for us until we had between 30 and 40 head to take to the north end of town to pasture for the day. Then in the evening we brought them back and each cow would drop out going to their own home. For this we were paid 5 cents a head each day. Our Stake President had the most cows, but it was always a difficult task to collect from him. At one time there was a cow that we could ride, so we didn’t have to walk all the way. The Slaughter boys would come out on horses as we went by and chase the cows just to see us fall off. We surely thought they were mean. There was another mean boy in our town, A. M. [name has been deleted to protect the guilty], who was a big, big boy and not accepted very well by the other boys. A. M. would watch until we had taken our egg to the store to exchange for candy and then would take the candy from us. Once on Easter we kids took our Easter Baskets up northeast of town to play in the brush were there was an old house called the Scout House. A. M. came and got all the kids to play hide-n-seek. When we were all hiding, he ate all the candy Easter Eggs out of our baskets. He was so mean the 5th grade teacher wasn’t going to promote him. But on the closing day of school, A. M. asked to give the prayer and he asked that the teacher be blessed because she was such a good teacher. She cried and he was promoted. One more boy was added to our family on 13 August 1910 and he was named Janeus Evan Wright. When our sister LaVell was born on 26 July 1913, I was old enough to remember that we kids took our homemade denim quits and made a bed on top of the haystack. When we climbed down the next morning we were told about our new sister. We were still living in only two rooms with a bed in the kitchen and two double beds in the living room. That made three to a bed. Money was very scarce in my childhood and we children learned life’s lesson of work pretty early. One way we earned our spending money was to receive 2 cents a gopher head, and 5 cents for a pair of rabbit ears. We could go to the show (silent movies) for one matchbox full of dead flies. Dad made us a flycatcher. We would put it over the swill barrel and if we couldn’t get enough flies, we would sweep them out of the windows at the high school where my father was custodian for many years. After the flies were collected at the theater, they were thrown out the back door. Some of the town kids would go out after the show and fill up their matchboxes. I got to see most of the shows without the flies, because I tended Wm. Gardner’s horse and buggy when he came to town once a week to show the films. In the basement of the theater was a dynamo [generator] for the lights. The films were handed turned on a wheel. I ran the shows for a while before and after my marriage. I worked on threshing crews and the drains to earn money for my own clothes from the time I was 12 years old. While still in school at age 17, I went to work in the bees for N. E. [Nephi Ephraim] Miller in Oasis. I would have to ride an old bike to work and then back each evening, a distance of 5 miles [more like 6+ miles] each way. Since the family ate their main meal at noon, my meal at night was usually what was left over from the noonday meal. Many times there wasn’t much. I didn’t attend Primary or MIA very often because we always had so much work and chores to do. Even when we had the time to go to the neighbors to play, we were put to work. In spite of the hard times and hard work, as kids we did have some good times. Mother always saw to that, as she was a very jovial person. For our birthdays, mother always had a cake for us if nothing else. Even the grandkids were so honored until her death. I remember once we planned a surprise party for Leslie. He had been sent to the neighbors. After the kids arrived, Dad went to get him. When he arrived home, he walked in and saw all the kids milling around. He walked straight to the kitchen and asked Mother, “What are these kids doing here?” Just before Christmas, Dad would go after wood and bring back a Christmas tree. We would decorate it and the house with colored paper chains, strings of popcorn and cranberries. One year it snowed before he could go, so he dug up a currant bush, planted it in a bucket and we decorated that. Christmas Eve we children would all sleep in the kitchen and the three older girls were given three matches. They were to strike a match to check and see if it was time to get up to look under the tree to see what Santa had left. By 11:00 pm the matches had been used, so the rest of the night the girls had to climb up on the bed to reach the clock and feel the hands to tell what time it was. Santa Claus would always come around to the home on Christmas Eve and leave a sack of candy for each child. When Les and I were older we decided we should rig up a device to trip him when he came to our house so we could get all his candy. We rigged a wire across the gate and sure enough it worked. He tripped but we were so scared we turned tail and ran as hard as we could. I guess we had a lesson to learn in honesty too. The Tithing House and Yard was located where the old garage in Hinckley is today and not far from our house. It was a meeting place for the town kids to play. Every 10th load of hay or grain, etc. was brought there by the