Jeremiah Leavitt

7 Feb 1851 - 26 Jul 1931

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Jeremiah Leavitt

7 Feb 1851 - 26 Jul 1931
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Jeremiah Leavitt 4th Date and place of birth 7 Feb. 1851 Pottawattomie Co. Utah Date and place of death 26th 1931 Gunlock Utah Date of arrival in Utah 1852 Married Mary Ellen Huntsman Leavitt 14 May 1876 Name of person writing history Mary Ellen Leavitt History submitted to Cardinal camp sent to Cen
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Life Information

Jeremiah Leavitt

Born:
Died:

Gunlock Cemetery

98 W 650th N
Veyo, Washington, Utah
United States

Headstone Description

Jeremiah and Eliza were both led from their respective homes in Hatley, Canada and Washington D.C. by their new found faith in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints to Nauvoll, Ill. where they met each other and were married Feb. 1, 1845. During a brief stay at Bonaparte, Iowa they were visted by Father Jeremiah Leavitt II who shortly after his arrival took sick and died. Mother Sarah S Leavitt recorded, "He sang Come Let Us Anew, as long as he had strength to sing and then wanted Eliza to sing it." Come Let Us Anew now stands at the Leavitt family hymn, sung on occasions of both sorrow and joy. The family moved from Bonaparte to the Kanesville area for several years. They crossed the Plains with their five children, arriving in the Salt Lake Valley on Sept. 15, 1852. From Tooele, Utah, Jeremiah was called to the Santa Clara Indian Mission on May 22, 1857. Living first in Santa Clara and then in Gunlock they suffered great losses in the flood of 1861-62. As a result of the various struggles associated with frontier life they helped carve out the communities of Mountain Meadows, Clover and Meadow Valleys and Hebron. They finally settled back in Gunlock where Jeremiah built a home and farmed. Jeremiah was a hard working, good man who live was an example of faithfulness to his friends and family. Eliza's testimony of the Prophet Joseph Smith remained with her to the end. It was on the strength of both of their testimonies that they were able to faithfully bring their young family to "Zion" and to settle and survive in Utah's Dixie. Their earthly tabernacles now rest beside each other in this peaceful cemetery. And while the roots of their posterity are here in Gunlock, their descendants have since branched out in every direction. May their legacy be reflected in our lives and passed to our children for generations to come. Placed by the Jeremiah Leavitt III Chapter of the Western Association of Leavitt Families. Dedicated 17 June 2006.
Transcriber

Bonnijones

April 5, 2015
Photographer

marshalllj

January 6, 2014

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Jeremiah Leavitt 4th.

