John Christopher Armstrong

27 Nov 1813 - 7 Jun 1881

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John Christopher Armstrong

27 Nov 1813 - 7 Jun 1881
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John Christopher Armstrong, a twin brother to Robert Armstrong, was born 27 November 1813 at Carlisle, Cumberland England. His parents were John Armstrong and Elanor Graham. He married Mark Kirkbride, 8 September 1840 at Wetheral, England. She was the daughter of John and Margaret Peel Kirkbride, bo

Life Information

John Christopher Armstrong

Born:
Died:

Chestnut Hill Cemetery

137-231 Wills Rd
Connellsville, Fayette, Pennsylvania
United States

Epitaph

**Come Unto Me Ye Heavy Laden**

Headstone Description

**JOHN...(Aka) Also known as...Drewer C Iveson between 1857 & 1881 Civil War Soldier: Company A, 25th Ohio Volunteer Infantry...

Military Service

INFANTRY
AMERICAN CIVIL WAR
Transcriber

GraveHunter

December 29, 2014
Photographer

Tombstoneguy

June 6, 2014

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Grave Site of John Christopher

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Memories

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Obituary of Mary Kirkbride Wade

Contributor: GraveHunter Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Obituary notes Deseret Weekly 05-04-1895: Mary Kirkbride Wade. Died November 26, 1894, at Teasdale, Wayne county, of old age, Mary Kirkbride, daughter of John and Margaret Peel Kirkbride; born June 20 1815, in Low Crosby, four miles out of Carlisle, England. She was married to John C Armstrong, September 8, 1840, at Wetherall England; was baptized in the river Mercer July 21 1844; emigrated to Utah, arriving in Salt Lake Valley in September 1847. She endured all the hardships and privations of the first settlers in Utah; was married again to Moses Wade December 20, 1854. She has two sons and two daughters, 23 grandchildren and 9 great grandchildren to mourn her loss. She was a kind and loving mother, and a faithful Latter-day Saint. (communited) Millennial Star.

