John LaMar Creamer

7 Jun 1917 - 27 Dec 2001

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John LaMar Creamer

7 Jun 1917 - 27 Dec 2001
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A Recollection By Luana Creamer Middleton This is as I remember the night of December 23rd, 1956 the night we lost our home in the fire - I remember Dad had been experiencing some pretty severe back pain that night (he had broken his back several months before) and had taken pain medication and musc
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Life Information

John LaMar Creamer

Born:
Married: 8 Sep 1934
Died:

Liberty Cemetery

3896 N 3500 E
Liberty, Weber, Utah
United States

Epitaph

Married Sept 8 1934 Sealed Mar 25 1936, Sealed 25 1936, Married Sept 8, 1934 Sealed March 25, 1936

Headstone Description

Sealed Mar 25, 1936
Transcriber

vkanarr

February 27, 2012
Photographer

MDSIMS

February 26, 2012

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House Fire Night of December 23, 1956

Contributor: vkanarr Created: 11 months ago Updated: 11 months ago

A Recollection By Luana Creamer Middleton This is as I remember the night of December 23rd, 1956 the night we lost our home in the fire - I remember Dad had been experiencing some pretty severe back pain that night (he had broken his back several months before) and had taken pain medication and muscle relaxers before going to bed. Mom said it was usually difficult to get him awake to go to work in the morning when he had taken the medication at night. We were all in bed sound asleep - it was somewhere near 11:00 PM. I remember Mom coming upstairs to the bedroom where Bonnie and I and Ida May and Janice were sleeping. She shook us awake yelling to us that the house was on fire and for Bonnie and I to go to the boys bedroom and get them out as fast as we could. (The boys bedroom was at the back of the house and our bedroom was upstairs and towards the front) Mom grabbed Janice out of her crib, Bonnie and I grabbed Ida May and Mom rushed us down the stairs ahead of her. When we got down the stairs and into the kitchen I looked back to make sure Mom was coming. As she got to the bottom of the stairs carrying Janice, the wall on the left of the stairs exploded and the stairs were immediately engulfed in flames. Mom barely made it down. I remember My eyes burning from the smoke and heat of the flames. Bonnie and I ran to the boys bedroom taking Ida May with us and threw the covers off the boys yelling for them to wake up, the house was on fire and we needed to get out fast! Dave was always difficult to wake and he grabbed the covers, pulled them up over his head and said to leave him alone he was tired - but we managed to get him and the other three awake and pushed David, Tom, Val and Leath out the back door of the house ahead of us. I was carrying Ida May and as we ran out the back door I thought I heard the phone ring and all I could think was I needed to answer the phone and tell them to send the fire department. I ran back in the house and into the living room - the heat and smoke were so bad I couldn’t breathe and I remember watching the flames climb up the east wall and across the ceiling on the north end of the living room. I grabbed the phone to answer it but the smoke and the flames were so hot that I couldn’t make a sound. I just stood there watching the flames as if in a trance - then I turned and saw the reflection of the flames on the glass of Marilyn’s graduation picture that sat on the buffet near the phone - it was as if it triggered my mind to what I needed to do and I remember throwing the receiver, hitting the picture smashing the glass and I ran out the back door. I don’t remember still having Ida May in my arms but she remembers the flames and the picture so I must have still been carrying her. I must have then taken her across the street to Jerry and Delta Southwick’s house because I remember running back across the street to our house to see if I could help Dad - I saw him go to the north side of the house and then ran back to the front as one of the front windows blew out showering the snow with glass and black soot. I will never forget - Dad dropped to his knees in the snow, buried his face in his hands and his whole body shook as he sobbed, crying