Contributor: Springsteen Groupie :-) Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Jeremiah Leavitt 4th Date and place of birth 7 Feb. 1851 Pottawattomie Co. Utah Date and place of death 26th 1931 Gunlock Utah Date of arrival in Utah 1852 Married Mary Ellen Huntsman Leavitt 14 May 1876 Name of person writing history Mary Ellen Leavitt History submitted to Cardinal camp sent to Central Camp, Salt Lake City, Utah. Name of person who submitting the history Ella Lovinnie Curtis Date submitted 10 February 1961 LIFE SKETCH OF JEREMIAH LEAVITT Jeremiah Leavitt was born February 7, 1851, in Pottawattomie County Iowa, and came with his parents, Jeremiah and Eliza Harrover Leavitt, arriving in Utah when he was just one Year old. They settled first in Salt Lake Valley, they later moved to East Toole, Utah. In 1857 they were called to Dixie. In the spring of 1858 they cleared a piece of ground and put in some crops on the northwest corner of the valley where St. George now stands. They irrigated their crop from the northwest spring and in the fall moved over to Santa Clara, where they built a log cabin and lived there until 1861. When they moved farther up on the Santa Clara Creek, there were just four families of them- Jeremiah and his brother Dudley Leavitt; their Uncle William Hamblin (know as Gunlock Bill), the man for whom the town was named; and Isaac Riddle. While they were living at this place, Apostle George A. Smith, then president of the entire Southern Mission from Parowan south, came down on his was to California and stayed with William Hamblin one night. When he was preparing to leave the next morning he said, “Billy, what is the name of this place?” William answered, “We call it the Santa Clara Creek.” Then George A. Smith said, “We will name it after you. We will call it Gunlock.” That was the name given William Hamblin while crossing the plains. He was the hunter for the George A. Smith Company and was the expert with guns. He was always examining and fixing his own and others’ guns while in camp. Each of these four families built log cabins and put in crops, planning to make this their permanent home. But on Christmas Day 1862, rain began to fall and storms continued daily for more than a month. Pouring down and alternating drizzles – the sun never getting a chance to shine and the creek rising with the increasing floods until it reached from hill to hill. The families were all compelled to seek refuge on the side of the black ridge, where they were for several days with scant provisions and little protection from the storm and cold. When the floods finally subsided, Jeremiah’s cabin stood on the back of the creek, with one corner projecting over the creek bank which was eight feet from the creek bed. They gathered what little they were able to salvage from their cabins and moved back downstream to Santa Clara where they remained until the following spring. Their next move was to Panacea, Nevada, staying in that place only a short time as the people were having so much trouble with the Indians with the Indians who were stealing horses, cattle and sheep and killing them. The people themselves were in constant danger of being slain so decided to move again. This time they moved to Clover Valley, and while there had to hear their stock night and day, relaying each other in standing guard. These were very trying times, as they were so short of provisions and clothing. On advice of President Lorenzo Snow, who came to visit them, they moved in a body to what was know as Shoal Creek, later called Hebron, where several other families were already located. There were still Indian troubles but before long peace was made and the settlers hired the natives to work for them, taught them many helpful things and learned much regarding the country. For a few years the people of Hebron prospered, their crops were good and they found sales for all their surplus at the mining camps of Pioche, Nevada, and that vicinity. Then came another grief to try their faith. The water began to fail and their crops dried up without maturing. This meant another move. Back again to Gunlock they traveled, clearing more ground, building a log cabin and putting in crops. “Here I had to work hard,” wrote Jeremiah Leavitt. “My father was a sickly and had a large family. I was the oldest boy of 12 children and had to take responsibility of caring for the family, as well as for my grandmother, Sarah Sturdivant Leavitt, who was old and had buried her husband in Iowa before coming to Utah. Her children were all married and we built her a log cabin near our own, so we could look after her. She died two years after I was married and was laid to rest at the Gunlock Cemetery, being 80 years old at her death. We always had to work hard for we were on the frontier from the time we came to Utah. My mother used to make soft soap from grease with cottonwood ash lye, which was leached by putting the ashes in a box and let the water drip over it and into a barrel. I have taken barrels of this soap to Cedar City and farther north and traded it for grain or anything we could use. Most of our bread was made from corn meal for many years. We ground the corn in our old coffee mill, which we brought across the plains. Often we had little to go with the corn bread, generally just a little sorghum and milk, but very little meat, butter or fats. I have often gone to bed as naked as the day I was born, while mother washed and mended my clothes, which consisted of a calico shirt and a pair of jeans- trousers made of homespun denim. I went barefooted most of the time till I was almost grown, often going barefoot to the ward dances and carrying a squash under my arm with which to pay my dance ticket. “As time rolled on we became a little better off. There were a few small stores put up in St. George, the largest nearby town, and a gristmill and cloth factory in Washington. We raised a little cotton and owned a few head of sheep. We could take our corn and wheat to the mill and have it ground, and while there trade our cotton, wool, and other products to the factory. Later we raised fruit and made sorghum and I would then take a load of dried fruit, sorghum, dried beans and other product north every fall, going to the towns along the Sevier River, to Richfield, Annabell, up or down the river and trade for flour or anything we could use. Such a trip would take three weeks to a month. “I soon had a large family. My father died in 1878, leaving my mother a widow and I had to provide for her, being the eldest son. My wife and I had 15 children, but we all worked hard and did the best we could. We had no farm machinery to speak of. I cut my grain with a cradle, threshed it with a flail and cleaned it with the wind. For over 50 years I made my sorghum every year in a regular boiler. I could always find plenty of work to do on my own farm and never had to go hunting work. My family grew up to be workers, not a drone among them. We have always earned our bread by the sweat of our brow, but have never felt to complain and have always tried to get along the best we could, never running into debt, but very little at and time and always tried to pay as we went along and do as ------ right as we could by everyone.” “My mother passed away July 7, 1905, at the age of 80 years and six months and was laid to rest by the side of my father who preceded her in1878. I am now in my 80th year and my eyesight and hearing are failing me, so I am a Patriarch. My family have all grown up and left the hive. There is only my companion and I left, but we are thankful that all is well with us as it is and hope we can stand true to the end.” Jeremiah Leavitt. He passed away July 26, 1931, aged 80 and six months. One day we were sitting alone and my husband said, “I wish you would write down a few things for me about my life, so this is what I wrote. This little note by his wife explains the forgoing. Note by Mabel Jarvis, who copied the manuscript. I remember once I was a small child how happy we always were when Grandpa Leavitt, as we always called him, and his wife came to see us when they were in St. George at conference. They seldom missed attending just as long as Brother Leavitt could stand the trip. Both were always so full of faith, and always enjoyed the conference so much. We are still made happy whenever Grandma Leavitt comes to visit us, and appreciate the thrifty, honest, wholesome, lives they have lived and the good work they have done for themselves, their family and for the Church and their Community.

