John A Burr

Died: 2 Sep 1914

Change Your Language

close

You can change the language of the BillionGraves website by changing the default language of your browser.

Learn More
English
Register

John A Burr

Died: 2 Sep 1914
edit Edit Record
photo Add Images
group_add Add Family
description Add a memory

Grave site information of John A Burr (Died: 2 Sep 1914) at Monticello City Cemetery in Monticello, San Juan, Utah, United States from BillionGraves

Life Information

John A Burr

Died:

Monticello City Cemetery

Monticello Cemetery Rd
Monticello, San Juan, Utah
United States

Military Service

PRIVATE
CAVALRY
INDIAN WARS
Transcriber

Todd Millett

May 23, 2019
Photographer

Todd Millett

May 22, 2019

Nearby Graves

See more nearby graves
Upgrade to BG+

Grave Site of John A

edit

John A Burr is buried in the Monticello City Cemetery at the location displayed on the map below. This GPS information is ONLY available at BillionGraves. Our technology can help you find the gravesite and other family members buried nearby.

Download the free BillionGraves mobile app for iPhone and Android before you go to the cemetery and it will guide you right to the gravesite.
android Google play phone_iphone App Store

Memories

add

John Atlantic Burr and Butch Cassidy

Contributor: Todd Millett Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

...LeRoy Parker, alias Butch Cassidy, was born and raised in Grass Valley in Southern Utah. He was raised in a Mormon town and attended L. D. S. church regularly. One night when he was escorting his lady friend home from Mutual there was a bully came along and tried to take the girl away from him and they got into a battle and LeRoy knocked the fellow out cold and he supposed that he had killed him. So he left and came to the Granite Ranch, here in Wayne County. Granite Ranch is eighteen miles south of Hanksville. The Ranch was owned by a cattle man by the name of Burr and all the desert between Granite Wash and Poison Spring Wash and the Dirty Devil River is called the Burr Desert. Well, LeRoy Parker came to Granite Ranch and applied for a job as cowpuncher. Mr. Burr asked him what his handle was and he said it was Butch Cassidy. He stayed there about one year then he came to Hanksville and got a job from Charley Gibbons and worked for him quite awhile. Then he left and went on the outlaw trail and ended up in Brown’s Hole Wyoming. The story of Matt Warner and Butch Cassidy was told to me by Matt Warner and the story of Butch Cassidy was told to me by Charley Gibbons after I came to Hanksvffle in 1935. And the story Matt and Charley told about Butch was identical so I believe they were true.... (partial portion of story found at: ******************************************************************************** ) OBSERVATION: (Not part of this story) It is interesting that Butch Cassidy was from Grass Valley, the same place that John A Burr was from. It is possible that they knew each other previously and that that is why Butch showed up at Burr's ranch...

(DONE!)Myron Leonard Burr (excerpts taken from Sarah Sloat's Diary)