out No, No, Oh God No! As I stood there watching him it seemed like he was there on his knees in the snow for a long time but I’m sure it was only several seconds - he then stood up, squared his shoulders, wiped the tears from his face with his hands, then turned and hurried across the street to Jerry and Delta’s. He knew there was nothing he could do to save the house. . . . . he gathered up all his strength and courage and went to comfort his family. I never told Dad that I was there and how I and my heart cried with him, but I will never forget that image of Dad there in the snow as the reflection of the flames grotesquely lit up the cold winter night. To me my Dad had always been a giant of a man in all ways - and seeing him there that night on his knees in the snow watching as all his hard work was destroyed in the smoke and flames, but rising up with one thought - to go about taking care of his family, he grew even more. This truly made me know how really Great he was. I remember being across the street in Jerry and Delta’s house watching as the whole house was engulfed in flames and then as is it collapsed in fierce flames, sparks and thick black smoke. I remember crying when I realized Rusty, our Cocker Spaniel and our cat were missing. We found the cat a few days later, his hair singed but he was OK - but Rusty never made it out. I remember all of us being sent to different places to stay the rest of the night. Bonnie and I went with Uncle Lisle and Aunt Zella Chard. Aunt Zella put us to bed but I couldn’t sleep. All I could think about was how were we going to be able to all be together for Christmas - and after Christmas - Where were we going to live? My biggest fear was that we wouldn’t all be together. And my thoughts went to our Cow Suzy and how frightened she must be with the fire so close to the barn. I worried about her all night hoping she was alright. She survived it all but was so frightened she couldn’t let her milk down and we thought her bag would burst. I think it was Harold Chadwick who came and gave her something to calm her and then she was OK. We all went to town the next day and got shoes and clothes and coats given to us by JC Penny’s and spent Christmas at Marilyn and Grant’s in Salt Lake. So many people sent clothes and money and food and gifts. People from all over - out of state and people we didn’t even know. People in the Ward got together and fixed up the little old Poulsen House - up on the hill by Loewesteins. There was a Christmas tree with so many gifts and clothes for all of us and even Christmas dinner. There were beds for all of us and the house was furnished with dishes, cookware, linens and food. The house was very small and we were very crowded - but we were there all together and that was all I cared about. It truly was a remarkable Christmas. Some time after the fire I remember Dad telling us that we were so very blessed to survive the fire and it wasn’t luck that saved us. It was Dad who woke Mom - even after taking the pain medications and ,muscle relaxers that night - he was the one who woke up. Dad said he was sleeping very soundly when he felt a pressure on his feet and opened his eyes to see his Mother standing at the foot of the bed. She told him he must wake up that the house was on fire and he must hurry to get his family to safety. As I recall, Dad said that before he fully realized what he was doing or saying he grabbed Mom, picked her up and lifted her over the top of him telling her they needed to get all the kids out fast because the house was on fire. Grandma Creamer had passed on several years before but she was there and woke Dad - She is truly our guardian angel. ( Grandma Ida may Marriott Creamer died 13 May 1949) In days that followed I remember going to the hole where the house once stood and sifting thru ashes to see if we could find anything that wasn’t totally destroyed. We found a watch that was on a dresser in Mom and Dads room - the hands melted at approximately 11:00 and as I recall a pair of vases that had been given to Mom and Dad when they got married. Aunt Gladys was able to somewhat restore them but the heat had been so intense there wasn’t much of anything else. But what really mattered - we were all together and safe and we had each other