Jeremiah Leavitt 4th.

Contributor: Bonnijones Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Jeremiah Leavitt 4th Date and place of birth 7 Feb. 1851 Pottawattomie Co. Utah Date and place of death 26th 1931 Gunlock Utah Date of arrival in Utah 1852 Married Mary Ellen Huntsman Leavitt 14 May 1876 Name of person writing history Mary Ellen Leavitt History submitted to Cardinal camp sent to Central Camp, Salt Lake City, Utah. Name of person who submitting the history Ella Lovinnie Curtis Date submitted 10 February 1961 LIFE SKETCH OF JEREMIAH LEAVITT Jeremiah Leavitt was born February 7, 1851, in Pottawattomie County Iowa, and came with his parents, Jeremiah and Eliza Harrover Leavitt, arriving in Utah when he was just one Year old. They settled first in Salt Lake Valley, they later moved to East Toole, Utah. In 1857 they were called to Dixie. In the spring of 1858 they cleared a piece of ground and put in some crops on the northwest corner of the valley where St. George now stands. They irrigated their crop from the northwest spring and in the fall moved over to Santa Clara, where they built a log cabin and lived there until 1861. When they moved farther up on the Santa Clara Creek, there were just four families of them- Jeremiah and his brother Dudley Leavitt; their Uncle William Hamblin (know as Gunlock Bill), the man for whom the town was named; and Isaac Riddle. While they were living at this place, Apostle George A. Smith, then president of the entire Southern Mission from Parowan south, came down on his was to California and stayed with William Hamblin one night. When he was preparing to leave the next morning he said, “Billy, what is the name of this place?” William answered, “We call it the Santa Clara Creek.” Then George A. Smith said, “We will name it after you. We will call it Gunlock.” That was the name given William Hamblin while crossing the plains. He was the hunter for the George A. Smith Company and was the expert with guns. He was always examining and fixing his own and others’ guns while in camp. Each of these four families built log cabins and put in crops, planning to make this their permanent home. But on Christmas Day 1862, rain began to fall and storms continued daily for more than a month. Pouring down and alternating drizzles – the sun never getting a chance to shine and the creek rising with the increasing floods until it reached from hill to hill. The families were all compelled to seek refuge on the side of the black ridge, where they were for several days with scant provisions and little protection from the storm and cold. When the floods finally subsided, Jeremiah’s cabin stood on the back of the creek, with one corner projecting over the creek bank which was eight feet from the creek bed. They gathered what little they were able to salvage from their cabins and moved back downstream to Santa Clara where they remained until the following spring. Their next move was to Panacea, Nevada, staying in that place only a short time as the people were having so much trouble with the Indians with the Indians who were stealing horses, cattle and sheep and killing them. The people themselves were in constant danger of being slain so decided to move again. This time they moved to Clover Valley, and while there had to hear their stock night and day, relaying each other in standing guard. These were very trying times, as they were so short of provisions and clothing. On advice of President Lorenzo Snow, who came to visit them, they moved in a body to what was know as Shoal Creek, later called Hebron, where several other families were already located. There were still Indian troubles but before long peace was made and the settlers hired the natives to work for them, taught them many helpful things and learned much regarding the country. For a few years the people of Hebron prospered, their crops were good and they found sales for all their surplus at the mining camps of Pioche, Nevada, and that vicinity. Then came another grief to try their faith. The water began to fail and their crops dried up without maturing. This meant another move. Back again to Gunlock they traveled, clearing more ground, building a log cabin and putting in crops. “Here I had to work hard,” wrote Jeremiah Leavitt. “My father was a