farmers for Tithing and we used to play cops and robbers around the hay and grain. We would keep an eye on the hens as we played. When we saw them laying eggs under the weigh scales, we would go get the eggs and trade them to the store for candy. We had another source to obtain treats. We would take the wagon up to the greasewoods and get a load for Grandma Wright to burn in exchange for cookies. Actually, she was no relation but was Grandma to all in town. We lived across the street from the Milton Moody family who had lots of boys, and Emerald (Em) Moody was a good friend as was Elmer Wright and Bill Reeves, a cousin. Janeus used to hold his breath if things didn’t go his way and we had been told to hold down his tongue when he did. One day when we were making mud pies, Janeus started to hold his breath and I grabbed his tongue, muddy fingers and all. He didn’t hold his breath for long. In our backyard we had five rows of currant bushes. One row of yellow and one of black were for eating raw and the other rows of yellow, black and red were for bottling, to be used for fruit and pies during the winter. When it came time for bottling we all helped pick our own. Mother and we kids would also go to Abraham to pick for shares. The currant buses held many memories for us. That is also where I went to try smoking paper and bark, as most boys did, only the other boys went out in the shed. We boys played a game of Russian Roulette, where one held a knife pointed down and moved the knife up and down. Another boy would move his hand back and forth on the surface, trying not to get stabbed. Asahel and I were playing one day when I jabbed his hand with the knife. I was scared and took off running through the currant bushes with Asahel after me. He had picked up a hoe. As we met at the other end, he hit me on the head with it, making a deep gash there. My brother Asahel, who had also worked hard all his life to help support the family, was working overtime in Delta at the Sugar Beet Factory during the Christmas holidays. He met with an accident and died before they could take him to the hospital in Salt Lake City. This was 6 January 1918 and he was only 15 years old. The family tended Laverna’s children: Myrlene and Dwight Moody while she worked at school teaching, or Pratt’s Store, or even D. Stevens department store in Delta. Her husband, Bryant, was traveling either with a theatrical group or as a clothing salesman. We had a hive of bees near the currant bushes. When Dwight was two years old, he took a rake and beat on the hives. The bees came out and started stinging him. The harder they stung, the madder he got, and the more he beat on the hive. I remember a little shorthaired dog we had that would go with Dad when he built houses. One day a rabid coyote bit the dog. We had to pen him up but he died. Dad built a coffin and we had a funeral for him and buried him in the currant bushes. When the folks were away Les and I dug him up to see what he looked like. He had mold all over his neck and armpits, etc. We hurriedly nailed the lid back on, covered it up, and sat down and bawled and bawled. I was taught in school by the following teachers: • 1st grade, Wealthy Parker; • 2nd and 3rd grade, Juanita Stout (who taught us songs in Spanish); • 4th grade, Myrtle Wright; • 5th grade, Florence Rassmussen; • part of 6th, Mr. Meeley; • 7th grade Devor Scott (my favorite - he had a way of talking me into doing things); • 8th grade, John Watts. My first year in the Millard Academy, I had to top beets until Christmas as Dad was sick. The two weeks before school was out, I left to work on the drain. I had made a cedar chest for Estella and a dressing table in shop. Although I was the only one to complete my project, I did not get credit as I had quit school too soon. While attending the Millard Academy, there was a girl from Lynndyl named Zola Walker. She lived in Hinckley [during the school year] with her sister Orlene and brother Fay. He had been a friend I played with when they lived in Hinckley before the family moved to Lynndyl. In the summer of 1921, Zola went back to her home in Lynndyl. We still carried on our courtship, although it was much harder to see each other then. Along with Les Walker, who was courting Zola’s cousin, Marjorie Finlinson in Leamington, we managed to get up there every other weekend. Either we would catch a ride on the train or rent a car. It took us a long time to get there as roads were so bad and it was almost daylight when we got back home, just in time to go to work on my bicycle. We were both happy when school started again that fall. It was 1922 that our basketball team went to the State Playoffs after winning the Regional tournament. No, we didn’t win, but had a lot of experiences in many ways. We were just a bunch of green kids in a big city. Most of us had not been to a big city before. The next year was the same, going to Lynndyl and working for Mr. N. E. Miller in the bees. When school started I stayed out two weeks to help in the beets, which made it hard for me to catch up on my schoolwork. Then about Christmas time I was playing ball and got a blister on my toe, which turned to blood poisoning. Again I was out of school for two weeks. By then I was so far behind that when Mr. Miller asked if I would like to go