Contributor: Todd Millett Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Myron Leonard Burr was the fifth child born to Charles Clark and Sarah Sloat Burr. He was born August 10,1857 in Salt Lake City, in what was then the territory of Utah. They were living in the First Ward at the time of his birth. In 1858, at the time of the unrest created by the arrival of Johnston's Army, the family was called to go to the Souther Mission in Payson, and Myron spent the next 18 years of his life helping the family and others settle Payson and the surrounding areas. His father established the second sawmill in Payson Canyon, and Myron spent many days at his father's side learning the trade. He also helped with the cows, horses and mules and worked on the family's farm. In November of 1873, he and his brother George went t Tintic, presumably with a load of lumber for the mines. They returned four days later. The sawmill business was a year round one, for CCB and his boys went to the "mill" and the canyon many times both summer and winter. In January 1874, she wrote: the boys were "fixin for Sevier." In April, Len, as he was called, went to the Sevier. Ten das later he returned home and joined the family for a birthday dinner for his sister, Laura. In October he went again to Sevier, returned home and then left again on October 19, returning this time on November 11. He stayed home for 5 days and then left again with his brother, John Atlantic. This time he returned home alone on the 30th. In December, he and his brother, George, went for a load of coal. The following year, he went to the "cars" (railroad). In March he went to Tintic to work and returned home in late April and worked with his father in the sawmill. On his 17th birthday, he went to the canyon. Grandfather left for Grass Valley on October 20th, 1875 and returned home on November 7th. He was home two days and then went with the men to Tintic. On the 18th, the family started for Grass Valley. Leonard and his brothers spent a considerable amount of time hunting, and there, in early February, they began to look for timber. On the 8th, the men went and got some house logs." on the 10th, Len had the backache so he must have strained himself lifting the logs. They spent the rest of the month in the mountain getting logs. If you go into the mountains west of Burrville, you can still see the high stumps of logs that were cut during the deep snow of that winter. On February 24th, the diary notes that "Frant" had a birthday and made an apron. "Frant" was Francis Caroline Cloward who was married to Len at a later time. The same entry said that "Len had gone to hunt cattle." In March he and Samuel Kay were hunting cattle. During the next several years, Len helped build the family home with the logs they gathered from the mountains. They made cheese and butter, went "berrin", hunted, farmed worked the sawmill, killed pigs, fried lard, hunted cows, hauled freight, bound oats, went to dances in Burrville, Koosharem and Greenwich, hauled wood and traveled. They made several trips to Payson and many to the Cove, which is now known as Glenwood. On one occasion, the "boys a peeling' bark, Myron cut his knee, he went down." This probably meant he went down to the Cove or Richfield for medical care. On his twenty-first birthday, he was baptized along with other members of his family. This was probably a second baptism, since many people were baptized again in those days. The family moved into the mountains during the summer with their dairy cows, where they made cheese. They spent their going back and forth between Fish Lake and Burrville, taking care of the farm and putting up hay. In 1879 he began going to "Rabit Valy," where they had their cattle, and his brother, John Atlantic, had apparently established residence in Teasdale. In January of 1880 he began to teach school and that lasted one week. I don't know whether he was just taking his turn or whether he didn't like it. In March he came home from the "Lake" snow blind. During the spring and summer, "Frant" spent considerable time in the Burr home; on Mondfay, October 25,1880, Sarah's diary entry states; A fix-en' Leonard off to get married. Len married Frant." Viola Burr Hanchett, a daughter, relates that "on one of his visits to his fiancé he invited her to take a walk with him to the corn fields where her father was cutting corn. During their conversation he asked for her hand in marriage. While they were on their way to get married, traveling by a team and covered wagon, a terrible snowstorm came up. It was very cold and Mother didn't have any head dress. Father took his nice, red bandanna handkerchief and gave it to her to wear on her head. Quite the style now a days. They were sealed by Daniel H. Wells on November 18,1880 in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. They built a log home in what is now Burrville, a village about a mile northwest of the home he helped his parents build shortly after they entered the valley in 1875. This home is still being lived in by family members as of 2015. My Great grandmother and Great grandfather saw many changes during their lifetime, from riding on horseback, covered wagons, buggies and trains to automobiles. I'm sure neither of them ever flew in an airplane. They also saw the advent of paved roads, and Great grandmother saw water piped into the homes, and indoor plumbing and the demise of the "thundermug; Burrville got electricity about the time of her death. They left a heritage of faith, hard work, sacrifice and service to their God and fellowmen; a dedication to making life better for the generation that followed and an example for all to emulate. Great Grandmother gave birth to 9 children: Chloe Catherine, 1881; Mary Viola,1883; Myron Edward, 1886; Wilford Poulson,1889; Charles Erwin,1892; Sara Jane, 1894; Meredith Novella, 1896; Reed Smoot, 1903; and Talmage Sloat, 1908.(END!)