House Fire Night of December 23, 1956

Contributor: IAquilter Created: 11 months ago Updated: 5 months ago

A Recollection By Luana Creamer Middleton This is as I remember the night of December 23rd, 1956 the night we lost our home in the fire - I remember Dad had been experiencing some pretty severe back pain that night (he had broken his back several months before) and had taken pain medication and muscle relaxers before going to bed. Mom said it was usually difficult to get him awake to go to work in the morning when he had taken the medication at night. We were all in bed sound asleep - it was somewhere near 11:00 PM. I remember Mom coming upstairs to the bedroom where Bonnie and I and Ida May and Janice were sleeping. She shook us awake yelling to us that the house was on fire and for Bonnie and I to go to the boys bedroom and get them out as fast as we could. (The boys bedroom was at the back of the house and our bedroom was upstairs and towards the front) Mom grabbed Janice out of her crib, Bonnie and I grabbed Ida May and Mom rushed us down the stairs ahead of her. When we got down the stairs and into the kitchen I looked back to make sure Mom was coming. As she got to the bottom of the stairs carrying Janice, the wall on the left of the stairs exploded and the stairs were immediately engulfed in flames. Mom barely made it down. I remember My eyes burning from the smoke and heat of the flames. Bonnie and I ran to the boys bedroom taking Ida May with us and threw the covers off the boys yelling for them to wake up, the house was on fire and we needed to get out fast! Dave was always difficult to wake and he grabbed the covers, pulled them up over his head and said to leave him alone he was tired - but we managed to get him and the other three awake and pushed David, Tom, Val and Leath out the back door of the house ahead of us. I was carrying Ida May and as we ran out the back door I thought I heard the phone ring and all I could think was I needed to answer the phone and tell them to send the fire department. I ran back in the house and into the living room - the heat and smoke were so bad I couldn’t breathe and I remember watching the flames climb up the east wall and across the ceiling on the north end of the living room. I grabbed the phone to answer it but the smoke and the flames were so hot that I couldn’t make a sound. I just stood there watching the flames as if in a trance - then I turned and saw the reflection of the flames on the glass of Marilyn’s graduation picture that sat on the buffet near the phone - it was as if it triggered my mind to what I needed to do and I remember throwing the receiver, hitting the picture smashing the glass and I ran out the back door. I don’t remember still having Ida May in my arms but she remembers the flames and the picture so I must have still been carrying her. I must have then taken her across the street to Jerry and Delta Southwick’s house because I remember running back across the street to our house to see if I could help Dad - I saw him go to the north side of the house and then ran back to the front as one of the front windows blew out showering the snow with glass and black soot. I will never forget - Dad dropped to his knees in the snow, buried his face in his hands and his whole body shook as he sobbed, crying out No, No, Oh God No! As I stood there watching him it seemed like he was there on his knees in the snow for a long time but I’m sure it was only several seconds - he then stood up, squared his shoulders, wiped the tears from his face with his hands, then turned and hurried across the street to Jerry and Delta’s. He knew there was nothing he could do to save the house. . . . . he gathered up all his strength and courage and went to comfort his family. I never told Dad that I was there and how I and my heart cried with him, but I will never forget that image of Dad there in the snow as the reflection of the flames grotesquely lit up the cold winter night. To me my Dad had always been a giant of a man in all ways - and seeing him there that night on his knees in the snow watching as all his hard work was destroyed in the smoke and flames, but rising up with one thought - to go about taking care of his family, he grew even more. This truly made me know how really Great he was. I remember being across the street in Jerry and Delta’s house watching as the whole house was engulfed in flames and then as is it collapsed in fierce flames, sparks and thick black smoke. I remember crying when I realized Rusty, our Cocker Spaniel and our cat were missing. We found the cat a few days later, his hair singed but he was OK - but Rusty never made it out. I remember all of us being sent to different places to stay the rest of the night. Bonnie and I went with Uncle Lisle and Aunt Zella Chard. Aunt Zella put us to bed but I couldn’t sleep. All I could think about was how were we going to be able to all be together for Christmas - and after Christmas - Where were we going to live? My biggest fear was that we wouldn’t all be together. And my thoughts went to our Cow Suzy and how frightened she must be with the fire so close to the barn. I worried about her all night hoping she was alright. She survived it all but was so frightened she couldn’t let her milk down and we thought her bag would burst. I think it was Harold Chadwick who came and gave her something to calm her and then she was OK. We all went to town the next day and got shoes and clothes and coats given to us by JC Penny’s and spent Christmas at Marilyn and Grant’s in Salt Lake. So many people sent clothes and money and food and gifts. People from all over - out of state and people we didn’t even know. People in the Ward got together and fixed up the little old Poulsen House - up on the hill by Loewesteins. There was a Christmas tree with so many gifts and clothes for all of us and even Christmas dinner. There were beds for all of us and the house was furnished with dishes, cookware, linens and food. The house was very small and we were very crowded - but we were there all together and that was all I cared about. It truly was a remarkable Christmas. Some time after the fire I remember Dad telling us that we were so very blessed to survive the fire and it wasn’t luck that saved us. It was Dad who woke Mom - even after taking the pain medications and ,muscle relaxers that night - he was the one who woke up. Dad said he was sleeping very soundly when he felt a pressure on his feet and opened his eyes to see his Mother standing at the foot of the bed. She told him he must wake up that the house was on fire and he must hurry to get his family to safety. As I recall, Dad said that before he fully realized what he was doing or saying he grabbed Mom, picked her up and lifted her over the top of him telling her they needed to get all the kids out fast because the house was on fire. Grandma Creamer had passed on several years before but she was there and woke Dad - She is truly our guardian angel. ( Grandma Ida may Marriott Creamer died 13 May 1949) In days that followed I remember going to the hole where the house once stood and sifting thru ashes to see if we could find anything that wasn’t totally destroyed. We found a watch that was on a dresser in Mom and Dads room - the hands melted at approximately 11:00 and as I recall a pair of vases that had been given to Mom and Dad when they got married. Aunt Gladys was able to somewhat restore them but the heat had been so intense there wasn’t much of anything else. But what really mattered - we were all together and safe and we had each other