to California to work, I told him I would come right down. I needed the money. I hated to leave my girl, so I asked her to marry me and go with me. We were married 11 February 1924, in Fillmore, Millard, Utah. I went on to California by freight with a load of bees. Zola came a little later on the passenger train. We had a cute little apartment in Colton and made some good friends in the apartment building. One couple was John and Marie Jennings from New Mexico whom we enjoyed very much. Mr. Miller let us take his truck and we got to see some of the countryside as well as made trips to Big Bear Lake [in San Bernardino County, California] and Smiley Lake [cannot find a lake but a Smiley Park in San Bernardino County]. We attended Church at the Colton Branch. My wages were only $90.00 to $150.00 per month during those early years. But for Christmas I managed to give Zola an ivory dresser set and a fur piece (dog fur) to go with a hat she had. They were ordered from the Sears catalog. When it was time to come home, Zola again rode the passenger train and I, with a load of bees, rode the freight train. We lived in a little house of Dad’s on the corner of their property across from the Hinckley High School. I arrived home after going to California again to bring back another load of bees. I hadn’t changed my clothes for six days, having been up for two days and nights spraying the hives with water as we traveled. About every hour the bees would stick their tongues out through the hives and I’d spray with them with water from 25-gallon cans. I got home in the morning but stayed up that night when our little girl was born on 15 July 1924. She was so tiny and cute, and we gave her the name of Shirley. We were still living in the house on Dad’s property across from the Hinckley high school. I guess I managed to get some sleep while on the train because some hobo stole my suit, glasses and class pin, I had to go to Salt Lake City to get some new ones. The next year we went again to Colton to work and we lived in a Mrs. Clark’s house. While there we bought a wicker buggy for Shirley to ride in. When we came back to Delta in the spring, we lived at the south end of the Sugar Factory Row houses. Zola’s parents, William Henry and Annie May (Talbot) Walker, also lived there. They enjoyed Shirley so much. Dad Walker would take Shirley to stay all night and that is the way she was weaned. On 14 July 1926, I took my wife to the Manti Temple to be sealed for “Time and All Eternity.” Also to have our little girl sealed to us. While we were still in the Sugar Factory Row house, we had our first son born to us on 15 November 1927. We named him Derral Walter. We got a home loan from the government and started to build our home on a lot one block west of the train depot in Delta, and moved into it before it was finished. Here another boy blessed our home, on Friday, the 13th of June 1930. We named him Ronald Edmond. Soon after we got home with Ronald, we began to decorate the front bedroom, got some rugs for the front room, and a new sofa and chair. We also got our bathroom fixtures in. It was so good to have a completed house. However (and I/Walter quote), "We have been adding to it ever since." This same year Reed Walker and I leased some bees from Mr. Miller and we took them to California. The family didn’t go that year or again until 1934 because we found there was such a difference in the school systems. Zola did manage to come down for a week or two each year, leaving Shirley and Derral with one of the relatives. In 1939 when we had Ronald with us, we lived in a trailer house in Colton. Ron said, “Mama, don’t have a baby down here. You'll have a little Mexican.” He didn’t like them peeking in our windows. We did wait to have for another child until 2 May 1940 when Wally Ray was born in Delta. In the years of 1931 and 1932, we took the bees only to St. George for Mr. Miller. In the fall of 1932 I was able to buy my own bees and the next spring I took them to Hurricane, Utah for the honey flow. After that we again took the bees to California for the winter. I was in California when they had the terrible flood in 1938. It was really an experience to see all that mud and silt flowing down the streets and into the homes. The honey crops failed the spring and summer of 1941 so I had to find work on the Union Pacific Railroad. World War II broke out 7 December 1941 with the Japanese bombing Pear Harbor. They started to build a Japanese Relocation Camp out west of Abraham and I was able to get work out there as a carpenter. I bought the 80-acre farm owned by Zola’s folks in Sutherland, along with 40 acres from Roy Smith. I began farming along with the bee business until I sold the bees to Ronald in 1948. I have served in several Church positions: • Sunday School Superintendent in the Colton California Branch, and also in the Delta 2nd Ward with John Koiter and Layton Maxfield. • 1st Counselor to Bishop William Bassett, 10 September 1950; with Charles Allen as 2nd Counselor for a while; then Lyle Bunker took his place for the rest of the five years. While in the Bishopric we remodeled the church house and added a cultural hall to our chapel. • High Council for two years until Zola and I were called on a mission to be ... • Temple Workers at the Manti Temple.