sickly and had a large family. I was the oldest boy of 12 children and had to take responsibility of caring for the family, as well as for my grandmother, Sarah Sturdivant Leavitt, who was old and had buried her husband in Iowa before coming to Utah. Her children were all married and we built her a log cabin near our own, so we could look after her. She died two years after I was married and was laid to rest at the Gunlock Cemetery, being 80 years old at her death. We always had to work hard for we were on the frontier from the time we came to Utah. My mother used to make soft soap from grease with cottonwood ash lye, which was leached by putting the ashes in a box and let the water drip over it and into a barrel. I have taken barrels of this soap to Cedar City and farther north and traded it for grain or anything we could use. Most of our bread was made from corn meal for many years. We ground the corn in our old coffee mill, which we brought across the plains. Often we had little to go with the corn bread, generally just a little sorghum and milk, but very little meat, butter or fats. I have often gone to bed as naked as the day I was born, while mother washed and mended my clothes, which consisted of a calico shirt and a pair of jeans- trousers made of homespun denim. I went barefooted most of the time till I was almost grown, often going barefoot to the ward dances and carrying a squash under my arm with which to pay my dance ticket. “As time rolled on we became a little better off. There were a few small stores put up in St. George, the largest nearby town, and a gristmill and cloth factory in Washington. We raised a little cotton and owned a few head of sheep. We could take our corn and wheat to the mill and have it ground, and while there trade our cotton, wool, and other products to the factory. Later we raised fruit and made sorghum and I would then take a load of dried fruit, sorghum, dried beans and other product north every fall, going to the towns along the Sevier River, to Richfield, Annabell, up or down the river and trade for flour or anything we could use. Such a trip would take three weeks to a month. “I soon had a large family. My father died in 1878, leaving my mother a widow and I had to provide for her, being the eldest son. My wife and I had 15 children, but we all worked hard and did the best we could. We had no farm machinery to speak of. I cut my grain with a cradle, threshed it with a flail and cleaned it with the wind. For over 50 years I made my sorghum every year in a regular boiler. I could always find plenty of work to do on my own farm and never had to go hunting work. My family grew up to be workers, not a drone among them. We have always earned our bread by the sweat of our brow, but have never felt to complain and have always tried to get along the best we could, never running into debt, but very little at and time and always tried to pay as we went along and do as ------ right as we could by everyone.” “My mother passed away July 7, 1905, at the age of 80 years and six months and was laid to rest by the side of my father who preceded her in1878. I am now in my 80th year and my eyesight and hearing are failing me, so I am a Patriarch. My family have all grown up and left the hive. There is only my companion and I left, but we are thankful that all is well with us as it is and hope we can stand true to the end.” Jeremiah Leavitt. He passed away July 26, 1931, aged 80 and six months. One day we were sitting alone and my husband said, “I wish you would write down a few things for me about my life, so this is what I wrote. This little note by his wife explains the forgoing. Note by Mabel Jarvis, who copied the manuscript. I remember once I was a small child how happy we always were when Grandpa Leavitt, as we always called him, and his wife came to see us when they were in St. George at conference. They seldom missed attending just as long as Brother Leavitt could stand the trip. Both were always so full of faith, and always enjoyed the conference so much. We are still made happy whenever Grandma Leavitt comes to visit us, and appreciate the thrifty, honest, wholesome, lives they have lived and the good work they have done for themselves, their family and for the Church and their Community.