House Fire Night of December 23, 1956

Contributor: Lona Graham Created: 11 months ago Updated: 5 months ago

A Recollection By Luana Creamer Middleton This is as I remember the night of December 23rd, 1956 the night we lost our home in the fire - I remember Dad had been experiencing some pretty severe back pain that night (he had broken his back several months before) and had taken pain medication and muscle relaxers before going to bed. Mom said it was usually difficult to get him awake to go to work in the morning when he had taken the medication at night. We were all in bed sound asleep - it was somewhere near 11:00 PM. I remember Mom coming upstairs to the bedroom where Bonnie and I and Ida May and Janice were sleeping. She shook us awake yelling to us that the house was on fire and for Bonnie and I to go to the boys bedroom and get them out as fast as we could. (The boys bedroom was at the back of the house and our bedroom was upstairs and towards the front) Mom grabbed Janice out of her crib, Bonnie and I grabbed Ida May and Mom rushed us down the stairs ahead of her. When we got down the stairs and into the kitchen I looked back to make sure Mom was coming. As she got to the bottom of the stairs carrying Janice, the wall on the left of the stairs exploded and the stairs were immediately engulfed in flames. Mom barely made it down. I remember My eyes burning from the smoke and heat of the flames. Bonnie and I ran to the boys bedroom taking Ida May with us and threw the covers off the boys yelling for them to wake up, the house was on fire and we needed to get out fast! Dave was always difficult to wake and he grabbed the covers, pulled them up over his head and said to leave him alone he was tired - but we managed to get him and the other three awake and pushed David, Tom, Val and Leath out the back door of the house ahead of us. I was carrying Ida May and as we ran out the back door I thought I heard the phone ring and all I could think was I needed to answer the phone and tell them to send the fire department. I ran back in the house and into the living room - the heat and smoke were so bad I couldn’t breathe and I remember watching the flames climb up the east wall and across the ceiling on the north end of the living room. I grabbed the phone to answer it but the smoke and the flames were so hot that I couldn’t make a sound. I just stood there watching the flames as if in a trance - then I turned and saw the reflection of the flames on the glass of Marilyn’s graduation picture that sat on the buffet near the phone - it was as if it triggered my mind to what I needed to do and I remember throwing the receiver, hitting the picture smashing the glass and I ran out the back door. I don’t remember still having Ida May in my arms but she remembers the flames and the picture so I must have still been carrying her. I must have then taken her across the street to Jerry and Delta Southwick’s house because I remember running back across the street to our house to see if I could help Dad - I saw him go to the north side of the house and then ran back to the front as one of the front windows blew out showering the snow with glass and black soot. I will never forget - Dad dropped to his knees in the snow, buried his face in his hands and his whole body shook as he sobbed, crying out No, No, Oh God No! As I stood there watching him it seemed like he was there on his knees in the snow for a long time but I’m sure it was only several seconds - he then stood up, squared his shoulders, wiped the tears from his face with his hands, then turned and hurried across the street to Jerry and Delta’s. He knew there was nothing he could do to save the house. . . . . he gathered up all his strength and courage and went to comfort his family. I never told Dad that I