Janeus Evan Wright: Name Iterations - Family Horse (Odessa) - Herding Cows

Contributor: janettelaurie Created: 2 years ago Updated: 5 months ago

JANEUS EVAN WRIGHT: Name Iterations - Family Horse (Odessa) - Herding Cows Written in first-person to Kathy (Wright) Anderson and family. Date is uncertain but between 1948-1992 – see first paragraph. (retyped [with added comments/clarifications] for posting on FamilySearch by Betty R. (Wright) Tucker - grandniece) My name is Janeus Evan Wright. I’m the seventh child of John Edmond and Mary Jane (Spendlove) Wright. I have three older brothers, three older sisters and one younger sister. My oldest sister Laverna and my oldest brother Asahel both died many years ago. The rest of the siblings are still here [Asahel died in 1918, Laverna in 1948 and next sibling, Leatha, in 1992 so written between 1948-1992], getting older and enjoying every bit of it. We are enjoying getting older because the alternative is awful! You’re wondering how I got that Janeus in my name? That was the way I was christened when I was born. My schoolteachers all called me that because that was the way it was spelled, but I never liked the sound of Janeus. So about high school time I decided to change it. I didn’t tell my mother or dad that I was doing it; I just signed my name to school papers and the teacher put my name in the roll book as Janus. I just left out the “E”. I liked the sound of Janus much better than Janeus, so that was my name for the next few years. In history class we were studying ancient Greek history. The history book had pictures of the Greek statues representing the Greek Gods. One of the stone statues had a name of – now get ready for this – Janus. I really got joked about this, being named after a Greek God especially because the Greek God had two faces. One face looked forward and the other face looked backward. Well, two-faced anyway. I learned that this statue was placed in the entrance of each home. One face was to look after and protect all the people in the home. The other face looked out away from the home and was to guard and protect the home from any harm coming from outside the home. I thought the God of Two Faces had a good job to do in the homes of the ancient Greek families but the modern thought of being two-faced didn’t appeal to me. So I was unhappy with my name again. Also, about this time, I was hearing of girls being called Janice. I never thought that I wanted to be called by a girl’s name since there were more girls called Janice than there were boys – namely me. I had to do something about that. Later, while I was attending BYU, my name somehow got down to just “Jay.” I was Jay Wright on most of the school papers. But I had to keep my registration in my full name Janeus Evan. Even later when I went to Huntington to teach school, Granma Mary didn’t go with me until after Christmas so we wrote letters, lots of letters back and forth. I was asking her to come out there and she thought she would rather live in Salt Lake City. While we were writing all these pleading letters, my letters kept coming to me after someone had opened them. I didn’t like that at all. I guess you’d call them love letters (I can’t remember what I said), but didn’t want anybody else to see them. I went to the post office and told them what was happening to my letters. Yes, they knew about the letters having been opened but they had a good reason: they were having a hard time trying to tell which letters were meant for me and which letters were meant for another man in Huntington with the name of James Wright. When you write Janeus or Janus or James in a hurry, they all look like James. From then on my official name was to be J. Evan Wright. I’ve yet to find another name like it or one that is mistaken for it. From then on I was my own person until we applied to the Bureau of Statistics for my birth certificate in preparation for obtaining a visa, a permit to travel outside the United States. I received the copy of my official birth certificate and I couldn’t believe the name I got in 1910. It was James Evan Wright. After all my struggles to correct my name, I had to do it one more time. I had to have my older brothers and sisters sign an order stating that I was one-and-the-same person and that my name should have been Janus Evan Wright, instead of James Evan Wright, which was on the original birth certificate. Now I have a second copy of my birth certificate showing my name spelled correctly. Well, after all that monkey business, I liked to be called Jan. But now I like to be called Granpa Jan. I wanted to be a cowboy once when I was little. I rode a horse, herded cows, and wore a big three-gallon hat and spurs, but not any cowboy boots. We had no money for that. I played cowboy until I grew up to be a big boy but the horse got old in the same time so I had to give up being a cowboy. We got the horse when my two brothers, the horse, and I were very young. We were playing in the yard