Life timeline of Jeremiah Leavitt

1851
Jeremiah Leavitt was born on 7 Feb 1851
Jeremiah Leavitt was 10 years old when Abraham Lincoln is elected as the 16th President of United States. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
Jeremiah Leavitt was 27 years old when Thomas Edison announces his invention of the phonograph, a machine that can record and play sound. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Jeremiah Leavitt was 37 years old when The Great Blizzard of 1888 struck the northeastern United States, producing snowdrifts in excess of 50 ft (15 m) and confining some people to their houses for up to a week. The Great Blizzard of 1888 or Great Blizzard of '88 was one of the most severe recorded blizzards in the history of the United States of America. The storm, referred to as the Great White Hurricane, paralyzed the East Coast from the Chesapeake Bay to Maine, as well as the Atlantic provinces of Canada. Snowfalls of 10 to 58 inches fell in parts of New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, and sustained winds of more than 45 miles per hour (72 km/h) produced snowdrifts in excess of 50 feet (15 m). Railroads were shut down, and people were confined to their houses for up to a week. Railway and telegraph lines were disabled, and this provided the impetus to move these pieces of infrastructure underground. Emergency services were also affected.
Jeremiah Leavitt was 41 years old when Thomas Edison patents the motion picture camera. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Jeremiah Leavitt was 55 years old when Albert Einstein publishes his first paper on the special theory of relativity. Albert Einstein was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics. His work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. He is best known to the general public for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2, which has been dubbed "the world's most famous equation". He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect", a pivotal step in the development of quantum theory.
Jeremiah Leavitt was 63 years old when Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife, Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, were assassinated by a Yugoslav nationalist named Gavrilo Princip in Sarajevo, sparking the outbreak of World War I. Archduke Franz Ferdinand, Archduke of Austria-Este was a member of the imperial Habsburg dynasty, and from 1896 until his death the heir presumptive (Thronfolger) to the Austro-Hungarian throne. His assassination in Sarajevo precipitated Austria-Hungary's declaration of war against Serbia, which in turn triggered a series of events that resulted in Austria-Hungary's allies and Serbia's declaring war on each other, starting World War I.
Jeremiah Leavitt was 77 years old when Walt Disney character Mickey Mouse premieres in his first cartoon, "Plane Crazy". Walter Elias Disney was an American entrepreneur, animator, voice actor and film producer. A pioneer of the American animation industry, he introduced several developments in the production of cartoons. As a film producer, Disney holds the record for most Academy Awards earned by an individual, having won 22 Oscars from 59 nominations. He was presented with two Golden Globe Special Achievement Awards and an Emmy Award, among other honors. Several of his films are included in the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress.
Jeremiah Leavitt died on 26 Jul 1931 at the age of 80
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Jeremiah Leavitt (7 Feb 1851 - 26 Jul 1931), BillionGraves Record 13421463 Veyo, Washington, Utah, United States

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