was there and how I and my heart cried with him, but I will never forget that image of Dad there in the snow as the reflection of the flames grotesquely lit up the cold winter night. To me my Dad had always been a giant of a man in all ways - and seeing him there that night on his knees in the snow watching as all his hard work was destroyed in the smoke and flames, but rising up with one thought - to go about taking care of his family, he grew even more. This truly made me know how really Great he was. I remember being across the street in Jerry and Delta’s house watching as the whole house was engulfed in flames and then as is it collapsed in fierce flames, sparks and thick black smoke. I remember crying when I realized Rusty, our Cocker Spaniel and our cat were missing. We found the cat a few days later, his hair singed but he was OK - but Rusty never made it out. I remember all of us being sent to different places to stay the rest of the night. Bonnie and I went with Uncle Lisle and Aunt Zella Chard. Aunt Zella put us to bed but I couldn’t sleep. All I could think about was how were we going to be able to all be together for Christmas - and after Christmas - Where were we going to live? My biggest fear was that we wouldn’t all be together. And my thoughts went to our Cow Suzy and how frightened she must be with the fire so close to the barn. I worried about her all night hoping she was alright. She survived it all but was so frightened she couldn’t let her milk down and we thought her bag would burst. I think it was Harold Chadwick who came and gave her something to calm her and then she was OK. We all went to town the next day and got shoes and clothes and coats given to us by JC Penny’s and spent Christmas at Marilyn and Grant’s in Salt Lake. So many people sent clothes and money and food and gifts. People from all over - out of state and people we didn’t even know. People in the Ward got together and fixed up the little old Poulsen House - up on the hill by Loewesteins. There was a Christmas tree with so many gifts and clothes for all of us and even Christmas dinner. There were beds for all of us and the house was furnished with dishes, cookware, linens and food. The house was very small and we were very crowded - but we were there all together and that was all I cared about. It truly was a remarkable Christmas. Some time after the fire I remember Dad telling us that we were so very blessed to survive the fire and it wasn’t luck that saved us. It was Dad who woke Mom - even after taking the pain medications and ,muscle relaxers that night - he was the one who woke up. Dad said he was sleeping very soundly when he felt a pressure on his feet and opened his eyes to see his Mother standing at the foot of the bed. She told him he must wake up that the house was on fire and he must hurry to get his family to safety. As I recall, Dad said that before he fully realized what he was doing or saying he grabbed Mom, picked her up and lifted her over the top of him telling her they needed to get all the kids out fast because the house was on fire. Grandma Creamer had passed on several years before but she was there and woke Dad - She is truly our guardian angel. ( Grandma Ida may Marriott Creamer died 13 May 1949) In days that followed I remember going to the hole where the house once stood and sifting thru ashes to see if we could find anything that wasn’t totally destroyed. We found a watch that was on a dresser in Mom and Dads room - the hands melted at approximately 11:00 and as I recall a pair of vases that had been given to Mom and Dad when they got married. Aunt Gladys was able to somewhat restore them but the heat had been so intense there wasn’t much of anything else. But what really mattered - we were all together and safe and we had each other