at home in Hinckley when there came a thunder-like noise in the street. When we got to the street we could see horses, and more horses filling the whole street. There were black horses, brown, yellow, and some of them were spotted with white. It seemed like there were hundreds of them to my little eyes. Maybe there were forty or fifty. Well, twenty-five anyway! As we stood there waiting and watching, a small black, female horse came right over to us. As little young horses are not afraid of anything, it came right up to my brother Walt [Walter Edmond Wright] and sniffed at his fingers. Quick as he could, Walt threw his arms around the horse’s neck and held on. Les [John Leslie Wright] jumped onto the other side and held on there. Both the boys easily held the frightened, new horse. The horse wasn’t frightened for long. It soon calmed down and actually enjoyed the patting we were giving it. I got around to the front and rubbed its nose and patted its neck. It felt so soft and silky. Right then, we decided we wanted that little mare colt. But the real cowboy rode up to us and said, “What are you doing with that colt?” Well, we were just patting it and wishing we could have it. “Well,” he said, “for five dollars you can have it.” Walt raced quickly for dad and returned with five dollars and we had ourselves a pony. She was black, coal-black, except for one white foot and a little speck of white on her face. We had never heard of or read the story Black Beauty or surely we would have named her Black Beauty. Somehow, I never understood how (maybe my older sisters) the name we gave her was Odessa. I thought that was a funny name for a wild mustang. We had to wait for the horse to grow up some before we were able to ride it, so we just made it one of our playmates and took it with us everywhere we went. Of course, we had to feed it at first because it was a little young to be taken from its mother. As it neared two years of age, we started riding it and teaching it to hold a bit in its mouth, the first step in teaching it to turn right or left. As Odessa grew older and stronger, and we grew bolder, we rode her everywhere we went. We took turns so the horse was running somewhere all day long. As I grew older and my turn came, I rode Odessa to herd the family cows. I took them every morning during summer vacation to the canals and roadways and brush area northwest of Hinckley. They would feed along the canals on the clover and grasses, then on brush on the land that wasn’t farmed. After we arrived at the big brush areas, we played cowboy. The cows had plenty of space to roam and so did we, the cow herders. We had time to swim in the canals at least once a day. Later in the afternoon, we’d gather the cows together and start them back towards town, letting them feed a little as they travelled. My dad furnished the horse and one half-sized saddle for me to herd the family cows, but I could take some of the neighbor’s cows for extra pay. The rate of pay for herding one cow for six days was five cents. That’s right! Five cents per week! If I had six cows from the neighbors, I’d have thirty cents Saturday night for the picture show, and maybe a popcorn ball. I always thought Odessa was a smart horse. She seemed to be in competition with us as boys, sometimes trying to make us fall off by stopping quickly when we’d least expect it or by suddenly turning the other direction causing us to fall. She seemed never to do this with girls riding her or little children. I think she knew the difference and seemed to make play out of it. Later on as we left home and Odessa got older, my dad gave her to a young boy if he would herd the cows for the summer. The next year he gave him the saddle too, if he would herd the cows another year. She was a wonderful animal, friend, truly a black beauty. Some people think I can talk to horses, but I’m not too sure about that! I think it’s a false language.

Life timeline of John Leslie Wright

1906
John Leslie Wright was born on 11 Nov 1906
John Leslie Wright was 10 years old when Tsar Nicholas II of Russia was forced to abdicate in the February Revolution, ending three centuries of Romanov rule. Nicholas II or Nikolai II, known as Saint Nicholas in the Russian Orthodox Church, was the last Emperor of Russia, ruling from 1 November 1894 until his forced abdication on 15 March 1917. His reign saw the fall of the Russian Empire from one of the foremost great powers of the world to economic and military collapse. He was given the nickname Nicholas the Bloody or Vile Nicholas by his political adversaries due to the Khodynka Tragedy, anti-Semitic pogroms, Bloody Sunday, the violent suppression of the 1905 Russian Revolution, the executions of political opponents, and his perceived responsibility for the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905). Soviet historians portray Nicholas as a weak and incompetent leader whose decisions led to military defeats and the deaths of millions of his subjects.