A History of John Atlantic and his wives

Contributor: Todd Millett Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

A History of John Atlantic and Martha Angeline Hancock Burr James B. Burr (* This history is chapter 6 in A History of the Burr Pioneers. It was written by James B. Burr, a grandson of John and Angeline Burr. The History book was edited by Wesley R. Burr and Ruth J. Burr and published by the Burr Family Organization in 1995. The published chapter has a great deal of information about the Burr ancestors and a number of pictures that are not included in this version because this version is just the text in the chapter. The larger book is available at the LDS Family History Library in Salt Lake City. ) Following the martyrdom of the prophet Joseph Smith in 1844, the Church was in disorder and the Saints felt a great sense of despair and uncertainty. The persecutions of the past were endured because the Church leadership, under the Prophet, was firm and secure. Joseph and Hyrum’s death brought a new fear of the unknown, and the Saints wanted to escape to safety. Brigham Young, the new president of the Church, brought back much unity and purpose to the Saints who were gathering for the westward trek across the great plains to “find a place, which God for us prepared, far away in the West.” Thus began the great westward migration for the Church. Many gave their lives in hostile conditions at Winter Quarters, Iowa in the bitter winter of 1846-47 before the first wagon trains ever left. Countless others died along the way during the following years of migration across the plains of Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, Wyoming and the mountains of the western Rockies. Most came by wagon train, or on horseback, but many walked. Other parties of immigrants crossed the barren plains pulling and pushing heavy handcarts laden with personal goods and provisions for the journey and the new homeland of Deseret. Many of these faithful people gave their lives in the attempt to reach the safety of the mountains of the West, in the Valley of the Great Salt Lake, where the temple would be built, and the Church could grow and prosper in safety. No more would the threat of mobs, nor the oppression of enemies continue to force the Mormons to flee their homes and seek refuge elsewhere. But there were other Saints in the East who chose a different route to the western valleys of Deseret. Though longer in time, they thought the journey would be easier if they went by sea. They chartered a sailing ship from New York harbor to take them around Cape Horn and up the coast of western South America to San Francisco Bay, and then overland to Salt Lake City. Six members of the Burr family and 232 other Saints began this journey in the winter of 1846. The Saints of this era left a legacy, a heritage of sacrifice and a standard of suffering never to be matched again in the history of the Church. These pioneer forefathers gave so much of themselves, their means, their strength and their faith that they had nothing else to give. And then they gave their very lives. They sacrificed so the blessings that we enjoy today could be realized. We owe much to them—a debt that can never be repaid or duplicated, only remembered and honored through living lives worthy of their great sacrifices for us and all their posterity. The incredible journey undertaken by the Saints aboard the USS Brooklyn, which left New York harbor on February 4, 1846, is described in Chapter 2 of this book. On February 24, 1846, Charles Clark and Sarah Sloat Burr became the parents of their second child, a son. Amid the suffering of his mother and the suffering of many of the others in the party, a few weeks after his birth, the new baby was christened by Elder Samuel Brannen, and given his name, John Atlantic Burr. According to the journals of those who were on the ship, it was a miracle that the tiny baby and his mother survived at all. During most of the voyage, the mother was deathly ill, so ill she was unable to nurse the baby. With the meager provisions aboard the Brooklyn, we can only assume that John was nursed and nourished by another of the loving women in the party. Otherwise, he surely would have died. After the long and arduous voyage, the Brooklyn arrived on July 31, 1846, in Yerba Buena harbor, known later as San Francisco. The families then faced new challenges. There was only enough food available to last about a month, and they needed to find shelter. The families were organized into a form of the United Order, and at first they divided up the responsibilities and cooperated as one large group in building new housing, finding food, and working by hauling timber to finish paying for the debts incurred on the voyage. During this period of time John’s father, uncle and grandfather built some of the first houses constructed in San Francisco. After Samuel Brannen returned to California from Salt Lake, in the summer of 1847, they disbanded the United Order program, and the families were free to pursue their own activities. Many of the families dispersed and settled in various parts of California. We do not know how long the Burr families lived in San Francisco. By the time John was two years old, the Burrs were involved with the sawmill business, using a mill that had been carried to California aboard the ship. They played an important role in the settling of the area around the American River, where gold was discovered, and could likely have found a very prosperous and happy life had they remained there. But their mission was to get to the Valley of the Great Salt Lake, and join with the other Saints there. So in the summer of 1848, the Burrs gathered enough money to buy an ox team and wagon to take them on the last part of their journey to Salt Lake City. We are told that father and mother Burr also kept a small amount of gold to help them get settled when they arrived. Joining with members of the Mormon Battalion who traveled north from San Diego, the family began the journey across the Sierra Nevada mountains and the deserts of the Great Basin just in time to experience the blistering heat and dryness of the summer. They arrived in Salt Lake City in October of 1848. Again, while there are no details of this journey, we can only imagine the hardships suffered by these hardy souls. JOHN’S CHILDHOOD YEARS John’s mother, Sarah, was baptized after arriving in Salt Lake City on November 26, 1848. We know very little about the next years of John’s life. His family lived in the Salt Lake area until he was about twelve years old, and during this time several other children were born. The family experienced some sadness because John’s brother, Nathan, two years younger than he, died in 1849, and a sister who was born in 1851 passed away in 1852. John’s brother George was three years younger than he; his next brother, Henry, was seven years younger than he. When John was about nine years old, his sister Jane was born, and when he was eleven his youngest brother Myron was born. In 1858, the family moved to Payson after Charles was called on a mission to “the Southern Settlements.” According to records from the Salt Lake First Ward History, Charles C. Burr, John Burr, and nine others were unanimously sustained as missionaries to settle Payson. This was about the time that Johnston’s Army came to Utah. After the family moved to Payson, they again started a sawmill in Peteteneet Canyon, later known as Payson Canyon. We do not know how involved John was in the sawmill, since he was only twelve years old, but he undoubtedly became involved, because it was one of the family’s main occupations until the mill burned some years later. John attended school in Payson during the winter months, but it is unknown how much schooling he received. It was enough that he was able to read and write effectively. Also, as indicated by the letter reproduced on page 159 of this chapter, he developed fairly good penmanship. JOHN MARRIES ANGELINE While the Burr family was living in Payson, the handsome young John met and fell in love with a pretty young lady named Martha Angeline Hancock, the daughter of Alvah Benjamin Hancock and Julietta Ames, whose ancestors were from Ohio and Massachusetts. Angie, as she was sometimes called, was born at Mount Pisgah, Iowa during the trek westward over the overland route to Utah. Her father experienced a great deal of sickness during his life, and he passed away while they lived in Mount Pisgah. Angeline was but a babe in arms when she came west with her mother and her older brothers and sisters. They settled in Nephi, a town about twenty miles south of Payson, and there she spent her childhood. She was baptized on July 5, 1866; she and John were married in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City on November 7, 1868. Angeline was a tall, neat, deeply religious, and well-educated woman. She loved to study and knew much about astrology. She was an excellent cook and homemaker, and she loved bright colors about her. She loved children and was loved by them all through her life. John was tall and slender, and his manner was mild, yet firm. He was highly respected by those who knew him. LIVING IN CENTRAL UTAH According to one of the short histories of John A’s life, he and his brother George Amasa, along with others from Payson, were called at one time by President Brigham Young to go and make a settlement on the Muddy River. This venture was unsuccessful, and after three years they were honorably released from their mission call. We do not know exactly which years were involved in this mission. It is possible the call occurred before John and Angeline were married in 1868. John and Angeline seem to have lived in Payson right after they were married. Their first child, John Preston, was born there on December 14, 1869. In the late 1860s there was a period of difficulties between the Indians and the white settlers. This conflict became so violent that it became known as the Black Hawk War. After the war broke out, the people from Sanpete and Sevier Counties were forced to return to the older, more established communities. In the first year of the conflict, at least 2,000 head of cattle had been run off by renegade-outlaw Indians who ambushed and mutilated anyone brave enough to venture away from the protection of the towns. The Indians threatened to burn homes and crops, so the terrified settlers fled to the safety of communities like Payson. More than 3,000 men including John A., were called into service during the course of the conflict. By 1870, the white settlers began moving back to Glenwood. Like a number of other Mormon communities, they planned to live the United Order—a cooperative life-style in which livestock, crops, and industries were held in common. It was about this time that John moved Angeline and little Johnny to Glenwood to live. Then, on the seventh of October in 1871 their second child, Juliette, was born. The proud parents now had a boy and a girl. A close bond developed between this little brother and sister that continued throughout their lives. John and his family seem to have traveled frequently between Sevier County and Payson during this period, and their third child, Charles Arthur, was born on September 8, 1873 in Payson. Martha Angeline likely wanted to be near her mother for the birth of this baby. During the summer of 1874, John and George Amasa went to Grass Valley to investigate a location for a new home. In 1875, the family moved from Payson to Grass Valley, near the present town of Burrville, in Sevier County. John and Amasa were the first members of the Burr family to arrive in Grass Valley, arriving in June of 1875. They took up quarters in the old ranch house previously built by George W. Bean and his sons, and began putting up hay from land where Burrville now stands. His mother Sarah and his sister Laura Ann were the first white women to come into the valley to stay, and the only women who spent the winter of 1875-76 in the valley. In February 1876, father Charles and John’s brother Henry and his family arrived in the valley and built a house about one and a half miles south of the present Burrville, at a spring near Cedar Grove. Farming was difficult in the high valleys due to the short growing season, and their first crop was a failure. THE CHILD REARING YEARS Not one to stay in one place very long, John and his family returned again to Glenwood, where Albert Delos was born on January 7, 1877. Then, back again to Burrville, where nearly to the day six years later, on January 6, Lester Orlando, my father, was born. All during their lives these two youngest sons in the family, Bert and Les, were close friends. Two years later, on September 21, 1885, in Burrville, Laura Estella was born. While the Burrs lived in Burrville, they engaged in cattle raising and dairying with the other Burr families. During the summer they moved their dairy herds to the valleys just north of Fish Lake, where there was a great deal of lush mountain grazing. They made butter and cheese, which they periodically took in wagon loads as far north as Park City and Salt Lake City. During the winter months they moved their cattle east to the desert areas for winter range. Even though the life of these pioneers was difficult, they also had their recreation in the form of picnics, campouts, and dances, and they took the time to enjoy life and each other. Holidays such as Christmas and the Fourth of July were celebrated as a community, and folks would come from miles around in wagons or on horseback to celebrate together. An incident during one of these celebrations helps us understand the Burrs and the families they lived with. Nearly every summer the county held the Fish Lake Jubilee, where dancing and all sorts of entertainment took place. There would be many young people there, so the Foy boys were really anxious to go. Their first night out they camped at Little Creek next to silverhaired John A. Burr and his family. His son, Johnny, had his kid sister with him as they joined in the fun that night, where Tommy said they just deviled around, singing and keeping the rest of the campers awake. The Foys and the Burrs both had dairy herds on Fish Lake Plateau, but it wasn’t until that campout that the young folks got well enough acquainted to strike up the lifelong friendship that followed. The second night, Mr. Burr had already set up his camp when Tommy and the others arrived, so he called to Tommy, “Hey young man, you come in here and camp where I can look after you.” The remainder of the time was spent in the company of the Burr family. (Barker, 1988, p. 17) After living in Burrville for eight or nine years, John and Angeline moved their family to Loa, where they lived for about two years. They then moved to Teasdale, where there was better range for the cattle and sheep. Teasdale was located at the northern end of the