House Fire Night of December 23, 1956

Contributor: Lona Graham Created: 11 months ago Updated: 5 months ago

A Recollection By Luana Creamer Middleton This is as I remember the night of December 23rd, 1956 the night we lost our home in the fire - I remember Dad had been experiencing some pretty severe back pain that night (he had broken his back several months before) and had taken pain medication and muscle relaxers before going to bed. Mom said it was usually difficult to get him awake to go to work in the morning when he had taken the medication at night. We were all in bed sound asleep - it was somewhere near 11:00 PM. I remember Mom coming upstairs to the bedroom where Bonnie and I and Ida May and Janice were sleeping. She shook us awake yelling to us that the house was on fire and for Bonnie and I to go to the boys bedroom and get them out as fast as we could. (The boys bedroom was at the back of the house and our bedroom was upstairs and towards the front) Mom grabbed Janice out of her crib, Bonnie and I grabbed Ida May and Mom rushed us down the stairs ahead of her. When we got down the stairs and into the kitchen I looked back to make sure Mom was coming. As she got to the bottom of the stairs carrying Janice, the wall on the left of the stairs exploded and the stairs were immediately engulfed in flames. Mom barely made it down. I remember My eyes burning from the smoke and heat of the flames. Bonnie and I ran to the boys bedroom taking Ida May with us and threw the covers off the boys yelling for them to wake up, the house was on fire and we needed to get out fast! Dave was always difficult to wake and he grabbed the covers, pulled them up over his head and said to leave him alone he was tired - but we managed to get him and the other three awake and pushed David, Tom, Val and Leath out the back door of the house ahead of us. I was carrying Ida May and as we ran out the back door I thought I heard the phone ring and all I could think was I needed to answer the phone and tell them to send the fire department. I ran back in the house and into the living room - the heat and smoke were so bad I couldn’t breathe and I remember watching the flames climb up the east wall and across the ceiling on the north end of the living room. I grabbed the phone to answer it but the smoke and the flames were so hot that I couldn’t make a sound. I just stood there watching the flames as if in a trance - then I turned and saw the reflection of the flames on the glass of Marilyn’s graduation picture that sat on the buffet near the phone - it was as if it triggered my mind to what I needed to do and I remember throwing the receiver, hitting the picture smashing the glass and I ran out the back door. I don’t remember still having Ida May in my arms but she remembers the flames and the picture so I must have still been carrying her. I must have then taken her across the street to Jerry and Delta Southwick’s house because I remember running back across the street to our house to see if I could help Dad - I saw him go to the north side of the house and then ran back to the front as one of the front windows blew out showering the snow with glass and black soot. I will never forget - Dad dropped to his knees in the snow, buried his face in his hands and his whole body shook as he sobbed, crying out No, No, Oh God No! As I stood there watching him it seemed like he was there on his knees in the snow for a long time but I’m sure it was only several seconds - he then stood up, squared his shoulders, wiped the tears from his face with his hands, then turned and hurried across the street to Jerry and Delta’s. He knew there was nothing he could do to save the house. . . . . he gathered up all his strength and courage and went to comfort his family. I never told Dad that I was there and how I and my heart cried with him, but I will never forget that image of Dad there in the snow as the reflection of the flames grotesquely lit up the cold winter night. To me my Dad had always been a giant of a man in all ways - and seeing him there that night on his knees in the snow watching as all his hard work was destroyed in the smoke and flames, but rising up with one thought - to go about taking care of his family, he grew even more. This truly made me know how really Great he was. I remember being across the street in Jerry and Delta’s house watching as the whole house was engulfed in flames and then as is it collapsed in fierce flames, sparks and thick black smoke. I remember crying when I realized Rusty, our Cocker Spaniel and our cat were missing. We found the cat a few days later, his hair singed but he was OK - but Rusty never made it out. I remember all of us being sent to different places to stay the rest of the night. Bonnie and I went with Uncle Lisle and Aunt Zella Chard. Aunt Zella put us to bed but I couldn’t sleep. All I could think about was how were we going to be able to all be together for Christmas - and after Christmas - Where were we going to live? My biggest fear was that we wouldn’t all be together. And my thoughts went to our Cow Suzy and how frightened she must be with the fire so close to the barn. I worried about her all night hoping she was alright. She survived it all but was so frightened she couldn’t let her milk down and we thought her bag would burst. I think it was Harold Chadwick who came and gave her something to calm her and then she was OK. We all went to town the next day and got shoes and clothes and coats given to us by JC Penny’s and spent Christmas at Marilyn and Grant’s in Salt Lake. So many people sent clothes and money and food and gifts. People from all over - out of state and people we didn’t even know. People in the Ward got together and fixed up the little old Poulsen House - up on the hill by Loewesteins. There was a Christmas tree with so many gifts and clothes for all of us and even Christmas dinner. There were beds for all of us and the house was furnished with dishes, cookware, linens and food. The house was very small and we were very crowded - but we were there all together and that was all I cared about. It truly was a remarkable Christmas. Some time after the fire I remember Dad telling us that we were so very blessed to survive the fire and it wasn’t luck that saved us. It was Dad who woke Mom - even after taking the pain medications and ,muscle relaxers that night - he was the one who woke up. Dad said he was sleeping very soundly when he felt a pressure on his feet and opened his eyes to see his Mother standing at the foot of the bed. She told him he must wake up that the house was on fire and he must hurry to get his family to safety. As I recall, Dad said that before he fully realized what he was doing or saying he grabbed Mom, picked her up and lifted her over the top of him telling her they needed to get all the kids out fast because the house was on fire. Grandma Creamer had passed on several years before but she was there and woke Dad - She is truly our guardian angel. ( Grandma Ida may Marriott Creamer died 13 May 1949) In days that followed I remember going to the hole where the house once stood and sifting thru ashes to see if we could find anything that wasn’t totally destroyed. We found a watch that was on a dresser in Mom and Dads room - the hands melted at approximately 11:00 and as I recall a pair of vases that had been given to Mom and Dad when they got married. Aunt Gladys was able to somewhat restore them but the heat had been so intense there wasn’t much of anything else. But what really mattered - we were all together and safe and we had each other