John Leslie Wright was 22 years old when Walt Disney character Mickey Mouse premieres in his first cartoon, "Plane Crazy". Walter Elias Disney was an American entrepreneur, animator, voice actor and film producer. A pioneer of the American animation industry, he introduced several developments in the production of cartoons. As a film producer, Disney holds the record for most Academy Awards earned by an individual, having won 22 Oscars from 59 nominations. He was presented with two Golden Globe Special Achievement Awards and an Emmy Award, among other honors. Several of his films are included in the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress.
John Leslie Wright was 33 years old when Adolf Hitler signs an order to begin the systematic euthanasia of mentally ill and disabled people. Adolf Hitler was a German politician, demagogue, and Pan-German revolutionary, who was the leader of the Nazi Party, Chancellor of Germany from 1933 to 1945 and Führer ("Leader") of Nazi Germany from 1934 to 1945. As dictator, Hitler initiated World War II in Europe with the invasion of Poland in September 1939, and was central to the Holocaust.
John Leslie Wright was 39 years old when World War II: German forces in the west agree to an unconditional surrender. The German Instrument of Surrender ended World War II in Europe. The definitive text was signed in Karlshorst, Berlin, on the night of 8 May 1945 by representatives of the three armed services of the Oberkommando der Wehrmacht (OKW) and the Allied Expeditionary Force together with the Supreme High Command of the Red Army, with further French and US representatives signing as witnesses. The signing took place 9 May 1945 at 00:16 local time.
John Leslie Wright was 46 years old when Jonas Salk announced the successful test of his polio vaccine on a small group of adults and children (vaccination pictured). Jonas Edward Salk was an American medical researcher and virologist. He discovered and developed one of the first successful polio vaccines. Born in New York City, he attended New York University School of Medicine, later choosing to do medical research instead of becoming a practicing physician. In 1939, after earning his medical degree, Salk began an internship as a physician scientist at Mount Sinai Hospital. Two years later he was granted a fellowship at the University of Michigan, where he would study flu viruses with his mentor Thomas Francis, Jr.
John Leslie Wright was 58 years old when Martin Luther King Jr. received the Nobel Peace Prize for combating racial inequality through nonviolence. Martin Luther King Jr. was an American Baptist minister and activist who became the most visible spokesperson and leader in the civil rights movement from 1954 until his death in 1968. Born in Atlanta, King is best known for advancing civil rights through nonviolence and civil disobedience, tactics his Christian beliefs and the nonviolent activism of Mahatma Gandhi helped inspire.
1977
John Leslie Wright was 71 years old when Star Wars is released in theaters. Star Wars is a 1977 American epic space opera film written and directed by George Lucas. It is the first film in the original Star Wars trilogy and the beginning of the Star Wars franchise. Starring Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford, Carrie Fisher, Peter Cushing, Alec Guinness, David Prowse, James Earl Jones, Anthony Daniels, Kenny Baker, and Peter Mayhew, the film focuses on the Rebel Alliance, led by Princess Leia (Fisher), and its attempt to destroy the Galactic Empire's space station, the Death Star.
John Leslie Wright was 76 years old when Michael Jackson's Thriller, the best-selling album of all time, was released. Michael Joseph Jackson was an American singer, songwriter, and dancer. Dubbed the "King of Pop", he was one of the most popular entertainers in the world, and was the best-selling music artist during the year of his death. Jackson's contributions to music, dance, and fashion along with his publicized personal life made him a global figure in popular culture for over four decades.
John Leslie Wright was 83 years old when Nelson Mandela is released from Victor Verster Prison outside Cape Town, South Africa after 27 years as a political prisoner. Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela was a South African anti-apartheid revolutionary, political leader, and philanthropist who served as President of South Africa from 1994 to 1999. He was the country's first black head of state and the first elected in a fully representative democratic election. His government focused on dismantling the legacy of apartheid by tackling institutionalised racism and fostering racial reconciliation. Ideologically an African nationalist and socialist, he served as President of the African National Congress (ANC) party from 1991 to 1997.
John Leslie Wright died on 4 Oct 2003 at the age of 96
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for John Leslie Wright (11 Nov 1906 - 4 Oct 2003), BillionGraves Record 13304 Provo, Utah, Utah, United States

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