Jenis Ott (Layton)

11 Jun 1906 - 20 Jun 1974

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Jenis Ott (Layton)

11 Jun 1906 - 20 Jun 1974
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LIFE SKETCH OF JENIS LAYTON OTT AND BESSIE RUBY PATTERSON (Written by Bessie Ruby Patterson Ott) Layton’s father’s family, the Otts, were interested in agriculture, fruit and stock raising. His mother’s family, the Johnsons, were colonizers. They moved around considerably, settling new towns.

Life Information

Jenis Ott (Layton)

Born:
Married: 19 Sep 1929
Died:

Georgetown Cemetery

about 3 miles south of Cannonville on Kodacrome Way (a few hundred yards to the west)
Cannonville, Garfield, Utah
United States

Epitaph

Father; Mother; Their children, He Saved Soles, In His Will Is Our Peace, Married Sep 14, 1935; sealed Sept 27, 1952, Wife of Seth Johnson Peace Perfect Peace A Loving Wife, A Mother Dear, A friend to all, Lies Buried Here, Sons of Geo. W & Henrietta G Johnson, married June 29, 1956; children Clara S, A. True, Marilyn K., Richard W., Joyce F, A Devoted Husband and a Loving Father a True Latter Day Saint, Beloved Father

Headstone Description

Father - Joseph Edward
Mother - Susan J
Children: Joseph E, Alfred D, Karma J, US ARMY WORLD WAR II, says and Baby, Children: Saundra, Ronald Lee, Sheila, Nila, Sue Ellen, Children: Billy, Sherman, Gwen, Deane, David, Dimion, Karen, Rebecca, Mother
Father, Sealed Sept 27, 1952
Children: Larry W - Ladona - Myrna L - Alma D - Ramona J - Joseph D, Son of Adelbert & Mary J Heaps, Children of Nephi & Zina Johnson, Children of Irving A & Daisie C Johnson, Utah
Cpl 12 Infantry
World War II BSM-PH, Married Irving A Johnson Sept 5, 1923, A loving wife & mother...
A friend to all..., Sons of Geo. W & Henrietta C. Johnson, Wife: Shana
Daughter: Kori Lee, Sealed June 28, 1939, US ARMY
WORLD WAR II, DEAN: US ARMY WORLD WAR II, UTAH CPL 1050 BASE UNIT AAF
WORLD WAR II, PFC US ARMY
WORLD WAR I, Children: Clara S - A True - Marilyn K - Richard W - Joyce F, Wife of Cyrus Mangum, Daugh of Marion..., Son of R. W. & Clara E Pinney, Magleby Mortuary, Husband of Sarah A Dutton, Daughter of Richard C & Susanah D. Pinney
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Memorial / Obituary / Personal History

Contributor: Ron Haymore Created: 3 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

LIFE SKETCH OF JENIS LAYTON OTT AND BESSIE RUBY PATTERSON (Written by Bessie Ruby Patterson Ott) Layton’s father’s family, the Otts, were interested in agriculture, fruit and stock raising. His mother’s family, the Johnsons, were colonizers. They moved around considerably, settling new towns. Several places in southern Utah are named for them. Both the Otts and the Johnsons belonged to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. James Robert Ott (father of Layton) was born January 3, 1873 at Duncan’s Retreat, Washington County, Utah. Janet Matilda Johnson (Layton’s mother) was born January 13, 1879 at Hillsdale, Garfield County, Utah. The Ott family lost most of their farm in a flood once when the Virgin River went on the rampage; so they moved to Tropic, Utah. In their many moves, the Johnson family finally settled in Cannonville, Utah, about six miles from Tropic. Janet clerked in a store in Tropic, before her marriage, and no doubt she met her future husband, James Robert, there. James and Janet were married May 4, 1897 and made their home in Topic. They had eleven children. Two little girls died when they were small children. The rest grew to man and womanhood. The oldest son, Joseph Alma, died February 22, 1941, at the age of 43 years. The rest of the children are all living at this time, October 1, 1964. Layton’s brothers and sisters are as follows: Joseph Alma, Hannah Hope, Lydia Vilate, Susan Janet, James Alvin, Jenis Layton, Louie Dugard, Wallace Moses, Sara, Iris Rose, and Agnes Johnson Ott. Layton was born June 11, 1906 at Cannonville, Garfield County, Utah. When he was only a few months old he had pneumonia and whooping cough. His life was feared for with both sicknesses, but with good care and faith, his life was spared. About this time his father was called on a mission to the Southern States, and even though Layton had had the pneumonia, the mission call must be heeded, so he went. In the family history book is a card Layton received from his father on his second birthday. His childhood playmates were Orlin Hatch, Bernard Johnson, Rex Jolley, and Elmo Cope. In the daytime, their favorite game was baseball, which they played in the dead-end street by the Ott home. At night, all the neighborhood children gathered, a bonfire was built, the children played games such as Prisoner’s Base, Run-sheep-run, Black-black, and the Bladder, etc. Sometimes they roasted chickens, potatoes, apples, and even prickly pears over the fire. The prickly pears did not prove very good food for them. They became very ill after eating them. The children had to be resourceful and make their own recreation, but they had more fun than most children. They made balls from twine strung around on a cork, then sewed securely. The ball bat was a limb from a tree. Layton especially liked to make high stilts and walk on them. Pine nut gathering was a favorite experience in the fall. Sometimes they got pine burrs, buried them in the ground, and built a fire over them. Then they could get the pine nuts out easily; for the fire caused the burrs to burst open and roasted the pine nuts too, so they had a delicious flavor. Layton’s grandfather Ott enjoyed playing the fiddle, and entertained the family. The Ott children often stayed with their grandparents while their father and mother were out to the ranch. Once Layton told his grandfather he knew his four times tables. His grandfather said, “What is four times six?” Layton was proud and happy to show him he knew it was 24. Then his grandfather would ask, “What is six times four?” And Layton replied, “I don’t know my sixes yet.” Then how his grandfather would laugh. Grandmother Ott was a nice kind lady. She always had cookies or something for the children to eat. From early spring until late in the fall, all the family lived out to the ranch at Yellow Creek, or Georgetown. Each boy had his own melon patch, so he could get a melon anytime he wanted when they were in season. It has been said of Layton, he ate so many melons, and so much juice ran onto his overalls, he could just step out of them and they would stand alone. One time James and Layton were told to weed a patch of beans. The weeds were so thick, it was a discouraging job, so they sat down to rest under a tree. Their older brother Joe came along and gave each boy a hard kick. The little boys thought they were badly mistreated, for their parents did nothing about their brother kicking them, so they decided to leave home. They walked quite a distance over hill and down dale. When it began to get dark they thought perhaps they should return to the ranch after all. It was about midnight when they arrived, having walked 10-12 miles. Their parents were very worried, and really scolded Joe. When Layton was about eleven and James nearly thirteen years old, they were making a new irrigation ditch, for the floods had piled rocks, gravel, etc. in the old ditch. A pick had been left up at the head of the ditch, a distance of about 1 ½ miles. When darkness came, Joe dared the boys to go to the head of the ditch and bring the pick back. Layton said he dared go, so he started out and eventually returned with the pick. When his father and brothers saw his footprints the next morning, they decided Layton had really jumped instead of walked after the pick. Often coyotes proved a nuisance around the ranch; taking turkeys, chickens, and even calves. Joe and James set traps but were not able to catch a coyote. Layton studied the tracks of the coyote, he noticed it always went in a particular place. He put a trap on the trail and caught the coyote—outwitting this cunning animal. Later on, he became more and more adept at catching wild animals, which he trapped for bounty and to sell the furs. While the family lived at the ranch, their cousins often came to visit on weekends. The children would swim in the swimming hole, ride the pony, hike in the hills, hunt for rocks, build roads, and haul wood on the wagon their grandfather Johnson had given them. A good deal of Layton’s time was also spent teasing the girls in the family. Layton helped with the chores, getting the cows at night. He also helped to milk them. Once when James and Layton were left alone at the ranch to do the chores, they decided to make hot cakes for breakfast. They thought their mother had been too conservative by using only part cream in the batter. They reasoned that all cream would make them much better. Naturally, the hot cakes were so rich, both boys got sick; then they knew that their mother had been wise in using part milk. Layton cared for the chickens, pigs, and any other work a child of his size could do. He earned money shucking corn for neighbors when he was about 8 or 10 years old. He used the money to buy clothes. Most of his clothes were homemade, so he was proud when he could buy some “store clothes”. When Layton was seventeen, his father was called to Henrieville to be the bishop there. Neither his mother, who was usually very religious, nor any of the children went for several months. For Henrieville, to them, was like Nazareth. They wondered if any good could come from Henrieville. After Layton went there, however, he found the young people sociable, and he joined in their fun and had good times. Layton went to Tropic High School two years, then to Panguitch High School. The principal of the latter school, a Mister Poulsen, was one of his outstanding teachers. Layton graduated from Panguitch High School in 1925. The next year he went to Cedar City to attend the Branch Agricultural College. Mr. Lyman, who taught sheep husbandry, was his favorite teacher that year. As he grew older, he worked for an oil drilling company, and a road construction company, and did some sheep herding during the summers to help himself with his schooling. During his year at the Branch Agricultural College in Cedar City, he got up at 4 a.m. to milk cows for his board and room. The board was very inferior—leftovers from the family—so he decided to try something else. Now his aptness at trapping wild animals stood him in good stead. After school, on Saturdays and whenever time permitted, he was busy looking for likely places to set traps. When school was over that year, he had enough money on hand to buy a little car, referred to as a “bug” in those days. He was really proud to have a car of his own. Later, after he was married, and during the time of the Second World War, when the bounty on coyotes was six dollars, Layton trapped and made as high as one-hundred dollars some days on furs. He had some exciting experiences at times. Most wild animals are afraid of people but if they get cornered, they fight for their lives. Cougars, however, seem to be man’s natural enemy. Layton had a narrow escape one day when he followed a cougar track. Layton’s first experience learning to trap was with squirrels and chipmunks. The family had a dog which they called Old Ring, who liked to chase chipmunks up trees. He would stay under the tree barking until James and Layton arrived; then they would shoot them with flippers. They began to trap squirrels and chipmunks; they buried them, and the coyotes dug them up, so they set traps and caught the coyotes. They hit a coyote with a rock and numbed it. Thinking it was dead, they carried it to show their father. When they laid it down to let him see, it ran away. They were very disappointed but undaunted. Layton kept trying to become quite successful trapping these wild animals. After he was married he continued to trap, and had good success, but had a few frightening experiences. One morning Layton took a bird dog and a hound to Cope Canyon, north of Tropic. It has snowed a little the night before. He found a fresh cougar track. The hound could go faster than Layton could go on a horse, until he got on the south side of a slope; then Layton would catch up, for the snow had melted, and he could track better than the hound. The bird dog helped quite a bit, for he had a good nose. Finally Layton got out on a high point where he could look all over Tropic. All at once the hound changed his bay, and bounded off. In a very few minutes he was so far away, he could hardly be heard. The going was so rough and slow, traveling over hills and down into ravines, Layton could not hear the hound anymore. He followed the cougar tracks the best he could. Imagine his disappointment when, after about 30 minutes, the old hound came back. But as soon as he got to Layton, he began to bay again, and ran back in the direction he had come from. After about two miles of hard struggling, Layton came to a small pinion pine about 8 to ten feet tall. Again he was disappointed for he knew a cougar would not be in that small of a tree. However, the hound left there and went up the hillside to a big yellow pine, and began to bay again. So Layton hurried up to that tree, looking up in the top, expecting to see a cougar up there. A big limb, just above his head went unnoticed, for a lion would not be there so close to the ground. Imagine his terror when he glanced in this direction, ad saw a big lion stretched out on this limb only about two feet from his head. Layton, still on the horse, moved away as quickly as possible, looked the situation over, and decided to just wound the lion, to see if the bird dog would help the hound tree it again. He was trying to train the bird dog to hunt animals instead of birds. When the lion jumped out of the tree, the bird dog left like a streak of lightning. The hound and the cougar began to fight. It seemed the hound was willing to keep fighting even if it meant his life. The cougar was scratching the dog terribly. In a matter of minutes the cougar would have killed the dog. Layton had to take a chance on a lucky shot. He aimed and killed the cougar. He vowed never again to take a chance like that. He also decided it was useless to try to make a hound out of a bird dog. He liked to ride horseback in the hills surrounding the towns where he lived. The beauties of nature, the freedom of the country that was inhabited, gave him the feeling that he was “king of all he surveyed”, as one writer has said. He loved the stories of Harold Bell Wright and James Oliver Curwood. From the time of his early youth Layton made friends easily with his sociable manner, smiling countenance and good nature. Bessie Ruby Patterson was born in West Point, Davis County, Utah, June 2, 1907. She was blessed August 4, 1907, and baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on June 13, 1915, in a canal in West Point. She attended church from her earliest recollections. She felt her early childhood was somewhat uneventful, partly because of the lack of children near her age in the family or in the neighborhood. Her parents lived across the street from Uncle John Singleton, her mother’s brother. Their children were older than Bessie, but their grandson, Ivan Jones, spent most of the summers with them, so he was her main playmate. Uncle John had a store; the children had what candy they wanted, because Ivan helped himself to it. Bessie’s brother, Ray, lived one half mile west of the parental home. His daughter, Mabel, was 1 ½ years younger than Bessie and was another playmate. Bessie liked to go there to play and remembers relishing a bread, spread with lard and sugar, Mabel’s mother fixed for them. After starting to school in West Point, Emerald Holt was Bessie’s best friend. In those days there was a beginner’s class, similar to the kindergarten of later years. Bessie liked school and learning, to which may be attributed the fact that she “skipped” the second and eighth grades, even though she often had to stay out of school because of illness. She began the eighth grade, but the teacher, Henry Bybee, suggested to her mother that she be sent to the ninth grade. So she went to Syracuse to little North Davis High School. This year she rode horseback to school, a distance of about two or three miles. Because she was younger than the other students, and very shy, she didn’t fare very well socially. She remembers going to a matinee dance. An older boy from Clinton asked her to dance. She refused because she didn’t know how to dance very well and was too bashful. When Lee Thurgood asked her, she accepted, for she knew Lee. They usually rode to and from school together. The next year she was fourteen. Her mother thought it best for her to live with her sister, Grace Jones, in Salt Lake City and attend Granite High School. She really liked that big school and made many friends. She liked to play basketball, and was chosen captain of the team, in the class of 100 pupils. She attended MIA in West Point and Salt Lake. She used to worry because she did not know how to dance. Her mother said, “If you never find anything harder to learn than that, you will be lucky.” She was fifteen years old before she learned, but that year she and her friend won the prize for being the best dancers at a Mutual dance. Was she ever happy about that! In 1922 the Patterson family had a new brick house built in Ogden at 334 34th Street. In Ogden Bessie hated to leave Granite, but she went along, and spent her junior year at Weber, which was then a high school and a junior college. At the end of the year the LDS Church decided to discontinue the high school, and make Weber strictly college. Those students who had fifteen units of credit, could go into college the following year. Her mother called Dr. Edward Rich, the family doctor, and asked what he thought about Bessie’s entering college, and he said, “She’s too little and slimsy to go to college.” Ogden High School graduation requirements were different than Weber’s; it was impossible to get all the required subjects in, in one year to graduate. There seemed no alternative but for her to go to college. So she started, at the age of 16. She became run-down and had to quit school. The first money Bessie earned was made by working in a tomato factory, where tomatoes were canned. The first fall she worked in Syracuse, when she was fifteen years old; and later in West Point. With the money earned, she bought clothes to go to Weber. Bessie and Opal Allred were Sunday School teachers in the Ogden First Ward where they lived, when Bessie was about fifteen years of age. That year, or the following one, they were members of the Junior Mutual Class, who considered they had a perfect teacher in Mrs. Walter Wright. After she and her husband were tragically killed in a flood near Farmington, Utah, the class had another outstanding teacher in Mrs. Conrad Jenson. She had traveled in Europe and made the class very interesting. After Bessie discontinued school, the year she was sixteen, she had a patriarchal blessing, which promised her that though she had been temporarily deprived of going to school, she would continue her education as she grew in years, which proved very true. Returning to Weber the next fall, Bessie resumed her work and graduated in the spring of 1926, and received a certificate to teach. Teaching jobs were scarce then. Dr. Edward Rich, who was probably on the State Board of Education and had a lot of prestige, interceded for Bessie, and helped her obtain a teaching position in Henrieville, Garfield County, Utah. At that time she had not been further south than Provo. It was an exciting experience to take the train to Marysvale, and be out on her own for the first time, at the age of nineteen. This Marysvale train was only a branch line, very dirty and pokey. There were several teachers on the train going to various Southern Utah towns. They were all young and unmarried, and everyone enjoyed the trip. Arriving in Marysvale, there was no means of transportation on. They hired a truck to take them to Panguitch, where they spent the night in a hotel (perhaps the Cameron). The next morning Bessie met Superintendent Gardner, then went on her way alone, on the mail truck bound for Henrieville. The scenery was vastly different from that of Northern Utah. The mail driver pointed out the different places of interest along the way. When they got to Henrieville the first building to meet the eye was the school, which was in reality “a little red school house”. The driver took her to the home of Bishop James R. Ott, the boarding place recommended to her by Superintendent Gardner. On the Ott porch a large group of children were assembled. Bessie thought, “What a large family these Otts must have”. Later, she learned that most of them were children from the town who had come to see the new teacher. Alma Fletcher, who Bessie knew slightly before, was the other teacher. He boarded with the Ott family too, and taught grades 5 through 8 while Bessie taught grades 1 through 4. It was rather hard to adjust to this little town. She hadn’t been used to speaking to people she didn’t know in Ogden, so some people thought she was “stuck up”. The Ott family who were at home consisted of the father, Bishop James R. Ott, who had been called from Tropic to be bishop of the Henrieville Ward; the mother, Janet Ott, and the following children: James (age 21)was away herding sheep most of the time; Layton (age 20) came home in about October; Louie (age 17) attended school in Panguitch this year; Wallace (age 15) a very shy big boy; Sara (age 13) with whom Bessie shared a room; Rose (age 11): and Agnes (age 8) was in the fourth grade in Bessie’s room. Alma Fletcher, who they called Fraz, had a Ford coupe. He suggested going to Bryce Canyon on one of the first Sundays the teachers were in Henrieville. A relative of Bishop Ott’s had died and the funeral was being held in Tropic. Alma and Bessie took Bishop Ott to Tropic, then went on their way to Bryce Canyon. After visiting the canyon, they decided they better go back to the funeral. As they sat in the funeral, it became very warm, and Bessie felt faint, so she asked Fraz for his keys and started out. The last thing she remembered was trying to open the car door. The next thing she knew she was lying on the ground, with what seemed to her a large group of men standing around. They probably rushed from the church when they saw Bessie fall. She heard one ask, “Who is she?” Another replied, “It’s the Henrieville schoolteacher.” She was taken to the Richard Ott home, feeling very embarrassed at having been introduced in such a manner. The first time Bessie saw Layton was one evening when the family and boarders were having supper. He had been away herding sheep, and came home for the remainder of the winter. He wore a big floppy cowboy hat. Bessie never cared for western apparel, but these two young people seemed attracted to each other from the beginning. He was a smiling, happy good- natured person; although not tall, was dark and handsome. His mother’s nickname for him was “Sunshine” and it seemed to fit. Fraz, Layton and Bessie went to the dances in Tropic every Friday night. They had real good times. Inasmuch as all the Tropic teachers were unmarried, the Henrieville and Tropic teachers had a lot of fun together. After the fall institute in about October, this group of teachers from the two towns took a little trip to Cedar Breaks, Zion and Grand Canyon. When they were eating grapes near St. George, and visited the temple there, little did Bessie think she would be living a few blocks from this place. The Tropic teachers were Rowena Gale, whom we called “Tiny”, Horace Bigler, Amy Howard, Andrew Jones, and Sylvia Woodward. Often, after the Friday night dances, Tiny would go to Henrieville for the weekend. On Saturday she and Fraz, Layton and Bessie, or “Pat” as she was called, would go hiking, horseback riding, etc. Very often, during the evenings they played Rook. Bessie hadn’t had much experience before, but she learned with lots of practice. That winter was a very enjoyable one. The conveniences of the city were lacking, but things more than compensated for them. A play “Her Honor the Mayer” was presented in the ward. Bessie was “Her Honor”. Bessie and Layton were so busy doing things, they seemed to have no interest in going with anyone except each other. When school was over, Bessie’s mother and dad came after her to take her home. She shed a few tears as the car took her away from the place she had had during such an enjoyable winter. If her parents noticed her tears, they said nothing. A few weeks after she got home, Bessie’s mother died with appendicitis (April 29, 1927). The earth seemed to have been moved from under this girl; she felt so forlorn and dejected. The following year she taught at West Point and boarded with her sister—Minnie and Delpha. West Point offered little recreation, she missed the good times she had had the year before, and did not adjust at all well to the loss of her mother. Her father married Amelia Barker that year, and when she went home for the weekend, Amelia acted very strangely—she kept her bedroom door locked, and when Bessie asked for some sheets for her bed, she was told, “If you want some sheets, go and buy them.” It was still the same house, furniture, sheets, etc. that her mother had had, but it was plain there was no place for Bessie there, so she moved all her belongings to her sister Delpha’s. Time proved this Amelia only married her father for financial gain. She made life so miserable for him, he was glad to give her a substantial sum to be rid of her. Bessie applied for work at the telephone company the next summer, so she could stay at home with her father, but when they noted two years college, she was not hired. Then she applied at the Salt Lake Telephone Company, leaving off the college credit from the application, she was hired. It was rather an interesting job. She worked nights and during lunch hour she and her friends danced. Sometimes they went to Utah Lake swimming. Layton came up to Ogden and Salt Lake occasionally, and the two corresponded until September, when Layton came again. They decided to get married. So on the 19th of September, 1929, they were married in the Salt Lake Temple. Minnie and Henry Lambert, sister and brother-in-law, went through the temple with them; and the family had a reception in their honor at the Patterson home in Ogden. When they went to Henrieville, Layton’s parents had another reception for them. They made their home in Henrieville in an unfinished house, with only a sub-floor; unplastered walls, and no floor coverings. An old -fashioned hearth stove was used for heating and cooking. Homemade table and bench were other kitchen furniture they used. There was no electricity or plumbing. Water was carried from the canal about a block from the house. In February Bessie went to Ogden, bought a bedroom suite, a used coal range, some chairs, and linoleum and got a table from her father’s house. About a year later they bought Allen Smith’s home, katty-cornered across the street from the school. It was a tall, old unpainted thing that used to have the reputation of being haunted. Layton and Bessie were not afraid of ghosts. They made the most of what they had and were quite content. Drinking water was hauled in barrels from the creek now. In summer, it often rained and made the water muddy, but it was all there was so they used it. One time Bessie’s nephew, Max Jones, brought some friends down from Salt Lake. Layton put some water into a wash basin, from the barrel, so they could wash. One of the boys said, “Where shall I put this dirty water?” Layton just smiled and threw the water out, and gave them some clear water they used for drinking. Layton herded sheep during the lambing season, and during the summer of 1930 Ray Patterson, Bessie’s brother, came down and took Layton to West Point. Layton worked in the fields picking tomatoes. During the night of September 4, a terrible wind came up and blew the telephone lines down. It was apparent that Layton and Bessie were soon to become parents, so Delpha and her husband Joseph Perkins went to Ogden, a distance of twelve miles, to get the doctor. In the early morning the baby was born; Layton Patterson he was called. He was born September 5, 1930, at his aunt Minnie’s home in West Point. That fall Layton bought a used Model-T Ford truck, purchased a new water barrel, 200 pounds of flour, 100 pounds of sugar, and a few groceries. They were very proud of their possessions. The truck had side curtains, but no heater. They could only travel the warmest part of the day, because of the baby. They stayed at Bessie’s sister, Grace Jones, the first night; the next day they went to Springville and stayed that night at Layton’s Aunt Mary Hatch’s place. The third day they went to Junction and stayed the night with another of Layton’s aunts—Saraphine Anderson. The fourth day brought them to their home in Henrieville. Layton herded sheep the first few summers, ran a little farm in Georgetown, and trapped coyotes and bobcats in the winter. They raised a big garden, which supplied them with vegetables for summer use and some to put in bottles for winter. Sometimes Bessie made quilts and quilt tops, which she traded for fruit to preserve for winter. They had a cow which furnished them milk, cream and butter; and they had their own chickens. About this time Layton served as assistant Sunday School Superintendent. Although Bessie was not afraid of ghosts, she was afraid of drunken men. One night, about 2 o’clock, when she was alone, except for little Layton, she was awakened by a noise. At first she thought it was the children over on the school ground. She got up to investigate and there was a carload of drunken men in front of our house. One of them was out of the car and said, “I’m going in.” Bessie did not know whether he meant in the house, or in the car. There was no back door on the house, except a screen, for the weather was hot, and when the door was open, it shut off the ventilation because it opened against the hall door, so Layton had taken it off before going to the sheep herd. Bessie stood by the window petrified with fear. Finally the man got into the car and they drove away. Another experience that happened while they were living in Henrieville was when they were driving toward Cannonville and were nearly out of gas. They came to a slight hill and nearly stopped. Bessie thought if she jumped out and gave a little push, they could get over the incline, and be able to make it into town. They were going faster than she thought. As she jumped out, the movement of the car caused her to fall, then Layton had to stop for her. They managed to get to the store where they sold gas though. Eliza Moore was the Henrieville ward organist, but often she failed to appear at church, so it fell the lot of Bessie to play the organ or piano for Sunday School and church. Other church jobs Bessie held in Henrieville were Primary President and literary class leader in Relief Society. A few good friends always make life more enjoyable. There were two that were especially good friends of Bessie-—Vera Quilter and Annie Colvin. Annie was not a permanent resident, but came in the winter while her husband, Orlin, taught school. These three women had a sort of club, going to each other’s homes to sew, etc. In March 1937, Layton got a job working on the farm of Lamoni Holbrook in West Point. Now Layton, Bessie and little Layton lived in Mrs. Knighton’s home near the Holbrook farm. On Mothers Day, Layton Patterson went out and picked his mother a pretty bouquet of Mrs. Knighton’s tulips. The mother was never more appreciative of anything than she was of those flowers, but Mrs. Knighton was not happy at all to have her tulips picked. That summer Layton and Bessie bought a small home across the street from Bessie’s brother Ray. Layton bought a large truck and started working for himself hauling tomatoes, beets, etc. During the beet season, he was taken very ill. Ray and Bessie took him to the hospital with a nearly ruptured appendix. When Dr. Junior Rich operated on him, he discovered a growth on his intestines that he thought might be malignant. The appendix was laid on the outside of his abdomen, and the incision clamped together. The test for malignancy was sent to Salt Lake; it came back negative; the operation was then completed, and he soon recovered. In the late winter or early spring this little family went back to Henrieville and Layton began raising mink. They lived in part of his mother’s house, for they had sold theirs when they moved. When summer came, Layton contracted tularemia from the rabbits he caught to feed the mink. He was very ill. Bessie’s sister and her husband, Grace and Joe Jones, came and took them to Ogden. Dr. C. N. Jenson gave Layton medicine to counteract the disease. He returned to Henrieville, but Bessie and son Layton remained in West Point, for another baby was expected, and the nearest doctor by Henrieville was more than fifty miles away. On October 1, or thereabouts, Bessie went to stay with her brother Leonard and his wife Elda to await the baby. Little Layton stayed in West Point with his Aunt Minnie. October 12, 1938, Elna took Bessie to the Dee Hospital in Ogden where James Dale was born. Layton could not come because of his own illness, so the little family was scattered. Layton got a job with the Federal Writer’s Project collecting pioneer histories and folk tales of Garfield County. Layton came after his little family and they went back to Henrieville and continued to live in part of his mother’s house. The next spring Wallace Ott bought the parental home and Layton’s family moved into the Alfred Quilter home where they stayed until 1940. Then Bessie and the two boys returned to West Point, as Layton now had a job as government trapper and would be away from home most of the time. Besides, another child was on its way. Layton thought he would join the family a little later, but he could not decide to quit trapping, for jobs were scarce. It was lonely for all of them, for Layton only got home once in a while—for Thanksgiving, Christmas, etc. On March 28, Bessie knew she must go to the hospital. Layton Patterson was in bed sick. Jimmie Dale was screaming because he did not want to be left with Aunt Lizzie Patterson. Nevertheless Bessie had to leave. Rosalyn was born that afternoon. Bessie was under anesthetic, and as she was regaining consciousness she heard Dr. Jenson say, “It’s a girl, Bessie.” She thought to herself, “I’m not going to pay any attention, for maybe it isn’t true.” She had wanted a girl so much. For a month or more, Rosalyn did not do at all well. She slept constantly. She could not be awakened to eat, even when washed with a cold, wet washcloth. She was taken to the doctor, who told Bessie she must get her to eat or they would have to put her in the hospital and feed her through the veins. She developed jaundice, her skin turned yellow. After some time though, she started to do better and became quite healthy. Because Layton could not seem to get to West Point to live, in the fall of 1941, they decided to sell the West Point house, and buy the old Myron Bybee place in the northern end of Tropic. It was a well-built house, but very old and run down. Layton and Bessie knocked off the old plaster, and put on plasterboard. The inside became quite comfortable, but the outside still looked terrible—unpainted and forlorn-looking. While they lived in Tropic, Layton gradually acquired land and cattle, until he was doing well in this line. The fall of 1942, there was a teacher shortage. Charles Wintch, Layton’s brother-in-law, was on the school board. He asked Bessie if she would go to Henrieville to teach. She was glad to, for the 1930s had been Depression years, and everyone was “hard pressed” for money. Each year Bessie thought she would teach this one-year and buy something they wanted, then quit; until the years added up, and she continued teaching years later. One of her pupils, Orla Gay Zabriskie, wrote a theme about Bessie for her high school English class. About 1944, Ray Patterson bought their land in West Point. Bessie’s father had deeded ten acres to Bessie and her sisters. Layton and Bessie had bought two other shares. With the money from the land, they bought the Jesse Jolley home. It was a nice big house in the middle of the town. Bessie liked living in Tropic better then. She continued to teach, sometimes in Tropic, and sometimes in Henrieville. She was organist in the Tropic Jr. Sunday School, and later organist in the Sr. Sunday School. Annie and Orlin Colvin had moved to Tropic too, and Bessie and Annie were the ward choristers. Bessie was also organist in the Primary. Each summer she took correspondence courses, and in the winter extension classes. Two summers she attended summer school in Cedar City. Rosalyn went along, and they lived in the dormitory in a housekeeping apartment. Rosalyn, with other children of student mothers, took dancing and singing. Bessie got her B. S. degree June 4, 1951. Layton gave her a diamond ring for graduation. He was chosen counselor to Bishop Bernard Johnson. Orlin Colvin was the other counselor. Allie (whose real name was Alice) and Bessie were good friends, and Bernard and Layton had grown up together. They were over to Panguitch to Conference the day the new bishopric was selected. Allie whispered and told Bessie that Bernard had been asked to be bishop, and he had chosen Layton for a counselor. All through the morning meeting and during lunch, she might have told Layton. But she thought Bernard should be the one to tell him. Bernard didn’t get a chance, so it was a shock to Layton during the afternoon session, to have his name read off as Bernard’s counselor. In fact, it was such a shock that Layton’s rheumatism left his foot, as he sat there with his shoe off. After Layton Patterson’s graduation from Tropic High School, he attended college two years at Cedar City, then he accepted a call to the Central States Mission. He was disappointed in being called to a place so near home, but during his mission he met, converted and fell in love with Bettye Byrd. She came to Tropic and visited the Ott family for a few weeks. When Layton’s mission was completed, the family took Bettye to Ogden to meet him. They were married June 30, 1952 in the Logan Temple. That evening, a reception was held for them in his Aunt Delpha’s pretty yard. The next day they all went home to Tropic. James Robert Ott (Layton Patterson’s grandfather) died suddenly following an illness the family did not realize was extreme. His death occurred July 4, 1952. The invitations for a reception for the newlyweds, in Tropic, had all been sent. There was no way of letting people know, so the reception was held as scheduled. Bessie had some real help from Areta Stewart, Mabel Ott and her daughter Rella, and Virginia Ott. During the time Bessie lived and later taught in Henrieville, she did not feel the Henrieville people really liked her. She felt like an outsider. But at the reception for Layton and Bettye, practically the whole town of Henrieville came. It was very gratifying. Since then, Bessie has seen some of the Henrieville people, and received letters and cards, so these people have a special place in her heart. Too, she learned that happiness is not measured in dollars and cents. While they lived in Tropic, they still raised good gardens. Bessie bottled all kinds of vegetables, meat and fruit. She often went into the hills with Layton to get wood for fuel and also to cut cedar posts, which he sold. Sometimes she helped her husband with the mowing and raking of hay. She drove the tractor while Layton ran the mower and rake. While Layton was in the bishopric, Tropic erected a large recreation hall adjoining the church. This bishopric was released six years from the day they were appointed. Later, Bernard and Allie moved to Farmington, Utah. On November 21, 1960, Orlin Colvin died, and Annie got a teaching position and bought a home in Layton, Utah, across the street from her daughter Merlene. In August 1953, Layton and Bessie sold their home in Tropic and bought a brick one in St. George, at 78 East 300 South Street. Areta Stewart helped move. She and Bessie went with Dean Hafen (a fruit and vegetable peddler from Dixie who sold his produce in Tropic and vicinity). They brought most of the furniture, except the heaviest things like the piano, refrigerator, etc. They arrived in St. George about 10 o’clock at night. The lights had not been turned on, but an outdoor light across the street shown in the living room so they could see well enough to pile the furniture in. That night Areta and Bessie stayed at Areta’s mother’s home, and the next day they arranged the furniture in the various rooms. Layton was working on the East Fork forest, so he did not get in on the moving job. Rosalyn, Jimmie Dale and their mother were in St. George for the beginning of school, but Layton came only on weekends until his forest job was finished in the fall. It was a discouraged trio who met him on his first weekend in St. George. Bessie had a much larger group of children to teach than she was used to in Tropic, and the heat was intense. Rosalyn’s first words to her dad were, “This house is ‘buggy’.” She was nearly petrified with fear of the many and various kinds of bugs which thrived in this warm climate, and which they had not seen before. Jimmie Dale did not like it here, and wanted to go back to Tropic. He soon adjusted, for he was a good ball player and runner (on the track team) and made many friends. His Uncle James Ott taught at Woodward, where he went to school. He introduced him to David Welch—head of student athletics. They became good friends. Toward the close of school that year, he was chosen “most popular boy” in school. It took Rosalyn longer to adjust. She still wanted to go back to Tropic. The following summer she stayed at Tropic with her dad, in the old post office building, as he was still working on the forest there. After that she began to like St. George. When she was in the tenth grade she was chosen queen at the FFA Ball, and during her senior year in high school, she was princess of the Dixie Homecoming. After Layton and Bettye’s marriage, they lived in Salt Lake. Layton attended the University of Utah, and both worked part-time. Boys were expected to go into the army for training for two years. Layton expected to be called anytime, so he decided to go voluntarily in 1953. They were expecting a baby. They came to St. George, where their first child was born November 11, 1953, and a few days later Layton left for Fort Ord, California. Bettye and the baby, Debra Kaye, stayed with Layton’s parents while he was in basic training; after that Bettye went with him to Virginia, where he spent some time in the army. After his release from the army, Layton continued his studies and graduated from the University of Utah as an honor student. From this school he went to the University of California at Los Angeles. His son, Stephen Layton, was born in Pleasanton, California, and Lorraine (or Lorie) was born in Los Angeles, California. Layton received his Masters degree from UCLA and also received his CPA. In the 1964 thirteenth edition of “World Who’s Who in Commerce and Industry” appears the following sketch: Ott, Layton Patterson, accountant; born, Westpoint, Utah, September 5, 1930; son of J. Layton and Bessie (Patterson) Ott; B. S. degree, University of Utah, 1956; MBA degree, University of California, Los Angeles, 1957; married Bettye Jean Byrd, June 30, 1952; children, Debra, Stephen, Lorraine, and Vickie Lynn. Instructor, Accounting, University of California, Los Angeles, 1956-57; Chairman, Accounting Department, Stevens Henagar College, Salt Lake City, 1957-60; Secretary-treasurer; Controller, Montek, Inc. Salt Lake City 1958-? Instructor, Accounting, University of Utah, 1960-? Management consultant, director, Trans-continental Investment Company; Secretary, director, Utah Palisades, Inc. Universal Copiers, Inc. Served with army of United States 1953-55. Certified Public Accountant, Utah. Member, American Institute of Accountants, National Society of Business Budgeting, American Accounting Association, Delta Gamma Sigma. Republican. Member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Home: 1378 North 550 East, Bountiful, Utah. Office: 4438 South State Street, Salt Lake City, Utah. In the St. George 4th Ward, Bessie was Jr. Sunday School coordinator, Jr. Sunday School organist, Relief Society Work Director, and person in charge of projects. The year after they moved to St. George, Layton and Bessie joined the square dance club, and really enjoyed square dancing. They attended a jamboree at Needles, California with the Clair Stirlings and the Vivian Leanys. April 27, 1959, Layton had a heart attack and they had to quit dancing. They bought Clair Stirling’s farm at Leeds, and Layton began raising calves. He was not able to do hard work. James Dale (Jim or Jimmie) had joined the army and was in Virginia at this time. Then he was transferred to Camp Erwin, near Barstow, California the summer of 1959. The following winter he was sent to Anchorage, Alaska, where he remained until his release. After Jim’s release from the army, he returned home and continued his studies at Dixie College. That year Janna Deen Slade from Kirtland, New Mexico, was attending Dixie also. They became engaged and were married May 4, 1962. Janna’s parents held a reception for them in Kirtland, and Jim’s parents held openhouse in St. George. Another openhouse was held in their honor at the home of Jim’s brother and sister-in-law, Layton and Bettye Ott, in Bountiful. Their first child, Denna Kyle Ott, was born December 13, 1962. In August 1960 Bessie had a slight heart attack, and missed the first week of school. She taught the remainder of the year until April 11, when she was taken to the hospital with a heart attack the doctor termed “myocardial insufficiency”. Rosalyn attended college at Utah State University in Logan, in 1960, and the fall quarter of the next year. The winter quarter she came home and attended Dixie College. She decided she did not want to go to college, so she became an airline stewardess for Bonanza Airlines in April 1961. She went to Phoenix, Arizona, for training and was stationed there for a while. She worked about one year for Bonanza Airlines, then she went to Europe with some other girls. When she returned she worked for a travel agency in San Francisco for a while, then she attended the University of Utah. While there she got a chance to learn to be a dance instructor at Arthur Murray’s Dance Studio in Salt Lake City. She was made an instructor after some time; then worked part-time as instructor, and part-time as interviewer for this studio, where she made very good progress. She was given a trophy, which read: Arthur Murray winter interviewing contest 1964 3rd Place Analyst Rosalyn Ott This was a great compliment to her, to get 3rd place in all the Arthur Murray Studios when she had been working at this particular job a short time. She met Jacques (Jack) DeBeve while working at Arthur Murray studio. He also got recognition in this same contest—he got 1st place, as interviewer. Rosalyn and Jacques were married. Her mother gave a trousseau tea in her honor July 5, 1964, and her brother and sister-in-law, Layton and Bettye Ott, had a reception for them July 18, 1964 at their home in Bountiful. August 15, 1958 Layton and Bettye’s 4th child was born, a girl whom they named Vickie Lynn. Layton Patterson needed help, so his mother went and took care of the other children while Bettye was in the hospital. The first few years Bessie and Layton lived in St. George, they belonged to a group consisting of Minnie and Ferrell Jolley, Beulah and Bill Lamb, and Lois and Ernie Wells. The women all taught together. This group celebrated each other’s birthdays and anniversaries. As time went on Ferrell seemed to fit in less and less, but for Minnie’s sake, they still associated together. Then Minnie was killed in a car accident in August 1959. After that Layton and Bessie associated with two other groups; one consisting of Chester and Nola Jones, Vivian and LaFave Leany, Lois and Ernie Wells. This group began playing rook, then the Joneses introduced them to the game of pinochle, so that was the game they usually played. The other group consisted of Verna and George Schmutz, Lois and Ernie Wells, Beulah and Bill Lamb, and Birdie and Les Cooper. Birdie taught the women to knit; the men either visited or played a game. Sometimes the group sang songs they composed about each other. Here is a song about Layton and Bessie: (Layton had mistakenly hauled a wrong calf with one of his own, so the group made the most of it). Tune—Bye Bye Blackbird Layton’s full of care and woe, waiting here feeling low. Bye, Bye Blackbird. “Keep the home fires bright for me, I’ll be back, don’t you see?” Bye, Bye Blackbird. When the sheriff knows and understands me, then he’ll know that the calf came willingly, so he’ll make the sentence light, I’ll be home late tonight—Sheriff bye, bye. Bessie’s waiting patiently, knitting there, pearling here, welcome home Layton. She’s tended cows and set them free, so the law won’t come and see, more calves roaming. Now she helps her boss with all his troubles, zippers, zippers, working on the double (this was about his work at the Hawthorne Company where they made tents and sleeping bags). She can light the light at night, knowing Layton’s safe tonight—blackbird, bye, bye. Bessie went to Henrieville, teaching here, dancing still—to bye, bye, blackbird. Just because her hair was dark, young folks thought it quite a lark, to call her blackbird. If she stayed at school to work hours after, teenagers would come to serenade her, with this song, they little knew, was Layton’s song—Bessie’s too. Blackbird, bye, bye. Other groups Bessie belonged to were the Dixie Beautification Club, of which she was president about 1960; the St. George Business and Professional Women’s Club, serving as its president during the 1962-63 year; and the Dixie Reviewers—a literary club. The fall of 1963 Layton sold the Leeds property to Leonard Carter. November 11, 1963, Bessie was taken to the LDS Hospital in Salt Lake City as a result of nervous exhaustion, and was forced to discontinue school for the remainder of the year. The doctor advised her not to teach the 1964-65 year either. Layton and Bessie had been asked by the temple president to be temple workers, but due to Bessie’s illness, that assignment was temporarily not filled. However, Bessie set her goal of going to the temple on the average of five sessions per week, for the 1964-65 season. In January, 1964, Layton began working at the Hawthorne Company plant in St. George. This plant manufactures tents and sleeping bags for the Sears store in Los Angeles. The first few days Layton zipped sleeping bags, turned the bags wrong side out, and other odd jobs that were very monotonous. He was on the verge of quitting one day, when the boss came along and asked if he’d like to work on quality control. His main job then, was to inspect tents, looking for any flaws that might have occurred during their manufacture. If flaws were found, the people working on production had to repair the flaws. This job was enjoyable. Layton was very adept at putting up tents, and quick to see if there was anything wrong with them. His boss often told visitors to the factory that Layton knew about all there was to know about tents. His work also took him to every part of the plant; the frame shop, the cutting table, the seamer line—where seams were sewn, the round table where floors are sewn in the tents. His job was to try to make the most perfect product possible. At times he offered suggestions that he felt would make the tents better. For instance, his first suggestion was concerning a different kind of hook to hold the tent to the frame. The next suggestion pertained to the window openings on one certain type of tent. The accompanying letter shows the recognition he received from the head office on these suggestions. Hawthorne Company A Division of Kellwood Company May 13, 164 Mr. O. Layton (Layton Ott) Hawthorne Company A Division of Kellwood Company St. George, Utah Dear Mr. Layton; You are to be complimented on your suggestions regarding improvements to Hawthorne tents. Your first suggestion regarding improved hooks on the folding top has resulted in the issuing of a product revision form to use a redesigned hook. This new hook will be used as soon as received from the supplier and will be included in revised specifications. As regards the second recommendation regarding the large, inside windows, I will discuss this with the buyers at the next research conference, May 26 & 27. I agree with you, particularly as regards the 7893 tent. That provision should be made to roll up and tie the inside window flap. You might be interested in knowing that a large portion of our product improvements come from employees such as yourself, who are conscientious enough to notice where improvements are required and to submit them to the management. Once a month, our department meets with industrial engineering personnel and quality control personnel at Hawthorne for just such a discussion and we would appreciate your sending any additional suggestions. These suggestions will be discussed at the meeting. Very truly yours, James C. Porter, Head Research and Engineering Department Layton declares this is the best job he has ever had—not the best paying job, but the most satisfying. On March 16, 1964, Layton and Bettye Ott had another baby bless their home, which they called Corrine. This baby became the idol of the family, almost. Even Stephen, who had wanted a brother, had decided this child is pretty special. After Jim Ott’s graduation from Dixie College, he went to Cedar City to continue college work in 1963-64. He was on the honor roll and received a letter from the college congratulating him on his scholastic achievements. The summer of 1964, Jim and Jana worked in New Mexico, to get money so Jim could finish school the next year. Jana also decided to continue her college work this time, in 1964. ******************** Left: James Ott dedicating his brother, Layton’s grave on June 24, 1974, in the Georgetown cemetery. Above: Grave marker in the Georgetown cemetery for Layton and Bessie Ott. MEMORIES OF LAYTON OTT (Contributed by his wife, brothers, sisters, nieces, nephews, children and grandchildren following his death in 1974) By Bessie Ott: My memories are similar to all the rest, except I probably have many more. The first time I saw Layton, I was teaching in Henrieville. I boarded at the Ott home, and was eating supper with the family when Layton arrived from the sheep herd. He was wearing a huge cowboy hat. I never cared for western clothes, so I’m sure it wasn’t the hat that impressed me. And, incidentally, I never saw him wear it again. One thing is—I do remember the first time I saw him, and as I look back, I don’t remember clearly seeing any of the rest for the first time. Layton’s mother called him “Sunshine” and it seemed to fit him very well, for he was always cheerful. Another first experience was the first dance we went to. It was in Cannonville. The crowd was real small, so there weren’t many people to dance with. In those days, a couple didn’t dance together the whole evening as they do now. Layton kept asking me to dance. I thought he felt sorry for me, so finally I said, “Why don’t you ask the other girls to dance?” I thought I was being unselfish, but he thought I didn’t want to dance with him anymore; so neither of us danced much after that, and after talking the matter over later, we understood the other’s motives, for he said he asked me because he wanted to dance with me. The winter was a very enjoyable one for both of us. We played Rook about every evening. I hadn’t played much before, but we always were partners. I seemed to hold the cards and he bid on my hand, so we got along fine. The first time we got beaten was late in the year when his dad and mother beat us. Now I’ll tell a little about our mission. Layton always liked to talk more than I did, so he usually did most of the talking wherever we went. He felt miserable most of the time, but the people didn’t know. When we were in Owyhee, he was the Branch President. A non-member Indian man died and the family wanted to have the funeral in the LDS chapel. Layton had been sick, so he didn’t feel equal to taking charge, so he got his counselor to take charge but he gave the only talk. He spoke about the hereafter, and how we were all our Heavenly Father’s children, and how He loved all of His children. Layton made quite a hit with the Indians by this line of talking; many said afterward how much they enjoyed his talk. They appreciated someone accepting them as equals. From the time we were in Owyhee to the end, he always found a secret spot to pray to his Heavenly Father. Even I never saw the places he chose. He became very close to his Heavenly Father who seemed to answer him and help him with his problems. In Owyhee he climbed the little mountain behind the church to pray. In Gold Run, he chose a nook down the hill among the dense trees, and in Lovelock he went early in the morning in his car somewhere to pray. I doubt if any missionary got closer to the Lord than he did. While we were in Gold Run I twisted my knee once and was laid up for awhile. Another time I got the flu. Both times, though, I wasn’t seriously ill. He prayed fervently for my recovery; I was really touched. He sometimes said he’d be glad to get home for he dreamed several times I was killed in the car or died some other way. He said he’d never forgive himself if anything happened to me. So that accounted for his praying so hard for me to get better. If there ever could have been any doubt that he loved me, those prayers would have convinced me. It’s hard to reconcile the fact that he didn’t get home where he wanted so much to come, but he could never have been more ready to meet his Heavenly Father than he was at that time. As the town drunk in Gold Run wrote on a card to me, “God has him, I know.” ¬¬---------------- Layton and Bessie served as missionaries in the Las Vegas North Mission from 1973-74. Left: Elder and Sister Ott with church member friends in Gold Run, CA. This picture was taken just before they were transferred to Lovelock, NV, where Layton had a heart attack and passed away on June 20, 1974, just before their mission concluded. By Rella Alvey and family: Uncle Layton owned a field, out the lane just a little way from where Royal and I live. As he lived in St. George, it was hard for him to take his water turns all the time as they came around. So one evening he stopped in to see if Kim would go out and take his next water turn. He said, “Kid, set your own price, I’ll pay you well.” He did. We were ready to eat supper; I had plenty of milk and had just baked bread, along with dessert and other things that go along with a meal. He was very independent, but finally consented to eat. “Everything looks good”, he said, “but the best of all is that good bread and milk.” We had a very enjoyable evening and visit with him. He loved just the good down-to-earth things of life. When I was a small child, we lived on a ranch called Yellow Creek. My father, Joe, always raised such good watermelons, I’ll never forget how spellbound I sat, watching uncle Layton eat watermelon. He didn’t seem to have any problem at all getting rid of the seeds. It took me forever to dig the seeds out. He loved watermelon very much. Many a time I have taken my children down to Luella Mangum’s store. If he was there he would dig down in his pocket and give each one of them a nickel or dime, after he had teased them a little bit first. My children all loved him. I’ll never forget the time I rode to St. George with him to catch the bus for Hawthorne, Nevada. How kind you both were to me. And when he could have slept a little longer that morning, he got up at 5 a.m. and took me to the bus station. I’ll never forget these things. Just one more—the time when my father died, Layton came up to the house. He was a great source of comfort and strength to Mother and to us children. He could take our minds off our problems with his laugh and witty ways. Through the years, when he was where he could, he never failed to stop in and see how Mother was doing. Although we procrastinated and didn’t tell him, we loved him very much. A loving niece, as always, Rella Alvey and family. By Faye Palmer Ott: I have been thinking of Layton all morning, and what I could write for this memory book. I think it says a lot for the kind of man he was to say that all my memories of him are happy ones. He was always so good to me, and made me feel so welcome to the Ott Family. I remember when he was driving the school bus, he heard me telling someone I had had a terrible nightmare the night before. Layton got such a kick out of my wild tale, he called me “old nightmares” for many years after. I will always remember Layton as a good man, and a fun loving man, and I will always remember him with love and respect. Layton standing by the school bus he drove. By Bob Ott: I have had many rich experiences with Layton—they are in my heart but hard to put on paper. I remember once I helped Layton and Wallace haul hay from the Palmer field in Cannonville. It was near the first of August, and the mosquitoes were in” full bloom”. Before leaving home I picked up some repellent and rubbed some on my head and hands before entering the fields. I asked Layton and Wallace if they wanted some, but they declined. I remember Layton kidding me, saying it was just for sissies. We had about half a load of hay when I noticed they were swatting their hands wildly about their heads; after about ten minutes of this Layton had to give in and say, “Gimme some of that dang stuff.” I said, “No, this is just for sissies.” After letting them suffer for some time, I gave in and shared my new product with them. I remember many experiences with Layton as we operated our cowherd together. Most of the subjects of cattlemen center around cows and their experiences with them. Both the good and the bad parts are told. When Layton came out from St. George he often stayed at our place, and many were the stories and experiences we told, sitting up until the wee hours of the morning. It was always a pleasure to listen to his stories. He was never known to “stretch the truth”. They were always just as it happened. Layton was always regarded as an expert on coyotes, and always took pride in out-smarting them. His experiences always got special attention from the kids and grown-ups alike. When he was around he seemed to be able to create an atmosphere of laughter and interest. Bob By Mira Loy Ott: When Layton came to visit us, he would always open the door and say, “Well, I’m here, kid,” or “Hi, kid, how’s my gal?” When I would inquire how Bessie was he would say, “Just grumbly, like a woman,” then he would laugh and tell me how “Pat” was. Layton really enjoyed himself here at Bryce; when he stayed overnight, he would usually rise early and go for a walk—counting his blessings and enjoying Mother Nature. He especially enjoyed the deer as they would feed on our back lawn. How Layton loved watermelon and ice cream. During the summer, he usually had one or two “good ol’ Dixie melons” in his truck, when he came out just to check on things. If he called before he came he would say, “Bring out the ice cream, kid, I’m on my way.” Layton was always interested in our family—how they were, where they were, and what they were doing. He would say, “Just checking on my kids.” He had a plastic oval-shaped coin purse; on occasion, he would arrange the money, then tell Stacey to “get over here and get you a nickel. Now be sure and take that big one there.” It was a quarter. Mira . By Tammie Ott: I remember when I was little, Uncle Layton would get me up on his lap, just before we would have dessert (usually pie), and rub his whiskers along my cheek, saying, “Aren’t those good whisker pies?” He always called me Pammy. He gave me an orange sleeping bag. I remember asking him if it was just made for me. He said, “Yes.” I was so proud of this sleeping bag, and I still have it, and use it. Tammie By Betty Lou Graff Wintch: UNCLE LAYTON “To know him is to love him” Are words that are not new; But could you describe Uncle Layton With words that are more true? Did you ever see a smile more contagious Or hear a voice with such laughter in it? Can you ever recall being in his presence Without enjoying it every minute? He’s a man, he’s a face, he’s a body Whose image will live in our minds; To think of him is to see him For his life was a picture—the unforgettable kind. Can’t you just see him playing Rook? He seemed to enjoy it more than others; Perhaps it could have been the game But I think it was being with sisters and brothers. You could hear his laughter all over the house As his bid topped all the rest; But he’d still laugh if he lost the game— He never thought of a game as a test. He never aspired to be president or king Except to his children and wife; Just to love, and be loved, was all he asked As he made his journey through life. They were his glory, his pride, his joy, His hopes in dreams come true; Being with family, just those he loved Was the greatest joy he knew. He died in the service of the Lord With Aunt Bessie by his side; And although our hearts broke when he left earth They were filled with pride. He probably asked God, as soon as he saw Him To pattern eternity after his favorite places; Then his desire to make Heaven complete He would stock them with favorite faces. His sisters and brothers, when they say his name Wipe teardrops from their eyes; They miss him and they love him And they cherish their family ties. Books could be written of Layton’s life His love of land—his love of wife; His joy in children, his loyalty to friend Yes, memories of Layton will never end. The years Layton spent catching the wily coyote Is a memory we chuckle at now; No matter how smart the old coyote was He couldn’t top Layton’s know-how. Layton loved Utah very much And especially its southern part; From “up on the mountain” to “down below” He cherished their scenes in his heart. He would be happy here today Watching children run and play; Enjoying his family and his kin And we’d hear his laughter above the din. Yes, “to know him was to love him” But the first thing he would say Is, “put on a smile and chat a while And let’s have fun today.” By Bill Shakespear: I remember how Uncle Layton would pop into the house on one of his trips from Dixie. It seems he always brought some goodies—grapes or pomegranates, etc. Uncle Layton was always so thoughtful and generous that way. He always brought sunshine with him; interrogating me about my current girl friends, pinching me and teasing me about the thickness of my trousers or shirt. If there was watermelon in the house, he always had time for a piece. I remember being amazed at the terribly efficient machinery of his mouth, which allowed him to place large amounts in the front of his mouth and pour seeds out the side of his mouth. I remember the same feeling of awe on an early morning ride from St. George to Tropic as he consumed quickly a large quantity of pine nuts. Then there was his imaginary pair of “girl hobbles”. He always threatened to tie us fellows down with “girl hobbles” to get us through town—fancying that, when we laid eyes on a girl, we were driven to uncontrollable pursuit. As I recall Uncle Layton, I am reminded how important attitude is. The cheerfulness he brought and the look from the world makes him someone we greatly admire. Bill By Virginia and James Ott: SOME OF OUR CHOICE MEMORIES One of the very happy and special experiences of our lives was living in St. George with Mother in her little “home” as she called it, Bessie and Layton across the street, and Garn and Rose around the corner and down a bit. Most of our associations were very happy—some a bit sad, the way the stream of life flows, but we were very close and loved and enjoyed many good times together. We remember Layton telling us, when he was sure we were going to move to Orem, “our lives will never be the same,” and they haven’t. Rose and Garn moved to Salt Lake, Mother had passed away, and we moved to Orem. The circle was broken. We loved those days, only wish we had made them happier than we did. Some mornings Layton would get up early to go to work at Hawthorn and we would be up early, preparing to go to school, and about 6:30 he would come over to visit with us for a few minutes. He always had an interesting experience to share with us, sometimes humorous, sometimes spiritual, but always with a smile and a twinkle in his brown eyes. He told me he was going to get me a walking-(jumping) stick to use up all my surplus energy (I felt barely able to crawl about), and always we had a good laugh, which was a good starter for the day coming up. We always went to work with renewed courage and a sweet smile and twinkling brown eyes to think about during the day. These were choice minutes to James and I. James had another choice visit with him, sharing his testimony of the gospel and discussing gospel principles with him, listening to his experiences as a missionary. This mission experience was a call from our Heavenly Father, and even though was far from good, he accepted it and was greatly blessed. We are thankful and happy for the joy he has given us. Virginia and James Ott By Janet Shakespear Sawyer: Uncle Layton, someone I admired, looked up to, and had a great love for—what a great friend, pal, and someone you could go to for advice. When I was about 9 years old I was out in the hills and saw a coyote go inside a den. I went looking for Uncle Layton. He caught the mother coyote and 8 pups. He gave me $10—I thought I was rich—I was, for having known him. After that, whenever he saw me he would say, “Let’s go coyote hunting, kid.” I am sure you are now having “happy hunting”, my uncle. Janet By Louie and Alton: Dearest Bessie and Family, My little bit of writing goes for all of you because my association with you dates back quite a number of years, and my memories are not only of Layton, for we have had many enjoyable times together. Right now I am thinking of a time when we lived to the ranch, and we came to Henrieville and stayed at your place for the 4th of July which came on a Monday. We had two little ones and you had Layton Pat, but we managed to leave them and went to the dance, which started right after midnight, and we danced until daylight. One thing I remember, especially at that time, was that Layton had bought several boxes of matches up to Aunt Sara Willis’ (this was in the days of the Depression). Well, the truth of the matches was that they had been wet or something, and you had to try four or five times to get one to strike; so he had paid two or three times as much as he would have done for good ones. We really laughed about it. I’ve taken much teasing and I get lonesome for it, but I have nothing but happy memories of Layton, and our associations with all of you. Love always, Louie By Wallace Ott: It is hard to say “goodbye” to a brother like Layton. Although he has been gone more than a year, we still miss him very much—Layton and I had so many good times together—working and roaming through the hills. It was really a pleasure when we went trapping and hunting coyotes. We used to catch as many as 100 coyotes in a season. We used to enjoy it, as well as earning a lot of our spending money. Several times we got two dens in one day. One time we got sixteen coyotes out of one hole. This we would do in the spring of the year, during the ”denning” season. In the fall and winter we would have trap lines and catch them for their fur. It was a great time. We enjoyed it very much. It has been said that Layton and I could make good wages trading with each other. In our lives we made a good many trades, and helped each other out. There was seldom a time in fifty years that I didn’t owe Layton, or he owed me some. We kept our account in a little book, and there were 100 cents in every dollar. We never had an argument about it. A short time before Layton left for his mission we got together and settled up our business. We helped each other out—when I needed help I went to Layton—when he needed help he came to me. I am really thankful now that I had that privilege of working with him and knowing him as well as I did. No matter how long I live, I’ll always have fond memories of the time we spent together. Wallace By Sara and Malen Littlefield: It is a pleasure for our family to pay a special tribute to Layton—one of the joys of our lives was knowing him. As a younger sister at home, I remember him for the little extras he did for everyone. He always seemed to have an extra dime to slip me when I pressed his suit. He had the first car in Henrieville owned by a single boy. He was so generous and good about taking all the kids in town for a ride. Then there were those dark days of the hotel in Kanab—Malen and I will never forget him for the way he tried to cheer us up and keep us going. He would say to us, “There is always going to be a brighter day.” He would “dig” right in and do whatever the jobs were that needed to be done. He was very special to our family too. Each one expressed how they loved to be around him—Jim says he remembers as a boy taking the cows to pasture—how Uncle Layton always took time to stop and tease him about the armful of books he always carried back and forth. He said lots of times he would wait for him to get the cow in the pasture, so he could give him a lift back to town. Very often he would have a goodie to share with him. Janell says she’ll always remember him for the way he teased her. She was so lonesome and homesick while we were in Kanab—one day she told Uncle Layton she knew she’d be old and shaggy before she got to move back to Tropic. She was about seven years old at the time. Of course Layton never let her forget it. On her wedding day (she was married on Layton’s birthday—June 11, 1960) Layton was in the hospital in Salt Lake where he had had an operation the day before. She wanted him to meet Chuck, so before she was married that day she took Chuck down to the hospital to meet Uncle Layton. On the way she told Chuck, “Don’t be surprised when Uncle Layton calls me old and shaggy”. She said as sick as he was, he still smiled and called her old and shaggy. She said she would have been disappointed if he hadn’t. Steve was too young to remember him when we lived in Tropic, but he remembered when he came to Layton & Bettye’s place in Bountiful, and always wanted to go there when he knew Layton and Bessie would be there. He says, too, he’ll always remember the special way Layton teased him by calling him that “Stevie Starvy Kid.” Malen says he loved him as a brother, and he’ll always remember him when he plants cucumbers. Layton used to tell him to plant an extra vine and put his name on it. I’ll never forget him for the good stories he told—always a good yarn to tell and a good, clean joke to share. He loved us all so, and made each one of us feel that we were someone special. I’m sure he will be remembered by so many—family and friends, and just people he met, for the generosity he showed. I heard one of the General Authorities say that the things we take with us in the next world are the things we give away while we are in this life—truly Layton will have much—how we all love him! Malen, Sara, Jim, Janell & Steve Littlefield By Rose Ott Olsen: There are many things that I could say—both humorous and serious about my brother Layton, so I think I’ll start by relating a few things when I was a kid at home. He always had a knack for teasing, even though we got disgusted with him sometimes, we still liked it very much. Of course there are too many things to mention, so I’ll choose a few that come to mind at the present time. For instance, when I first started dating boyfriends, he was never afraid to tease them in some way. I remember one boyfriend who was very bashful, so he’d tell me exactly what time he’d pick me up, and would tell me to be sure to answer the door myself. He knew that if Layton opened the door he would be in for plenty of teasing. My cousin, Maxine, used to come and stay with us at times. There was one fellow who had broken his elbow—it hadn’t been set properly—so his arm curved. Maxine really didn’t like him at all, but every time Layton would get around her, he’d hold his arm out and tell her that 45-degree angle would just fit around her. A lot of the young kids used to get together at our home and James would always make up plenty of scary stories to tell us. Everyone would be so engrossed in the story, Layton would slip out and just at the right time, and he’d rap on the window, which always gave the story a real effect. Layton was always very popular with the girls. Anytime a new girl came into town, they always tried to find out about Layton Ott. Many times I have had good-looking girls stop me and ask if I was Layton Ott’s sister. Layton was always sporty in his dress, and had dark, black hair, which he combed straight back, and put plenty of hair oil on to hold it down, which was the style at that time. He had so many cowlicks, sometimes before a dance when he really wanted to look sharp, he’d wear a skullcap during the day. Now—just to tell a little incident—one year we had a very big crop of pine nuts and he went out and gathered pine nuts to sell and made extra spending money. He went into Nevada where he gathered some huge pine nuts. He had gathered several seamless sacks full. He kept them in the closet with the door locked. One day while he was gone, I happened to find the key and went in and really got my fill of pine nuts. I told no one about this, and that night when Mother called us to supper, I was very ill and sick to my stomach. Of course, Mother was quite concerned when I turned down eating my dinner. Just as they sat down to eat I ran out the door and made it barely in time to get relieved of all my pine nuts. The several years I was ill in St. George, when Layton would come over to see how I was, he’d say, "Cheer up, kid, you’re going to be alright—it’s just the meanness coming out.” All of my family have been close to their Uncle Layton, and they too, enjoyed his teasing. Rose By Sally Olsen: I remember Uncle Layton dropping by our house in St. George to visit. Occasionally he would time it just right to join us in a game of Rook. He would bid and outrageous amount, and enjoy every play—win or lose. He always seemed to know the right card to play. He lived life the way he played cards—he lived to win, but he had to have a lot of warmth, love, happiness and laughter along the way. No matter what was needed—a kind word, a bit of teasing, learning to laugh at your own mistakes, or money—he was always there. I know—for he never let me down. I loved him for all the thoughtful things he did. I will always consider myself lucky for knowing him and blessed by being related to him! Sally By Diana Olsen Tucker: I have fond memories of Uncle Layton from the St. George days. As we just lived around the corner from Uncle Layton, he often walked over to visit. I hadn’t dated much until I met my husband, Reed. And when Uncle Layton found out I was going pretty steady with Reed, he couldn’t resist doing a little teasing. As soon as Uncle Layton would pop in, head in the door, he would smile that wide grin of his and say, “The same old geek?” The first time he said that, I couldn’t figure out what he was talking about, but all the explanation he would give was another large grin before he wandered back into the house to find someone else to tease. Every time he visited after that, the first thing he’d say to me was “Same old geek?” As I never again went with anyone but Reed, I have to say, “Yes”. Reed worked as a part-time disk jockey at the local radio station while he went to school. When Uncle Layton found out he worked there, he asked Reed if he could play a request. Reed said, “Of course, what do you want to hear?” The next day we got the radio turned on at the appointed time and we heard Reed say, “We’ve had a special request for a certain song, and I had to dig clear down to the bottom of the stack, but I finally found it—for Layton Ott. Here’s On Top of Old Smokey.” Uncle Layton was really tickled. About three for four years after Reed and I were married, we finally got to one of the family reunions at Tropic Reservoir. I was excited to see everyone, because I hadn’t seen most of them since our wedding. As soon as I saw Uncle Layton, I went over to hug him. Of course, the first thing he said to me was--you guessed it--“Same old geek?” Then he added, “Boy, you’ve filled out so nice.” I’d gained some unneeded weight since he had last seen me. I’ll always remember Uncle Layton as the world’s biggest teaser, with that 50-cent grin on his face. Diana By Agnes Ott Littlefield: In memory of a loving brother I write these few lines, as the song reads—“Memories are treasures locked in my heart, I can keep evermore.” I do have very fond memories of my brother, Layton—some from long ago, during the Depression times, and of course of these last few years. And always, as I have him in my thoughts, I can see that smile on his face and know that he was getting ready to tease you about something. In later years our children looked forward to his visits, for they liked to have him tease them and would enjoy the attention he would give them. These last few years, as he would come out this way to check on his farms and livestock, he would stop in for a very short visit, but it was always so nice to have him come, as he always had a way of making the day more cheery. With his short “hello, how are you, kid?” He was greatly missed last August, and he will be missed this year, but I’m sure that he would be so happy to have his own family carry on for him. There comes a time for all of us when there is a break in the link of that chain, and we all have to weld it back together with memories and trying to live the lives that he will be proud to take us by the hand when we meet him, and he will say, “How are you, kid, sure is good to see you.” I send these few lines written this 16th day of July 1975 in memory of my dear brother—Layton Ott. Agnes By Deena Ott: I remember one time Grandpa and Grandma Ott had gotten back from Mexico and brought all the grandkids a present. On Thanksgiving Day we were all at Uncle Layton and Aunt Bettye’s house. It was snowing. All the little kids were in the living and out came Grandpa dressed up in a funny Santa Claus suit, with a paper sack hat, a big plastic nose with glasses on, and he passed out the presents. I remember how excited we all were at Grandpa and his Santa Claus suit. Grandpa was always doing something special, like when he worked at the tent factory, he gave me my first sleeping bag. He also made me a doll tent that was just like a big tent, with windows, except it was smaller. He was always playing games with us kids, like he’d put money in his hand behind his back and say, “Hey, diddle, diddle, what hand is the money in?” If we’d guess right, he’d give us the nickel or dine; even if we guessed wrong, he would still give us the money. Another game was the “chin-pie” game. He rubbed his whiskers on my cheeks and said, “Aren’t those good chin pies?” Deena By Rosalyn Ott: My Dad My Dad was jolly, My Dad was gay, My Dad was friendly To everyone, all the time—every day. My Dad was generous, My Dad was kind, My Dad was outspoken, And always spoke his mind. My Dad was honest, My Dad was true, My Dad had knowledge— More than some highly educated do. My Dad was simple, My Dad was plain, My Dad loved nature, All animals, and their terrain. My Dad loved his neighbors, My Dad loved his friends, He especially loved his family— With a love only Heaven sends. My Dad had religion, My Dad spread the word, My Dad loved the Church And let it be, so many people heard. All I have said, And more in my heart Are the very reasons he’s missed Since we’ve been apart. I’m so proud of this man And love him so much— You might ask— What was my Dad? A man, Who loved, Gave love, And was loved by all! He Was A Success !!!!!!!!!! Rosalyn--1975 By Jan Slade Ott: The first time I met Dad Ott, Jim was having a party at his home. There was a house full of people. He walked in and said to Jim, “Well, which one belongs to you?” From that day on he always made me feel welcome in his home. After Jim and I were married and Jim was going to school at Dixie, we played Pinochle with the folks a lot. I have never known anyone who would “shoot to the moon” all the time, and usually made it. When I graduated from business school at Cedar City, he gave me an extra nice sleeping bag. He said, “Now, kid, this is the best sleeping bag they make so take good care of it.” He always gave me the best. One year for Christmas I couldn’t decide what to get him for Christmas as we were going to school and didn’t have a lot of money. I knew how he loved house slippers. He would even wear them to the fields. I picked out a nice leather pair. When he opened them, he said, “Pretty fancy.” I told him they were just to wear in the house and not in the field. He laughed and said, “What good are they?” Whenever we would stop by and he would have them on he’d say, “Here’s my fancy house slippers—too fancy to wear outside.” When we lived in St. George and Deena was a baby, he dearly loved to stop by each morning to see her. If she wasn’t awake when he came, she was by the time he left. She rolled off the sofa when she was two months old. He gave me some money to, “Go buy that baby a chair so that wouldn’t happen again.” When we moved to Kanab, Jim and Dad Ott started ranching together. I couldn’t see where they were making much profit. When Layton (the son) was doing our income tax, I had kept records on everything that was for the ranch. I was telling Dad the list of things, and he said, “You can’t keep track of everything, like gas, or Jim will never make a profit on cows.” Then he said like he always said, “Kid, things will look better next year.” I always felt that we had a special relationship, but looking back I realized he had a special relationship with everyone, because he always made them feel special. Jan *************** MOTHERS DAY LETTERS TO LAYTON’S SISTERS (Written by Layton) Mothers Day 1974 Dear sister Rose and Garn, You may not be able to read this letter as you know how poor a writer I am, but just once in my life I want to write and tell you on my sister’s Mothers Day how much you have meant in our lives. You were so good to us at St. George and you and Pat seemed to get such a great friendship between you two. I just want to tell you this day I love my sisters and your missionary brother. Just want you to remember at this time I want you to know how much my sisters have meant in my life. So, on your Mothers Day, we just thank you for what you have done in our lives. You’ve been very close to us because of your sickness and living in St. George. So glad you are all feeling better, and we are happy to be seeing you soon. Then we can talk; you know how I can talk, but I just can’t write. We had so many wonderful experiences—so marvelous. I am so glad I did go on a mission and will be able to meet my mother as she wanted it so. Time moves on and we’ll be moving to Lovelock, Nevada. If you don’t write before the 1st of June, just address the letters to Lovelock, Nevada, general delivery. We’re kind of looking forward to going home. It’s been wonderful, but as it nears the end and our health could both be better, we’ll kind of be glad to get home and see all the folks. Like I say, I can’t write but can talk, and we have had many wonderful experiences—very outstanding things to tell you about. May our Heavenly Father watch over one of my wonderful sisters I have and her family. We love you very much and, on this Mothers Day, this letter from your missionary brother Layton and what you have meant to us in our lives. May God watch over you all always. Thanking you for coming to see us last summer. Love, Layton and Pat Mothers Day 1974 Dearest sisters in the little town that means so much to us, My sisters are so important to me and, it being Mothers Day and you are mothers, I guess you will have to try and make out this letter as I take after my own Grandfather Johnson in writing. I’m very poor at it, and it’s a job for me and I don’t do it too often. Pat does most of the letter writing, so please give her the credit in writing and working on me to write. It’s not that I don’t think of you often and, as the years go by, I don’t tell you enough about what you have meant to us. I sometimes think back on our childhood days and wish we could go back, maybe just for a little while. As time goes on, those days at Yellow Creek I have wished I had known what I know now and I may have done a little better about enjoying what we had there. This much, my sisters mean much in my life, and on this Mothers Day, quite late in life I want you to know just how much you mean and how you have helped me in shaping my life—the way you have lifted us up and helped me, so we thank you again. To all three of you that live in the little town of Tropic, we hope before long, if all is well, to be seeing you soon. I can’t write, but you know how I can talk. I ask our Father in Heaven to watch over you all and give you the things in life to help in health and the other things. Well, about a few of the things that are so outstanding, I have so much I could say but to write it is very hard for me. But last night we baptized two people. We worked so hard giving them lessons. It was worth all our mission, and I laid my hands on their heads and made them members of the true Church of Jesus Christ. Then we worked so hard to get a building, and with the help of us all, it looks like we’re going to make it. The branch up here is small and we have to work very hard with the members to help them realize all they should do, but as we meet in the little building—our little church—as we make it over it will be a nice one. Wish I could write about it, but I’ll wait and tell you later how the Lord helped us get it. I am glad I did get to go on a mission, and I’m so glad I waited and Pat could go with me, for I don’t know how I could have done without her to help me. I could talk by the hours the marvelous things that have happened, and then, again, I will be able to meet my mother up there and say, “I did it.” You all know how hard she hoped and I now know why. It looks like we will be going back to Lovelock for the last part of our mission. When we were sent to the Indian mission, there was one such a nice young woman that had gone to California and was not home. I think, if we find her back to her home in Lovelock, she will join the Church. She told her friend, if anyone made her a Mormon it would be Elder Ott. It sure made us feel good, and the mission president said we could go back there for the last, as we have to be out of the little cottage at Gold Run on the first of June. Once again, as I write the letter addressed to you, my younger sister, please let them all read and tell them it means the same. I love my sisters very much, so this letter is to all of you there. And please write; we need your letters. Love, Layton and Pat P.S. The new address at Lovelock will be General Delivery at Lovelock, Nevada, 89419. But don’t wait until then to write. We’ll be here until the first of June, so write here and don’t wait until then.

Memorial / Obituary / Personal History

Contributor: greatgranny Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

LIFE SKETCH OF JENIS LAYTON OTT AND BESSIE RUBY PATTERSON (Written by Bessie Ruby Patterson Ott) Layton’s father’s family, the Otts, were interested in agriculture, fruit and stock raising. His mother’s family, the Johnsons, were colonizers. They moved around considerably, settling new towns. Several places in southern Utah are named for them. Both the Otts and the Johnsons belonged to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. James Robert Ott (father of Layton) was born January 3, 1873 at Duncan’s Retreat, Washington County, Utah. Janet Matilda Johnson (Layton’s mother) was born January 13, 1879 at Hillsdale, Garfield County, Utah. The Ott family lost most of their farm in a flood once when the Virgin River went on the rampage; so they moved to Tropic, Utah. In their many moves, the Johnson family finally settled in Cannonville, Utah, about six miles from Tropic. Janet clerked in a store in Tropic, before her marriage, and no doubt she met her future husband, James Robert, there. James and Janet were married May 4, 1897 and made their home in Topic. They had eleven children. Two little girls died when they were small children. The rest grew to man and womanhood. The oldest son, Joseph Alma, died February 22, 1941, at the age of 43 years. The rest of the children are all living at this time, October 1, 1964. Layton’s brothers and sisters are as follows: Joseph Alma, Hannah Hope, Lydia Vilate, Susan Janet, James Alvin, Jenis Layton, Louie Dugard, Wallace Moses, Sara, Iris Rose, and Agnes Johnson Ott. Layton was born June 11, 1906 at Cannonville, Garfield County, Utah. When he was only a few months old he had pneumonia and whooping cough. His life was feared for with both sicknesses, but with good care and faith, his life was spared. About this time his father was called on a mission to the Southern States, and even though Layton had had the pneumonia, the mission call must be heeded, so he went. In the family history book is a card Layton received from his father on his second birthday. His childhood playmates were Orlin Hatch, Bernard Johnson, Rex Jolley, and Elmo Cope. In the daytime, their favorite game was baseball, which they played in the dead-end street by the Ott home. At night, all the neighborhood children gathered, a bonfire was built, the children played games such as Prisoner’s Base, Run-sheep-run, Black-black, and the Bladder, etc. Sometimes they roasted chickens, potatoes, apples, and even prickly pears over the fire. The prickly pears did not prove very good food for them. They became very ill after eating them. The children had to be resourceful and make their own recreation, but they had more fun than most children. They made balls from twine strung around on a cork, then sewed securely. The ball bat was a limb from a tree. Layton especially liked to make high stilts and walk on them. Pine nut gathering was a favorite experience in the fall. Sometimes they got pine burrs, buried them in the ground, and built a fire over them. Then they could get the pine nuts out easily; for the fire caused the burrs to burst open and roasted the pine nuts too, so they had a delicious flavor. Layton’s grandfather Ott enjoyed playing the fiddle, and entertained the family. The Ott children often stayed with their grandparents while their father and mother were out to the ranch. Once Layton told his grandfather he knew his four times tables. His grandfather said, “What is four times six?” Layton was proud and happy to show him he knew it was 24. Then his grandfather would ask, “What is six times four?” And Layton replied, “I don’t know my sixes yet.” Then how his grandfather would laugh. Grandmother Ott was a nice kind lady. She always had cookies or something for the children to eat. From early spring until late in the fall, all the family lived out to the ranch at Yellow Creek, or Georgetown. Each boy had his own melon patch, so he could get a melon anytime he wanted when they were in season. It has been said of Layton, he ate so many melons, and so much juice ran onto his overalls, he could just step out of them and they would stand alone. One time James and Layton were told to weed a patch of beans. The weeds were so thick, it was a discouraging job, so they sat down to rest under a tree. Their older brother Joe came along and gave each boy a hard kick. The little boys thought they were badly mistreated, for their parents did nothing about their brother kicking them, so they decided to leave home. They walked quite a distance over hill and down dale. When it began to get dark they thought perhaps they should return to the ranch after all. It was about midnight when they arrived, having walked 10-12 miles. Their parents were very worried, and really scolded Joe. When Layton was about eleven and James nearly thirteen years old, they were making a new irrigation ditch, for the floods had piled rocks, gravel, etc. in the old ditch. A pick had been left up at the head of the ditch, a distance of about 1 ½ miles. When darkness came, Joe dared the boys to go to the head of the ditch and bring the pick back. Layton said he dared go, so he started out and eventually returned with the pick. When his father and brothers saw his footprints the next morning, they decided Layton had really jumped instead of walked after the pick. Often coyotes proved a nuisance around the ranch; taking turkeys, chickens, and even calves. Joe and James set traps but were not able to catch a coyote. Layton studied the tracks of the coyote, he noticed it always went in a particular place. He put a trap on the trail and caught the coyote—outwitting this cunning animal. Later on, he became more and more adept at catching wild animals, which he trapped for bounty and to sell the furs. While the family lived at the ranch, their cousins often came to visit on weekends. The children would swim in the swimming hole, ride the pony, hike in the hills, hunt for rocks, build roads, and haul wood on the wagon their grandfather Johnson had given them. A good deal of Layton’s time was also spent teasing the girls in the family. Layton helped with the chores, getting the cows at night. He also helped to milk them. Once when James and Layton were left alone at the ranch to do the chores, they decided to make hot cakes for breakfast. They thought their mother had been too conservative by using only part cream in the batter. They reasoned that all cream would make them much better. Naturally, the hot cakes were so rich, both boys got sick; then they knew that their mother had been wise in using part milk. Layton cared for the chickens, pigs, and any other work a child of his size could do. He earned money shucking corn for neighbors when he was about 8 or 10 years old. He used the money to buy clothes. Most of his clothes were homemade, so he was proud when he could buy some “store clothes”. When Layton was seventeen, his father was called to Henrieville to be the bishop there. Neither his mother, who was usually very religious, nor any of the children went for several months. For Henrieville, to them, was like Nazareth. They wondered if any good could come from Henrieville. After Layton went there, however, he found the young people sociable, and he joined in their fun and had good times. Layton went to Tropic High School two years, then to Panguitch High School. The principal of the latter school, a Mister Poulsen, was one of his outstanding teachers. Layton graduated from Panguitch High School in 1925. The next year he went to Cedar City to attend the Branch Agricultural College. Mr. Lyman, who taught sheep husbandry, was his favorite teacher that year. As he grew older, he worked for an oil drilling company, and a road construction company, and did some sheep herding during the summers to help himself with his schooling. During his year at the Branch Agricultural College in Cedar City, he got up at 4 a.m. to milk cows for his board and room. The board was very inferior—leftovers from the family—so he decided to try something else. Now his aptness at trapping wild animals stood him in good stead. After school, on Saturdays and whenever time permitted, he was busy looking for likely places to set traps. When school was over that year, he had enough money on hand to buy a little car, referred to as a “bug” in those days. He was really proud to have a car of his own. Later, after he was married, and during the time of the Second World War, when the bounty on coyotes was six dollars, Layton trapped and made as high as one-hundred dollars some days on furs. He had some exciting experiences at times. Most wild animals are afraid of people but if they get cornered, they fight for their lives. Cougars, however, seem to be man’s natural enemy. Layton had a narrow escape one day when he followed a cougar track. Layton’s first experience learning to trap was with squirrels and chipmunks. The family had a dog which they called Old Ring, who liked to chase chipmunks up trees. He would stay under the tree barking until James and Layton arrived; then they would shoot them with flippers. They began to trap squirrels and chipmunks; they buried them, and the coyotes dug them up, so they set traps and caught the coyotes. They hit a coyote with a rock and numbed it. Thinking it was dead, they carried it to show their father. When they laid it down to let him see, it ran away. They were very disappointed but undaunted. Layton kept trying to become quite successful trapping these wild animals. After he was married he continued to trap, and had good success, but had a few frightening experiences. One morning Layton took a bird dog and a hound to Cope Canyon, north of Tropic. It has snowed a little the night before. He found a fresh cougar track. The hound could go faster than Layton could go on a horse, until he got on the south side of a slope; then Layton would catch up, for the snow had melted, and he could track better than the hound. The bird dog helped quite a bit, for he had a good nose. Finally Layton got out on a high point where he could look all over Tropic. All at once the hound changed his bay, and bounded off. In a very few minutes he was so far away, he could hardly be heard. The going was so rough and slow, traveling over hills and down into ravines, Layton could not hear the hound anymore. He followed the cougar tracks the best he could. Imagine his disappointment when, after about 30 minutes, the old hound came back. But as soon as he got to Layton, he began to bay again, and ran back in the direction he had come from. After about two miles of hard struggling, Layton came to a small pinion pine about 8 to ten feet tall. Again he was disappointed for he knew a cougar would not be in that small of a tree. However, the hound left there and went up the hillside to a big yellow pine, and began to bay again. So Layton hurried up to that tree, looking up in the top, expecting to see a cougar up there. A big limb, just above his head went unnoticed, for a lion would not be there so close to the ground. Imagine his terror when he glanced in this direction, ad saw a big lion stretched out on this limb only about two feet from his head. Layton, still on the horse, moved away as quickly as possible, looked the situation over, and decided to just wound the lion, to see if the bird dog would help the hound tree it again. He was trying to train the bird dog to hunt animals instead of birds. When the lion jumped out of the tree, the bird dog left like a streak of lightning. The hound and the cougar began to fight. It seemed the hound was willing to keep fighting even if it meant his life. The cougar was scratching the dog terribly. In a matter of minutes the cougar would have killed the dog. Layton had to take a chance on a lucky shot. He aimed and killed the cougar. He vowed never again to take a chance like that. He also decided it was useless to try to make a hound out of a bird dog. He liked to ride horseback in the hills surrounding the towns where he lived. The beauties of nature, the freedom of the country that was inhabited, gave him the feeling that he was “king of all he surveyed”, as one writer has said. He loved the stories of Harold Bell Wright and James Oliver Curwood. From the time of his early youth Layton made friends easily with his sociable manner, smiling countenance and good nature. Bessie Ruby Patterson was born in West Point, Davis County, Utah, June 2, 1907. She was blessed August 4, 1907, and baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on June 13, 1915, in a canal in West Point. She attended church from her earliest recollections. She felt her early childhood was somewhat uneventful, partly because of the lack of children near her age in the family or in the neighborhood. Her parents lived across the street from Uncle John Singleton, her mother’s brother. Their children were older than Bessie, but their grandson, Ivan Jones, spent most of the summers with them, so he was her main playmate. Uncle John had a store; the children had what candy they wanted, because Ivan helped himself to it. Bessie’s brother, Ray, lived one half mile west of the parental home. His daughter, Mabel, was 1 ½ years younger than Bessie and was another playmate. Bessie liked to go there to play and remembers relishing a bread, spread with lard and sugar, Mabel’s mother fixed for them. After starting to school in West Point, Emerald Holt was Bessie’s best friend. In those days there was a beginner’s class, similar to the kindergarten of later years. Bessie liked school and learning, to which may be attributed the fact that she “skipped” the second and eighth grades, even though she often had to stay out of school because of illness. She began the eighth grade, but the teacher, Henry Bybee, suggested to her mother that she be sent to the ninth grade. So she went to Syracuse to little North Davis High School. This year she rode horseback to school, a distance of about two or three miles. Because she was younger than the other students, and very shy, she didn’t fare very well socially. She remembers going to a matinee dance. An older boy from Clinton asked her to dance. She refused because she didn’t know how to dance very well and was too bashful. When Lee Thurgood asked her, she accepted, for she knew Lee. They usually rode to and from school together. The next year she was fourteen. Her mother thought it best for her to live with her sister, Grace Jones, in Salt Lake City and attend Granite High School. She really liked that big school and made many friends. She liked to play basketball, and was chosen captain of the team, in the class of 100 pupils. She attended MIA in West Point and Salt Lake. She used to worry because she did not know how to dance. Her mother said, “If you never find anything harder to learn than that, you will be lucky.” She was fifteen years old before she learned, but that year she and her friend won the prize for being the best dancers at a Mutual dance. Was she ever happy about that! In 1922 the Patterson family had a new brick house built in Ogden at 334 34th Street. In Ogden Bessie hated to leave Granite, but she went along, and spent her junior year at Weber, which was then a high school and a junior college. At the end of the year the LDS Church decided to discontinue the high school, and make Weber strictly college. Those students who had fifteen units of credit, could go into college the following year. Her mother called Dr. Edward Rich, the family doctor, and asked what he thought about Bessie’s entering college, and he said, “She’s too little and slimsy to go to college.” Ogden High School graduation requirements were different than Weber’s; it was impossible to get all the required subjects in, in one year to graduate. There seemed no alternative but for her to go to college. So she started, at the age of 16. She became run-down and had to quit school. The first money Bessie earned was made by working in a tomato factory, where tomatoes were canned. The first fall she worked in Syracuse, when she was fifteen years old; and later in West Point. With the money earned, she bought clothes to go to Weber. Bessie and Opal Allred were Sunday School teachers in the Ogden First Ward where they lived, when Bessie was about fifteen years of age. That year, or the following one, they were members of the Junior Mutual Class, who considered they had a perfect teacher in Mrs. Walter Wright. After she and her husband were tragically killed in a flood near Farmington, Utah, the class had another outstanding teacher in Mrs. Conrad Jenson. She had traveled in Europe and made the class very interesting. After Bessie discontinued school, the year she was sixteen, she had a patriarchal blessing, which promised her that though she had been temporarily deprived of going to school, she would continue her education as she grew in years, which proved very true. Returning to Weber the next fall, Bessie resumed her work and graduated in the spring of 1926, and received a certificate to teach. Teaching jobs were scarce then. Dr. Edward Rich, who was probably on the State Board of Education and had a lot of prestige, interceded for Bessie, and helped her obtain a teaching position in Henrieville, Garfield County, Utah. At that time she had not been further south than Provo. It was an exciting experience to take the train to Marysvale, and be out on her own for the first time, at the age of nineteen. This Marysvale train was only a branch line, very dirty and pokey. There were several teachers on the train going to various Southern Utah towns. They were all young and unmarried, and everyone enjoyed the trip. Arriving in Marysvale, there was no means of transportation on. They hired a truck to take them to Panguitch, where they spent the night in a hotel (perhaps the Cameron). The next morning Bessie met Superintendent Gardner, then went on her way alone, on the mail truck bound for Henrieville. The scenery was vastly different from that of Northern Utah. The mail driver pointed out the different places of interest along the way. When they got to Henrieville the first building to meet the eye was the school, which was in reality “a little red school house”. The driver took her to the home of Bishop James R. Ott, the boarding place recommended to her by Superintendent Gardner. On the Ott porch a large group of children were assembled. Bessie thought, “What a large family these Otts must have”. Later, she learned that most of them were children from the town who had come to see the new teacher. Alma Fletcher, who Bessie knew slightly before, was the other teacher. He boarded with the Ott family too, and taught grades 5 through 8 while Bessie taught grades 1 through 4. It was rather hard to adjust to this little town. She hadn’t been used to speaking to people she didn’t know in Ogden, so some people thought she was “stuck up”. The Ott family who were at home consisted of the father, Bishop James R. Ott, who had been called from Tropic to be bishop of the Henrieville Ward; the mother, Janet Ott, and the following children: James (age 21)was away herding sheep most of the time; Layton (age 20) came home in about October; Louie (age 17) attended school in Panguitch this year; Wallace (age 15) a very shy big boy; Sara (age 13) with whom Bessie shared a room; Rose (age 11): and Agnes (age 8) was in the fourth grade in Bessie’s room. Alma Fletcher, who they called Fraz, had a Ford coupe. He suggested going to Bryce Canyon on one of the first Sundays the teachers were in Henrieville. A relative of Bishop Ott’s had died and the funeral was being held in Tropic. Alma and Bessie took Bishop Ott to Tropic, then went on their way to Bryce Canyon. After visiting the canyon, they decided they better go back to the funeral. As they sat in the funeral, it became very warm, and Bessie felt faint, so she asked Fraz for his keys and started out. The last thing she remembered was trying to open the car door. The next thing she knew she was lying on the ground, with what seemed to her a large group of men standing around. They probably rushed from the church when they saw Bessie fall. She heard one ask, “Who is she?” Another replied, “It’s the Henrieville schoolteacher.” She was taken to the Richard Ott home, feeling very embarrassed at having been introduced in such a manner. The first time Bessie saw Layton was one evening when the family and boarders were having supper. He had been away herding sheep, and came home for the remainder of the winter. He wore a big floppy cowboy hat. Bessie never cared for western apparel, but these two young people seemed attracted to each other from the beginning. He was a smiling, happy good- natured person; although not tall, was dark and handsome. His mother’s nickname for him was “Sunshine” and it seemed to fit. Fraz, Layton and Bessie went to the dances in Tropic every Friday night. They had real good times. Inasmuch as all the Tropic teachers were unmarried, the Henrieville and Tropic teachers had a lot of fun together. After the fall institute in about October, this group of teachers from the two towns took a little trip to Cedar Breaks, Zion and Grand Canyon. When they were eating grapes near St. George, and visited the temple there, little did Bessie think she would be living a few blocks from this place. The Tropic teachers were Rowena Gale, whom we called “Tiny”, Horace Bigler, Amy Howard, Andrew Jones, and Sylvia Woodward. Often, after the Friday night dances, Tiny would go to Henrieville for the weekend. On Saturday she and Fraz, Layton and Bessie, or “Pat” as she was called, would go hiking, horseback riding, etc. Very often, during the evenings they played Rook. Bessie hadn’t had much experience before, but she learned with lots of practice. That winter was a very enjoyable one. The conveniences of the city were lacking, but things more than compensated for them. A play “Her Honor the Mayer” was presented in the ward. Bessie was “Her Honor”. Bessie and Layton were so busy doing things, they seemed to have no interest in going with anyone except each other. When school was over, Bessie’s mother and dad came after her to take her home. She shed a few tears as the car took her away from the place she had had during such an enjoyable winter. If her parents noticed her tears, they said nothing. A few weeks after she got home, Bessie’s mother died with appendicitis (April 29, 1927). The earth seemed to have been moved from under this girl; she felt so forlorn and dejected. The following year she taught at West Point and boarded with her sister—Minnie and Delpha. West Point offered little recreation, she missed the good times she had had the year before, and did not adjust at all well to the loss of her mother. Her father married Amelia Barker that year, and when she went home for the weekend, Amelia acted very strangely—she kept her bedroom door locked, and when Bessie asked for some sheets for her bed, she was told, “If you want some sheets, go and buy them.” It was still the same house, furniture, sheets, etc. that her mother had had, but it was plain there was no place for Bessie there, so she moved all her belongings to her sister Delpha’s. Time proved this Amelia only married her father for financial gain. She made life so miserable for him, he was glad to give her a substantial sum to be rid of her. Bessie applied for work at the telephone company the next summer, so she could stay at home with her father, but when they noted two years college, she was not hired. Then she applied at the Salt Lake Telephone Company, leaving off the college credit from the application, she was hired. It was rather an interesting job. She worked nights and during lunch hour she and her friends danced. Sometimes they went to Utah Lake swimming. Layton came up to Ogden and Salt Lake occasionally, and the two corresponded until September, when Layton came again. They decided to get married. So on the 19th of September, 1929, they were married in the Salt Lake Temple. Minnie and Henry Lambert, sister and brother-in-law, went through the temple with them; and the family had a reception in their honor at the Patterson home in Ogden. When they went to Henrieville, Layton’s parents had another reception for them. They made their home in Henrieville in an unfinished house, with only a sub-floor; unplastered walls, and no floor coverings. An old -fashioned hearth stove was used for heating and cooking. Homemade table and bench were other kitchen furniture they used. There was no electricity or plumbing. Water was carried from the canal about a block from the house. In February Bessie went to Ogden, bought a bedroom suite, a used coal range, some chairs, and linoleum and got a table from her father’s house. About a year later they bought Allen Smith’s home, katty-cornered across the street from the school. It was a tall, old unpainted thing that used to have the reputation of being haunted. Layton and Bessie were not afraid of ghosts. They made the most of what they had and were quite content. Drinking water was hauled in barrels from the creek now. In summer, it often rained and made the water muddy, but it was all there was so they used it. One time Bessie’s nephew, Max Jones, brought some friends down from Salt Lake. Layton put some water into a wash basin, from the barrel, so they could wash. One of the boys said, “Where shall I put this dirty water?” Layton just smiled and threw the water out, and gave them some clear water they used for drinking. Layton herded sheep during the lambing season, and during the summer of 1930 Ray Patterson, Bessie’s brother, came down and took Layton to West Point. Layton worked in the fields picking tomatoes. During the night of September 4, a terrible wind came up and blew the telephone lines down. It was apparent that Layton and Bessie were soon to become parents, so Delpha and her husband Joseph Perkins went to Ogden, a distance of twelve miles, to get the doctor. In the early morning the baby was born; Layton Patterson he was called. He was born September 5, 1930, at his aunt Minnie’s home in West Point. That fall Layton bought a used Model-T Ford truck, purchased a new water barrel, 200 pounds of flour, 100 pounds of sugar, and a few groceries. They were very proud of their possessions. The truck had side curtains, but no heater. They could only travel the warmest part of the day, because of the baby. They stayed at Bessie’s sister, Grace Jones, the first night; the next day they went to Springville and stayed that night at Layton’s Aunt Mary Hatch’s place. The third day they went to Junction and stayed the night with another of Layton’s aunts—Saraphine Anderson. The fourth day brought them to their home in Henrieville. Layton herded sheep the first few summers, ran a little farm in Georgetown, and trapped coyotes and bobcats in the winter. They raised a big garden, which supplied them with vegetables for summer use and some to put in bottles for winter. Sometimes Bessie made quilts and quilt tops, which she traded for fruit to preserve for winter. They had a cow which furnished them milk, cream and butter; and they had their own chickens. About this time Layton served as assistant Sunday School Superintendent. Although Bessie was not afraid of ghosts, she was afraid of drunken men. One night, about 2 o’clock, when she was alone, except for little Layton, she was awakened by a noise. At first she thought it was the children over on the school ground. She got up to investigate and there was a carload of drunken men in front of our house. One of them was out of the car and said, “I’m going in.” Bessie did not know whether he meant in the house, or in the car. There was no back door on the house, except a screen, for the weather was hot, and when the door was open, it shut off the ventilation because it opened against the hall door, so Layton had taken it off before going to the sheep herd. Bessie stood by the window petrified with fear. Finally the man got into the car and they drove away. Another experience that happened while they were living in Henrieville was when they were driving toward Cannonville and were nearly out of gas. They came to a slight hill and nearly stopped. Bessie thought if she jumped out and gave a little push, they could get over the incline, and be able to make it into town. They were going faster than she thought. As she jumped out, the movement of the car caused her to fall, then Layton had to stop for her. They managed to get to the store where they sold gas though. Eliza Moore was the Henrieville ward organist, but often she failed to appear at church, so it fell the lot of Bessie to play the organ or piano for Sunday School and church. Other church jobs Bessie held in Henrieville were Primary President and literary class leader in Relief Society. A few good friends always make life more enjoyable. There were two that were especially good friends of Bessie-—Vera Quilter and Annie Colvin. Annie was not a permanent resident, but came in the winter while her husband, Orlin, taught school. These three women had a sort of club, going to each other’s homes to sew, etc. In March 1937, Layton got a job working on the farm of Lamoni Holbrook in West Point. Now Layton, Bessie and little Layton lived in Mrs. Knighton’s home near the Holbrook farm. On Mothers Day, Layton Patterson went out and picked his mother a pretty bouquet of Mrs. Knighton’s tulips. The mother was never more appreciative of anything than she was of those flowers, but Mrs. Knighton was not happy at all to have her tulips picked. That summer Layton and Bessie bought a small home across the street from Bessie’s brother Ray. Layton bought a large truck and started working for himself hauling tomatoes, beets, etc. During the beet season, he was taken very ill. Ray and Bessie took him to the hospital with a nearly ruptured appendix. When Dr. Junior Rich operated on him, he discovered a growth on his intestines that he thought might be malignant. The appendix was laid on the outside of his abdomen, and the incision clamped together. The test for malignancy was sent to Salt Lake; it came back negative; the operation was then completed, and he soon recovered. In the late winter or early spring this little family went back to Henrieville and Layton began raising mink. They lived in part of his mother’s house, for they had sold theirs when they moved. When summer came, Layton contracted tularemia from the rabbits he caught to feed the mink. He was very ill. Bessie’s sister and her husband, Grace and Joe Jones, came and took them to Ogden. Dr. C. N. Jenson gave Layton medicine to counteract the disease. He returned to Henrieville, but Bessie and son Layton remained in West Point, for another baby was expected, and the nearest doctor by Henrieville was more than fifty miles away. On October 1, or thereabouts, Bessie went to stay with her brother Leonard and his wife Elda to await the baby. Little Layton stayed in West Point with his Aunt Minnie. October 12, 1938, Elna took Bessie to the Dee Hospital in Ogden where James Dale was born. Layton could not come because of his own illness, so the little family was scattered. Layton got a job with the Federal Writer’s Project collecting pioneer histories and folk tales of Garfield County. Layton came after his little family and they went back to Henrieville and continued to live in part of his mother’s house. The next spring Wallace Ott bought the parental home and Layton’s family moved into the Alfred Quilter home where they stayed until 1940. Then Bessie and the two boys returned to West Point, as Layton now had a job as government trapper and would be away from home most of the time. Besides, another child was on its way. Layton thought he would join the family a little later, but he could not decide to quit trapping, for jobs were scarce. It was lonely for all of them, for Layton only got home once in a while—for Thanksgiving, Christmas, etc. On March 28, Bessie knew she must go to the hospital. Layton Patterson was in bed sick. Jimmie Dale was screaming because he did not want to be left with Aunt Lizzie Patterson. Nevertheless Bessie had to leave. Rosalyn was born that afternoon. Bessie was under anesthetic, and as she was regaining consciousness she heard Dr. Jenson say, “It’s a girl, Bessie.” She thought to herself, “I’m not going to pay any attention, for maybe it isn’t true.” She had wanted a girl so much. For a month or more, Rosalyn did not do at all well. She slept constantly. She could not be awakened to eat, even when washed with a cold, wet washcloth. She was taken to the doctor, who told Bessie she must get her to eat or they would have to put her in the hospital and feed her through the veins. She developed jaundice, her skin turned yellow. After some time though, she started to do better and became quite healthy. Because Layton could not seem to get to West Point to live, in the fall of 1941, they decided to sell the West Point house, and buy the old Myron Bybee place in the northern end of Tropic. It was a well-built house, but very old and run down. Layton and Bessie knocked off the old plaster, and put on plasterboard. The inside became quite comfortable, but the outside still looked terrible—unpainted and forlorn-looking. While they lived in Tropic, Layton gradually acquired land and cattle, until he was doing well in this line. The fall of 1942, there was a teacher shortage. Charles Wintch, Layton’s brother-in-law, was on the school board. He asked Bessie if she would go to Henrieville to teach. She was glad to, for the 1930s had been Depression years, and everyone was “hard pressed” for money. Each year Bessie thought she would teach this one-year and buy something they wanted, then quit; until the years added up, and she continued teaching years later. One of her pupils, Orla Gay Zabriskie, wrote a theme about Bessie for her high school English class. About 1944, Ray Patterson bought their land in West Point. Bessie’s father had deeded ten acres to Bessie and her sisters. Layton and Bessie had bought two other shares. With the money from the land, they bought the Jesse Jolley home. It was a nice big house in the middle of the town. Bessie liked living in Tropic better then. She continued to teach, sometimes in Tropic, and sometimes in Henrieville. She was organist in the Tropic Jr. Sunday School, and later organist in the Sr. Sunday School. Annie and Orlin Colvin had moved to Tropic too, and Bessie and Annie were the ward choristers. Bessie was also organist in the Primary. Each summer she took correspondence courses, and in the winter extension classes. Two summers she attended summer school in Cedar City. Rosalyn went along, and they lived in the dormitory in a housekeeping apartment. Rosalyn, with other children of student mothers, took dancing and singing. Bessie got her B. S. degree June 4, 1951. Layton gave her a diamond ring for graduation. He was chosen counselor to Bishop Bernard Johnson. Orlin Colvin was the other counselor. Allie (whose real name was Alice) and Bessie were good friends, and Bernard and Layton had grown up together. They were over to Panguitch to Conference the day the new bishopric was selected. Allie whispered and told Bessie that Bernard had been asked to be bishop, and he had chosen Layton for a counselor. All through the morning meeting and during lunch, she might have told Layton. But she thought Bernard should be the one to tell him. Bernard didn’t get a chance, so it was a shock to Layton during the afternoon session, to have his name read off as Bernard’s counselor. In fact, it was such a shock that Layton’s rheumatism left his foot, as he sat there with his shoe off. After Layton Patterson’s graduation from Tropic High School, he attended college two years at Cedar City, then he accepted a call to the Central States Mission. He was disappointed in being called to a place so near home, but during his mission he met, converted and fell in love with Bettye Byrd. She came to Tropic and visited the Ott family for a few weeks. When Layton’s mission was completed, the family took Bettye to Ogden to meet him. They were married June 30, 1952 in the Logan Temple. That evening, a reception was held for them in his Aunt Delpha’s pretty yard. The next day they all went home to Tropic. James Robert Ott (Layton Patterson’s grandfather) died suddenly following an illness the family did not realize was extreme. His death occurred July 4, 1952. The invitations for a reception for the newlyweds, in Tropic, had all been sent. There was no way of letting people know, so the reception was held as scheduled. Bessie had some real help from Areta Stewart, Mabel Ott and her daughter Rella, and Virginia Ott. During the time Bessie lived and later taught in Henrieville, she did not feel the Henrieville people really liked her. She felt like an outsider. But at the reception for Layton and Bettye, practically the whole town of Henrieville came. It was very gratifying. Since then, Bessie has seen some of the Henrieville people, and received letters and cards, so these people have a special place in her heart. Too, she learned that happiness is not measured in dollars and cents. While they lived in Tropic, they still raised good gardens. Bessie bottled all kinds of vegetables, meat and fruit. She often went into the hills with Layton to get wood for fuel and also to cut cedar posts, which he sold. Sometimes she helped her husband with the mowing and raking of hay. She drove the tractor while Layton ran the mower and rake. While Layton was in the bishopric, Tropic erected a large recreation hall adjoining the church. This bishopric was released six years from the day they were appointed. Later, Bernard and Allie moved to Farmington, Utah. On November 21, 1960, Orlin Colvin died, and Annie got a teaching position and bought a home in Layton, Utah, across the street from her daughter Merlene. In August 1953, Layton and Bessie sold their home in Tropic and bought a brick one in St. George, at 78 East 300 South Street. Areta Stewart helped move. She and Bessie went with Dean Hafen (a fruit and vegetable peddler from Dixie who sold his produce in Tropic and vicinity). They brought most of the furniture, except the heaviest things like the piano, refrigerator, etc. They arrived in St. George about 10 o’clock at night. The lights had not been turned on, but an outdoor light across the street shown in the living room so they could see well enough to pile the furniture in. That night Areta and Bessie stayed at Areta’s mother’s home, and the next day they arranged the furniture in the various rooms. Layton was working on the East Fork forest, so he did not get in on the moving job. Rosalyn, Jimmie Dale and their mother were in St. George for the beginning of school, but Layton came only on weekends until his forest job was finished in the fall. It was a discouraged trio who met him on his first weekend in St. George. Bessie had a much larger group of children to teach than she was used to in Tropic, and the heat was intense. Rosalyn’s first words to her dad were, “This house is ‘buggy’.” She was nearly petrified with fear of the many and various kinds of bugs which thrived in this warm climate, and which they had not seen before. Jimmie Dale did not like it here, and wanted to go back to Tropic. He soon adjusted, for he was a good ball player and runner (on the track team) and made many friends. His Uncle James Ott taught at Woodward, where he went to school. He introduced him to David Welch—head of student athletics. They became good friends. Toward the close of school that year, he was chosen “most popular boy” in school. It took Rosalyn longer to adjust. She still wanted to go back to Tropic. The following summer she stayed at Tropic with her dad, in the old post office building, as he was still working on the forest there. After that she began to like St. George. When she was in the tenth grade she was chosen queen at the FFA Ball, and during her senior year in high school, she was princess of the Dixie Homecoming. After Layton and Bettye’s marriage, they lived in Salt Lake. Layton attended the University of Utah, and both worked part-time. Boys were expected to go into the army for training for two years. Layton expected to be called anytime, so he decided to go voluntarily in 1953. They were expecting a baby. They came to St. George, where their first child was born November 11, 1953, and a few days later Layton left for Fort Ord, California. Bettye and the baby, Debra Kaye, stayed with Layton’s parents while he was in basic training; after that Bettye went with him to Virginia, where he spent some time in the army. After his release from the army, Layton continued his studies and graduated from the University of Utah as an honor student. From this school he went to the University of California at Los Angeles. His son, Stephen Layton, was born in Pleasanton, California, and Lorraine (or Lorie) was born in Los Angeles, California. Layton received his Masters degree from UCLA and also received his CPA. In the 1964 thirteenth edition of “World Who’s Who in Commerce and Industry” appears the following sketch: Ott, Layton Patterson, accountant; born, Westpoint, Utah, September 5, 1930; son of J. Layton and Bessie (Patterson) Ott; B. S. degree, University of Utah, 1956; MBA degree, University of California, Los Angeles, 1957; married Bettye Jean Byrd, June 30, 1952; children, Debra, Stephen, Lorraine, and Vickie Lynn. Instructor, Accounting, University of California, Los Angeles, 1956-57; Chairman, Accounting Department, Stevens Henagar College, Salt Lake City, 1957-60; Secretary-treasurer; Controller, Montek, Inc. Salt Lake City 1958-? Instructor, Accounting, University of Utah, 1960-? Management consultant, director, Trans-continental Investment Company; Secretary, director, Utah Palisades, Inc. Universal Copiers, Inc. Served with army of United States 1953-55. Certified Public Accountant, Utah. Member, American Institute of Accountants, National Society of Business Budgeting, American Accounting Association, Delta Gamma Sigma. Republican. Member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Home: 1378 North 550 East, Bountiful, Utah. Office: 4438 South State Street, Salt Lake City, Utah. In the St. George 4th Ward, Bessie was Jr. Sunday School coordinator, Jr. Sunday School organist, Relief Society Work Director, and person in charge of projects. The year after they moved to St. George, Layton and Bessie joined the square dance club, and really enjoyed square dancing. They attended a jamboree at Needles, California with the Clair Stirlings and the Vivian Leanys. April 27, 1959, Layton had a heart attack and they had to quit dancing. They bought Clair Stirling’s farm at Leeds, and Layton began raising calves. He was not able to do hard work. James Dale (Jim or Jimmie) had joined the army and was in Virginia at this time. Then he was transferred to Camp Erwin, near Barstow, California the summer of 1959. The following winter he was sent to Anchorage, Alaska, where he remained until his release. After Jim’s release from the army, he returned home and continued his studies at Dixie College. That year Janna Deen Slade from Kirtland, New Mexico, was attending Dixie also. They became engaged and were married May 4, 1962. Janna’s parents held a reception for them in Kirtland, and Jim’s parents held openhouse in St. George. Another openhouse was held in their honor at the home of Jim’s brother and sister-in-law, Layton and Bettye Ott, in Bountiful. Their first child, Denna Kyle Ott, was born December 13, 1962. In August 1960 Bessie had a slight heart attack, and missed the first week of school. She taught the remainder of the year until April 11, when she was taken to the hospital with a heart attack the doctor termed “myocardial insufficiency”. Rosalyn attended college at Utah State University in Logan, in 1960, and the fall quarter of the next year. The winter quarter she came home and attended Dixie College. She decided she did not want to go to college, so she became an airline stewardess for Bonanza Airlines in April 1961. She went to Phoenix, Arizona, for training and was stationed there for a while. She worked about one year for Bonanza Airlines, then she went to Europe with some other girls. When she returned she worked for a travel agency in San Francisco for a while, then she attended the University of Utah. While there she got a chance to learn to be a dance instructor at Arthur Murray’s Dance Studio in Salt Lake City. She was made an instructor after some time; then worked part-time as instructor, and part-time as interviewer for this studio, where she made very good progress. She was given a trophy, which read: Arthur Murray winter interviewing contest 1964 3rd Place Analyst Rosalyn Ott This was a great compliment to her, to get 3rd place in all the Arthur Murray Studios when she had been working at this particular job a short time. She met Jacques (Jack) DeBeve while working at Arthur Murray studio. He also got recognition in this same contest—he got 1st place, as interviewer. Rosalyn and Jacques were married. Her mother gave a trousseau tea in her honor July 5, 1964, and her brother and sister-in-law, Layton and Bettye Ott, had a reception for them July 18, 1964 at their home in Bountiful. August 15, 1958 Layton and Bettye’s 4th child was born, a girl whom they named Vickie Lynn. Layton Patterson needed help, so his mother went and took care of the other children while Bettye was in the hospital. The first few years Bessie and Layton lived in St. George, they belonged to a group consisting of Minnie and Ferrell Jolley, Beulah and Bill Lamb, and Lois and Ernie Wells. The women all taught together. This group celebrated each other’s birthdays and anniversaries. As time went on Ferrell seemed to fit in less and less, but for Minnie’s sake, they still associated together. Then Minnie was killed in a car accident in August 1959. After that Layton and Bessie associated with two other groups; one consisting of Chester and Nola Jones, Vivian and LaFave Leany, Lois and Ernie Wells. This group began playing rook, then the Joneses introduced them to the game of pinochle, so that was the game they usually played. The other group consisted of Verna and George Schmutz, Lois and Ernie Wells, Beulah and Bill Lamb, and Birdie and Les Cooper. Birdie taught the women to knit; the men either visited or played a game. Sometimes the group sang songs they composed about each other. Here is a song about Layton and Bessie: (Layton had mistakenly hauled a wrong calf with one of his own, so the group made the most of it). Tune—Bye Bye Blackbird Layton’s full of care and woe, waiting here feeling low. Bye, Bye Blackbird. “Keep the home fires bright for me, I’ll be back, don’t you see?” Bye, Bye Blackbird. When the sheriff knows and understands me, then he’ll know that the calf came willingly, so he’ll make the sentence light, I’ll be home late tonight—Sheriff bye, bye. Bessie’s waiting patiently, knitting there, pearling here, welcome home Layton. She’s tended cows and set them free, so the law won’t come and see, more calves roaming. Now she helps her boss with all his troubles, zippers, zippers, working on the double (this was about his work at the Hawthorne Company where they made tents and sleeping bags). She can light the light at night, knowing Layton’s safe tonight—blackbird, bye, bye. Bessie went to Henrieville, teaching here, dancing still—to bye, bye, blackbird. Just because her hair was dark, young folks thought it quite a lark, to call her blackbird. If she stayed at school to work hours after, teenagers would come to serenade her, with this song, they little knew, was Layton’s song—Bessie’s too. Blackbird, bye, bye. Other groups Bessie belonged to were the Dixie Beautification Club, of which she was president about 1960; the St. George Business and Professional Women’s Club, serving as its president during the 1962-63 year; and the Dixie Reviewers—a literary club. The fall of 1963 Layton sold the Leeds property to Leonard Carter. November 11, 1963, Bessie was taken to the LDS Hospital in Salt Lake City as a result of nervous exhaustion, and was forced to discontinue school for the remainder of the year. The doctor advised her not to teach the 1964-65 year either. Layton and Bessie had been asked by the temple president to be temple workers, but due to Bessie’s illness, that assignment was temporarily not filled. However, Bessie set her goal of going to the temple on the average of five sessions per week, for the 1964-65 season. In January, 1964, Layton began working at the Hawthorne Company plant in St. George. This plant manufactures tents and sleeping bags for the Sears store in Los Angeles. The first few days Layton zipped sleeping bags, turned the bags wrong side out, and other odd jobs that were very monotonous. He was on the verge of quitting one day, when the boss came along and asked if he’d like to work on quality control. His main job then, was to inspect tents, looking for any flaws that might have occurred during their manufacture. If flaws were found, the people working on production had to repair the flaws. This job was enjoyable. Layton was very adept at putting up tents, and quick to see if there was anything wrong with them. His boss often told visitors to the factory that Layton knew about all there was to know about tents. His work also took him to every part of the plant; the frame shop, the cutting table, the seamer line—where seams were sewn, the round table where floors are sewn in the tents. His job was to try to make the most perfect product possible. At times he offered suggestions that he felt would make the tents better. For instance, his first suggestion was concerning a different kind of hook to hold the tent to the frame. The next suggestion pertained to the window openings on one certain type of tent. The accompanying letter shows the recognition he received from the head office on these suggestions. Hawthorne Company A Division of Kellwood Company May 13, 164 Mr. O. Layton (Layton Ott) Hawthorne Company A Division of Kellwood Company St. George, Utah Dear Mr. Layton; You are to be complimented on your suggestions regarding improvements to Hawthorne tents. Your first suggestion regarding improved hooks on the folding top has resulted in the issuing of a product revision form to use a redesigned hook. This new hook will be used as soon as received from the supplier and will be included in revised specifications. As regards the second recommendation regarding the large, inside windows, I will discuss this with the buyers at the next research conference, May 26 & 27. I agree with you, particularly as regards the 7893 tent. That provision should be made to roll up and tie the inside window flap. You might be interested in knowing that a large portion of our product improvements come from employees such as yourself, who are conscientious enough to notice where improvements are required and to submit them to the management. Once a month, our department meets with industrial engineering personnel and quality control personnel at Hawthorne for just such a discussion and we would appreciate your sending any additional suggestions. These suggestions will be discussed at the meeting. Very truly yours, James C. Porter, Head Research and Engineering Department Layton declares this is the best job he has ever had—not the best paying job, but the most satisfying. On March 16, 1964, Layton and Bettye Ott had another baby bless their home, which they called Corrine. This baby became the idol of the family, almost. Even Stephen, who had wanted a brother, had decided this child is pretty special. After Jim Ott’s graduation from Dixie College, he went to Cedar City to continue college work in 1963-64. He was on the honor roll and received a letter from the college congratulating him on his scholastic achievements. The summer of 1964, Jim and Jana worked in New Mexico, to get money so Jim could finish school the next year. Jana also decided to continue her college work this time, in 1964. ******************** Left: James Ott dedicating his brother, Layton’s grave on June 24, 1974, in the Georgetown cemetery. Above: Grave marker in the Georgetown cemetery for Layton and Bessie Ott. MEMORIES OF LAYTON OTT (Contributed by his wife, brothers, sisters, nieces, nephews, children and grandchildren following his death in 1974) By Bessie Ott: My memories are similar to all the rest, except I probably have many more. The first time I saw Layton, I was teaching in Henrieville. I boarded at the Ott home, and was eating supper with the family when Layton arrived from the sheep herd. He was wearing a huge cowboy hat. I never cared for western clothes, so I’m sure it wasn’t the hat that impressed me. And, incidentally, I never saw him wear it again. One thing is—I do remember the first time I saw him, and as I look back, I don’t remember clearly seeing any of the rest for the first time. Layton’s mother called him “Sunshine” and it seemed to fit him very well, for he was always cheerful. Another first experience was the first dance we went to. It was in Cannonville. The crowd was real small, so there weren’t many people to dance with. In those days, a couple didn’t dance together the whole evening as they do now. Layton kept asking me to dance. I thought he felt sorry for me, so finally I said, “Why don’t you ask the other girls to dance?” I thought I was being unselfish, but he thought I didn’t want to dance with him anymore; so neither of us danced much after that, and after talking the matter over later, we understood the other’s motives, for he said he asked me because he wanted to dance with me. The winter was a very enjoyable one for both of us. We played Rook about every evening. I hadn’t played much before, but we always were partners. I seemed to hold the cards and he bid on my hand, so we got along fine. The first time we got beaten was late in the year when his dad and mother beat us. Now I’ll tell a little about our mission. Layton always liked to talk more than I did, so he usually did most of the talking wherever we went. He felt miserable most of the time, but the people didn’t know. When we were in Owyhee, he was the Branch President. A non-member Indian man died and the family wanted to have the funeral in the LDS chapel. Layton had been sick, so he didn’t feel equal to taking charge, so he got his counselor to take charge but he gave the only talk. He spoke about the hereafter, and how we were all our Heavenly Father’s children, and how He loved all of His children. Layton made quite a hit with the Indians by this line of talking; many said afterward how much they enjoyed his talk. They appreciated someone accepting them as equals. From the time we were in Owyhee to the end, he always found a secret spot to pray to his Heavenly Father. Even I never saw the places he chose. He became very close to his Heavenly Father who seemed to answer him and help him with his problems. In Owyhee he climbed the little mountain behind the church to pray. In Gold Run, he chose a nook down the hill among the dense trees, and in Lovelock he went early in the morning in his car somewhere to pray. I doubt if any missionary got closer to the Lord than he did. While we were in Gold Run I twisted my knee once and was laid up for awhile. Another time I got the flu. Both times, though, I wasn’t seriously ill. He prayed fervently for my recovery; I was really touched. He sometimes said he’d be glad to get home for he dreamed several times I was killed in the car or died some other way. He said he’d never forgive himself if anything happened to me. So that accounted for his praying so hard for me to get better. If there ever could have been any doubt that he loved me, those prayers would have convinced me. It’s hard to reconcile the fact that he didn’t get home where he wanted so much to come, but he could never have been more ready to meet his Heavenly Father than he was at that time. As the town drunk in Gold Run wrote on a card to me, “God has him, I know.” ¬¬---------------- Layton and Bessie served as missionaries in the Las Vegas North Mission from 1973-74. Left: Elder and Sister Ott with church member friends in Gold Run, CA. This picture was taken just before they were transferred to Lovelock, NV, where Layton had a heart attack and passed away on June 20, 1974, just before their mission concluded. By Rella Alvey and family: Uncle Layton owned a field, out the lane just a little way from where Royal and I live. As he lived in St. George, it was hard for him to take his water turns all the time as they came around. So one evening he stopped in to see if Kim would go out and take his next water turn. He said, “Kid, set your own price, I’ll pay you well.” He did. We were ready to eat supper; I had plenty of milk and had just baked bread, along with dessert and other things that go along with a meal. He was very independent, but finally consented to eat. “Everything looks good”, he said, “but the best of all is that good bread and milk.” We had a very enjoyable evening and visit with him. He loved just the good down-to-earth things of life. When I was a small child, we lived on a ranch called Yellow Creek. My father, Joe, always raised such good watermelons, I’ll never forget how spellbound I sat, watching uncle Layton eat watermelon. He didn’t seem to have any problem at all getting rid of the seeds. It took me forever to dig the seeds out. He loved watermelon very much. Many a time I have taken my children down to Luella Mangum’s store. If he was there he would dig down in his pocket and give each one of them a nickel or dime, after he had teased them a little bit first. My children all loved him. I’ll never forget the time I rode to St. George with him to catch the bus for Hawthorne, Nevada. How kind you both were to me. And when he could have slept a little longer that morning, he got up at 5 a.m. and took me to the bus station. I’ll never forget these things. Just one more—the time when my father died, Layton came up to the house. He was a great source of comfort and strength to Mother and to us children. He could take our minds off our problems with his laugh and witty ways. Through the years, when he was where he could, he never failed to stop in and see how Mother was doing. Although we procrastinated and didn’t tell him, we loved him very much. A loving niece, as always, Rella Alvey and family. By Faye Palmer Ott: I have been thinking of Layton all morning, and what I could write for this memory book. I think it says a lot for the kind of man he was to say that all my memories of him are happy ones. He was always so good to me, and made me feel so welcome to the Ott Family. I remember when he was driving the school bus, he heard me telling someone I had had a terrible nightmare the night before. Layton got such a kick out of my wild tale, he called me “old nightmares” for many years after. I will always remember Layton as a good man, and a fun loving man, and I will always remember him with love and respect. Layton standing by the school bus he drove. By Bob Ott: I have had many rich experiences with Layton—they are in my heart but hard to put on paper. I remember once I helped Layton and Wallace haul hay from the Palmer field in Cannonville. It was near the first of August, and the mosquitoes were in” full bloom”. Before leaving home I picked up some repellent and rubbed some on my head and hands before entering the fields. I asked Layton and Wallace if they wanted some, but they declined. I remember Layton kidding me, saying it was just for sissies. We had about half a load of hay when I noticed they were swatting their hands wildly about their heads; after about ten minutes of this Layton had to give in and say, “Gimme some of that dang stuff.” I said, “No, this is just for sissies.” After letting them suffer for some time, I gave in and shared my new product with them. I remember many experiences with Layton as we operated our cowherd together. Most of the subjects of cattlemen center around cows and their experiences with them. Both the good and the bad parts are told. When Layton came out from St. George he often stayed at our place, and many were the stories and experiences we told, sitting up until the wee hours of the morning. It was always a pleasure to listen to his stories. He was never known to “stretch the truth”. They were always just as it happened. Layton was always regarded as an expert on coyotes, and always took pride in out-smarting them. His experiences always got special attention from the kids and grown-ups alike. When he was around he seemed to be able to create an atmosphere of laughter and interest. Bob By Mira Loy Ott: When Layton came to visit us, he would always open the door and say, “Well, I’m here, kid,” or “Hi, kid, how’s my gal?” When I would inquire how Bessie was he would say, “Just grumbly, like a woman,” then he would laugh and tell me how “Pat” was. Layton really enjoyed himself here at Bryce; when he stayed overnight, he would usually rise early and go for a walk—counting his blessings and enjoying Mother Nature. He especially enjoyed the deer as they would feed on our back lawn. How Layton loved watermelon and ice cream. During the summer, he usually had one or two “good ol’ Dixie melons” in his truck, when he came out just to check on things. If he called before he came he would say, “Bring out the ice cream, kid, I’m on my way.” Layton was always interested in our family—how they were, where they were, and what they were doing. He would say, “Just checking on my kids.” He had a plastic oval-shaped coin purse; on occasion, he would arrange the money, then tell Stacey to “get over here and get you a nickel. Now be sure and take that big one there.” It was a quarter. Mira . By Tammie Ott: I remember when I was little, Uncle Layton would get me up on his lap, just before we would have dessert (usually pie), and rub his whiskers along my cheek, saying, “Aren’t those good whisker pies?” He always called me Pammy. He gave me an orange sleeping bag. I remember asking him if it was just made for me. He said, “Yes.” I was so proud of this sleeping bag, and I still have it, and use it. Tammie By Betty Lou Graff Wintch: UNCLE LAYTON “To know him is to love him” Are words that are not new; But could you describe Uncle Layton With words that are more true? Did you ever see a smile more contagious Or hear a voice with such laughter in it? Can you ever recall being in his presence Without enjoying it every minute? He’s a man, he’s a face, he’s a body Whose image will live in our minds; To think of him is to see him For his life was a picture—the unforgettable kind. Can’t you just see him playing Rook? He seemed to enjoy it more than others; Perhaps it could have been the game But I think it was being with sisters and brothers. You could hear his laughter all over the house As his bid topped all the rest; But he’d still laugh if he lost the game— He never thought of a game as a test. He never aspired to be president or king Except to his children and wife; Just to love, and be loved, was all he asked As he made his journey through life. They were his glory, his pride, his joy, His hopes in dreams come true; Being with family, just those he loved Was the greatest joy he knew. He died in the service of the Lord With Aunt Bessie by his side; And although our hearts broke when he left earth They were filled with pride. He probably asked God, as soon as he saw Him To pattern eternity after his favorite places; Then his desire to make Heaven complete He would stock them with favorite faces. His sisters and brothers, when they say his name Wipe teardrops from their eyes; They miss him and they love him And they cherish their family ties. Books could be written of Layton’s life His love of land—his love of wife; His joy in children, his loyalty to friend Yes, memories of Layton will never end. The years Layton spent catching the wily coyote Is a memory we chuckle at now; No matter how smart the old coyote was He couldn’t top Layton’s know-how. Layton loved Utah very much And especially its southern part; From “up on the mountain” to “down below” He cherished their scenes in his heart. He would be happy here today Watching children run and play; Enjoying his family and his kin And we’d hear his laughter above the din. Yes, “to know him was to love him” But the first thing he would say Is, “put on a smile and chat a while And let’s have fun today.” By Bill Shakespear: I remember how Uncle Layton would pop into the house on one of his trips from Dixie. It seems he always brought some goodies—grapes or pomegranates, etc. Uncle Layton was always so thoughtful and generous that way. He always brought sunshine with him; interrogating me about my current girl friends, pinching me and teasing me about the thickness of my trousers or shirt. If there was watermelon in the house, he always had time for a piece. I remember being amazed at the terribly efficient machinery of his mouth, which allowed him to place large amounts in the front of his mouth and pour seeds out the side of his mouth. I remember the same feeling of awe on an early morning ride from St. George to Tropic as he consumed quickly a large quantity of pine nuts. Then there was his imaginary pair of “girl hobbles”. He always threatened to tie us fellows down with “girl hobbles” to get us through town—fancying that, when we laid eyes on a girl, we were driven to uncontrollable pursuit. As I recall Uncle Layton, I am reminded how important attitude is. The cheerfulness he brought and the look from the world makes him someone we greatly admire. Bill By Virginia and James Ott: SOME OF OUR CHOICE MEMORIES One of the very happy and special experiences of our lives was living in St. George with Mother in her little “home” as she called it, Bessie and Layton across the street, and Garn and Rose around the corner and down a bit. Most of our associations were very happy—some a bit sad, the way the stream of life flows, but we were very close and loved and enjoyed many good times together. We remember Layton telling us, when he was sure we were going to move to Orem, “our lives will never be the same,” and they haven’t. Rose and Garn moved to Salt Lake, Mother had passed away, and we moved to Orem. The circle was broken. We loved those days, only wish we had made them happier than we did. Some mornings Layton would get up early to go to work at Hawthorn and we would be up early, preparing to go to school, and about 6:30 he would come over to visit with us for a few minutes. He always had an interesting experience to share with us, sometimes humorous, sometimes spiritual, but always with a smile and a twinkle in his brown eyes. He told me he was going to get me a walking-(jumping) stick to use up all my surplus energy (I felt barely able to crawl about), and always we had a good laugh, which was a good starter for the day coming up. We always went to work with renewed courage and a sweet smile and twinkling brown eyes to think about during the day. These were choice minutes to James and I. James had another choice visit with him, sharing his testimony of the gospel and discussing gospel principles with him, listening to his experiences as a missionary. This mission experience was a call from our Heavenly Father, and even though was far from good, he accepted it and was greatly blessed. We are thankful and happy for the joy he has given us. Virginia and James Ott By Janet Shakespear Sawyer: Uncle Layton, someone I admired, looked up to, and had a great love for—what a great friend, pal, and someone you could go to for advice. When I was about 9 years old I was out in the hills and saw a coyote go inside a den. I went looking for Uncle Layton. He caught the mother coyote and 8 pups. He gave me $10—I thought I was rich—I was, for having known him. After that, whenever he saw me he would say, “Let’s go coyote hunting, kid.” I am sure you are now having “happy hunting”, my uncle. Janet By Louie and Alton: Dearest Bessie and Family, My little bit of writing goes for all of you because my association with you dates back quite a number of years, and my memories are not only of Layton, for we have had many enjoyable times together. Right now I am thinking of a time when we lived to the ranch, and we came to Henrieville and stayed at your place for the 4th of July which came on a Monday. We had two little ones and you had Layton Pat, but we managed to leave them and went to the dance, which started right after midnight, and we danced until daylight. One thing I remember, especially at that time, was that Layton had bought several boxes of matches up to Aunt Sara Willis’ (this was in the days of the Depression). Well, the truth of the matches was that they had been wet or something, and you had to try four or five times to get one to strike; so he had paid two or three times as much as he would have done for good ones. We really laughed about it. I’ve taken much teasing and I get lonesome for it, but I have nothing but happy memories of Layton, and our associations with all of you. Love always, Louie By Wallace Ott: It is hard to say “goodbye” to a brother like Layton. Although he has been gone more than a year, we still miss him very much—Layton and I had so many good times together—working and roaming through the hills. It was really a pleasure when we went trapping and hunting coyotes. We used to catch as many as 100 coyotes in a season. We used to enjoy it, as well as earning a lot of our spending money. Several times we got two dens in one day. One time we got sixteen coyotes out of one hole. This we would do in the spring of the year, during the ”denning” season. In the fall and winter we would have trap lines and catch them for their fur. It was a great time. We enjoyed it very much. It has been said that Layton and I could make good wages trading with each other. In our lives we made a good many trades, and helped each other out. There was seldom a time in fifty years that I didn’t owe Layton, or he owed me some. We kept our account in a little book, and there were 100 cents in every dollar. We never had an argument about it. A short time before Layton left for his mission we got together and settled up our business. We helped each other out—when I needed help I went to Layton—when he needed help he came to me. I am really thankful now that I had that privilege of working with him and knowing him as well as I did. No matter how long I live, I’ll always have fond memories of the time we spent together. Wallace By Sara and Malen Littlefield: It is a pleasure for our family to pay a special tribute to Layton—one of the joys of our lives was knowing him. As a younger sister at home, I remember him for the little extras he did for everyone. He always seemed to have an extra dime to slip me when I pressed his suit. He had the first car in Henrieville owned by a single boy. He was so generous and good about taking all the kids in town for a ride. Then there were those dark days of the hotel in Kanab—Malen and I will never forget him for the way he tried to cheer us up and keep us going. He would say to us, “There is always going to be a brighter day.” He would “dig” right in and do whatever the jobs were that needed to be done. He was very special to our family too. Each one expressed how they loved to be around him—Jim says he remembers as a boy taking the cows to pasture—how Uncle Layton always took time to stop and tease him about the armful of books he always carried back and forth. He said lots of times he would wait for him to get the cow in the pasture, so he could give him a lift back to town. Very often he would have a goodie to share with him. Janell says she’ll always remember him for the way he teased her. She was so lonesome and homesick while we were in Kanab—one day she told Uncle Layton she knew she’d be old and shaggy before she got to move back to Tropic. She was about seven years old at the time. Of course Layton never let her forget it. On her wedding day (she was married on Layton’s birthday—June 11, 1960) Layton was in the hospital in Salt Lake where he had had an operation the day before. She wanted him to meet Chuck, so before she was married that day she took Chuck down to the hospital to meet Uncle Layton. On the way she told Chuck, “Don’t be surprised when Uncle Layton calls me old and shaggy”. She said as sick as he was, he still smiled and called her old and shaggy. She said she would have been disappointed if he hadn’t. Steve was too young to remember him when we lived in Tropic, but he remembered when he came to Layton & Bettye’s place in Bountiful, and always wanted to go there when he knew Layton and Bessie would be there. He says, too, he’ll always remember the special way Layton teased him by calling him that “Stevie Starvy Kid.” Malen says he loved him as a brother, and he’ll always remember him when he plants cucumbers. Layton used to tell him to plant an extra vine and put his name on it. I’ll never forget him for the good stories he told—always a good yarn to tell and a good, clean joke to share. He loved us all so, and made each one of us feel that we were someone special. I’m sure he will be remembered by so many—family and friends, and just people he met, for the generosity he showed. I heard one of the General Authorities say that the things we take with us in the next world are the things we give away while we are in this life—truly Layton will have much—how we all love him! Malen, Sara, Jim, Janell & Steve Littlefield By Rose Ott Olsen: There are many things that I could say—both humorous and serious about my brother Layton, so I think I’ll start by relating a few things when I was a kid at home. He always had a knack for teasing, even though we got disgusted with him sometimes, we still liked it very much. Of course there are too many things to mention, so I’ll choose a few that come to mind at the present time. For instance, when I first started dating boyfriends, he was never afraid to tease them in some way. I remember one boyfriend who was very bashful, so he’d tell me exactly what time he’d pick me up, and would tell me to be sure to answer the door myself. He knew that if Layton opened the door he would be in for plenty of teasing. My cousin, Maxine, used to come and stay with us at times. There was one fellow who had broken his elbow—it hadn’t been set properly—so his arm curved. Maxine really didn’t like him at all, but every time Layton would get around her, he’d hold his arm out and tell her that 45-degree angle would just fit around her. A lot of the young kids used to get together at our home and James would always make up plenty of scary stories to tell us. Everyone would be so engrossed in the story, Layton would slip out and just at the right time, and he’d rap on the window, which always gave the story a real effect. Layton was always very popular with the girls. Anytime a new girl came into town, they always tried to find out about Layton Ott. Many times I have had good-looking girls stop me and ask if I was Layton Ott’s sister. Layton was always sporty in his dress, and had dark, black hair, which he combed straight back, and put plenty of hair oil on to hold it down, which was the style at that time. He had so many cowlicks, sometimes before a dance when he really wanted to look sharp, he’d wear a skullcap during the day. Now—just to tell a little incident—one year we had a very big crop of pine nuts and he went out and gathered pine nuts to sell and made extra spending money. He went into Nevada where he gathered some huge pine nuts. He had gathered several seamless sacks full. He kept them in the closet with the door locked. One day while he was gone, I happened to find the key and went in and really got my fill of pine nuts. I told no one about this, and that night when Mother called us to supper, I was very ill and sick to my stomach. Of course, Mother was quite concerned when I turned down eating my dinner. Just as they sat down to eat I ran out the door and made it barely in time to get relieved of all my pine nuts. The several years I was ill in St. George, when Layton would come over to see how I was, he’d say, "Cheer up, kid, you’re going to be alright—it’s just the meanness coming out.” All of my family have been close to their Uncle Layton, and they too, enjoyed his teasing. Rose By Sally Olsen: I remember Uncle Layton dropping by our house in St. George to visit. Occasionally he would time it just right to join us in a game of Rook. He would bid and outrageous amount, and enjoy every play—win or lose. He always seemed to know the right card to play. He lived life the way he played cards—he lived to win, but he had to have a lot of warmth, love, happiness and laughter along the way. No matter what was needed—a kind word, a bit of teasing, learning to laugh at your own mistakes, or money—he was always there. I know—for he never let me down. I loved him for all the thoughtful things he did. I will always consider myself lucky for knowing him and blessed by being related to him! Sally By Diana Olsen Tucker: I have fond memories of Uncle Layton from the St. George days. As we just lived around the corner from Uncle Layton, he often walked over to visit. I hadn’t dated much until I met my husband, Reed. And when Uncle Layton found out I was going pretty steady with Reed, he couldn’t resist doing a little teasing. As soon as Uncle Layton would pop in, head in the door, he would smile that wide grin of his and say, “The same old geek?” The first time he said that, I couldn’t figure out what he was talking about, but all the explanation he would give was another large grin before he wandered back into the house to find someone else to tease. Every time he visited after that, the first thing he’d say to me was “Same old geek?” As I never again went with anyone but Reed, I have to say, “Yes”. Reed worked as a part-time disk jockey at the local radio station while he went to school. When Uncle Layton found out he worked there, he asked Reed if he could play a request. Reed said, “Of course, what do you want to hear?” The next day we got the radio turned on at the appointed time and we heard Reed say, “We’ve had a special request for a certain song, and I had to dig clear down to the bottom of the stack, but I finally found it—for Layton Ott. Here’s On Top of Old Smokey.” Uncle Layton was really tickled. About three for four years after Reed and I were married, we finally got to one of the family reunions at Tropic Reservoir. I was excited to see everyone, because I hadn’t seen most of them since our wedding. As soon as I saw Uncle Layton, I went over to hug him. Of course, the first thing he said to me was--you guessed it--“Same old geek?” Then he added, “Boy, you’ve filled out so nice.” I’d gained some unneeded weight since he had last seen me. I’ll always remember Uncle Layton as the world’s biggest teaser, with that 50-cent grin on his face. Diana By Agnes Ott Littlefield: In memory of a loving brother I write these few lines, as the song reads—“Memories are treasures locked in my heart, I can keep evermore.” I do have very fond memories of my brother, Layton—some from long ago, during the Depression times, and of course of these last few years. And always, as I have him in my thoughts, I can see that smile on his face and know that he was getting ready to tease you about something. In later years our children looked forward to his visits, for they liked to have him tease them and would enjoy the attention he would give them. These last few years, as he would come out this way to check on his farms and livestock, he would stop in for a very short visit, but it was always so nice to have him come, as he always had a way of making the day more cheery. With his short “hello, how are you, kid?” He was greatly missed last August, and he will be missed this year, but I’m sure that he would be so happy to have his own family carry on for him. There comes a time for all of us when there is a break in the link of that chain, and we all have to weld it back together with memories and trying to live the lives that he will be proud to take us by the hand when we meet him, and he will say, “How are you, kid, sure is good to see you.” I send these few lines written this 16th day of July 1975 in memory of my dear brother—Layton Ott. Agnes By Deena Ott: I remember one time Grandpa and Grandma Ott had gotten back from Mexico and brought all the grandkids a present. On Thanksgiving Day we were all at Uncle Layton and Aunt Bettye’s house. It was snowing. All the little kids were in the living and out came Grandpa dressed up in a funny Santa Claus suit, with a paper sack hat, a big plastic nose with glasses on, and he passed out the presents. I remember how excited we all were at Grandpa and his Santa Claus suit. Grandpa was always doing something special, like when he worked at the tent factory, he gave me my first sleeping bag. He also made me a doll tent that was just like a big tent, with windows, except it was smaller. He was always playing games with us kids, like he’d put money in his hand behind his back and say, “Hey, diddle, diddle, what hand is the money in?” If we’d guess right, he’d give us the nickel or dine; even if we guessed wrong, he would still give us the money. Another game was the “chin-pie” game. He rubbed his whiskers on my cheeks and said, “Aren’t those good chin pies?” Deena By Rosalyn Ott: My Dad My Dad was jolly, My Dad was gay, My Dad was friendly To everyone, all the time—every day. My Dad was generous, My Dad was kind, My Dad was outspoken, And always spoke his mind. My Dad was honest, My Dad was true, My Dad had knowledge— More than some highly educated do. My Dad was simple, My Dad was plain, My Dad loved nature, All animals, and their terrain. My Dad loved his neighbors, My Dad loved his friends, He especially loved his family— With a love only Heaven sends. My Dad had religion, My Dad spread the word, My Dad loved the Church And let it be, so many people heard. All I have said, And more in my heart Are the very reasons he’s missed Since we’ve been apart. I’m so proud of this man And love him so much— You might ask— What was my Dad? A man, Who loved, Gave love, And was loved by all! He Was A Success !!!!!!!!!! Rosalyn--1975 By Jan Slade Ott: The first time I met Dad Ott, Jim was having a party at his home. There was a house full of people. He walked in and said to Jim, “Well, which one belongs to you?” From that day on he always made me feel welcome in his home. After Jim and I were married and Jim was going to school at Dixie, we played Pinochle with the folks a lot. I have never known anyone who would “shoot to the moon” all the time, and usually made it. When I graduated from business school at Cedar City, he gave me an extra nice sleeping bag. He said, “Now, kid, this is the best sleeping bag they make so take good care of it.” He always gave me the best. One year for Christmas I couldn’t decide what to get him for Christmas as we were going to school and didn’t have a lot of money. I knew how he loved house slippers. He would even wear them to the fields. I picked out a nice leather pair. When he opened them, he said, “Pretty fancy.” I told him they were just to wear in the house and not in the field. He laughed and said, “What good are they?” Whenever we would stop by and he would have them on he’d say, “Here’s my fancy house slippers—too fancy to wear outside.” When we lived in St. George and Deena was a baby, he dearly loved to stop by each morning to see her. If she wasn’t awake when he came, she was by the time he left. She rolled off the sofa when she was two months old. He gave me some money to, “Go buy that baby a chair so that wouldn’t happen again.” When we moved to Kanab, Jim and Dad Ott started ranching together. I couldn’t see where they were making much profit. When Layton (the son) was doing our income tax, I had kept records on everything that was for the ranch. I was telling Dad the list of things, and he said, “You can’t keep track of everything, like gas, or Jim will never make a profit on cows.” Then he said like he always said, “Kid, things will look better next year.” I always felt that we had a special relationship, but looking back I realized he had a special relationship with everyone, because he always made them feel special. Jan *************** MOTHERS DAY LETTERS TO LAYTON’S SISTERS (Written by Layton) Mothers Day 1974 Dear sister Rose and Garn, You may not be able to read this letter as you know how poor a writer I am, but just once in my life I want to write and tell you on my sister’s Mothers Day how much you have meant in our lives. You were so good to us at St. George and you and Pat seemed to get such a great friendship between you two. I just want to tell you this day I love my sisters and your missionary brother. Just want you to remember at this time I want you to know how much my sisters have meant in my life. So, on your Mothers Day, we just thank you for what you have done in our lives. You’ve been very close to us because of your sickness and living in St. George. So glad you are all feeling better, and we are happy to be seeing you soon. Then we can talk; you know how I can talk, but I just can’t write. We had so many wonderful experiences—so marvelous. I am so glad I did go on a mission and will be able to meet my mother as she wanted it so. Time moves on and we’ll be moving to Lovelock, Nevada. If you don’t write before the 1st of June, just address the letters to Lovelock, Nevada, general delivery. We’re kind of looking forward to going home. It’s been wonderful, but as it nears the end and our health could both be better, we’ll kind of be glad to get home and see all the folks. Like I say, I can’t write but can talk, and we have had many wonderful experiences—very outstanding things to tell you about. May our Heavenly Father watch over one of my wonderful sisters I have and her family. We love you very much and, on this Mothers Day, this letter from your missionary brother Layton and what you have meant to us in our lives. May God watch over you all always. Thanking you for coming to see us last summer. Love, Layton and Pat Mothers Day 1974 Dearest sisters in the little town that means so much to us, My sisters are so important to me and, it being Mothers Day and you are mothers, I guess you will have to try and make out this letter as I take after my own Grandfather Johnson in writing. I’m very poor at it, and it’s a job for me and I don’t do it too often. Pat does most of the letter writing, so please give her the credit in writing and working on me to write. It’s not that I don’t think of you often and, as the years go by, I don’t tell you enough about what you have meant to us. I sometimes think back on our childhood days and wish we could go back, maybe just for a little while. As time goes on, those days at Yellow Creek I have wished I had known what I know now and I may have done a little better about enjoying what we had there. This much, my sisters mean much in my life, and on this Mothers Day, quite late in life I want you to know just how much you mean and how you have helped me in shaping my life—the way you have lifted us up and helped me, so we thank you again. To all three of you that live in the little town of Tropic, we hope before long, if all is well, to be seeing you soon. I can’t write, but you know how I can talk. I ask our Father in Heaven to watch over you all and give you the things in life to help in health and the other things. Well, about a few of the things that are so outstanding, I have so much I could say but to write it is very hard for me. But last night we baptized two people. We worked so hard giving them lessons. It was worth all our mission, and I laid my hands on their heads and made them members of the true Church of Jesus Christ. Then we worked so hard to get a building, and with the help of us all, it looks like we’re going to make it. The branch up here is small and we have to work very hard with the members to help them realize all they should do, but as we meet in the little building—our little church—as we make it over it will be a nice one. Wish I could write about it, but I’ll wait and tell you later how the Lord helped us get it. I am glad I did get to go on a mission, and I’m so glad I waited and Pat could go with me, for I don’t know how I could have done without her to help me. I could talk by the hours the marvelous things that have happened, and then, again, I will be able to meet my mother up there and say, “I did it.” You all know how hard she hoped and I now know why. It looks like we will be going back to Lovelock for the last part of our mission. When we were sent to the Indian mission, there was one such a nice young woman that had gone to California and was not home. I think, if we find her back to her home in Lovelock, she will join the Church. She told her friend, if anyone made her a Mormon it would be Elder Ott. It sure made us feel good, and the mission president said we could go back there for the last, as we have to be out of the little cottage at Gold Run on the first of June. Once again, as I write the letter addressed to you, my younger sister, please let them all read and tell them it means the same. I love my sisters very much, so this letter is to all of you there. And please write; we need your letters. Love, Layton and Pat P.S. The new address at Lovelock will be General Delivery at Lovelock, Nevada, 89419. But don’t wait until then to write. We’ll be here until the first of June, so write here and don’t wait until then.

Memorial / Obituary / Personal History

Contributor: josephryanlaird Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

LIFE SKETCH OF JENIS LAYTON OTT AND BESSIE RUBY PATTERSON (Written by Bessie Ruby Patterson Ott) Layton’s father’s family, the Otts, were interested in agriculture, fruit and stock raising. His mother’s family, the Johnsons, were colonizers. They moved around considerably, settling new towns. Several places in southern Utah are named for them. Both the Otts and the Johnsons belonged to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. James Robert Ott (father of Layton) was born January 3, 1873 at Duncan’s Retreat, Washington County, Utah. Janet Matilda Johnson (Layton’s mother) was born January 13, 1879 at Hillsdale, Garfield County, Utah. The Ott family lost most of their farm in a flood once when the Virgin River went on the rampage; so they moved to Tropic, Utah. In their many moves, the Johnson family finally settled in Cannonville, Utah, about six miles from Tropic. Janet clerked in a store in Tropic, before her marriage, and no doubt she met her future husband, James Robert, there. James and Janet were married May 4, 1897 and made their home in Topic. They had eleven children. Two little girls died when they were small children. The rest grew to man and womanhood. The oldest son, Joseph Alma, died February 22, 1941, at the age of 43 years. The rest of the children are all living at this time, October 1, 1964. Layton’s brothers and sisters are as follows: Joseph Alma, Hannah Hope, Lydia Vilate, Susan Janet, James Alvin, Jenis Layton, Louie Dugard, Wallace Moses, Sara, Iris Rose, and Agnes Johnson Ott. Layton was born June 11, 1906 at Cannonville, Garfield County, Utah. When he was only a few months old he had pneumonia and whooping cough. His life was feared for with both sicknesses, but with good care and faith, his life was spared. About this time his father was called on a mission to the Southern States, and even though Layton had had the pneumonia, the mission call must be heeded, so he went. In the family history book is a card Layton received from his father on his second birthday. His childhood playmates were Orlin Hatch, Bernard Johnson, Rex Jolley, and Elmo Cope. In the daytime, their favorite game was baseball, which they played in the dead-end street by the Ott home. At night, all the neighborhood children gathered, a bonfire was built, the children played games such as Prisoner’s Base, Run-sheep-run, Black-black, and the Bladder, etc. Sometimes they roasted chickens, potatoes, apples, and even prickly pears over the fire. The prickly pears did not prove very good food for them. They became very ill after eating them. The children had to be resourceful and make their own recreation, but they had more fun than most children. They made balls from twine strung around on a cork, then sewed securely. The ball bat was a limb from a tree. Layton especially liked to make high stilts and walk on them. Pine nut gathering was a favorite experience in the fall. Sometimes they got pine burrs, buried them in the ground, and built a fire over them. Then they could get the pine nuts out easily; for the fire caused the burrs to burst open and roasted the pine nuts too, so they had a delicious flavor. Layton’s grandfather Ott enjoyed playing the fiddle, and entertained the family. The Ott children often stayed with their grandparents while their father and mother were out to the ranch. Once Layton told his grandfather he knew his four times tables. His grandfather said, “What is four times six?” Layton was proud and happy to show him he knew it was 24. Then his grandfather would ask, “What is six times four?” And Layton replied, “I don’t know my sixes yet.” Then how his grandfather would laugh. Grandmother Ott was a nice kind lady. She always had cookies or something for the children to eat. From early spring until late in the fall, all the family lived out to the ranch at Yellow Creek, or Georgetown. Each boy had his own melon patch, so he could get a melon anytime he wanted when they were in season. It has been said of Layton, he ate so many melons, and so much juice ran onto his overalls, he could just step out of them and they would stand alone. One time James and Layton were told to weed a patch of beans. The weeds were so thick, it was a discouraging job, so they sat down to rest under a tree. Their older brother Joe came along and gave each boy a hard kick. The little boys thought they were badly mistreated, for their parents did nothing about their brother kicking them, so they decided to leave home. They walked quite a distance over hill and down dale. When it began to get dark they thought perhaps they should return to the ranch after all. It was about midnight when they arrived, having walked 10-12 miles. Their parents were very worried, and really scolded Joe. When Layton was about eleven and James nearly thirteen years old, they were making a new irrigation ditch, for the floods had piled rocks, gravel, etc. in the old ditch. A pick had been left up at the head of the ditch, a distance of about 1 ½ miles. When darkness came, Joe dared the boys to go to the head of the ditch and bring the pick back. Layton said he dared go, so he started out and eventually returned with the pick. When his father and brothers saw his footprints the next morning, they decided Layton had really jumped instead of walked after the pick. Often coyotes proved a nuisance around the ranch; taking turkeys, chickens, and even calves. Joe and James set traps but were not able to catch a coyote. Layton studied the tracks of the coyote, he noticed it always went in a particular place. He put a trap on the trail and caught the coyote—outwitting this cunning animal. Later on, he became more and more adept at catching wild animals, which he trapped for bounty and to sell the furs. While the family lived at the ranch, their cousins often came to visit on weekends. The children would swim in the swimming hole, ride the pony, hike in the hills, hunt for rocks, build roads, and haul wood on the wagon their grandfather Johnson had given them. A good deal of Layton’s time was also spent teasing the girls in the family. Layton helped with the chores, getting the cows at night. He also helped to milk them. Once when James and Layton were left alone at the ranch to do the chores, they decided to make hot cakes for breakfast. They thought their mother had been too conservative by using only part cream in the batter. They reasoned that all cream would make them much better. Naturally, the hot cakes were so rich, both boys got sick; then they knew that their mother had been wise in using part milk. Layton cared for the chickens, pigs, and any other work a child of his size could do. He earned money shucking corn for neighbors when he was about 8 or 10 years old. He used the money to buy clothes. Most of his clothes were homemade, so he was proud when he could buy some “store clothes”. When Layton was seventeen, his father was called to Henrieville to be the bishop there. Neither his mother, who was usually very religious, nor any of the children went for several months. For Henrieville, to them, was like Nazareth. They wondered if any good could come from Henrieville. After Layton went there, however, he found the young people sociable, and he joined in their fun and had good times. Layton went to Tropic High School two years, then to Panguitch High School. The principal of the latter school, a Mister Poulsen, was one of his outstanding teachers. Layton graduated from Panguitch High School in 1925. The next year he went to Cedar City to attend the Branch Agricultural College. Mr. Lyman, who taught sheep husbandry, was his favorite teacher that year. As he grew older, he worked for an oil drilling company, and a road construction company, and did some sheep herding during the summers to help himself with his schooling. During his year at the Branch Agricultural College in Cedar City, he got up at 4 a.m. to milk cows for his board and room. The board was very inferior—leftovers from the family—so he decided to try something else. Now his aptness at trapping wild animals stood him in good stead. After school, on Saturdays and whenever time permitted, he was busy looking for likely places to set traps. When school was over that year, he had enough money on hand to buy a little car, referred to as a “bug” in those days. He was really proud to have a car of his own. Later, after he was married, and during the time of the Second World War, when the bounty on coyotes was six dollars, Layton trapped and made as high as one-hundred dollars some days on furs. He had some exciting experiences at times. Most wild animals are afraid of people but if they get cornered, they fight for their lives. Cougars, however, seem to be man’s natural enemy. Layton had a narrow escape one day when he followed a cougar track. Layton’s first experience learning to trap was with squirrels and chipmunks. The family had a dog which they called Old Ring, who liked to chase chipmunks up trees. He would stay under the tree barking until James and Layton arrived; then they would shoot them with flippers. They began to trap squirrels and chipmunks; they buried them, and the coyotes dug them up, so they set traps and caught the coyotes. They hit a coyote with a rock and numbed it. Thinking it was dead, they carried it to show their father. When they laid it down to let him see, it ran away. They were very disappointed but undaunted. Layton kept trying to become quite successful trapping these wild animals. After he was married he continued to trap, and had good success, but had a few frightening experiences. One morning Layton took a bird dog and a hound to Cope Canyon, north of Tropic. It has snowed a little the night before. He found a fresh cougar track. The hound could go faster than Layton could go on a horse, until he got on the south side of a slope; then Layton would catch up, for the snow had melted, and he could track better than the hound. The bird dog helped quite a bit, for he had a good nose. Finally Layton got out on a high point where he could look all over Tropic. All at once the hound changed his bay, and bounded off. In a very few minutes he was so far away, he could hardly be heard. The going was so rough and slow, traveling over hills and down into ravines, Layton could not hear the hound anymore. He followed the cougar tracks the best he could. Imagine his disappointment when, after about 30 minutes, the old hound came back. But as soon as he got to Layton, he began to bay again, and ran back in the direction he had come from. After about two miles of hard struggling, Layton came to a small pinion pine about 8 to ten feet tall. Again he was disappointed for he knew a cougar would not be in that small of a tree. However, the hound left there and went up the hillside to a big yellow pine, and began to bay again. So Layton hurried up to that tree, looking up in the top, expecting to see a cougar up there. A big limb, just above his head went unnoticed, for a lion would not be there so close to the ground. Imagine his terror when he glanced in this direction, ad saw a big lion stretched out on this limb only about two feet from his head. Layton, still on the horse, moved away as quickly as possible, looked the situation over, and decided to just wound the lion, to see if the bird dog would help the hound tree it again. He was trying to train the bird dog to hunt animals instead of birds. When the lion jumped out of the tree, the bird dog left like a streak of lightning. The hound and the cougar began to fight. It seemed the hound was willing to keep fighting even if it meant his life. The cougar was scratching the dog terribly. In a matter of minutes the cougar would have killed the dog. Layton had to take a chance on a lucky shot. He aimed and killed the cougar. He vowed never again to take a chance like that. He also decided it was useless to try to make a hound out of a bird dog. He liked to ride horseback in the hills surrounding the towns where he lived. The beauties of nature, the freedom of the country that was inhabited, gave him the feeling that he was “king of all he surveyed”, as one writer has said. He loved the stories of Harold Bell Wright and James Oliver Curwood. From the time of his early youth Layton made friends easily with his sociable manner, smiling countenance and good nature. Bessie Ruby Patterson was born in West Point, Davis County, Utah, June 2, 1907. She was blessed August 4, 1907, and baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on June 13, 1915, in a canal in West Point. She attended church from her earliest recollections. She felt her early childhood was somewhat uneventful, partly because of the lack of children near her age in the family or in the neighborhood. Her parents lived across the street from Uncle John Singleton, her mother’s brother. Their children were older than Bessie, but their grandson, Ivan Jones, spent most of the summers with them, so he was her main playmate. Uncle John had a store; the children had what candy they wanted, because Ivan helped himself to it. Bessie’s brother, Ray, lived one half mile west of the parental home. His daughter, Mabel, was 1 ½ years younger than Bessie and was another playmate. Bessie liked to go there to play and remembers relishing a bread, spread with lard and sugar, Mabel’s mother fixed for them. After starting to school in West Point, Emerald Holt was Bessie’s best friend. In those days there was a beginner’s class, similar to the kindergarten of later years. Bessie liked school and learning, to which may be attributed the fact that she “skipped” the second and eighth grades, even though she often had to stay out of school because of illness. She began the eighth grade, but the teacher, Henry Bybee, suggested to her mother that she be sent to the ninth grade. So she went to Syracuse to little North Davis High School. This year she rode horseback to school, a distance of about two or three miles. Because she was younger than the other students, and very shy, she didn’t fare very well socially. She remembers going to a matinee dance. An older boy from Clinton asked her to dance. She refused because she didn’t know how to dance very well and was too bashful. When Lee Thurgood asked her, she accepted, for she knew Lee. They usually rode to and from school together. The next year she was fourteen. Her mother thought it best for her to live with her sister, Grace Jones, in Salt Lake City and attend Granite High School. She really liked that big school and made many friends. She liked to play basketball, and was chosen captain of the team, in the class of 100 pupils. She attended MIA in West Point and Salt Lake. She used to worry because she did not know how to dance. Her mother said, “If you never find anything harder to learn than that, you will be lucky.” She was fifteen years old before she learned, but that year she and her friend won the prize for being the best dancers at a Mutual dance. Was she ever happy about that! In 1922 the Patterson family had a new brick house built in Ogden at 334 34th Street. In Ogden Bessie hated to leave Granite, but she went along, and spent her junior year at Weber, which was then a high school and a junior college. At the end of the year the LDS Church decided to discontinue the high school, and make Weber strictly college. Those students who had fifteen units of credit, could go into college the following year. Her mother called Dr. Edward Rich, the family doctor, and asked what he thought about Bessie’s entering college, and he said, “She’s too little and slimsy to go to college.” Ogden High School graduation requirements were different than Weber’s; it was impossible to get all the required subjects in, in one year to graduate. There seemed no alternative but for her to go to college. So she started, at the age of 16. She became run-down and had to quit school. The first money Bessie earned was made by working in a tomato factory, where tomatoes were canned. The first fall she worked in Syracuse, when she was fifteen years old; and later in West Point. With the money earned, she bought clothes to go to Weber. Bessie and Opal Allred were Sunday School teachers in the Ogden First Ward where they lived, when Bessie was about fifteen years of age. That year, or the following one, they were members of the Junior Mutual Class, who considered they had a perfect teacher in Mrs. Walter Wright. After she and her husband were tragically killed in a flood near Farmington, Utah, the class had another outstanding teacher in Mrs. Conrad Jenson. She had traveled in Europe and made the class very interesting. After Bessie discontinued school, the year she was sixteen, she had a patriarchal blessing, which promised her that though she had been temporarily deprived of going to school, she would continue her education as she grew in years, which proved very true. Returning to Weber the next fall, Bessie resumed her work and graduated in the spring of 1926, and received a certificate to teach. Teaching jobs were scarce then. Dr. Edward Rich, who was probably on the State Board of Education and had a lot of prestige, interceded for Bessie, and helped her obtain a teaching position in Henrieville, Garfield County, Utah. At that time she had not been further south than Provo. It was an exciting experience to take the train to Marysvale, and be out on her own for the first time, at the age of nineteen. This Marysvale train was only a branch line, very dirty and pokey. There were several teachers on the train going to various Southern Utah towns. They were all young and unmarried, and everyone enjoyed the trip. Arriving in Marysvale, there was no means of transportation on. They hired a truck to take them to Panguitch, where they spent the night in a hotel (perhaps the Cameron). The next morning Bessie met Superintendent Gardner, then went on her way alone, on the mail truck bound for Henrieville. The scenery was vastly different from that of Northern Utah. The mail driver pointed out the different places of interest along the way. When they got to Henrieville the first building to meet the eye was the school, which was in reality “a little red school house”. The driver took her to the home of Bishop James R. Ott, the boarding place recommended to her by Superintendent Gardner. On the Ott porch a large group of children were assembled. Bessie thought, “What a large family these Otts must have”. Later, she learned that most of them were children from the town who had come to see the new teacher. Alma Fletcher, who Bessie knew slightly before, was the other teacher. He boarded with the Ott family too, and taught grades 5 through 8 while Bessie taught grades 1 through 4. It was rather hard to adjust to this little town. She hadn’t been used to speaking to people she didn’t know in Ogden, so some people thought she was “stuck up”. The Ott family who were at home consisted of the father, Bishop James R. Ott, who had been called from Tropic to be bishop of the Henrieville Ward; the mother, Janet Ott, and the following children: James (age 21)was away herding sheep most of the time; Layton (age 20) came home in about October; Louie (age 17) attended school in Panguitch this year; Wallace (age 15) a very shy big boy; Sara (age 13) with whom Bessie shared a room; Rose (age 11): and Agnes (age 8) was in the fourth grade in Bessie’s room. Alma Fletcher, who they called Fraz, had a Ford coupe. He suggested going to Bryce Canyon on one of the first Sundays the teachers were in Henrieville. A relative of Bishop Ott’s had died and the funeral was being held in Tropic. Alma and Bessie took Bishop Ott to Tropic, then went on their way to Bryce Canyon. After visiting the canyon, they decided they better go back to the funeral. As they sat in the funeral, it became very warm, and Bessie felt faint, so she asked Fraz for his keys and started out. The last thing she remembered was trying to open the car door. The next thing she knew she was lying on the ground, with what seemed to her a large group of men standing around. They probably rushed from the church when they saw Bessie fall. She heard one ask, “Who is she?” Another replied, “It’s the Henrieville schoolteacher.” She was taken to the Richard Ott home, feeling very embarrassed at having been introduced in such a manner. The first time Bessie saw Layton was one evening when the family and boarders were having supper. He had been away herding sheep, and came home for the remainder of the winter. He wore a big floppy cowboy hat. Bessie never cared for western apparel, but these two young people seemed attracted to each other from the beginning. He was a smiling, happy good- natured person; although not tall, was dark and handsome. His mother’s nickname for him was “Sunshine” and it seemed to fit. Fraz, Layton and Bessie went to the dances in Tropic every Friday night. They had real good times. Inasmuch as all the Tropic teachers were unmarried, the Henrieville and Tropic teachers had a lot of fun together. After the fall institute in about October, this group of teachers from the two towns took a little trip to Cedar Breaks, Zion and Grand Canyon. When they were eating grapes near St. George, and visited the temple there, little did Bessie think she would be living a few blocks from this place. The Tropic teachers were Rowena Gale, whom we called “Tiny”, Horace Bigler, Amy Howard, Andrew Jones, and Sylvia Woodward. Often, after the Friday night dances, Tiny would go to Henrieville for the weekend. On Saturday she and Fraz, Layton and Bessie, or “Pat” as she was called, would go hiking, horseback riding, etc. Very often, during the evenings they played Rook. Bessie hadn’t had much experience before, but she learned with lots of practice. That winter was a very enjoyable one. The conveniences of the city were lacking, but things more than compensated for them. A play “Her Honor the Mayer” was presented in the ward. Bessie was “Her Honor”. Bessie and Layton were so busy doing things, they seemed to have no interest in going with anyone except each other. When school was over, Bessie’s mother and dad came after her to take her home. She shed a few tears as the car took her away from the place she had had during such an enjoyable winter. If her parents noticed her tears, they said nothing. A few weeks after she got home, Bessie’s mother died with appendicitis (April 29, 1927). The earth seemed to have been moved from under this girl; she felt so forlorn and dejected. The following year she taught at West Point and boarded with her sister—Minnie and Delpha. West Point offered little recreation, she missed the good times she had had the year before, and did not adjust at all well to the loss of her mother. Her father married Amelia Barker that year, and when she went home for the weekend, Amelia acted very strangely—she kept her bedroom door locked, and when Bessie asked for some sheets for her bed, she was told, “If you want some sheets, go and buy them.” It was still the same house, furniture, sheets, etc. that her mother had had, but it was plain there was no place for Bessie there, so she moved all her belongings to her sister Delpha’s. Time proved this Amelia only married her father for financial gain. She made life so miserable for him, he was glad to give her a substantial sum to be rid of her. Bessie applied for work at the telephone company the next summer, so she could stay at home with her father, but when they noted two years college, she was not hired. Then she applied at the Salt Lake Telephone Company, leaving off the college credit from the application, she was hired. It was rather an interesting job. She worked nights and during lunch hour she and her friends danced. Sometimes they went to Utah Lake swimming. Layton came up to Ogden and Salt Lake occasionally, and the two corresponded until September, when Layton came again. They decided to get married. So on the 19th of September, 1929, they were married in the Salt Lake Temple. Minnie and Henry Lambert, sister and brother-in-law, went through the temple with them; and the family had a reception in their honor at the Patterson home in Ogden. When they went to Henrieville, Layton’s parents had another reception for them. They made their home in Henrieville in an unfinished house, with only a sub-floor; unplastered walls, and no floor coverings. An old -fashioned hearth stove was used for heating and cooking. Homemade table and bench were other kitchen furniture they used. There was no electricity or plumbing. Water was carried from the canal about a block from the house. In February Bessie went to Ogden, bought a bedroom suite, a used coal range, some chairs, and linoleum and got a table from her father’s house. About a year later they bought Allen Smith’s home, katty-cornered across the street from the school. It was a tall, old unpainted thing that used to have the reputation of being haunted. Layton and Bessie were not afraid of ghosts. They made the most of what they had and were quite content. Drinking water was hauled in barrels from the creek now. In summer, it often rained and made the water muddy, but it was all there was so they used it. One time Bessie’s nephew, Max Jones, brought some friends down from Salt Lake. Layton put some water into a wash basin, from the barrel, so they could wash. One of the boys said, “Where shall I put this dirty water?” Layton just smiled and threw the water out, and gave them some clear water they used for drinking. Layton herded sheep during the lambing season, and during the summer of 1930 Ray Patterson, Bessie’s brother, came down and took Layton to West Point. Layton worked in the fields picking tomatoes. During the night of September 4, a terrible wind came up and blew the telephone lines down. It was apparent that Layton and Bessie were soon to become parents, so Delpha and her husband Joseph Perkins went to Ogden, a distance of twelve miles, to get the doctor. In the early morning the baby was born; Layton Patterson he was called. He was born September 5, 1930, at his aunt Minnie’s home in West Point. That fall Layton bought a used Model-T Ford truck, purchased a new water barrel, 200 pounds of flour, 100 pounds of sugar, and a few groceries. They were very proud of their possessions. The truck had side curtains, but no heater. They could only travel the warmest part of the day, because of the baby. They stayed at Bessie’s sister, Grace Jones, the first night; the next day they went to Springville and stayed that night at Layton’s Aunt Mary Hatch’s place. The third day they went to Junction and stayed the night with another of Layton’s aunts—Saraphine Anderson. The fourth day brought them to their home in Henrieville. Layton herded sheep the first few summers, ran a little farm in Georgetown, and trapped coyotes and bobcats in the winter. They raised a big garden, which supplied them with vegetables for summer use and some to put in bottles for winter. Sometimes Bessie made quilts and quilt tops, which she traded for fruit to preserve for winter. They had a cow which furnished them milk, cream and butter; and they had their own chickens. About this time Layton served as assistant Sunday School Superintendent. Although Bessie was not afraid of ghosts, she was afraid of drunken men. One night, about 2 o’clock, when she was alone, except for little Layton, she was awakened by a noise. At first she thought it was the children over on the school ground. She got up to investigate and there was a carload of drunken men in front of our house. One of them was out of the car and said, “I’m going in.” Bessie did not know whether he meant in the house, or in the car. There was no back door on the house, except a screen, for the weather was hot, and when the door was open, it shut off the ventilation because it opened against the hall door, so Layton had taken it off before going to the sheep herd. Bessie stood by the window petrified with fear. Finally the man got into the car and they drove away. Another experience that happened while they were living in Henrieville was when they were driving toward Cannonville and were nearly out of gas. They came to a slight hill and nearly stopped. Bessie thought if she jumped out and gave a little push, they could get over the incline, and be able to make it into town. They were going faster than she thought. As she jumped out, the movement of the car caused her to fall, then Layton had to stop for her. They managed to get to the store where they sold gas though. Eliza Moore was the Henrieville ward organist, but often she failed to appear at church, so it fell the lot of Bessie to play the organ or piano for Sunday School and church. Other church jobs Bessie held in Henrieville were Primary President and literary class leader in Relief Society. A few good friends always make life more enjoyable. There were two that were especially good friends of Bessie-—Vera Quilter and Annie Colvin. Annie was not a permanent resident, but came in the winter while her husband, Orlin, taught school. These three women had a sort of club, going to each other’s homes to sew, etc. In March 1937, Layton got a job working on the farm of Lamoni Holbrook in West Point. Now Layton, Bessie and little Layton lived in Mrs. Knighton’s home near the Holbrook farm. On Mothers Day, Layton Patterson went out and picked his mother a pretty bouquet of Mrs. Knighton’s tulips. The mother was never more appreciative of anything than she was of those flowers, but Mrs. Knighton was not happy at all to have her tulips picked. That summer Layton and Bessie bought a small home across the street from Bessie’s brother Ray. Layton bought a large truck and started working for himself hauling tomatoes, beets, etc. During the beet season, he was taken very ill. Ray and Bessie took him to the hospital with a nearly ruptured appendix. When Dr. Junior Rich operated on him, he discovered a growth on his intestines that he thought might be malignant. The appendix was laid on the outside of his abdomen, and the incision clamped together. The test for malignancy was sent to Salt Lake; it came back negative; the operation was then completed, and he soon recovered. In the late winter or early spring this little family went back to Henrieville and Layton began raising mink. They lived in part of his mother’s house, for they had sold theirs when they moved. When summer came, Layton contracted tularemia from the rabbits he caught to feed the mink. He was very ill. Bessie’s sister and her husband, Grace and Joe Jones, came and took them to Ogden. Dr. C. N. Jenson gave Layton medicine to counteract the disease. He returned to Henrieville, but Bessie and son Layton remained in West Point, for another baby was expected, and the nearest doctor by Henrieville was more than fifty miles away. On October 1, or thereabouts, Bessie went to stay with her brother Leonard and his wife Elda to await the baby. Little Layton stayed in West Point with his Aunt Minnie. October 12, 1938, Elna took Bessie to the Dee Hospital in Ogden where James Dale was born. Layton could not come because of his own illness, so the little family was scattered. Layton got a job with the Federal Writer’s Project collecting pioneer histories and folk tales of Garfield County. Layton came after his little family and they went back to Henrieville and continued to live in part of his mother’s house. The next spring Wallace Ott bought the parental home and Layton’s family moved into the Alfred Quilter home where they stayed until 1940. Then Bessie and the two boys returned to West Point, as Layton now had a job as government trapper and would be away from home most of the time. Besides, another child was on its way. Layton thought he would join the family a little later, but he could not decide to quit trapping, for jobs were scarce. It was lonely for all of them, for Layton only got home once in a while—for Thanksgiving, Christmas, etc. On March 28, Bessie knew she must go to the hospital. Layton Patterson was in bed sick. Jimmie Dale was screaming because he did not want to be left with Aunt Lizzie Patterson. Nevertheless Bessie had to leave. Rosalyn was born that afternoon. Bessie was under anesthetic, and as she was regaining consciousness she heard Dr. Jenson say, “It’s a girl, Bessie.” She thought to herself, “I’m not going to pay any attention, for maybe it isn’t true.” She had wanted a girl so much. For a month or more, Rosalyn did not do at all well. She slept constantly. She could not be awakened to eat, even when washed with a cold, wet washcloth. She was taken to the doctor, who told Bessie she must get her to eat or they would have to put her in the hospital and feed her through the veins. She developed jaundice, her skin turned yellow. After some time though, she started to do better and became quite healthy. Because Layton could not seem to get to West Point to live, in the fall of 1941, they decided to sell the West Point house, and buy the old Myron Bybee place in the northern end of Tropic. It was a well-built house, but very old and run down. Layton and Bessie knocked off the old plaster, and put on plasterboard. The inside became quite comfortable, but the outside still looked terrible—unpainted and forlorn-looking. While they lived in Tropic, Layton gradually acquired land and cattle, until he was doing well in this line. The fall of 1942, there was a teacher shortage. Charles Wintch, Layton’s brother-in-law, was on the school board. He asked Bessie if she would go to Henrieville to teach. She was glad to, for the 1930s had been Depression years, and everyone was “hard pressed” for money. Each year Bessie thought she would teach this one-year and buy something they wanted, then quit; until the years added up, and she continued teaching years later. One of her pupils, Orla Gay Zabriskie, wrote a theme about Bessie for her high school English class. About 1944, Ray Patterson bought their land in West Point. Bessie’s father had deeded ten acres to Bessie and her sisters. Layton and Bessie had bought two other shares. With the money from the land, they bought the Jesse Jolley home. It was a nice big house in the middle of the town. Bessie liked living in Tropic better then. She continued to teach, sometimes in Tropic, and sometimes in Henrieville. She was organist in the Tropic Jr. Sunday School, and later organist in the Sr. Sunday School. Annie and Orlin Colvin had moved to Tropic too, and Bessie and Annie were the ward choristers. Bessie was also organist in the Primary. Each summer she took correspondence courses, and in the winter extension classes. Two summers she attended summer school in Cedar City. Rosalyn went along, and they lived in the dormitory in a housekeeping apartment. Rosalyn, with other children of student mothers, took dancing and singing. Bessie got her B. S. degree June 4, 1951. Layton gave her a diamond ring for graduation. He was chosen counselor to Bishop Bernard Johnson. Orlin Colvin was the other counselor. Allie (whose real name was Alice) and Bessie were good friends, and Bernard and Layton had grown up together. They were over to Panguitch to Conference the day the new bishopric was selected. Allie whispered and told Bessie that Bernard had been asked to be bishop, and he had chosen Layton for a counselor. All through the morning meeting and during lunch, she might have told Layton. But she thought Bernard should be the one to tell him. Bernard didn’t get a chance, so it was a shock to Layton during the afternoon session, to have his name read off as Bernard’s counselor. In fact, it was such a shock that Layton’s rheumatism left his foot, as he sat there with his shoe off. After Layton Patterson’s graduation from Tropic High School, he attended college two years at Cedar City, then he accepted a call to the Central States Mission. He was disappointed in being called to a place so near home, but during his mission he met, converted and fell in love with Bettye Byrd. She came to Tropic and visited the Ott family for a few weeks. When Layton’s mission was completed, the family took Bettye to Ogden to meet him. They were married June 30, 1952 in the Logan Temple. That evening, a reception was held for them in his Aunt Delpha’s pretty yard. The next day they all went home to Tropic. James Robert Ott (Layton Patterson’s grandfather) died suddenly following an illness the family did not realize was extreme. His death occurred July 4, 1952. The invitations for a reception for the newlyweds, in Tropic, had all been sent. There was no way of letting people know, so the reception was held as scheduled. Bessie had some real help from Areta Stewart, Mabel Ott and her daughter Rella, and Virginia Ott. During the time Bessie lived and later taught in Henrieville, she did not feel the Henrieville people really liked her. She felt like an outsider. But at the reception for Layton and Bettye, practically the whole town of Henrieville came. It was very gratifying. Since then, Bessie has seen some of the Henrieville people, and received letters and cards, so these people have a special place in her heart. Too, she learned that happiness is not measured in dollars and cents. While they lived in Tropic, they still raised good gardens. Bessie bottled all kinds of vegetables, meat and fruit. She often went into the hills with Layton to get wood for fuel and also to cut cedar posts, which he sold. Sometimes she helped her husband with the mowing and raking of hay. She drove the tractor while Layton ran the mower and rake. While Layton was in the bishopric, Tropic erected a large recreation hall adjoining the church. This bishopric was released six years from the day they were appointed. Later, Bernard and Allie moved to Farmington, Utah. On November 21, 1960, Orlin Colvin died, and Annie got a teaching position and bought a home in Layton, Utah, across the street from her daughter Merlene. In August 1953, Layton and Bessie sold their home in Tropic and bought a brick one in St. George, at 78 East 300 South Street. Areta Stewart helped move. She and Bessie went with Dean Hafen (a fruit and vegetable peddler from Dixie who sold his produce in Tropic and vicinity). They brought most of the furniture, except the heaviest things like the piano, refrigerator, etc. They arrived in St. George about 10 o’clock at night. The lights had not been turned on, but an outdoor light across the street shown in the living room so they could see well enough to pile the furniture in. That night Areta and Bessie stayed at Areta’s mother’s home, and the next day they arranged the furniture in the various rooms. Layton was working on the East Fork forest, so he did not get in on the moving job. Rosalyn, Jimmie Dale and their mother were in St. George for the beginning of school, but Layton came only on weekends until his forest job was finished in the fall. It was a discouraged trio who met him on his first weekend in St. George. Bessie had a much larger group of children to teach than she was used to in Tropic, and the heat was intense. Rosalyn’s first words to her dad were, “This house is ‘buggy’.” She was nearly petrified with fear of the many and various kinds of bugs which thrived in this warm climate, and which they had not seen before. Jimmie Dale did not like it here, and wanted to go back to Tropic. He soon adjusted, for he was a good ball player and runner (on the track team) and made many friends. His Uncle James Ott taught at Woodward, where he went to school. He introduced him to David Welch—head of student athletics. They became good friends. Toward the close of school that year, he was chosen “most popular boy” in school. It took Rosalyn longer to adjust. She still wanted to go back to Tropic. The following summer she stayed at Tropic with her dad, in the old post office building, as he was still working on the forest there. After that she began to like St. George. When she was in the tenth grade she was chosen queen at the FFA Ball, and during her senior year in high school, she was princess of the Dixie Homecoming. After Layton and Bettye’s marriage, they lived in Salt Lake. Layton attended the University of Utah, and both worked part-time. Boys were expected to go into the army for training for two years. Layton expected to be called anytime, so he decided to go voluntarily in 1953. They were expecting a baby. They came to St. George, where their first child was born November 11, 1953, and a few days later Layton left for Fort Ord, California. Bettye and the baby, Debra Kaye, stayed with Layton’s parents while he was in basic training; after that Bettye went with him to Virginia, where he spent some time in the army. After his release from the army, Layton continued his studies and graduated from the University of Utah as an honor student. From this school he went to the University of California at Los Angeles. His son, Stephen Layton, was born in Pleasanton, California, and Lorraine (or Lorie) was born in Los Angeles, California. Layton received his Masters degree from UCLA and also received his CPA. In the 1964 thirteenth edition of “World Who’s Who in Commerce and Industry” appears the following sketch: Ott, Layton Patterson, accountant; born, Westpoint, Utah, September 5, 1930; son of J. Layton and Bessie (Patterson) Ott; B. S. degree, University of Utah, 1956; MBA degree, University of California, Los Angeles, 1957; married Bettye Jean Byrd, June 30, 1952; children, Debra, Stephen, Lorraine, and Vickie Lynn. Instructor, Accounting, University of California, Los Angeles, 1956-57; Chairman, Accounting Department, Stevens Henagar College, Salt Lake City, 1957-60; Secretary-treasurer; Controller, Montek, Inc. Salt Lake City 1958-? Instructor, Accounting, University of Utah, 1960-? Management consultant, director, Trans-continental Investment Company; Secretary, director, Utah Palisades, Inc. Universal Copiers, Inc. Served with army of United States 1953-55. Certified Public Accountant, Utah. Member, American Institute of Accountants, National Society of Business Budgeting, American Accounting Association, Delta Gamma Sigma. Republican. Member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Home: 1378 North 550 East, Bountiful, Utah. Office: 4438 South State Street, Salt Lake City, Utah. In the St. George 4th Ward, Bessie was Jr. Sunday School coordinator, Jr. Sunday School organist, Relief Society Work Director, and person in charge of projects. The year after they moved to St. George, Layton and Bessie joined the square dance club, and really enjoyed square dancing. They attended a jamboree at Needles, California with the Clair Stirlings and the Vivian Leanys. April 27, 1959, Layton had a heart attack and they had to quit dancing. They bought Clair Stirling’s farm at Leeds, and Layton began raising calves. He was not able to do hard work. James Dale (Jim or Jimmie) had joined the army and was in Virginia at this time. Then he was transferred to Camp Erwin, near Barstow, California the summer of 1959. The following winter he was sent to Anchorage, Alaska, where he remained until his release. After Jim’s release from the army, he returned home and continued his studies at Dixie College. That year Janna Deen Slade from Kirtland, New Mexico, was attending Dixie also. They became engaged and were married May 4, 1962. Janna’s parents held a reception for them in Kirtland, and Jim’s parents held openhouse in St. George. Another openhouse was held in their honor at the home of Jim’s brother and sister-in-law, Layton and Bettye Ott, in Bountiful. Their first child, Denna Kyle Ott, was born December 13, 1962. In August 1960 Bessie had a slight heart attack, and missed the first week of school. She taught the remainder of the year until April 11, when she was taken to the hospital with a heart attack the doctor termed “myocardial insufficiency”. Rosalyn attended college at Utah State University in Logan, in 1960, and the fall quarter of the next year. The winter quarter she came home and attended Dixie College. She decided she did not want to go to college, so she became an airline stewardess for Bonanza Airlines in April 1961. She went to Phoenix, Arizona, for training and was stationed there for a while. She worked about one year for Bonanza Airlines, then she went to Europe with some other girls. When she returned she worked for a travel agency in San Francisco for a while, then she attended the University of Utah. While there she got a chance to learn to be a dance instructor at Arthur Murray’s Dance Studio in Salt Lake City. She was made an instructor after some time; then worked part-time as instructor, and part-time as interviewer for this studio, where she made very good progress. She was given a trophy, which read: Arthur Murray winter interviewing contest 1964 3rd Place Analyst Rosalyn Ott This was a great compliment to her, to get 3rd place in all the Arthur Murray Studios when she had been working at this particular job a short time. She met Jacques (Jack) DeBeve while working at Arthur Murray studio. He also got recognition in this same contest—he got 1st place, as interviewer. Rosalyn and Jacques were married. Her mother gave a trousseau tea in her honor July 5, 1964, and her brother and sister-in-law, Layton and Bettye Ott, had a reception for them July 18, 1964 at their home in Bountiful. August 15, 1958 Layton and Bettye’s 4th child was born, a girl whom they named Vickie Lynn. Layton Patterson needed help, so his mother went and took care of the other children while Bettye was in the hospital. The first few years Bessie and Layton lived in St. George, they belonged to a group consisting of Minnie and Ferrell Jolley, Beulah and Bill Lamb, and Lois and Ernie Wells. The women all taught together. This group celebrated each other’s birthdays and anniversaries. As time went on Ferrell seemed to fit in less and less, but for Minnie’s sake, they still associated together. Then Minnie was killed in a car accident in August 1959. After that Layton and Bessie associated with two other groups; one consisting of Chester and Nola Jones, Vivian and LaFave Leany, Lois and Ernie Wells. This group began playing rook, then the Joneses introduced them to the game of pinochle, so that was the game they usually played. The other group consisted of Verna and George Schmutz, Lois and Ernie Wells, Beulah and Bill Lamb, and Birdie and Les Cooper. Birdie taught the women to knit; the men either visited or played a game. Sometimes the group sang songs they composed about each other. Here is a song about Layton and Bessie: (Layton had mistakenly hauled a wrong calf with one of his own, so the group made the most of it). Tune—Bye Bye Blackbird Layton’s full of care and woe, waiting here feeling low. Bye, Bye Blackbird. “Keep the home fires bright for me, I’ll be back, don’t you see?” Bye, Bye Blackbird. When the sheriff knows and understands me, then he’ll know that the calf came willingly, so he’ll make the sentence light, I’ll be home late tonight—Sheriff bye, bye. Bessie’s waiting patiently, knitting there, pearling here, welcome home Layton. She’s tended cows and set them free, so the law won’t come and see, more calves roaming. Now she helps her boss with all his troubles, zippers, zippers, working on the double (this was about his work at the Hawthorne Company where they made tents and sleeping bags). She can light the light at night, knowing Layton’s safe tonight—blackbird, bye, bye. Bessie went to Henrieville, teaching here, dancing still—to bye, bye, blackbird. Just because her hair was dark, young folks thought it quite a lark, to call her blackbird. If she stayed at school to work hours after, teenagers would come to serenade her, with this song, they little knew, was Layton’s song—Bessie’s too. Blackbird, bye, bye. Other groups Bessie belonged to were the Dixie Beautification Club, of which she was president about 1960; the St. George Business and Professional Women’s Club, serving as its president during the 1962-63 year; and the Dixie Reviewers—a literary club. The fall of 1963 Layton sold the Leeds property to Leonard Carter. November 11, 1963, Bessie was taken to the LDS Hospital in Salt Lake City as a result of nervous exhaustion, and was forced to discontinue school for the remainder of the year. The doctor advised her not to teach the 1964-65 year either. Layton and Bessie had been asked by the temple president to be temple workers, but due to Bessie’s illness, that assignment was temporarily not filled. However, Bessie set her goal of going to the temple on the average of five sessions per week, for the 1964-65 season. In January, 1964, Layton began working at the Hawthorne Company plant in St. George. This plant manufactures tents and sleeping bags for the Sears store in Los Angeles. The first few days Layton zipped sleeping bags, turned the bags wrong side out, and other odd jobs that were very monotonous. He was on the verge of quitting one day, when the boss came along and asked if he’d like to work on quality control. His main job then, was to inspect tents, looking for any flaws that might have occurred during their manufacture. If flaws were found, the people working on production had to repair the flaws. This job was enjoyable. Layton was very adept at putting up tents, and quick to see if there was anything wrong with them. His boss often told visitors to the factory that Layton knew about all there was to know about tents. His work also took him to every part of the plant; the frame shop, the cutting table, the seamer line—where seams were sewn, the round table where floors are sewn in the tents. His job was to try to make the most perfect product possible. At times he offered suggestions that he felt would make the tents better. For instance, his first suggestion was concerning a different kind of hook to hold the tent to the frame. The next suggestion pertained to the window openings on one certain type of tent. The accompanying letter shows the recognition he received from the head office on these suggestions. Hawthorne Company A Division of Kellwood Company May 13, 164 Mr. O. Layton (Layton Ott) Hawthorne Company A Division of Kellwood Company St. George, Utah Dear Mr. Layton; You are to be complimented on your suggestions regarding improvements to Hawthorne tents. Your first suggestion regarding improved hooks on the folding top has resulted in the issuing of a product revision form to use a redesigned hook. This new hook will be used as soon as received from the supplier and will be included in revised specifications. As regards the second recommendation regarding the large, inside windows, I will discuss this with the buyers at the next research conference, May 26 & 27. I agree with you, particularly as regards the 7893 tent. That provision should be made to roll up and tie the inside window flap. You might be interested in knowing that a large portion of our product improvements come from employees such as yourself, who are conscientious enough to notice where improvements are required and to submit them to the management. Once a month, our department meets with industrial engineering personnel and quality control personnel at Hawthorne for just such a discussion and we would appreciate your sending any additional suggestions. These suggestions will be discussed at the meeting. Very truly yours, James C. Porter, Head Research and Engineering Department Layton declares this is the best job he has ever had—not the best paying job, but the most satisfying. On March 16, 1964, Layton and Bettye Ott had another baby bless their home, which they called Corrine. This baby became the idol of the family, almost. Even Stephen, who had wanted a brother, had decided this child is pretty special. After Jim Ott’s graduation from Dixie College, he went to Cedar City to continue college work in 1963-64. He was on the honor roll and received a letter from the college congratulating him on his scholastic achievements. The summer of 1964, Jim and Jana worked in New Mexico, to get money so Jim could finish school the next year. Jana also decided to continue her college work this time, in 1964. ******************** Left: James Ott dedicating his brother, Layton’s grave on June 24, 1974, in the Georgetown cemetery. Above: Grave marker in the Georgetown cemetery for Layton and Bessie Ott. MEMORIES OF LAYTON OTT (Contributed by his wife, brothers, sisters, nieces, nephews, children and grandchildren following his death in 1974) By Bessie Ott: My memories are similar to all the rest, except I probably have many more. The first time I saw Layton, I was teaching in Henrieville. I boarded at the Ott home, and was eating supper with the family when Layton arrived from the sheep herd. He was wearing a huge cowboy hat. I never cared for western clothes, so I’m sure it wasn’t the hat that impressed me. And, incidentally, I never saw him wear it again. One thing is—I do remember the first time I saw him, and as I look back, I don’t remember clearly seeing any of the rest for the first time. Layton’s mother called him “Sunshine” and it seemed to fit him very well, for he was always cheerful. Another first experience was the first dance we went to. It was in Cannonville. The crowd was real small, so there weren’t many people to dance with. In those days, a couple didn’t dance together the whole evening as they do now. Layton kept asking me to dance. I thought he felt sorry for me, so finally I said, “Why don’t you ask the other girls to dance?” I thought I was being unselfish, but he thought I didn’t want to dance with him anymore; so neither of us danced much after that, and after talking the matter over later, we understood the other’s motives, for he said he asked me because he wanted to dance with me. The winter was a very enjoyable one for both of us. We played Rook about every evening. I hadn’t played much before, but we always were partners. I seemed to hold the cards and he bid on my hand, so we got along fine. The first time we got beaten was late in the year when his dad and mother beat us. Now I’ll tell a little about our mission. Layton always liked to talk more than I did, so he usually did most of the talking wherever we went. He felt miserable most of the time, but the people didn’t know. When we were in Owyhee, he was the Branch President. A non-member Indian man died and the family wanted to have the funeral in the LDS chapel. Layton had been sick, so he didn’t feel equal to taking charge, so he got his counselor to take charge but he gave the only talk. He spoke about the hereafter, and how we were all our Heavenly Father’s children, and how He loved all of His children. Layton made quite a hit with the Indians by this line of talking; many said afterward how much they enjoyed his talk. They appreciated someone accepting them as equals. From the time we were in Owyhee to the end, he always found a secret spot to pray to his Heavenly Father. Even I never saw the places he chose. He became very close to his Heavenly Father who seemed to answer him and help him with his problems. In Owyhee he climbed the little mountain behind the church to pray. In Gold Run, he chose a nook down the hill among the dense trees, and in Lovelock he went early in the morning in his car somewhere to pray. I doubt if any missionary got closer to the Lord than he did. While we were in Gold Run I twisted my knee once and was laid up for awhile. Another time I got the flu. Both times, though, I wasn’t seriously ill. He prayed fervently for my recovery; I was really touched. He sometimes said he’d be glad to get home for he dreamed several times I was killed in the car or died some other way. He said he’d never forgive himself if anything happened to me. So that accounted for his praying so hard for me to get better. If there ever could have been any doubt that he loved me, those prayers would have convinced me. It’s hard to reconcile the fact that he didn’t get home where he wanted so much to come, but he could never have been more ready to meet his Heavenly Father than he was at that time. As the town drunk in Gold Run wrote on a card to me, “God has him, I know.” ¬¬---------------- Layton and Bessie served as missionaries in the Las Vegas North Mission from 1973-74. Left: Elder and Sister Ott with church member friends in Gold Run, CA. This picture was taken just before they were transferred to Lovelock, NV, where Layton had a heart attack and passed away on June 20, 1974, just before their mission concluded. By Rella Alvey and family: Uncle Layton owned a field, out the lane just a little way from where Royal and I live. As he lived in St. George, it was hard for him to take his water turns all the time as they came around. So one evening he stopped in to see if Kim would go out and take his next water turn. He said, “Kid, set your own price, I’ll pay you well.” He did. We were ready to eat supper; I had plenty of milk and had just baked bread, along with dessert and other things that go along with a meal. He was very independent, but finally consented to eat. “Everything looks good”, he said, “but the best of all is that good bread and milk.” We had a very enjoyable evening and visit with him. He loved just the good down-to-earth things of life. When I was a small child, we lived on a ranch called Yellow Creek. My father, Joe, always raised such good watermelons, I’ll never forget how spellbound I sat, watching uncle Layton eat watermelon. He didn’t seem to have any problem at all getting rid of the seeds. It took me forever to dig the seeds out. He loved watermelon very much. Many a time I have taken my children down to Luella Mangum’s store. If he was there he would dig down in his pocket and give each one of them a nickel or dime, after he had teased them a little bit first. My children all loved him. I’ll never forget the time I rode to St. George with him to catch the bus for Hawthorne, Nevada. How kind you both were to me. And when he could have slept a little longer that morning, he got up at 5 a.m. and took me to the bus station. I’ll never forget these things. Just one more—the time when my father died, Layton came up to the house. He was a great source of comfort and strength to Mother and to us children. He could take our minds off our problems with his laugh and witty ways. Through the years, when he was where he could, he never failed to stop in and see how Mother was doing. Although we procrastinated and didn’t tell him, we loved him very much. A loving niece, as always, Rella Alvey and family. By Faye Palmer Ott: I have been thinking of Layton all morning, and what I could write for this memory book. I think it says a lot for the kind of man he was to say that all my memories of him are happy ones. He was always so good to me, and made me feel so welcome to the Ott Family. I remember when he was driving the school bus, he heard me telling someone I had had a terrible nightmare the night before. Layton got such a kick out of my wild tale, he called me “old nightmares” for many years after. I will always remember Layton as a good man, and a fun loving man, and I will always remember him with love and respect. Layton standing by the school bus he drove. By Bob Ott: I have had many rich experiences with Layton—they are in my heart but hard to put on paper. I remember once I helped Layton and Wallace haul hay from the Palmer field in Cannonville. It was near the first of August, and the mosquitoes were in” full bloom”. Before leaving home I picked up some repellent and rubbed some on my head and hands before entering the fields. I asked Layton and Wallace if they wanted some, but they declined. I remember Layton kidding me, saying it was just for sissies. We had about half a load of hay when I noticed they were swatting their hands wildly about their heads; after about ten minutes of this Layton had to give in and say, “Gimme some of that dang stuff.” I said, “No, this is just for sissies.” After letting them suffer for some time, I gave in and shared my new product with them. I remember many experiences with Layton as we operated our cowherd together. Most of the subjects of cattlemen center around cows and their experiences with them. Both the good and the bad parts are told. When Layton came out from St. George he often stayed at our place, and many were the stories and experiences we told, sitting up until the wee hours of the morning. It was always a pleasure to listen to his stories. He was never known to “stretch the truth”. They were always just as it happened. Layton was always regarded as an expert on coyotes, and always took pride in out-smarting them. His experiences always got special attention from the kids and grown-ups alike. When he was around he seemed to be able to create an atmosphere of laughter and interest. Bob By Mira Loy Ott: When Layton came to visit us, he would always open the door and say, “Well, I’m here, kid,” or “Hi, kid, how’s my gal?” When I would inquire how Bessie was he would say, “Just grumbly, like a woman,” then he would laugh and tell me how “Pat” was. Layton really enjoyed himself here at Bryce; when he stayed overnight, he would usually rise early and go for a walk—counting his blessings and enjoying Mother Nature. He especially enjoyed the deer as they would feed on our back lawn. How Layton loved watermelon and ice cream. During the summer, he usually had one or two “good ol’ Dixie melons” in his truck, when he came out just to check on things. If he called before he came he would say, “Bring out the ice cream, kid, I’m on my way.” Layton was always interested in our family—how they were, where they were, and what they were doing. He would say, “Just checking on my kids.” He had a plastic oval-shaped coin purse; on occasion, he would arrange the money, then tell Stacey to “get over here and get you a nickel. Now be sure and take that big one there.” It was a quarter. Mira . By Tammie Ott: I remember when I was little, Uncle Layton would get me up on his lap, just before we would have dessert (usually pie), and rub his whiskers along my cheek, saying, “Aren’t those good whisker pies?” He always called me Pammy. He gave me an orange sleeping bag. I remember asking him if it was just made for me. He said, “Yes.” I was so proud of this sleeping bag, and I still have it, and use it. Tammie By Betty Lou Graff Wintch: UNCLE LAYTON “To know him is to love him” Are words that are not new; But could you describe Uncle Layton With words that are more true? Did you ever see a smile more contagious Or hear a voice with such laughter in it? Can you ever recall being in his presence Without enjoying it every minute? He’s a man, he’s a face, he’s a body Whose image will live in our minds; To think of him is to see him For his life was a picture—the unforgettable kind. Can’t you just see him playing Rook? He seemed to enjoy it more than others; Perhaps it could have been the game But I think it was being with sisters and brothers. You could hear his laughter all over the house As his bid topped all the rest; But he’d still laugh if he lost the game— He never thought of a game as a test. He never aspired to be president or king Except to his children and wife; Just to love, and be loved, was all he asked As he made his journey through life. They were his glory, his pride, his joy, His hopes in dreams come true; Being with family, just those he loved Was the greatest joy he knew. He died in the service of the Lord With Aunt Bessie by his side; And although our hearts broke when he left earth They were filled with pride. He probably asked God, as soon as he saw Him To pattern eternity after his favorite places; Then his desire to make Heaven complete He would stock them with favorite faces. His sisters and brothers, when they say his name Wipe teardrops from their eyes; They miss him and they love him And they cherish their family ties. Books could be written of Layton’s life His love of land—his love of wife; His joy in children, his loyalty to friend Yes, memories of Layton will never end. The years Layton spent catching the wily coyote Is a memory we chuckle at now; No matter how smart the old coyote was He couldn’t top Layton’s know-how. Layton loved Utah very much And especially its southern part; From “up on the mountain” to “down below” He cherished their scenes in his heart. He would be happy here today Watching children run and play; Enjoying his family and his kin And we’d hear his laughter above the din. