Jeppa Nelson

29 Oct 1834 - 23 Sep 1914

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Jeppa Nelson

29 Oct 1834 - 23 Sep 1914
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Grave site information of Jeppa Nelson (29 Oct 1834 - 23 Sep 1914) at Pleasant Grove City Cemetery in Pleasant Grove, Utah, Utah, United States from BillionGraves
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Life Information

Jeppa Nelson

Born:
Died:

Pleasant Grove City Cemetery

301-945 Utah 146
Pleasant Grove, Utah, Utah
United States

Headstone Description

Jeppa, born at East Sallerur Sweden. Anna, born in Sweden.
Transcriber

finnsh

January 14, 2012
Photographer

Papa Moose

December 30, 2011

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Memories of Grandpa and Grandma Nelson

Contributor: Catirrel Created: 7 months ago Updated: 3 months ago

As I remember them, Grandpa was quite tall, maybe 6 feet, with white hair and beard. Grandma was small and the only time I remember her hair it was still black, although it was thin. For everyday she wore a dark calico full skirt, floor length, and an over blouse, or dressing sacque (I think they called them) and on her head a small bonnet which was worn both inside and outside of the house at all times. I don't know what she wore underneath, except I remember when she would give me a peppermint or maybe a penny she would lift her skirt and then several petticoats, one at a time, and finally in the bottom one she would find a pocket in which was my gift. On Sunday or special occasions her costume was always the same except that the cloth was silky black and the bonnet was fancier. Grandpa used to come and tend us kids, Harold, Boyd and me, while Mama and Dad went to parties. He would bounce us on his knee and sing hymns, both in English and Swedish. Even now, whenever I hear "Count Your Many Blessings" or "Catch the Sunshine", I think of Grandpa Nelson. Grandma used to make the soap at our place. All year long Mama saved bacon and fat rinds, it all went to soap. On soap making days a fire would be built in the yard and Grandma would put in the collected grease along with lye and water, I don't think she used a recipe, she would then cook it, stirring with a long clean stick until it was done. She didn't have any length of time to cook it either, I remember she would hold up the stick and watch how the soap dripped from it, somewhat as we test the syrup for popcorn, then when she judged it was done it would be poured into flat metal containers. When it was partially hardened it would be cut into bars and separated to dry further. She made enough soap to last a year. Whenever we killed a pig, Grandma always came to help with the many things that had to be done to the meat. I remember her getting the "pluck-a-fit" from the intestines to be rendered into lard. She would then clean the small intestines thoroughly, with soap and lye, etc., and then stuff them with sausage, which was ground pork with salt, pepper and spices (which Swedes always used with meat) added. She used a set of different sized length of cow horns for stuffing the sausage into the intestines. Then she would tie the sausage into appropriate lengths of string, now it was ready to smoke. She would dig a hole in the ground, build a fire in it with certain kinds of wood and then when it had burned down, the sausage would be hung above the smoking ashes and the hole covered. When the process was finished the meat would be cooked as well as smoked. It was put away to use with our other cured meat, it was delicious. Grandpa learned to speak English well, on thinking back I don't even remember an accent, but Grandma never learned to speak it very well. When I was a child I couldn't understand much of what she said to me, but as I was around her more, I understood her better. I remember some of her expressions (part Swedish, part English) and naturally these are the ways I remember them even though they may not be right. She would say, "Taks sk du ha" for thanks. "Bitty Peega" in a tender voice for a little girl. She would caution me to be careful in crossing the "beel track" meaning the road and when the children were making a lot of noise or confusion, she would throw up her hands and explain, "sooch un tudermulia". Her house always smelled of moth balls and coffee. Grandma had a spinning wheel and I used to watch with fascination as she spun thread on it. In Sweden, they had raised their own flax, spun the thread and woven it into cloth. I also remember how she used to wash wool which had been sheared from sheep and then when it was clean and dried, she would card it with those carders (which were wooden boards with handles and many wires sticking through them) and the finished product was what we used in all our quilts. The house and lot Grandma and Grandpa bought when they left the farm and moved into town, was the most interesting place on earth. It had been a store with living quarters behind it. When the store owners sold it, they apparently left all their unsold stock there. Since Grandma and Grandpa didn't need this big front part that opened into the street for living, they also left the things in it. I remember dressing up in the grown up clothes, corsets and shoes, and rummaging through all those wonderful bins and boxes to see what we could find. Underneath the house, was a cellar. I can still see it and smell it. Grandpa had the sides lined with uniformly sawed and split wood arranged according to size. There was even raspberry wood kindling neatly tied into small bunches with binder twine. Hanging from the roof or ceiling were hams and slabs of bacon, and in white sacks were dried apples, prunes and apricots. In homemade willow baskets were feathers to be cleaned and made into pillows and feather beds when they were needed. Of course there were also all kinds of vegetables in the winter, cabbage, squash, parsnips, turnips, carrots, potatoes, and bins of apples. Outside a big ditch ran through the lot. I am sure this must have been a worry to Grandma and Grandpa and the folks, but someone always stayed with us when we were outside, mostly Grandpa. There were cherry trees on most of the lot, as I remember them, they were the biggest and best Bing's, Lambert's and Royal Ann's I have ever seen. After Mama became ill, Grandma used to come to our place to help me. By this time she was living in the little brick house behind Aunt Regina's. Grandpa had died. I came to know and love Grandma very much, more than I had done before. As we worked, she told me stories of her life in Sweden, how I wish I would have written them down. I remember she told me how they used to wash only every few months. They would take the clothes down to the river in wagons, it would take several days to wash and dry them. The whole family would go along and it was really sort of a holiday. Even after she became very old, Grandma was not content to sit and do nothing, she would come down to our place and pick fruit and gather raspberry limbs, etc.. I think I will conclude with this story which isn't a personal remembrance, but was told to me by Mons Monson. He said in addition to Grandpas regular grainery at the farm there was a smaller one set right by the street and the door was always left unlocked. Mr Monson said to Grandpa, "Brother Nelson, that is a poor place to have a grainery, and besides, you are liable to have your grain stolen." He said Grandpa replied, "The purpose of putting that grainery there and leaving it unlocked is so people who need the grain may take it with no embarrassment. They are welcome to it." Now that is what I call a trusting good man. Written by Zelda Freeman Submitted by Anne Lynch