House Fire Night of December 23, 1956

Contributor: finnsh Created: 11 months ago Updated: 5 months ago

A Recollection By Luana Creamer Middleton This is as I remember the night of December 23rd, 1956 the night we lost our home in the fire - I remember Dad had been experiencing some pretty severe back pain that night (he had broken his back several months before) and had taken pain medication and muscle relaxers before going to bed. Mom said it was usually difficult to get him awake to go to work in the morning when he had taken the medication at night. We were all in bed sound asleep - it was somewhere near 11:00 PM. I remember Mom coming upstairs to the bedroom where Bonnie and I and Ida May and Janice were sleeping. She shook us awake yelling to us that the house was on fire and for Bonnie and I to go to the boys bedroom and get them out as fast as we could. (The boys bedroom was at the back of the house and our bedroom was upstairs and towards the front) Mom grabbed Janice out of her crib, Bonnie and I grabbed Ida May and Mom rushed us down the stairs ahead of her. When we got down the stairs and into the kitchen I looked back to make sure Mom was coming. As she got to the bottom of the stairs carrying Janice, the wall on the left of the stairs exploded and the stairs were immediately engulfed in flames. Mom barely made it down. I remember My eyes burning from the smoke and heat of the flames. Bonnie and I ran to the boys bedroom taking Ida May with us and threw the covers off the boys yelling for them to wake up, the house was on fire and we needed to get out fast! Dave was always difficult to wake and he grabbed the covers, pulled them up over his head and said to leave him alone he was tired - but we managed to get him and the other three awake and pushed David, Tom, Val and Leath out the back door of the house ahead of us. I was carrying Ida May and as we ran out the back door I thought I heard the phone ring and all I could think was I needed to answer the phone and tell them to send the fire department. I ran back in the house and into the living room - the heat and smoke were so bad I couldn’t breathe and I remember watching the flames climb up the east wall and across the ceiling on the north end of the living room. I grabbed the phone to answer it but the smoke and the flames were so hot that I couldn’t make a sound. I just stood there watching the flames as if in a trance - then I turned and saw the reflection of the flames on the glass of Marilyn’s graduation picture that sat on the buffet near the phone - it was as if it triggered my mind to what I needed to do and I remember throwing the receiver, hitting the picture smashing the glass and I ran out the back door. I don’t remember still having Ida May in my arms but she remembers the flames and the picture so I must have still been carrying her. I must have then taken her across the street to Jerry and Delta Southwick’s house because I remember running back across the street to our house to see if I could help Dad - I saw him go to the north side of the house and then ran back to the front as one of the front windows blew out showering the snow with glass and black soot. I will never forget - Dad dropped to his knees in the snow, buried his face in his hands and his whole body shook as he sobbed, crying out No, No, Oh God No! As I stood there watching him it seemed like he was there on his knees in the snow for a long time but I’m sure it was only several seconds - he then stood up, squared his shoulders, wiped the tears from his face with his hands, then turned and hurried across the street to Jerry and Delta’s. He knew there was nothing he could do to save the house. . . . . he gathered up all his strength and courage and went to comfort his family. I never told Dad that I was there and how I and my heart cried with him, but I will never forget that image of Dad there in the snow as the reflection of the flames grotesquely lit up the cold winter night. To me my Dad had always been a giant of a man in all ways - and seeing him there that night on his knees in the snow watching as all his hard work was destroyed in the smoke and flames, but rising up with one thought - to go about taking care of his family, he grew even more. This truly made me know how really Great he was. I remember being across the street in Jerry and Delta’s house watching as the whole house was engulfed in flames and then as is it collapsed in fierce flames, sparks and thick black smoke. I remember crying when I realized Rusty, our Cocker Spaniel and our cat were missing. We found the cat a few days later, his hair singed but he was OK - but Rusty never made it out. I remember all of us being sent to different places to stay the rest of the night. Bonnie and I went with Uncle Lisle and Aunt Zella Chard. Aunt Zella put us to bed but I couldn’t sleep. All I could think about was how were we going to be able to all be together for Christmas - and after Christmas - Where were we going to live? My biggest fear was that we wouldn’t all be together. And my thoughts went to our Cow Suzy and how frightened she must be with the fire so close to the barn. I worried about her all night hoping she was alright. She survived it all but was so frightened she couldn’t let her milk down and we thought her bag would burst. I think it was Harold Chadwick who came and gave her something to calm her and then she was OK. We all went to town the next day and got shoes and clothes and coats given to us by JC Penny’s and spent Christmas at Marilyn and Grant’s in Salt Lake. So many people sent clothes and money and food and gifts. People from all over - out of state and people we didn’t even know. People in the Ward got together and fixed up the little old Poulsen House - up on the hill by Loewesteins. There was a Christmas tree with so many gifts and clothes for all of us and even Christmas dinner. There were beds for all of us and the house was furnished with dishes, cookware, linens and food. The house was very small and we were very crowded - but we were there all together and that was all I cared about. It truly was a remarkable Christmas. Some time after the fire I remember Dad telling us that we were so very blessed to survive the fire and it wasn’t luck that saved us. It was Dad who woke Mom - even after taking the pain medications and ,muscle relaxers that night - he was the one who woke up. Dad said he was sleeping very soundly when he felt a pressure on his feet and opened his eyes to see his Mother standing at the foot of the bed. She told him he must wake up that the house was on fire and he must hurry to get his family to safety. As I recall, Dad said that before he fully realized what he was doing or saying he grabbed Mom, picked her up and lifted her over the top of him telling her they needed to get all the kids out fast because the house was on fire. Grandma Creamer had passed on several years before but she was there and woke Dad - She is truly our guardian angel. ( Grandma Ida may Marriott Creamer died 13 May 1949) In days that followed I remember going to the hole where the house once stood and sifting thru ashes to see if we could find anything that wasn’t totally destroyed. We found a watch that was on a dresser in Mom and Dads room - the hands melted at approximately 11:00 and as I recall a pair of vases that had been given to Mom and Dad when they got married. Aunt Gladys was able to somewhat restore them but the heat had been so intense there wasn’t much of anything else. But what really mattered - we were all together and safe and we had each other