John Christopher Armstrong and Mary Kirkbride Armstrong

Contributor: GraveHunter Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

John Christopher Armstrong, a twin brother to Robert Armstrong, was born 27 November 1813 at Carlisle, Cumberland England. His parents were John Armstrong and Elanor Graham. He married Mark Kirkbride, 8 September 1840 at Wetheral, England. She was the daughter of John and Margaret Peel Kirkbride, born 20 June 1815 at Low Crosby, four miles out of Carlisle, Cumberland England. They had one son William, born 10 August 1841 at Eccles, near Manchester England. He died 21 August 1841. They were converted to the Gospel by the Mormon Missionaries and one time grandmother hid Parley P. Pratt under her feather bed for safety when a mob searched her home for him. They were baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Manchester, England in the river Merser, 21 July 1844. Grandfather’s relatives were very bitter against the Mormons and tried to get he and his wife to not join the Church and come to America but they were thoroughly converted to the Church and emigrated to the United Stated in 1845, settling in St. Louis Missouri, where their son Joseph Hyrum was born, 14 October 1846. Grandfather was a tailor by trade and had an establishment of his own and sixty men worked under him. He was well to do, having every thing they wished for. They had lovely clothing of the finest and best material and as Grandmother had a good supply of very nice clothes she thought it wise to bring as much of them to America as she could. Several trunks were filled with their nice suits, dressed and clothing of every kind and bolts of fine cloth. Their trunks were taken secretly, one or two at a time, to the ship so their people would know nothing about it, but after sailing and having their baggage checked it was found they had more than was allowed so the extra trunks were thrown overboard. They sailed up the Mississippi River to join the Exodus in the spring of 1847. Their history is a record of privation and endurance unequalled since the days of the Moors in Spain, the Huguenots in France and the Protestants in Holland, when murder sought to exterminate all heresy in the name of the Catholic Church for the Glory of God. It was the same spirit in the Protestant heart that sought the destructions of Mormonism. Those who had stopped their plows, who had silenced their hammers, their axes, their shuttles and their workshop wheels, those who had put out their fires, who had eaten their food, spoiled their orchards and trampled underfoot their thousands of acres of un-harvested bread... these were the keepers of their dwellings, the carousers in their town and whose drunken riot insulted the ears of their dying. Out into the trackless American wilds, into an Indian country the Mormons wended their way weary and destitute for more than fifteen hundred miles. Grandmother said while crossing the State if Iowa during the rainy season all the water they had for days was dipped from the wagon tracks and for days and days they never laid down in a dry bed. The distance they traveled each day was so short a horseman could ride back and bring fire from the camp of the night before, and as matches were scarce they did this many times. God opened their way and as a result of their unity, humility and faith through severe tribulations and deep sorrows, they were guided to a refuge in the valley of the Great Salt Lake. The gathering of the Lord's people, "One of a city and two of a family," brings about many conditions, which the Savior said would be the result of the preaching of His gospel. Grandfather, Grandmother and son Joseph Hyrum Armstrong came in Abram a Smoot's Company. George B. Wallace's Fifty and Samuel Turnbow's Ten. Captain Wallace's Fifty was organized on the bank of the Elk Horn River, Friday 18 June 1847, and on the same day moved a mile westward and camped on the prairie. The next day 19 June 1847, the Company reached the Platte River and on 22 June 1847 all companies of the Camps moved westward and traveled close together. At night the two Fifties belonging to the same Hundred generally camped together. 30 July 1847 they reached Chimney Rock and on 5 August 1847 camped at Fort Laramie, when a halt was made for a few days for the purpose of repairing wagons and resting the animals. On 27 August 1847 having reached the Sweetwater River near Independence Rock, the teams in the Companies were equalized to the different wagons. Some of the animals had become weak and a number had died. On the 25 September 1847 the advanced teams of the Company arrived in the Salt Lake Valley and on the 26 September 1847, joined the Pioneer Brethren on the cite of Salt Lake City. The last of Captain Wallace's Company arrived on 29 September 1847. This Company had crossed the Plains and Mountains in as good shape and with less loss than any of the other Companies. It also extended help to some of the Companies that had lost so many of their cattle with Indians, poisonings and other causes. Two babies were born on the way. This Company met President Brigham Young and Company going back to Winter Quarters. Grandfather and Family arrived in the Salt Lake Valley 26 September 1847. Upon reaching Apox Woodruff's cabin Grandmother knelt and thanked God that here they could worship Him in peace. They moved on the block north of the Pioneer Square. Grandfather was a member of the Gallos Brass Band and later taught and led a band of his own. He was a Dancing Master and Musician of ability and owned a number of instruments. He had blue eyes and brown hair, was of medium height and had a very kind loving disposition and was full of life. He was a "Bugler" in Parley P. Pratt's Company of Fifty men sent to explore Southern Utah in the winter of 1849- 1850. His diary reads: "On the 12th of January we camped at the mouth of Hieroglyphic Canyon at the west end of little Salt Lake." They explored Sanpete Valley to Panguitch, Utah then crossing the mountains, wading in snow two feet deep, crossing streams and came into the valley just north of Cedar City, Utah. While on this expedition, Grandfather carved his name in the rock wall of the canyon, which is still legible. He was called with a Company of men to defend Fort Bridger, Wyoming against Indians who were on the WarPath. He was well acquainted with Brigham Young and Family, also Wilford Woodruff, who father ate with, has family all the way across the plains. He did some work at his trade and at one time made a pair of trousers for Brigham Young from one of his large broadcloth cloaks. He was called to go on a Mission to England and left Salt Lake City, 5 May 1852. He died on his way home after serving his Mission at St. Louis, Missouri, probably from the cholera epidemic. Grandmother was left with three small children, Joseph Hyrum, Mary Elanor and John Graham, passing through the hardships of the early settlers of Utah. Mary Kirkbride (Armstrong) was born 20 June 1815 at Low Crosby, four miles out of Carlisle, England. Her parents were John Kirkbride and Margaret Peel. She married John Christopher Armstrong, 8 September 1840, at Wetheral, England. She was baptized into the Church in Manchester, England in the river Merser, 21 July 1844. Grandmother, while in England, never needing to soil her hands with work. She had servants to do everything. She had a well-furnished seven-room house and beautiful clothing made of the finest material. Grandfather had a brother William, who was a rich pawnbroker, and who while Grandfather was in England on a Mission, wanted him to write to her and tell her he would come to Utah and get her and family and take them back to England and make her heiress to his property and everything he possessed if she would give up her religion. Grandfather wouldn't write, but told his brother if he wanted to write and make his offer and Grandmother accepted it, he would stay. William wrote, but she said; "Not for all the gold in England would she give up her religion." She was a kind and loving Mother and a faithful Latter-day Saint. In 1848 she helped fight the oncoming crickets with a broom made of small willows. The third day with the crickets coming thicker and faster she threw down her broom saying, "Enough, Oh Lord, I can do no more." It was then while looking to the west she saw the coming of the Sea Gulls. She watched them devour the crickets and fly to the nearest water, drink and disgorge and return to the attack. She bowed down in prayer thanking God for His care of His children and another test of her faith and courage. She was quite apt with her needle and went out sewing among families and in this way earned a living for herself and family and with all her hard earnings she would share her last pound of flour with the distressed. Her life long friend came to her house disheartened and hungry and she gave her all she had left. That night they both commended themselves to their Heavenly Father's care. The next morning as Grandmother opened her door to sweep the snow out, a sack of corn meal fell into the room. Gathering it in her arms she said; "See our Father has not forgotten us, here is food for thee and me." One winter her children went barefoot except when they wore moccasins, which she made from Grandfather's cloak. At the time of "The Move" on approach of Johnson's Army, the family was taken by team to American Fork, Utah where they remained till their recall to Salt Lake City. Brother and Sister Greenwood, English acquaintances lived there. A lean-to was made with a wagon cover on the north side of the house and Grandmother and family lived there. On 20 December 1854, Grandmother married Moses Wade of Mormon Battalion fame. He was born 12 July 1792 and died at their home in Salt Lake City, 20 March 1869. They had one child Maria Jane Wade. Grandmother lived to see all her children grown and married. The later years of her life were passed at the home of her daughter, Mary Elanor Adams, Teasdale, Wayne County, Utah. She died 20 November 1894 and was buried at Teasdale, Utah. She was 79 years old. She came up through much tribulation true to the faith, and lived in the hope of a glorious resurrection. Aye, call that Holy ground, Which first their brave feet trod; They left unstained what here they found, Freedom to worship God. Written by: Marcia A. Jolley, Granddaughter James V. Armstrong, Grandson Marcia A. Jolley and James V. Armstrong are sister and brother to my mother Vera May Armstrong Lawrence. This is a history of my great Grandparents on the Armstrong side of the family. Maurine L. Ernstrom

Joseph Hyrum Armstrong Life Story by his own hand and submitted to Family Search by his great-great grandson Karl Seymor Schmutz

Contributor: GraveHunter Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

My father John Christopher Armstrong was born in Carlisle, Cumberland, England in 1813. My mother Mary Kirkbride was born in Low Crosby four miles out of Carlisle June 20, 1815. They were both baptized into the church in Manchester, England in the year 1844. They emigrated to America in 1845 settling in St. Louis, Missouri. where I was born October 14, 1846. They came up the Missouri River to join the exodus in the spring of 1847. My mother carried me in her arms through the Nauvoo Temple (then deserted). They came west for the gospels sake. We came in A.O. Smoots Company. George B. Wallace fifty, and Samuel Turnbows ten. In crossing the state of Iowa in the rainy season, I heard my mother say, what with the wallowing through the mud, getting stuck, doubling teams, breaking chains, etc, they would make such a short distance in a day (and matches being scarce) a horseman could ride back and bring fire back from the camp of the night before. All the water we used for days was dipped from the wagon trucks and for many days Mother said she never lay down in a dry bed, and having never seen an ox until she came to America, she walked day after day carrying me in her arms rather then trust me or herself behind "those things" as she called the oxen. My father a thorough English man (a tailor by trade) could not get used to the oxen and could not remember which was "gee" or "haw". So he walked on one side of them and my mother on the other. When the oxen came mothers way my father would cry out "head em Poll, head em" In this way they soon became used to the team of oxen and she gladly trusted them to draw here and her babe in the wagon. So with all the incidents in the "ups and downs" of crossing the plains we arrived in the valley on the 23rd of September 1847. My mother going down on her knees and kissing the dirt floor of Grandpa Apex Woodruffs cabin thanking God that here they could worship Him in peace. We moved on to a block just north of Pioneer Square. My father was a member of "Ballaus Brass Band". He was a trumpeteer in Parley P. Pratts Company in exploring Southern Utah in the winter of 1849-50. His diary reads that on January 12th 1850 we camped at the mouth of Hieroglyphics Canyon at the west end of Little Salt Lake. So my father was in Parowan Valley just one year before it was settled. In 1852 he returned to England on a mission and died in the mission field, leaving my mother a widow with 3 small children, myself, my sister Mary Eleanor, and brother John Graham, passing through the severe hardships of the early settlement of Utah. In 1848 my mother placing me in the shade of a bush fought the oncoming crickets with a broom made of small willows. The third day with the crickets coming thicker and faster she threw down her broom saying "enough O Lord, I can do more". It was then while looking to the west she saw the seagulls coming, and watched them alight and devour the crickets, fly to the nearest water, drink and disgorge and return to the attack. She then bowed down in prayer, thanking God for his care of his children and another test of her faith and courage. My mother was quite apt with her needle and used to go out sewing among families and in this way earned bread for us to eat and with all hard earning would share her last pound of flour with those in distress. I will tell of one instance among many. Mary Jackson Woodruff (mother of James Jackson) was a lifelong acquaintance. They traveled together across the plains. Mary Jackson became estranged from Wilford Woodruff and worked out taking her boy with her and often came to our house, this particular time my mother came home bringing a little flour which she immediately made into bread, or biscuits. We ate and were satisfied and there were two biscuits left, which was all there was to eat in the house. Late in the evening a cold winter night, came and Mary and her boy. After being warmed, Mary burst into tears. My mother coming to her said "O poll, what is the matter with thee". Sobbing she replied, "neither or the boy have had a bite to eat this day" "Now I know" said my mother "why we had two biscuits left". Bringing them out she fed the hungry. That night the two widows (so to speak) with their little flock around them commended them selves to their fathers care with not a bite of bread in the house. The next morning when my mother opened the door to sweep out the snow, a sack of cornmeal fell into the room. Gathering it into her arms she said, "see our Heavenly Father has not forgotten us, here is food for thee and for me." The cornmeal had been left by Brother Charles Miller who coming from the mill remembered he owed my father for making him a coat and "providently" fed the widows and the fatherless. As for shoes it was one thousand miles to the nearest pair of shoes. I remember one winter in particular that we went barefoot, but for moccasins mother made from a cloak of my fathers. the first shoes I can remember were old shoe tops tacked to wooden soles, called clogs. Later when in my teens, my shoes had holes just as big as my toes. There was a dance that night. I went to the chimney and blacking my shoes and stockings (or more properly my feet) went to the dance and enjoyed myself.forgetting my lower appendages. On December 20, 1854 mother married Moses Wade of Battalion fame. He died at our home November 20, 1869. Mother lived to see her children grown and married and passed on at the home of her daughter Mary Eleanor Adams, in Teasdale,Wayne County, Utah. in her 79th year and from her death bed sent me this message. "Tell my boy to keep his feet planted firmly upon the deck of the Old Ship Zion and she will carry him safely through". She had come up through much tribulation, true to the faith, and died in the hopes of a glorious resurrection. I was too young to remember of the first doings in Salt Lake City other them my going hungry and being poorly clad. I have dug sego's on Capitol Hill for my breakfast and roots and pigweed's for lunch and dinner. I remember holding to my mothers hand and watching the laying of the cornerstone of the Salt Lake Temple in 1853, was there at the laying of the capstone, was there at the dedication, and have officiated for the dead in that Holy House. My first school teacher was Miss Margret Judd, (mother of Rudger Clawson). In the little adobe school house on 2nd South between 3rd and 4th West in the old 15th Ward. I remember between seven of us. I attended Sister Sarah M. Kimball's school on the corner of 1st South and 2nd West. I gleaned many a peck of wheat in the old fort after it was turned into a wheat field. We have circled the "old Cedar Tree" many times as a boy. At the time of the move at the approach of Johnson's Army we were taken by a team of Bishop Harrington's to American Fork and my mother being an English acquaintance of Brother and Sister William Greenwood we made a loan of a wagon cover on the north side of their house and stayed there until our recall back to Salt Lake City. In connection with James W. Ure a lifelong chum I joined the first Sunday School organized in the 15th Ward in the winter of 1856, by Joseph E. Jensen and Richard Ballantyne, and in passing may I say I have been a pupil, teacher, and officer in the Sunday School from that day to this. My first sunday school teachers were Robert T. Burton, Nelson A. Empey, and John Clark. I remember well the building of the theater and the plays, "Pride of the Market", "Under the Gas Lights", also "the Coming of Julia Dean Hayne". I have danced the same set with President Brigham Young in the Old Social Hall. I remained in Salt Lake City until the spring of 1863 when I came to Cedar City with Brother John Middleton and wife to live with James Simkins (whose first wife was my mothers sister). May I tell you of our journey down in contrast of the travels of today. We came by oxen team and brother Middleton's ox "Darby", by name, was weak in the faith, or legs, for sometimes everyday old Darby would stop and every kind of persuasion severe or otherwise would not make him move. So we had to camp, and thus it was everyday. It took a full two weeks to reach Cedar City where it can now be covered in eight or ten hours. Taking me so long to get here I have remained ever since in Southern Utah. I moved with brother James Simkins to Adamsville, Beaver County, Utah taking up a small farm. I was married to Mary Ann Smith daughter of Joseph H. and Maria Stanford Smith in the Old Endowment House in Salt Lake City, Utah October 9, 1866 by Wilford Woodruff. Moved back to Cedar City in the fall of 1868. After which time I served two terms as City Councilman with Robert W. Heybourne as Mayor. An incident while I held this office was tracking down horse thieves, who had stolen two horses. I with my brother-in-law George Chaffin were to trail them and arrest them. We were told they had gone north and west. Going to Minersville and west beyond the hot spring I found I was on a blind trail. Leaving Chaffin at Adamsville, I went on to Beaver and there got onto a hot trail. Wiring for my Brother John and Chaffin to follow I struck out alone. I called on Sheriff Peter Huntsman of Filmore, and by riding all night in heavy rain I got them in Nephi. I had on a pair of pants very fancifully forced with buckskin. By the time I reached Nephi in the rain the buckskin pants had bagged at the knees and other places so badly that i thought I had enough buckskin for two or three pair of pants. But when they began to dry "oh my" they nearly pulled me off my horse and when my brother (who finally caught up) riding ahead was asked "which is the horse thief" answered "that fellow back there in the fancy buckskin pants". I was ever active in guarding the lives and property of the settlers against indian raids. In that memorable ninety days while not mustered into service with pension allowed, I kept horse saddled and gun where it could had at a moments notice. To illustrate that we were on the alert as "home guard" a runner came in from a ranch twelve miles out in the night saying the indians were threatening to make trouble and asked for help. One hour after the signal was given we were in the saddle reaching the ranch before daylight and brought the family to safety, and thus through those troublesome times the "home guard" slept with one eye open. I was ordained a Seventy in the 63rd Quorum December 3, 1868 by C.J. Arthur. Was called on a mission to Great Britain 1883, and returned due to ill health in 1884. Was called to be Superintendent of Parowan Stake Sunday School. Set apart by President Thomas Jefferson Jones September 1885. Held this position 22 years. Appointed 2nd Assistant to Stake President Charles Heybourne of the YMMIA 1886-1894. Called to the Eastern States Mission January 1890 and was released through ill health after 16 months in the field. In June 1891 set apart as one of the Seven Presidents of the 63rd Quorum of the Seventy by B.H. Roberts. In Oct 1896 was called by Bishop Williams H. Corry to labor as an ordinance worker in the St. George Temple, released in November 1898. Was ordained a High Priest by Bishop Charles Adams having been an active Ward Teacher nigh on to 60 years. When asked what I meant by active I answered "one who gets results", and in my four score years I am still active. I followed farming for a living. Farming at Enoch, Utah from 1876. Never went back to the farm after my returning as ordinance worker in the Temple in 1896. My wife Mary Ann bore me seven children, four boys and three girls. Joseph S. of Idaho Falls, Idaho, Mrs. Jane A. Jones, John M., and William of Enoch, Leroy S. and Mabel McFarlane of Cedar City and one daughter preceded her to the other side. She took Lucy Belle daughter of John T. Joseph and Elizabeth Elliker at the death of her mother when nine days old to whom she gave a mothers full love. She also took three of her brothers, Joseph S. Smiths children at the death of their mother one of whom she raised to womanhood. In the hard times of early Utah she carded spun and wove the cloth for her own wedding outfit from raw cotton. She was an active worker in the Relief Society all her married life. And after a happy married life of over 50 years in June 1921 she was stricken with a paralytic stroke and after 25 months of suffering was released. I buried her on the 30th of July 1923. Lucy Belle is still with me and is unmarried. I am still living and hope to meet my wife once again through the Gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ. Amen Joseph Hyrum died November 11, 1927 at the age of 81 years. He is buried in the Cedar City Cemetery. this history was written after the death of his wife in 1923 when he was in his late seventies. It was printed just as he wrote it and made available to his descendants in July 1973, so that they may know of the life of their wonderful pioneer Grandfather, Great Grandfather, Great Great Grandfather, and I Karl Seymor Schmutz, a great great grandson count it a great honor to be able to submit it to Family Search on August 20, 2014.

Baptism

Contributor: GraveHunter Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Baptized 21 July 1844 in England

Mission

Contributor: GraveHunter Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Early Mormon Missionaries Gender: Male Birth date, place: 27 November 1813, Carlisle, Cumberland, England Death date: 7 June 1881 Baptism date: 21 July 1844 Father's name: John Armstrong Mother's name: Eleanor Graham John Christopher Armstrong Europe May 1851–November 1853 Age Called: 37 Europe Departed From Home: 5 May 1851 Departed From Field: November 1853 Mission type: Proselytizing Marital Status: Plurally Married Priesthood office: Seventy Called From: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah Territory, United States Stories and Documents Historical Department journal history of the Church, 4 July 1852. British Mission manuscript history and historical reports, 1841-1971, LR 1140 2, Church History Library. "John C Armstrong" General Epistle Files, CHL. Notes Alt name: Drewer C Iveson

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John Christopher Armstrong

Family Search Person
27 Nov 1813 - 7 Jun 1881

John Christopher Armstrong

Historic Record
England, Kent, Register of Electors, 1570-1907

John Christopher Armstrong

Historic Record
England, Kent, Register of Electors, 1570-1907

John Christopher Armstrong

Historic Record
England, Kent, Register of Electors, 1570-1907

John Christopher Armstrong

Historic Record
England, Kent, Register of Electors, 1570-1907

John Christopher Armstrong

Historic Record
England, Kent, Register of Electors, 1570-1907

John Christopher Armstrong

Historic Record
England, Kent, Register of Electors, 1570-1907

John Christopher Armstrong

Historic Record
England, Kent, Register of Electors, 1570-1907

John Christopher Armstrong

Historic Record
England, Kent, Register of Electors, 1570-1907

John Christopher Armstrong

Historic Record
England, Kent, Register of Electors, 1570-1907

John Christopher Armstrong

Historic Record
England, Kent, Register of Electors, 1570-1907

John Christopher Armstrong

Historic Record
England, Kent, Register of Electors, 1570-1907

John Christopher Armstrong

Historic Record
England, Kent, Register of Electors, 1570-1907

John Christopher Armstrong

Historic Record
England, Kent, Register of Electors, 1570-1907

John Christopher Armstrong

Historic Record
England, Kent, Register of Electors, 1570-1907

John Christopher Armstrong

Historic Record
England, Kent, Register of Electors, 1570-1907

John Christopher Armstrong

Historic Record
England, Kent, Register of Electors, 1570-1907

John Christopher Armstrong

Historic Record
England, Kent, Register of Electors, 1570-1907

Military Service

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Transcription

Infantry Civil War

Branch

INFANTRY

Conflicts

AMERICAN CIVIL WAR

Life timeline of John Christopher Armstrong

1813
John Christopher Armstrong was born on 27 Nov 1813
John Christopher Armstrong was 12 years old when The Erie Canal opens: Passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie. The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System. Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.
John Christopher Armstrong was 18 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
John Christopher Armstrong was 27 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
John Christopher Armstrong was 46 years old when Charles Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
John Christopher Armstrong was 47 years old when Abraham Lincoln is elected as the 16th President of United States. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
John Christopher Armstrong was 61 years old when Winston Churchill, English colonel, journalist, and politician, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1965) Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill was a British politician, army officer, and writer, who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. As Prime Minister, Churchill led Britain to victory in the Second World War. Churchill represented five constituencies during his career as Member of Parliament (MP). Ideologically an economic liberal and British imperialist, he began and ended his parliamentary career as a member of the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955, but for twenty years from 1904 he was a prominent member of the Liberal Party.
John Christopher Armstrong died on 7 Jun 1881 at the age of 67
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for John Christopher Armstrong (27 Nov 1813 - 7 Jun 1881), BillionGraves Record 12101256 Connellsville, Fayette, Pennsylvania, United States

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