Christmas At 5 Years Old----1895

Contributor: Catirrel Created: 7 months ago Updated: 3 months ago

Twas the day before Christmas. The ground was covered with snow. We were up early waiting for our Grandpa, Jeppa Nelson, from Pleasant Grove, to take us to the Northfield for Christmas. After breakfast Mother got our warm clothes out and fixed a hot dinner. About 11:00 am we heard sleigh bells and looking out the east window we saw a two seated sleigh drawn by two white horses drive into our yard. The horses were breathing hard from running and pulling the sleigh 12 miles and the breath from their nostrils turned to frost from the cold. Papa helped Grandpa from the sleigh. He wore a calfskin coat, felt boots, overshoes and a fur cap. His beard and mustache were white with frost. The horses were fed in the barn and while we ate dinner bricks were heated in the hot oven. By 1:00 pm the horses were hitched to the sleigh and we dressed in warm clothes and got into the sleigh. Feet resting on hot bricks, our legs covered with quilts, we started for Pleasant Grove. As the horses trotted along pulling the sleigh over the glistening snow, we enjoyed the snow covered bushes and trees across the Provo bench and the sleigh bells merry music as the horses trotted along. They were brass bells from Sweden in strands fastened to the horses with 16 on each horse. The bells ranged in size from 1 inch to 4 inches in diameter. This was a swell, cold, musical ride of 12 miles to the Northfield of Pleasant Grove. We were Grandpa, Papa, Mama, myself, sister Ilah and baby brother Henry. At the Jeppa Nelson farm we were met by Grandma, Uncle Swen, Aunt Carrie and Aunt Gine. We were hustled into the farm house and warmed before the open fire in the fireplace. On the hearth was a jug of cider and apples were sputtering from the heat. It surely tasted good. When we arrived Grandma was cooking rice in a big black iron kettle. The rice was cooked in milk and was stirred with a wisp (small peeled willow sticks tied together at one end). When the rice was cooked, it was made into custard puddings. Two 3 quart pans were filled and baked in the oven, one of which we had for supper. The second was saved for Santa Claus. I enjoyed following Uncle Swen as he fed the cows and milked four of them. He fed chickens, horses, cows,sheep and hogs. After supper we listened to Grandpa play the accordion as Mother played the organ and we all sang Christmas songs. Then Ilah and I hung our stockings on the wall by the fireplace and we were tucked in a family bed for the night. I was about asleep when the cold, quiet night was filled with yelping and howls of the coyotes on the foothills and the family dog (Old Rover) answered back. Ilah and I were out of bed with a bound and Aunt Carrie had to come sleep with us. We awoke Christmas morning at the light of day. Our stockings were filled from the toe to the top with goodies to eat such as candy, nuts, oranges and popcorn. I had a red wagon and a harmonica that Grandpa taught me to play Silent Night. The custard pudding for Santa (nearly 3 quarts) was almost gone...How could he eat so much? In the midst of the Christmas excitement, I missed Grandpa. I went to the barn but he wasn't there, but out by the corn crib he sat on a stool whistling a tune as he was husking corn. I asked why he worked on Christmas Day. "Oh" he said, "the animals need corn to eat too." The next day we made the trip back to Provo. This Christmas I have always remembered. Written by Lawrence Raymond Nelson Submitted by Anne Lynch

Jeppa Nelson Farm

Contributor: Catirrel Created: 7 months ago Updated: 3 months ago

At the age of 8 Raymond began working on the Jeppa Nelson Farm in Pleasant Grove. He would help his Grandma and Uncle Swen care for the farm animals; horses, cows, sheep, pigs and chickens, but especially the cows. Each day he would herd them along to the nearest irrigation ditch for a drink of water. If there was no water, then they would head to the big spring about a mile away. Each evening he would clean the stalls and litter them with fresh straw. Every morning and evening the cows were milked and the milk cared for. They would use a cream separator, powered by hand, then sell the cream to a dairy and feed the skim milk to the calves and pigs. Some days Grandma would make cottage cheese and churn some of the cream to butter. Oh boy! Grandma sure had a busy life back in those days; cook and bake, wash and iron, mend and sew, clean and scour, bottle fruits and vegetables and on and on. It's a good thing she had some daughters to help. The hay was cut by horse drawn mowers, raked and hauled into the barn or stacked in the hay yard. Corn and potatoes were stored in bins, grain reaped and stacked in round stacks to be thrashed later. It was a two day job for men, horses and a big thrashing machine powered by a steam engine (straw and chafe blowing in the wind). Then the grain was carried to bins in the granaries and stacked in sacks to be cared for. At noon the steam whistle would blow and all of the men would line up at the water trough or at the tubs of water to wash up for dinner. In the living room a long table was set with the bounties of the farm, with fresh cider to drink. Then came the clean up and that was the end of summer's work. For pay I received new clothes, some money, one summer a wardrobe trunk and another summer a bicycle. I remember one fall I drove a team of horses with a wagon loaded with wheat to the American Fork tithing grain elevator. I followed Grandpa's outfit. One load of grain was for tithing and the other was a donation to the new Alpine Stake Tabernacle in American Fork. I learned Grandpa was a full tithe payer. He said, "That is what makes good crops and well people." Submitted by Anne Lynch