Boulder Mountains in a little valley surrounded by low hills and rocky ridges. At first it was called Bulberry because of the much prized bulberries growing around there, but was later named Teasdale after Apostle Teasdale had visited there. A sparkling clear stream ran right through the little valley, so it was quite a pleasant place to live. (Barker, 1988, p. 25) While the Burrs lived in Teasdale, the last of their children, a girl named Florence Irene, was born one day before Pioneer Day, July 23, 1887. She died as a child in Teasdale on April 8, 1889. Several of the entries in Grandma Sarah Sloat’s April 1889 diary give us glimpses into how the family banded together during these times and how they shared their heartaches and their happiness. Mon 8. Had news from John. Their baby died. Tue 9. I went to John’s. To Teasdale. They buried their little girl. Wen 10. At John’s. Mon 15. Came home. Wen 17. Went over to John’s. Sun 21. To John’s and George’s. Wen 24. Angeline said Juliet could get married in the spring. To say that life was hard for the family during the 1880s would be a great understatement. Hardship, sickness, poverty and death were dealt with regularly. Feeding and caring for a large family, along with all the struggles associated with just staying alive in the harsh environment of Sevier County, Utah hardened these people to the point where they could endure great trials and survive terrible tragedies. Their faith in God, and the love for each other, sustained them. That great strength, which we have come to call the “pioneer spirit,” which overcame all trials, and preserved the faith and determination of most of our pioneer forefathers, was abundant in John and Angie’s family. They suffered greatly, and endured beyond our present ability to understand; but even more trouble lay ahead for the family of John Atlantic Burr and Martha Angeline Hancock Burr. While they were living in Teasdale, Angeline wrote a letter to her mother, Juliette Hancock (the letter has remained in the family). Angie’s mother was about eighty years old at the time, so she was aged and not well. From the portion of the letter we have, we can sense Angeline's love and concern. A copy of her letter is reproduced on the next page. The lines across the page seem to be pieces of tape that held the century-old letter together to preserve it. Since it is difficult to decipher some of the words, and the spelling and punctuation used by these pioneers was different from the way we write today, our reading of the text reproduced. Teasdale, Nov 23d Dear mother. I will write you a few lines and try and cheer you up I could not come and see you now for my children needed some clothes made so bad But I am a coming before long you must cheer up and look on the bright side. do not fret for tomorrow but drive away care and sorrow when Salley comes you will have company and someone to read to you and then you wont be so lonly tell Warren he must keep you in wood to keep you warm. John said you wanted to see me before you went [part not legible] you wont go you must not think so the Lord is merciful to us and if we trust in him all will be well with us. I always hate to come and see you because I always have to leave you and Who can hear the last Good by Without one pang of silent sorrow To think that friends who now are neigh may be far distant on the morrow. but you will see me a good many times yet I do not know as I have wrote any thing very cheering but I cannot think of any thing more this time hoping the Lord will keep and comfort you in your Old age I remain your loving daughter Angeline This was probably one of the last times Angie had contact with her mother, as Juliette passed away on August 28, 1888, in Burrville. In December of 1890, the Burr family moved again, this time to Escalante. Here they continued to raise cattle and other livestock, which grazed widely on the Escalante desert. John also owned and operated a small store for about two years before he sold out and moved to Potato Valley, so named because of the profusion of wild potatoes which grew there. In the fall when the potatoes were ripe, hogs were turned out to feed on the crop that nature had provided. John served in this area as a ward teacher and was very active in the Church, often giving interesting and testimony-building sermons on Gospel principles, and bearing testimony of the truthfulness of the restored Gospel. During the summer of 1893, John, along with his sons John Preston and Charles Arthur contracted with Magleby’s sawmill to remove timber for the sawmill. THE BURR TRAIL The winters in the Burrville, Loa, and Escalante areas are severe, because this part of Utah is a series of high mountain valleys. Many of the valleys are above 7,000 feet and the mountains that surround them are much higher, so the snow comes early in the fall and stays until late in the spring. This makes it difficult to raise cattle and sheep because they need to be fed hay and grain for many months of the year. The Burrs therefore tried to find a way to move their cattle and sheep into the desert areas where they would have good winter grazing. This part of Utah, however, is very rough country, and it has a geological feature that made it difficult to get the cattle from the high mountainous areas to the desert areas: the Waterpocket Fold, given its name by John Wesley Powell in his epic journey down the Colorado River. It is a series of very steep and rough cliffs about 100 miles long, extending from the Fremont River on the north to the Colorado River on the south. It is as though mother nature needed to fold some immense sandstone slickrock areas back on themselves as she raised the mountain range on the west. The eastern slope of the Fold is an uneven hogback of spectacular beauty. The smooth sandstone formations have been etched and hollowed out over millennia by water, wind and sand to create thousands of potholes or tanks that fill with water in the spring and when cloudbursts come. The high valleys and meadows where the Burrs lived were on the west of the Waterpocket Fold; the desert grazing was east of these cliffs. John Atlantic Burr was the first white man to explore this area, and he found one small draw in the 100-mile long cliffs where it was possible to move cattle through the Waterpocket Fold. The place he discovered was a narrow and winding draw that was later called Muley Twist. John and the others who were working with him carved out a series of steep switchbacks down the draw so it was possible to move cattle down in the fall and back up in the spring. The winter range they used was the San Rafael Desert southwest of Green River and the Burr desert still further to the south in the Robbers’ Roost country, desert areas between 3,000 and 4,000 feet high in elevation. The summer range was in the 11,000-foot-high Aquarius Plateau north of Escalante; one part of it was known as Burr Top. The trail that connected these two areas became known as the Burr Trail, a name well known to much of America in recent years because of the controversy over whether it should be paved to further open the area to tourism. The Burr Trail was not used frequently until the Hole in the Rock route was discontinued in the 1880s. After that, the Burr Trail was used more frequently as a route between the mountainous areas to the west and Hall’s Creek and Hall’s Crossing on the Colorado River. The following description of how Charles