Life timeline of John LaMar Creamer

1917
John LaMar Creamer was born on 7 Jun 1917
John LaMar Creamer was 12 years old when The New York Stock Exchange crashes in what will be called the Crash of '29 or "Black Tuesday", ending the Great Bull Market of the 1920s and beginning the Great Depression. The New York Stock Exchange, is an American stock exchange located at 11 Wall Street, Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York. It is by far the world's largest stock exchange by market capitalization of its listed companies at US$21.3 trillion as of June 2017. The average daily trading value was approximately US$169 billion in 2013. The NYSE trading floor is located at 11 Wall Street and is composed of 21 rooms used for the facilitation of trading. A fifth trading room, located at 30 Broad Street, was closed in February 2007. The main building and the 11 Wall Street building were designated National Historic Landmarks in 1978.
1929
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John LaMar Creamer was 22 years old when World War II: Nazi Germany and Slovakia invade Poland, beginning the European phase of World War II. World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most global war in history; it directly involved more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. In a state of total war, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.
1939
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John LaMar Creamer was 28 years old when World War II: Combat ends in the Pacific Theater: The Japanese Instrument of Surrender is signed by Japanese Foreign Minister Mamoru Shigemitsu and accepted aboard the battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay. The Pacific War, sometimes called the Asia-Pacific War, was the theater of World War II that was fought in the Pacific and Asia. It was fought over a vast area that included the Pacific Ocean and islands, the South West Pacific, South-East Asia, and in China.
1945
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John LaMar Creamer was 38 years old when Disneyland Hotel opens to the public in Anaheim, California. The Disneyland Hotel is a resort hotel located at the Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, California, owned by the Walt Disney Company and operated through its Parks, Experiences and Consumer Products division. Opened on October 5, 1955, as a motor inn owned and operated by Jack Wrather under an agreement with Walt Disney, the hotel was the first to officially bear the Disney name. Under Wrather's ownership, the hotel underwent several expansions and renovations over the years before being acquired by Disney in 1988. The hotel was downsized to its present capacity in 1999 as part of the Disneyland Resort expansion.
1955
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John LaMar Creamer was 47 years old when Martin Luther King Jr. received the Nobel Peace Prize for combating racial inequality through nonviolence. Martin Luther King Jr. was an American Baptist minister and activist who became the most visible spokesperson and leader in the civil rights movement from 1954 until his death in 1968. Born in Atlanta, King is best known for advancing civil rights through nonviolence and civil disobedience, tactics his Christian beliefs and the nonviolent activism of Mahatma Gandhi helped inspire.
1964
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John LaMar Creamer was 55 years old when Munich massacre: Nine Israeli athletes die (along with a German policeman) at the hands of the Palestinian "Black September" terrorist group after being taken hostage at the Munich Olympic Games. Two other Israeli athletes were slain in the initial attack the previous day. The Munich massacre was an attack during the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, West Germany, in which the Palestinian terrorist group Black September took eleven Israeli Olympic team members hostage and killed them along with a West German police officer.
1972
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John LaMar Creamer was 63 years old when Mount St. Helens erupts in Washington, United States, killing 57 people and causing $3 billion in damage. Mount St. Helens or Louwala-Clough is an active stratovolcano located in Skamania County, Washington, in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. It is 50 miles (80 km) northeast of Portland, Oregon and 96 miles (154 km) south of Seattle, Washington. Mount St. Helens takes its English name from the British diplomat Lord St Helens, a friend of explorer George Vancouver who made a survey of the area in the late 18th century. The volcano is located in the Cascade Range and is part of the Cascade Volcanic Arc, a segment of the Pacific Ring of Fire that includes over 160 active volcanoes. This volcano is well known for its ash explosions and pyroclastic flows.
1980
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John LaMar Creamer was 74 years old when The World Wide Web is opened to the public. The World Wide Web (WWW), also called the Web, is an information space where documents and other web resources are identified by Uniform Resource Locators (URLs), interlinked by hypertext links, and accessible via the Internet. English scientist Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web in 1989. He wrote the first web browser in 1990 while employed at CERN in Switzerland. The browser was released outside CERN in 1991, first to other research institutions starting in January 1991 and to the general public on the Internet in August 1991.
1991
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John LaMar Creamer died on 27 Dec 2001 at the age of 84
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for John LaMar Creamer (7 Jun 1917 - 27 Dec 2001), BillionGraves Record 760954 Liberty, Weber, Utah, United States

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