Journal of Jeppa Nelson

Contributor: Catirrel Created: 7 months ago Updated: 3 months ago

JOURNAL OF JEPPA NELSON My life story as I remember it as a little boy in all brevity according to my memory. I was born at Osstra Sallorp (Ostra Sallerup) the 28th of October, 1834. Then my parents moved to Ulstorp, Hangar Parish, and stayed there until there death. My mother, she died in 1873 (2 June) in the month of May, and my father died a few years later. Since my parents were very poor, for we had had hard times and we were many children and they had poor land, so we used to go around and ask for some bread for Christmas, and I was out during the summer as a little guard with the farmers (probably watched the geese and pigs), and it wasn’t always easy or pleasant. My mind was always thinking of God. At certain times I thought of my future and wondered whether the Lord would help me, so I wouldn’t have to become so poor as my parents were. That always was on my mind. I always wanted to have knowledge about God. I wondered why we called God our father. I had one father. I wondered if they could call him father because He had created me from the dust of the ground. It was written that of dust thou art and unto dust thou shalt return. I couldn’t understand that He was both creator and father. And as I walked around in the forest, I cried sometimes, and sometimes I changed and was very happy. So my mind was very changeable. I had to go out to make my own living and fetch for myself when I was twelve. I enjoyed playing all kinds of games, and I tried to practice, nobody could beat me at playing ball, or jumping over everything, or climbing trees. When I was 13 years old, one beautiful Sunday morning in the fall, all my playmates were out playing ball, while I was driving my sheep and geese and pigs out in the forest. And that Sunday I realized that I was a poor man’s boy, and did not have my freedom like the rich men’s children, and I was very depressed, and that morning I cried a lot. I usually could comfort myself with my food, but that Sunday nothing could comfort my mind. I was so toughed by my thoughts, which had gone so far back into my childhood, and I could see that I was a prisoner, not having my freedom like the rich children. I was sitting by a Juniper and cried and thought, cried and thought. And there was something that moved around me, and I looked around but couldn’t see anything. But my understanding was opened and I could understand that my parents had not lived well before God, or prayed to God to bless them. Therefore, we had become so poor that we had to work so hard for our bread. And it was as if I heard a voice saying that if I wanted to dedicate myself to the Lord, I or my children should not lack for bread. From that day on, I have seen the Lord’s blessings for me, and thank Him that he visited me in my youth and enlightened my understanding and blessed my labor. And He has protected me and helped me in life, and I have repented when I haven’t done the right thing. I was confirmed in Ostra Sallerup when I was 15 years old by Priest Olandar. Then I worked in Ormastorp for two years, and then I moved to Efvered (Everod) and worked there for three years. Then I served my military service, and then I was in Va Parish at Klabbark and labored there for three years and then I moved to Jonsby in Assomtorp (Asumtorp) and served as a farm hand there. They had a lot of trust in me there, and I had a lot of responsibility there. There was a lot to look after there. I kept all the tools for the land (all the field machinery) in order. And I came to think that there was a life after this. I started to go listen to the work of God and was very touched by it, and started to repent in my life, and started to see that I was lost if I did not begin to live according to the word of God. I was very concerned about knowing what was right. I went to the Baptists and listened to them and to the Mission Church (an outgrowth of the Lutheran State Church who believed in more missionary work), which they called the Tract Distribution Association, and stayed with them. The Lord showed me great joy in my heart and my mind and my life, so I had great power to understand. That which had been a temptation now became something foolish. I stopped swearing, I stopped talking evil about anybody. I started a new life. I became a much better man to serve under, when before I had been very strict to work for. I was strong and fast. Everything went well. We had all our work on schedule, contrary to what it was earlier before I came there. I became tired of that hard work so I moved to Gappa in Assomtorp, stayed there for two years. Then I moved it Anders Jorrans in Assomtorp and stayed there for a year. I was very much appreciated and well-liked by the people there. But as I had bought a place in Ormastorp, I had to move there and live there. I moved there in 1865. I married the same year and worked hard on that place, and made it better and bought more land until I had 15 tonne (close to 17 acres). I had three cows and a horse, and all I needed, and I had money left over in the bank. Then in 1871 I went and listened to the Latter-Day Saints, as they called themselves. Then I understood that this was the correct religion if any was right. Then with sincerity in my heart, both I and my wife went and were baptized to that religion they called Mormons. Then I didn’t stay in Sweden for more than two years. I sold my little place and went to Utah in 1873, and arrived there on July 24th in the morning. I stayed in Salt Lake Valley one night then I went to Pleasant Grove where I bought land and settled down. We had a good journey there. Everything went well on the journey. There was a wave went over the ship once that took one of my girls out to the railing. I was asleep on the deck but a sailor grabbed her and held her until I could see to look around. The other I held myself; I had them both on my arm. I had new wooden shoes but they went into the sea. I was so happy I didn’t notice I was wet, for I had both my girls so they didn’t go into the ocean. I and my wife were not very sick on the journey across the sea, but on the railroad across America, my little son became so sick he was close to death. But we arrived in Salt Lake Valley the 23rd of July at Ogden, and came into Salt Lake Valley the same day and stayed there overnight. Then came Nels Kalson in and got us, and so we went to Pleasant Grove. There we settled down after the long journey. We were very tired so it was good to rest a few days before we started to work. And as fast as I was somewhat acquainted I received work. But there was no money to be had, but I earned wheat and other things which I could use in the family. I could do many different kinds of work and I took on anything they wanted me to do. I rented a couple of rooms until I had dug out a basement (dugout). I bought 10 acres of land, and in between working for other people, I dug in the dugout, and lined it with brick and rock inside. So I had a good room ready at Christmas so I could move in there at Christmas. Then I went around during the winter did some slaughtering, made wooden shoes, went to the mountains after timber for a chicken coop. I had no timber the first year. I didn’t have much of my land tilled, but worked for others most of the time, until I built two rooms that summer. Then I bought a pair of oxen, an old wagon, and ten acres more land and leased five acres. Then it started to go well for me in working on the land, and I harvested wheat and potatoes and lucerne, and I bought until I had 30 acres. Then I had all I could do to take care of it and add to our house every year. For nine years I wondered if I should buy more land, then I received a letter which read if I wanted to go on a mission to Sweden. If I were willing they wanted me to be ready to leave in August. On August 22nd I left Salt Lake City in 1882, and came to Sweden in the middle of September. After a pleasant journey I was called to Skane and to Kristianstad where I served two years, went home in ’84 in June and had a successful mission. I baptized 11 but there were many more who were baptized in the branch which my companions baptized in the branch, so there are that plus 33 I think if I remember. There were many who journeyed to Utah when I went home in ’84. Some went to Idaho, some to Provo, and two to Pleasant Grove. When I came home to Pleasant Grove I started to work on my farm again and after a few years the ward it was divided into three wards, (Pleasant Grove) Lindon and Manila, and I came in Manila with Svenson as bishop. Now we had to reorganize everything. I was asked if I wanted to become bishop’s counselor, but wanted to ask for an excuse as I was not good enough in the language, but was placed to preside over the teacher’s quorum with Jons Manson as first counselor and Attwood as second counselor. And I was called as one of the building committee, and then was put in as treasurer for the meeting house. Which I carried on to great satisfaction in the ward and paid out money and labor over 2025 dollars. And there was a lot of work and time which I never counted, for there were many things I took care of which none of the others understood. I was in charge of the stone cutting. I cut every stone clear up to the roof. Then we hired somebody for the gable, for the harvest came and we couldn’t be there all the time. But we went there as often as we could, and when the house was ready, I had it paid for so when we were gathered and then the committee should also be free, and the accounts were settled, and secretary of the books should be free, and we had 6 dollars left over and the house paid for, and they said that was the best treasurer they had ever heard of, and they had always failed or been missing money that was not accounted for. We gave the 6 dollars to the bishop and he could give it to whom he thought needed it the most, and there was a poor family which received it. I was called to take another mission, which I was willing to go, but the Bishop wrote a letter for me which I sent in and asked if I could be free until they had a meetinghouse ready. And I received a letter which read that I was free and they would call again. It took many years, and they sent my son. He went and was away for 26 months. They called me in a couple of years. I had moved into town and was on the finance committee there for a meetinghouse in the town, but the Bishop said I could do as I pleased, and I thought I leaned to leaving. When I was 70 years old I left the city on the 25th of May 1904, and had a pleasant journey, and came to Kristianstad on the 17th of June. And was immediately put into the branch to work together with Brother Lawrence Pearson from West Jordan and Wilford Poulson, and when Pearson went home I took charge of the branch and Brother Poulson was my counselor. He and I we had a good measure of success in the branch. We baptized 12 during the summer and more would have been baptized if Poulson and I had stayed together, but he was moved to Malme (Malmo) and I was alone. I received a young man who knew little about missionary life, so it did not go very well after that. But we had a good time in the branch. Many came to our meetings and we had many meetings. We always had two in the city the first Sunday of every month. Then we had two in Morkava the second Sunday of every month and the third Sunday we held meetings in three different places, Sjatteljonga and Orretorpet and Skogsma and Efvired and the fourth Sunday we had meetings in Ahuskjar with Per Anderson, a man who later sold out and went to Utah with me in May, 1906. I had a successful time these two years. This is witnessed by mine and others’ reports (as to the quarterly and annually reports) that there was a great work done. I was always for the most out among the people, and distributed tracts and had conversations, so I was known everywhere in the branch. Was known and acquainted with people and knew the roads. We had our offices in Kristianstad moved two times so I lived in three places. Now we live at Vasstrasnedgattan 187 Albargsgard, which Hanna Albarg sold to the blacksmith Lindholm where we now board. I have on my mission visited and held meetings in the east and west, in the south and the north of Kristianstad, and have had many good conversations. I have given out many books and tracts in 25 parishes. My Annual Report for 1904 was, as I started it on the 17th of June: Conversations about the gospel 335 Tracting from door to door 682 (hours) Miscellaneous and in meetings 555 (hours) Books sold 59 Books given away 86 This was my report for 1904. Till Conference there were five months more, November, December, January, February, March, April to the first of May 1905. Report for Six Months, For What Was done in Kristianstad Branch By Me To the First Day of May 1905 Tracting from door to door 233 Other Miscellaneous and in meetings 111 Houses visited with from tracting 189 Books Sold 954 Books given away 993 First Invitations 62 Second Invitations 58 Gospel Conversations 312 Ordained to the Priesthood 2 Confirmed 3 Child Blessed 1 Baptized 5 (These 5 were actually baptized by Wilford Poulson: 3 confirmed by Jeppa Nelson, the other 2 by Andrew O. Ingelstrom.) Annual Report For 12 Months, 1905 Tracting from Door to Door 938 Otherwise and in meetings 454 Houses Visited With From Tracting 583 Books Sold 110 Books Given Away 155 Invitations From the Branch Members 89 Other Invitations 95 Gospel Conversations 594 Meetings Held 204 Baptized in the Branch 12 Children Blessed 3 Ordained to Priesthood 4 Of those 12 that were baptized into the branch I only baptized one of them, a woman, the widow of Elna Anderson. Since she insisted that nobody should baptize her but Jeppa Nilson, I baptized her and ordained her a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. She was baptized in Askettorp (Eskelstrop). She enjoyed it because for some time before she was baptized, we were somewhat acquainted. On the 16th of April (1906), which was Easter Monday, I baptized the son to Per Anderson in Ahuskjar by name Sven Parson and we had a pleasant Easter. We held five meetings, one on good Friday, two on Easter day and two on Easter Monday. So that was a pleasant Easter. Then we went to the City and continued our mission. Again I went out in the country and held some meetings. This time came to be ready to go to conference which was held in Halsenborg (Helsingborg) the 28th of April, 1906. We left the city the 27th of April, took the train at 1:40 to Aslop (Eslop), from there to Halsenborg, arrived there at six p.m. and made ready for the conference which started the 28th at 8 o’clock in the evening. And on Sunday we had Sunday School and two meetings, and on Monday we had two meetings, on Tuesday one meeting, on Wednesday one meeting, and on Thursday I went to Myshog to my brother. Stayed there for a night, then I went to Kristianstad, stayed there for two days and held two meetings there.

Jeppa Nelson - Family Photo- 1916

Contributor: Catirrel Created: 7 months ago Updated: 3 months ago

TOP ROW: Lars Nelson-son-in-law, married to Eliza (2nd row). He was a City Recorder in Provo for 30 years. He had also been a bishop. He was in the first class that graduated from BYU. Hannah Nelson Robison-daughter, married to Hamner Robison. She was born in Sweden. She attended BYU. She was a school teacher. Hamner Robison-son-in-law, married to Hannah Nelson. He was a school teacher and later became a principal of the LDS High School (now the LDS Business School). Caroline Nelson Nielson-daughter- married to N.K. Nielson. She was a school teacher in Pleasant Grove. N.K. Nielson-son-in-law, married to Caroline Nelson. He was a school teacher. He later became a principal at Tooele High School, and Springville High School. Ella Walters Nelson-daughter-in-law, married to Swen Nelson. She was a housewife. MIDDLE ROW: Eliza Nelson-oldest daughter, married to Lars Nelson. She was born in Sweden. She attended BYU. Eliza fell off the boat and was rescued in a storm crossing the Atlantic when her family emigrated to America. Jeppa Nelson-father, (grandfather to LeRoy Thorne) He was a Mormon convert in Sweden. Jeppa had a big farm in Manilla. At that time it was called the North Field. He lived in Manila for five years and then he went back to Sweden on a mission. He was gone for two years. When he was 70 years old he went to Sweden on another mission for the church. He helped build the Manilla Ward building. Anna Swenson Nelson-mother, (grandmother to LeRoy Thorne). She was a Mormon convert in Sweden. She didn't speak English. They all spoke Swedish. Anna Swensen was born in Huarod, Sweden on Nov 28, 1836. Died Jan. 28, 1930 in Pleasant Grove Utah. Swen Nelson-son-married to Ella Walters. He was born in Sweden. Swen later ran the Thorne farm in Manilla. BOTTOM ROW: Regina Nelson Thorne- daughter- (LeRoy Thorne's mother) married to Joseph William Thorne. She attended BYU. Joseph William Thorne - son-in-law, married to Regina Nelson( LeRoy Thorne's father) He worked as a manager of Thorne's Mercantile and Dry Goods on Pleasant Grove Main Street at the location of the former Christensen Store. The store's merchandise consisted of men's clothing, suits, work shoes, and boots. A room at the back of the store was used to build and sell wooden coffins. Joseph Ephraim Thorne had been a bishop.. He also helped write the Utah State Constitution. His signature is on the document. Joseph William Thorne later owned his own grocery and meat market store where the Pleasant Grove Post Office was on Main Street.

Memories of Grandpa and Grandma Nelson

Contributor: finnsh Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

As I remember them, Grandpa was quite tall, maybe 6 feet, with white hair and beard. Grandma was small and the only time I remember her hair it was still black, although it was thin. For everyday she wore a dark calico full skirt, floor length, and an over blouse, or dressing sacque (I think they called them) and on her head a small bonnet which was worn both inside and outside of the house at all times. I don't know what she wore underneath, except I remember when she would give me a peppermint or maybe a penny she would lift her skirt and then several petticoats, one at a time, and finally in the bottom one she would find a pocket in which was my gift. On Sunday or special occasions her costume was always the same except that the cloth was silky black and the bonnet was fancier. Grandpa used to come and tend us kids, Harold, Boyd and me, while Mama and Dad went to parties. He would bounce us on his knee and sing hymns, both in English and Swedish. Even now, whenever I hear "Count Your Many Blessings" or "Catch the Sunshine", I think of Grandpa Nelson. Grandma used to make the soap at our place. All year long Mama saved bacon and fat rinds, it all went to soap. On soap making days a fire would be built in the yard and Grandma would put in the collected grease along with lye and water, I don't think she used a recipe, she would then cook it, stirring with a long clean stick until it was done. She didn't have any length of time to cook it either, I remember she would hold up the stick and watch how the soap dripped from it, somewhat as we test the syrup for popcorn, then when she judged it was done it would be poured into flat metal containers. When it was partially hardened it would be cut into bars and separated to dry further. She made enough soap to last a year. Whenever we killed a pig, Grandma always came to help with the many things that had to be done to the meat. I remember her getting the "pluck-a-fit" from the intestines to be rendered into lard. She would then clean the small intestines thoroughly, with soap and lye, etc., and then stuff them with sausage, which was ground pork with salt, pepper and spices (which Swedes always used with meat) added. She used a set of different sized length of cow horns for stuffing the sausage into the intestines. Then she would tie the sausage into appropriate lengths of string, now it was ready to smoke. She would dig a hole in the ground, build a fire in it with certain kinds of wood and then when it had burned down, the sausage would be hung above the smoking ashes and the hole covered. When the process was finished the meat would be cooked as well as smoked. It was put away to use with our other cured meat, it was delicious. Grandpa learned to speak English well, on thinking back I don't even remember an accent, but Grandma never learned to speak it very well. When I was a child I couldn't understand much of what she said to me, but as I was around her more, I understood her better. I remember some of her expressions (part Swedish, part English) and naturally these are the ways I remember them even though they may not be right. She would say, "Taks sk du ha" for thanks. "Bitty Peega" in a tender voice for a little girl. She would caution me to be careful in crossing the "beel track" meaning the road and when the children were making a lot of noise or confusion, she would throw up her hands and explain, "sooch un tudermulia". Her house always smelled of moth balls and coffee. Grandma had a spinning wheel and I used to watch with fascination as she spun thread on it. In Sweden, they had raised their own flax, spun the thread and woven it into cloth. I also remember how she used to wash wool which had been sheared from sheep and then when it was clean and dried, she would card it with those carders (which were wooden boards with handles and many wires sticking through them) and the finished product was what we used in all our quilts. The house and lot Grandma and Grandpa bought when they left the farm and moved into town, was the most interesting place on earth. It had been a store with living quarters behind it. When the store owners sold it, they apparently left all their unsold stock there. Since Grandma and Grandpa didn't need this big front part that opened into the street for living, they also left the things in it. I remember dressing up in the grown up clothes, corsets and shoes, and rummaging through all those wonderful bins and boxes to see what we could find. Underneath the house, was a cellar. I can still see it and smell it. Grandpa had the sides lined with uniformly sawed and split wood arranged according to size. There was even raspberry wood kindling neatly tied into small bunches with binder twine. Hanging from the roof or ceiling were hams and slabs of bacon, and in white sacks were dried apples, prunes and apricots. In homemade willow baskets were feathers to be cleaned and made into pillows and feather beds when they were needed. Of course there were also all kinds of vegetables in the winter, cabbage, squash, parsnips, turnips, carrots, potatoes, and bins of apples. Outside a big ditch ran through the lot. I am sure this must have been a worry to Grandma and Grandpa and the folks, but someone always stayed with us when we were outside, mostly Grandpa. There were cherry trees on most of the lot, as I remember them, they were the biggest and best Bing's, Lambert's and Royal Ann's I have ever seen. After Mama became ill, Grandma used to come to our place to help me. By this time she was living in the little brick house behind Aunt Regina's. Grandpa had died. I came to know and love Grandma very much, more than I had done before. As we worked, she told me stories of her life in Sweden, how I wish I would have written them down. I remember she told me how they used to wash only every few months. They would take the clothes down to the river in wagons, it would take several days to wash and dry them. The whole family would go along and it was really sort of a holiday. Even after she became very old, Grandma was not content to sit and do nothing, she would come down to our place and pick fruit and gather raspberry limbs, etc.. I think I will conclude with this story which isn't a personal remembrance, but was told to me by Mons Monson. He said in addition to Grandpas regular grainery at the farm there was a smaller one set right by the street and the door was always left unlocked. Mr Monson said to Grandpa, "Brother Nelson, that is a poor place to have a grainery, and besides, you are liable to have your grain stolen." He said Grandpa replied, "The purpose of putting that grainery there and leaving it unlocked is so people who need the grain may take it with no embarrassment. They are welcome to it." Now that is what I call a trusting good man. Written by Zelda Freeman Submitted by Anne Lynch

Christmas At 5 Years Old----1895

Contributor: finnsh Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Twas the day before Christmas. The ground was covered with snow. We were up early waiting for our Grandpa, Jeppa Nelson, from Pleasant Grove, to take us to the Northfield for Christmas. After breakfast Mother got our warm clothes out and fixed a hot dinner. About 11:00 am we heard sleigh bells and looking out the east window we saw a two seated sleigh drawn by two white horses drive into our yard. The horses were breathing hard from running and pulling the sleigh 12 miles and the breath from their nostrils turned to frost from the cold. Papa helped Grandpa from the sleigh. He wore a calfskin coat, felt boots, overshoes and a fur cap. His beard and mustache were white with frost. The horses were fed in the barn and while we ate dinner bricks were heated in the hot oven. By 1:00 pm the horses were hitched to the sleigh and we dressed in warm clothes and got into the sleigh. Feet resting on hot bricks, our legs covered with quilts, we started for Pleasant Grove. As the horses trotted along pulling the sleigh over the glistening snow, we enjoyed the snow covered bushes and trees across the Provo bench and the sleigh bells merry music as the horses trotted along. They were brass bells from Sweden in strands fastened to the horses with 16 on each horse. The bells ranged in size from 1 inch to 4 inches in diameter. This was a swell, cold, musical ride of 12 miles to the Northfield of Pleasant Grove. We were Grandpa, Papa, Mama, myself, sister Ilah and baby brother Henry. At the Jeppa Nelson farm we were met by Grandma, Uncle Swen, Aunt Carrie and Aunt Gine. We were hustled into the farm house and warmed before the open fire in the fireplace. On the hearth was a jug of cider and apples were sputtering from the heat. It surely tasted good. When we arrived Grandma was cooking rice in a big black iron kettle. The rice was cooked in milk and was stirred with a wisp (small peeled willow sticks tied together at one end). When the rice was cooked, it was made into custard puddings. Two 3 quart pans were filled and baked in the oven, one of which we had for supper. The second was saved for Santa Claus. I enjoyed following Uncle Swen as he fed the cows and milked four of them. He fed chickens, horses, cows,sheep and hogs. After supper we listened to Grandpa play the accordion as Mother played the organ and we all sang Christmas songs. Then Ilah and I hung our stockings on the wall by the fireplace and we were tucked in a family bed for the night. I was about asleep when the cold, quiet night was filled with yelping and howls of the coyotes on the foothills and the family dog (Old Rover) answered back. Ilah and I were out of bed with a bound and Aunt Carrie had to come sleep with us. We awoke Christmas morning at the light of day. Our stockings were filled from the toe to the top with goodies to eat such as candy, nuts, oranges and popcorn. I had a red wagon and a harmonica that Grandpa taught me to play Silent Night. The custard pudding for Santa (nearly 3 quarts) was almost gone...How could he eat so much? In the midst of the Christmas excitement, I missed Grandpa. I went to the barn but he wasn't there, but out by the corn crib he sat on a stool whistling a tune as he was husking corn. I asked why he worked on Christmas Day. "Oh" he said, "the animals need corn to eat too." The next day we made the trip back to Provo. This Christmas I have always remembered. Written by Lawrence Raymond Nelson Submitted by Anne Lynch

Jeppa Nelson Farm

Contributor: finnsh Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

At the age of 8 Raymond began working on the Jeppa Nelson Farm in Pleasant Grove. He would help his Grandma and Uncle Swen care for the farm animals; horses, cows, sheep, pigs and chickens, but especially the cows. Each day he would herd them along to the nearest irrigation ditch for a drink of water. If there was no water, then they would head to the big spring about a mile away. Each evening he would clean the stalls and litter them with fresh straw. Every morning and evening the cows were milked and the milk cared for. They would use a cream separator, powered by hand, then sell the cream to a dairy and feed the skim milk to the calves and pigs. Some days Grandma would make cottage cheese and churn some of the cream to butter. Oh boy! Grandma sure had a busy life back in those days; cook and bake, wash and iron, mend and sew, clean and scour, bottle fruits and vegetables and on and on. It's a good thing she had some daughters to help. The hay was cut by horse drawn mowers, raked and hauled into the barn or stacked in the hay yard. Corn and potatoes were stored in bins, grain reaped and stacked in round stacks to be thrashed later. It was a two day job for men, horses and a big thrashing machine powered by a steam engine (straw and chafe blowing in the wind). Then the grain was carried to bins in the granaries and stacked in sacks to be cared for. At noon the steam whistle would blow and all of the men would line up at the water trough or at the tubs of water to wash up for dinner. In the living room a long table was set with the bounties of the farm, with fresh cider to drink. Then came the clean up and that was the end of summer's work. For pay I received new clothes, some money, one summer a wardrobe trunk and another summer a bicycle. I remember one fall I drove a team of horses with a wagon loaded with wheat to the American Fork tithing grain elevator. I followed Grandpa's outfit. One load of grain was for tithing and the other was a donation to the new Alpine Stake Tabernacle in American Fork. I learned Grandpa was a full tithe payer. He said, "That is what makes good crops and well people." Submitted by Anne Lynch

Journal of Jeppa Nelson

Contributor: finnsh Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

JOURNAL OF JEPPA NELSON My life story as I remember it as a little boy in all brevity according to my memory. I was born at Osstra Sallorp (Ostra Sallerup) the 28th of October, 1834. Then my parents moved to Ulstorp, Hangar Parish, and stayed there until there death. My mother, she died in 1873 (2 June) in the month of May, and my father died a few years later. Since my parents were very poor, for we had had hard times and we were many children and they had poor land, so we used to go around and ask for some bread for Christmas, and I was out during the summer as a little guard with the farmers (probably watched the geese and pigs), and it wasn’t always easy or pleasant. My mind was always thinking of God. At certain times I thought of my future and wondered whether the Lord would help me, so I wouldn’t have to become so poor as my parents were. That always was on my mind. I always wanted to have knowledge about God. I wondered why we called God our father. I had one father. I wondered if they could call him father because He had created me from the dust of the ground. It was written that of dust thou art and unto dust thou shalt return. I couldn’t understand that He was both creator and father. And as I walked around in the forest, I cried sometimes, and sometimes I changed and was very happy. So my mind was very changeable. I had to go out to make my own living and fetch for myself when I was twelve. I enjoyed playing all kinds of games, and I tried to practice, nobody could beat me at playing ball, or jumping over everything, or climbing trees. When I was 13 years old, one beautiful Sunday morning in the fall, all my playmates were out playing ball, while I was driving my sheep and geese and pigs out in the forest. And that Sunday I realized that I was a poor man’s boy, and did not have my freedom like the rich men’s children, and I was very depressed, and that morning I cried a lot. I usually could comfort myself with my food, but that Sunday nothing could comfort my mind. I was so toughed by my thoughts, which had gone so far back into my childhood, and I could see that I was a prisoner, not having my freedom like the rich children. I was sitting by a Juniper and cried and thought, cried and thought. And there was something that moved around me, and I looked around but couldn’t see anything. But my understanding was opened and I could understand that my parents had not lived well before God, or prayed to God to bless them. Therefore, we had become so poor that we had to work so hard for our bread. And it was as if I heard a voice saying that if I wanted to dedicate myself to the Lord, I or my children should not lack for bread. From that day on, I have seen the Lord’s blessings for me, and thank Him that he visited me in my youth and enlightened my understanding and blessed my labor. And He has protected me and helped me in life, and I have repented when I haven’t done the right thing. I was confirmed in Ostra Sallerup when I was 15 years old by Priest Olandar. Then I worked in Ormastorp for two years, and then I moved to Efvered (Everod) and worked there for three years. Then I served my military service, and then I was in Va Parish at Klabbark and labored there for three years and then I moved to Jonsby in Assomtorp (Asumtorp) and served as a farm hand there. They had a lot of trust in me there, and I had a lot of responsibility there. There was a lot to look after there. I kept all the tools for the land (all the field machinery) in order. And I came to think that there was a life after this. I started to go listen to the work of God and was very touched by it, and started to repent in my life, and started to see that I was lost if I did not begin to live according to the word of God. I was very concerned about knowing what was right. I went to the Baptists and listened to them and to the Mission Church (an outgrowth of the Lutheran State Church who believed in more missionary work), which they called the Tract Distribution Association, and stayed with them. The Lord showed me great joy in my heart and my mind and my life, so I had great power to understand. That which had been a temptation now became something foolish. I stopped swearing, I stopped talking evil about anybody. I started a new life. I became a much better man to serve under, when before I had been very strict to work for. I was strong and fast. Everything went well. We had all our work on schedule, contrary to what it was earlier before I came there. I became tired of that hard work so I moved to Gappa in Assomtorp, stayed there for two years. Then I moved it Anders Jorrans in Assomtorp and stayed there for a year. I was very much appreciated and well-liked by the people there. But as I had bought a place in Ormastorp, I had to move there and live there. I moved there in 1865. I married the same year and worked hard on that place, and made it better and bought more land until I had 15 tonne (close to 17 acres). I had three cows and a horse, and all I needed, and I had money left over in the bank. Then in 1871 I went and listened to the Latter-Day Saints, as they called themselves. Then I understood that this was the correct religion if any was right. Then with sincerity in my heart, both I and my wife went and were baptized to that religion they called Mormons. Then I didn’t stay in Sweden for more than two years. I sold my little place and went to Utah in 1873, and arrived there on July 24th in the morning. I stayed in Salt Lake Valley one night then I went to Pleasant Grove where I bought land and settled down. We had a good journey there. Everything went well on the journey. There was a wave went over the ship once that took one of my girls out to the railing. I was asleep on the deck but a sailor grabbed her and held her until I could see to look around. The other I held myself; I had them both on my arm. I had new wooden shoes but they went into the sea. I was so happy I didn’t notice I was wet, for I had both my girls so they didn’t go into the ocean. I and my wife were not very sick on the journey across the sea, but on the railroad across America, my little son became so sick he was close to death. But we arrived in Salt Lake Valley the 23rd of July at Ogden, and came into Salt Lake Valley the same day and stayed there overnight. Then came Nels Kalson in and got us, and so we went to Pleasant Grove. There we settled down after the long journey. We were very tired so it was good to rest a few days before we started to work. And as fast as I was somewhat acquainted I received work. But there was no money to be had, but I earned wheat and other things which I could use in the family. I could do many different kinds of work and I took on anything they wanted me to do. I rented a couple of rooms until I had dug out a basement (dugout). I bought 10 acres of land, and in between working for other people, I dug in the dugout, and lined it with brick and rock inside. So I had a good room ready at Christmas so I could move in there at Christmas. Then I went around during the winter did some slaughtering, made wooden shoes, went to the mountains after timber for a chicken coop. I had no timber the first year. I didn’t have much of my land tilled, but worked for others most of the time, until I built two rooms that summer. Then I bought a pair of oxen, an old wagon, and ten acres more land and leased five acres. Then it started to go well for me in working on the land, and I harvested wheat and potatoes and lucerne, and I bought until I had 30 acres. Then I had all I could do to take care of it and add to our house every year. For nine years I wondered if I should buy more land, then I received a letter which read if I wanted to go on a mission to Sweden. If I were willing they wanted me to be ready to leave in August. On August 22nd I left Salt Lake City in 1882, and came to Sweden in the middle of September. After a pleasant journey I was called to Skane and to Kristianstad where I served two years, went home in ’84 in June and had a successful mission. I baptized 11 but there were many more who were baptized in the branch which my companions baptized in the branch, so there are that plus 33 I think if I remember. There were many who journeyed to Utah when I went home in ’84. Some went to Idaho, some to Provo, and two to Pleasant Grove. When I came home to Pleasant Grove I started to work on my farm again and after a few years the ward it was divided into three wards, (Pleasant Grove) Lindon and Manila, and I came in Manila with Svenson as bishop. Now we had to reorganize everything. I was asked if I wanted to become bishop’s counselor, but wanted to ask for an excuse as I was not good enough in the language, but was placed to preside over the teacher’s quorum with Jons Manson as first counselor and Attwood as second counselor. And I was called as one of the building committee, and then was put in as treasurer for the meeting house. Which I carried on to great satisfaction in the ward and paid out money and labor over 2025 dollars. And there was a lot of work and time which I never counted, for there were many things I took care of which none of the others understood. I was in charge of the stone cutting. I cut every stone clear up to the roof. Then we hired somebody for the gable, for the harvest came and we couldn’t be there all the time. But we went there as often as we could, and when the house was ready, I had it paid for so when we were gathered and then the committee should also be free, and the accounts were settled, and secretary of the books should be free, and we had 6 dollars left over and the house paid for, and they said that was the best treasurer they had ever heard of, and they had always failed or been missing money that was not accounted for. We gave the 6 dollars to the bishop and he could give it to whom he thought needed it the most, and there was a poor family which received it. I was called to take another mission, which I was willing to go, but the Bishop wrote a letter for me which I sent in and asked if I could be free until they had a meetinghouse ready. And I received a letter which read that I was free and they would call again. It took many years, and they sent my son. He went and was away for 26 months. They called me in a couple of years. I had moved into town and was on the finance committee there for a meetinghouse in the town, but the Bishop said I could do as I pleased, and I thought I leaned to leaving. When I was 70 years old I left the city on the 25th of May 1904, and had a pleasant journey, and came to Kristianstad on the 17th of June. And was immediately put into the branch to work together with Brother Lawrence Pearson from West Jordan and Wilford Poulson, and when Pearson went home I took charge of the branch and Brother Poulson was my counselor. He and I we had a good measure of success in the branch. We baptized 12 during the summer and more would have been baptized if Poulson and I had stayed together, but he was moved to Malme (Malmo) and I was alone. I received a young man who knew little about missionary life, so it did not go very well after that. But we had a good time in the branch. Many came to our meetings and we had many meetings. We always had two in the city the first Sunday of every month. Then we had two in Morkava the second Sunday of every month and the third Sunday we held meetings in three different places, Sjatteljonga and Orretorpet and Skogsma and Efvired and the fourth Sunday we had meetings in Ahuskjar with Per Anderson, a man who later sold out and went to Utah with me in May, 1906. I had a successful time these two years. This is witnessed by mine and others’ reports (as to the quarterly and annually reports) that there was a great work done. I was always for the most out among the people, and distributed tracts and had conversations, so I was known everywhere in the branch. Was known and acquainted with people and knew the roads. We had our offices in Kristianstad moved two times so I lived in three places. Now we live at Vasstrasnedgattan 187 Albargsgard, which Hanna Albarg sold to the blacksmith Lindholm where we now board. I have on my mission visited and held meetings in the east and west, in the south and the north of Kristianstad, and have had many good conversations. I have given out many books and tracts in 25 parishes. My Annual Report for 1904 was, as I started it on the 17th of June: Conversations about the gospel 335 Tracting from door to door 682 (hours) Miscellaneous and in meetings 555 (hours) Books sold 59 Books given away 86 This was my report for 1904. Till Conference there were five months more, November, December, January, February, March, April to the first of May 1905. Report for Six Months, For What Was done in Kristianstad Branch By Me To the First Day of May 1905 Tracting from door to door 233 Other Miscellaneous and in meetings 111 Houses visited with from tracting 189 Books Sold 954 Books given away 993 First Invitations 62 Second Invitations 58 Gospel Conversations 312 Ordained to the Priesthood 2 Confirmed 3 Child Blessed 1 Baptized 5 (These 5 were actually baptized by Wilford Poulson: 3 confirmed by Jeppa Nelson, the other 2 by Andrew O. Ingelstrom.) Annual Report For 12 Months, 1905 Tracting from Door to Door 938 Otherwise and in meetings 454 Houses Visited With From Tracting 583 Books Sold 110 Books Given Away 155 Invitations From the Branch Members 89 Other Invitations 95 Gospel Conversations 594 Meetings Held 204 Baptized in the Branch 12 Children Blessed 3 Ordained to Priesthood 4 Of those 12 that were baptized into the branch I only baptized one of them, a woman, the widow of Elna Anderson. Since she insisted that nobody should baptize her but Jeppa Nilson, I baptized her and ordained her a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. She was baptized in Askettorp (Eskelstrop). She enjoyed it because for some time before she was baptized, we were somewhat acquainted. On the 16th of April (1906), which was Easter Monday, I baptized the son to Per Anderson in Ahuskjar by name Sven Parson and we had a pleasant Easter. We held five meetings, one on good Friday, two on Easter day and two on Easter Monday. So that was a pleasant Easter. Then we went to the City and continued our mission. Again I went out in the country and held some meetings. This time came to be ready to go to conference which was held in Halsenborg (Helsingborg) the 28th of April, 1906. We left the city the 27th of April, took the train at 1:40 to Aslop (Eslop), from there to Halsenborg, arrived there at six p.m. and made ready for the conference which started the 28th at 8 o’clock in the evening. And on Sunday we had Sunday School and two meetings, and on Monday we had two meetings, on Tuesday one meeting, on Wednesday one meeting, and on Thursday I went to Myshog to my brother. Stayed there for a night, then I went to Kristianstad, stayed there for two days and held two meetings there.