Hall, the pioneer who discovered the crossing that bears his name, might describe the trip from Escalante to the Colorado River provides a picture-with-words of what this country is like. To anyone in Escalante wanting directions, he (Charles Hall) would have said: Stay on the Hole-in-the-Rock road for ten miles and then turn left into Harris Wash. Follow the Wash—there’s no other way to go as it drops down into a canyon. At its mouth you will find yourself at the Escalante River, which you will have to ford. Before crossing, go upstream nearly half a mile until you come opposite the mouth of a narrow canyon. This is Silver Fall Creek. There’s water in it for a ways. There are some steep pitches over slick rock. Then you leave the cliff behind as you come out into the open. The country around you won’t make much sense. It’s choppy—pinon and juniper obscure the view—you can easily get lost. Keep on climbing. Soon you will top out. Now stop and take your bearings. You have just come through the rough country enclosed by the Circle Cliffs, which you can see back of you and toward the north and ahead of you. Off to the north is the dark rim of Boulder mountain; those isolated gray-green peaks to the east are the Henry Mountains. The roughest part of the road is just ahead. You have stopped on a narrow flat top. Below you is a huge funnel-like opening between two cliffs. Drive down over that steep slope and head for the funnel; it’s about two miles to the bottom—you drop a thousand feet. You’re in a canyon now. It’s deep, narrow, one sharp bend after another, and the cliff walls are undercut at nearly every turn. You might have to do some roadwork in this canyon to get your wagons through. (So typical of the canyon country, this narrow, winding canyon, barely permitting wagons, was later named Muley twist.) Keep going. That open sky ahead is the valley of Hall’s Creek. When you reach the mouth of the canyon you have passed through the Waterpocket Fold. (Powell’s men named it.) When you get out into the open, you will be on Hall’s Creek. Turn right and follow the creek about thirty miles to the river. (C. Gregory Crampton, Standing Up Country) The scenery in this part of Utah is breathtakingly beautiful. But much of the area, especially the Waterpocket Fold, is extremely treacherous and rough country. It was home to the Burr families for a long period of time, and much of the area today is within the Capitol Reef and Canyonlands National Parks. UNIQUE ADVENTURES While John was living in Sevier county, he married a second wife, Evangeline Sanford Starr, the widow of Orson Edward Starr. Widow Starr, as she became known in the Burr family, had five children. To this union was born a son, Arthur, on August 3, 1889 in Richfield. On January 7, 1890, John was arrested for polygamy by the United States marshals. The account of this event is described in a colorful way in Inez Barker’s history of Tommy Foy. Every chance he got, Tommy went to Teasdale. Juliette’s mother had promised her they could get married in the spring. On a cold wintry day in January of 1890 as Tommy was riding to the Burr’s place, he saw Brother and Sister Burr and two strangers coming toward him. It didn’t take long to find out the strangers were United States Marshals taking them to stand trial on charges of cohabitation. Tommy figured the Burr family had about had their share of troubles lately. They had buried their two year old daughter, who had died recently. In the case of the marshals arresting them, however, he couldn’t help feeling Brother Burr could have avoided it if he had tried. It was beyond him why Brother Burr had married the Widow Starr anyway when lawmen were everywhere imaginable trying to catch and imprison any polygamist they could lay their hands on. Besides that, the widow Starr had already been sealed to her first husband, so about all Brother Burr would ever get out of the marriage was a big headache. But that wasn’t exactly true either—widow Starr was pregnant with his child. He now had her children to raise besides his own and maybe from the looks of things it would be from prison. In desperation, old John A. Burr said to Tommy, “If you are ever going to marry my daughter, get on over to my place and marry her now. Then you two can take care of the place while we are gone.” They couldn’t help worrying about the children. Juliette was the only one at home to look after them and do the chores. After a little gentle persuasion the marshals agreed to let Brother and Sister Burr return to Teasdale long enough to witness the marriage before they had to leave for Salina and the trial. (Barker, 1988, p.50) John and Angeline left for Salina with the marshals right after the wedding. The Judge agreed to release John on the condition he would give up his second wife, and John agreed. Sarah Sloat’s diary recorded these events in her usually brief manner. The diary also shows that they spent over a week celebrating the wedding. Wen 8. John came, an Angeline. Thu 9. They went to Salina. Fri 10. At home. Sat 11. They came back. Sun 12. Went to meeting. Mon 13. John gone home. Tue 14. The rest going in the morning. I went to Teasdale with Len and Johny. At Ridel’s all night. Wen 15. Went to John’s Thu 16. A fixing for the wedding party. They had a dance in the evening. Fri 17. At John’s and Georges’ all night. Windy. Sat 18. On our way home with George and Amelia. At Hugh McClelen’s all night. Sun 19. Pleasant. Got home. The parties like the one they held on the 16th undoubtedly went well into the night and were festive events. The dances and socials at Teasdale were held in the twenty-foot-square log building erected by the people of the community as a gathering place for socials and religious services. The building was so small they had to take turns dancing. The men were given numbers and the caller would call out “Numbers one to ten fill the floor for a waltz.” Later numbers eleven to twenty would take their turns. They danced waltzes, polkas, and scottish and two-step to the toe-tapping accompaniment of a fiddle or organ, or any other available musical instrument, for that matter. The floor groaned and heaved as they swung their partners to and fro. (Barker, 1988, p. 51) When John made the decision to give up Eva, she felt deserted. She therefore again went by the name of Starr, and because of this John’s son Arthur grew up as Arthur Starr. Arthur retained this name throughout his life. Later in his life he moved to Washington state. The pictures on this page are all that we know about he and his family. LIFE IN THE FOUR CORNERS AREA We are not sure when John and Angeline moved from Teasdale to the Four Corners area. According to Bert Burr, John’s son, he made his first trip when Bert was thirteen years old. That would have been in 1890. It is possible they made a trip to the Four Corners area in 1890, but it is unlikely they moved there at that time. John still lived close to Burrville in March 1890, because Sarah Sloat mentions in her diary on March 1 and 2 that he stopped in Burrville as he was returning from a trip to Provo. He was likely gone for the next several months. Several events suggest this. Sarah Sloat’s diary says she received a letter from John on April 10, and she didn’t mention that he was around for several months. The next time she mentions him was on May 2, when she indicated he came from someplace. Also, Sarah mentioned that she went “to John’s” on June 28. Also, she mentioned that John and his family came in early December and that “they went away to Tater Valley.” Thus it is likely that John made a trip to the southeastern corner of the state in 1890 but didn’t move there. Sarah also mentions that John visited her in January, June and December 1891 and February of 1892. She seems to mention John much less after the polygamy problem, but John seems to be close enough to visit occasionally. In the fall of 1894, John sold his cattle and sheep and started out for Monticello. Due to the lateness of the season and the onset of winter, the family stayed together in Burrville. Then in the spring of 1895, John, his family, along with John’s brother-in-law, George B. Waters and his nephew, Frank Cloward, started out again for Monticello. This would become a very perilous and dreadful journey. The heat was very intense, and water was extremely scarce in the desert. After about five days’ travel, the last day being entirely without water, the party came upon a watering place owned by an old couple who charged them twenty-five cents per bucket for water. They used it sparingly, giving the horses but a small portion. They were able to negotiate a price of twenty cents per bucket for water to fill the barrels. They then set out again for Monticello. After only one day, a terrible sand storm blew in, and everything in camp was covered with sand, and all the food was ruined. During the storm, father John continuously visited every wagon to encourage the members of the party, and to ensure their welfare. The next day, they reached the San Rafael River, which was at high water stage, and very muddy. The water could only be used sparingly, and then only after boiling. The next night they reached Green River, where the grazing was good for the livestock, and they remained there for two days. Before them now was the Green River, also in high-water stage, and it too had to be forded. After surviving a dangerous river crossing, the party arrived in Moab, forded the mighty Colorado (or Grand River, as it was known then), and rested for a time in Moab. Fifty-five arduous miles to the southeast, over some of the most desolate and forbidding terrain in America, lay Monticello, which would be home for the Burr family for the next six years. John engaged in farming, and later obtained a mail contract with the U.S. Postal Service to carry mail and freight by team and wagon from the railroad stop at Thompson, Utah to Monticello and return. Not being one to remain in one place too long, John uprooted his family to move to several other locations in the Four Corners area. According to one account, he moved from Moab to Cortez, Colorado in the Montezuma Valley. While they were there he was called for a short while to be a presiding elder of the branch. In Montezuma Valley, he had a contract to carry mail between Cortez and Bluff for four years. From there they moved to Fruitland, or Jewitt, New Mexico, where he again ran livestock and apparently also was involved in freighting. They were also involved in one way or another in sawmilling at virtually every location where they settled. From Fruitland, on January 1, 1902, John wrote a letter to his parents. A copy of the first page of the letter is reproduced on page 159 because it shows his penmanship and his style of writing. Since the letter is difficult to read, we've reproduced the contents below. Fruitland N. Mex Jan 1 1902 Dear parents I will try to rite you a few lines to let you know that we are alive and as well as usual with the exception of John he has what they call the small pocks he is getting along fine he says refers it to a bad cold his rumatism is no beter i am a going to montizuma to live in the spring we have bought a farm there we have done very poorly here so we will try the back track we have tryed it ther and know we can do well but i have a hard time of it here but we live in hopes Jesey J and Ereline took dinner with us the other day said they would rite to you has Laura gone to stay or do they intend to come back and where are they has Len sold out and you and ____ their is no news here to rite apostle Brigham Young is here is in quite poor health we have had very cold wether here but no storm i will try to give you our genology the list i can you have min and when we were married is would like very much to come and see you but don’t see any opportunity in site i have not seen July or charles for near 2 years. My love to all your son J.A. Burr After living for a period of time in New Mexico, they moved back to Montezuma Valley and engaged in freighting between Cortez and Monticello. John and Angie and the unmarried children moved back to Monticello about 1910. That year they purchased a piece of property in Monticello, consisting of 1,056 acres from C. L. Brandford and his wife, Gertrude. They paid $350.00 for it. John and Angie lived in Monticello and were involved in the sawmill business for the remaining years of their lives. During all of these travels, Angie was beside her husband. She was an excellent cook and homemaker. One of the main desires of her life was to bring comfort to her menfolk, and she often said, “If you want a happy man, keep his stomach full.” It was an unusual day when she did not go into the fields with some special treat for her menfolk. She also was fond of children, and many a child that lived in Moab knew that they could always get a cookie at Grandma Burr’s place. In their later years, Grandma and Grandpa Burr could not care for themselves, so John lived with Charles in Monticello and Grandma Burr lived in a little cabin built for her by Tommy Foy near his home in Moab. While she lived there, she helped take care of Tommy’s children while he was away. One day word came to the Foys that Grandpa Burr was sick, and one of the Foy children, Elsie, was sent to tell Grandma Burr to get her things ready and they would take her to Monticello. Elsie found her little grandmother in the lane with her things in a pillowcase waiting to go. She had sensed that something was wrong before anyone told her. Later, as a part of a business deal in which he sold off his cattle, Tommy Foy also sold his property in Moab, which required Grandma Burr to move a little distance out of town. During his declining years, John was afflicted with prostate trouble, a contributing factor in his death in the fall of 1914. He was buried in the Monticello cemetery. After John's death, Angie spent the rest of her life in Moab. She died in Moab on January 8, 1925, and was buried beside her husband in the Monticello cemetery. The headstones that mark their graves are easy to find. THE JOHN ATLANTIC BURR FERRY The memory of John Atlantic Burr lives on, not only in his history, but in the many geographic locations named after him. The ferry boat which now takes vehicles and people across Lake Powell at Hall's Crossing and Bullfrog is named after him, and the boat that bears his name cruises the waters of Lake Powell near the Burr Desert and the Burr Trail. The modern ferry is quite different from the primitive versions used earlier. The first ferries were made of logs. The Chaffin Ferry that was built in the 1930's sank in the late 1940s; it was replaced by a version that could carry three cars. Later, as Lake Powell began to fill up, a pontoon version that carried only one car was used until 1985, when the John Atlantic Burr ferry was designed, built especially for Lake Powell and launched.

Evangeline Starr, second wife to John Atlantic Burr

Contributor: Todd Millett Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

There is another branch to this family that is rarely spoken of. They don't carry the name Burr, but Starr. John Atlantic Burr took a second wife, right at the end of the period that the mainstream Mormons were still practicing plural marriage. The second wife, Evangeline, was a widow, with several children, whose first husband's name was Starr. The details are sketchy as to why the marriage last only a very brief time. One idea is that the first wife, whose permission was essential, had not consented to the second wife. Another is that it was because the American government was sentencing men who would not give up their multiple wives to prison terms. Whatever the reason, the all ready pregnant Evangeline was very upset about it. She took her children to California, changed her name back to Starr, and her new baby's name, and raised him as if he had been the child of her first husband, who had died several years before his birth. He never had any contact with his father or any of his relatives on that side. When he was in his 80s, his grandson's wife took a job helping a little old lady in her 90s, who was the daughter of a younger brother of John Atlantic Burr. The Burr family knew something of the second wife and the son born from that, but it had been a big mystery for nearly 90 years. Posted On "Find a Grave" by Noelani on 12 Mar 2012

Military Service

edit

Transcription

UTAH PVT CAV UTAH TER MILITIA INDIAN WARS

Rank

PRIVATE

Branch

CAVALRY

Conflicts

INDIAN WARS
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for John A Burr (Died: 2 Sep 1914), BillionGraves Record 31306833 Monticello, San Juan, Utah, United States

Loading