Jeppa Nelson - Family Photo- 1916

Contributor: finnsh Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

TOP ROW: Lars Nelson-son-in-law, married to Eliza (2nd row). He was a City Recorder in Provo for 30 years. He had also been a bishop. He was in the first class that graduated from BYU. Hannah Nelson Robison-daughter, married to Hamner Robison. She was born in Sweden. She attended BYU. She was a school teacher. Hamner Robison-son-in-law, married to Hannah Nelson. He was a school teacher and later became a principal of the LDS High School (now the LDS Business School). Caroline Nelson Nielson-daughter- married to N.K. Nielson. She was a school teacher in Pleasant Grove. N.K. Nielson-son-in-law, married to Caroline Nelson. He was a school teacher. He later became a principal at Tooele High School, and Springville High School. Ella Walters Nelson-daughter-in-law, married to Swen Nelson. She was a housewife. MIDDLE ROW: Eliza Nelson-oldest daughter, married to Lars Nelson. She was born in Sweden. She attended BYU. Eliza fell off the boat and was rescued in a storm crossing the Atlantic when her family emigrated to America. Jeppa Nelson-father, (grandfather to LeRoy Thorne) He was a Mormon convert in Sweden. Jeppa had a big farm in Manilla. At that time it was called the North Field. He lived in Manila for five years and then he went back to Sweden on a mission. He was gone for two years. When he was 70 years old he went to Sweden on another mission for the church. He helped build the Manilla Ward building. Anna Swenson Nelson-mother, (grandmother to LeRoy Thorne). She was a Mormon convert in Sweden. She didn't speak English. They all spoke Swedish. Anna Swensen was born in Huarod, Sweden on Nov 28, 1836. Died Jan. 28, 1930 in Pleasant Grove Utah. Swen Nelson-son-married to Ella Walters. He was born in Sweden. Swen later ran the Thorne farm in Manilla. BOTTOM ROW: Regina Nelson Thorne- daughter- (LeRoy Thorne's mother) married to Joseph William Thorne. She attended BYU. Joseph William Thorne - son-in-law, married to Regina Nelson( LeRoy Thorne's father) He worked as a manager of Thorne's Mercantile and Dry Goods on Pleasant Grove Main Street at the location of the former Christensen Store. The store's merchandise consisted of men's clothing, suits, work shoes, and boots. A room at the back of the store was used to build and sell wooden coffins. Joseph Ephraim Thorne had been a bishop.. He also helped write the Utah State Constitution. His signature is on the document. Joseph William Thorne later owned his own grocery and meat market store where the Pleasant Grove Post Office was on Main Street.

Life Timeline of Jeppa Nelson

1834
Jeppa Nelson was born on 29 Oct 1834
Jeppa Nelson was 6 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
1840
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Jeppa Nelson was 25 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
1859
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Jeppa Nelson was 28 years old when U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring the freedom of all slaves in Confederate territory by January 1, 1863. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
1862
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Jeppa Nelson was 43 years old when Thomas Edison announces his invention of the phonograph, a machine that can record and play sound. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
1877
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Jeppa Nelson was 53 years old when The Great Blizzard of 1888 struck the northeastern United States, producing snowdrifts in excess of 50 ft (15 m) and confining some people to their houses for up to a week. The Great Blizzard of 1888 or Great Blizzard of '88 was one of the most severe recorded blizzards in the history of the United States of America. The storm, referred to as the Great White Hurricane, paralyzed the East Coast from the Chesapeake Bay to Maine, as well as the Atlantic provinces of Canada. Snowfalls of 10 to 58 inches fell in parts of New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, and sustained winds of more than 45 miles per hour (72 km/h) produced snowdrifts in excess of 50 feet (15 m). Railroads were shut down, and people were confined to their houses for up to a week. Railway and telegraph lines were disabled, and this provided the impetus to move these pieces of infrastructure underground. Emergency services were also affected.
1888
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Jeppa Nelson was 57 years old when Thomas Edison patents the motion picture camera. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
1891
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Jeppa Nelson was 74 years old when Ford puts the Model T car on the market at a price of US$825. Ford Motor Company is an American multinational automaker headquartered in Dearborn, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit. It was founded by Henry Ford and incorporated on June 16, 1903. The company sells automobiles and commercial vehicles under the Ford brand and most luxury cars under the Lincoln brand. Ford also owns Brazilian SUV manufacturer Troller, an 8% stake in Aston Martin of the United Kingdom, and a 49% stake in Jiangling Motors of China. It also has joint-ventures in China, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, and Russia. The company is listed on the New York Stock Exchange and is controlled by the Ford family; they have minority ownership but the majority of the voting power.
1908
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Jeppa Nelson died on 23 Sep 1914 at the age of 79
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Jeppa Nelson (29 Oct 1834 - 23 Sep 1914), BillionGraves Record 596454 Pleasant Grove, Utah, Utah, United States

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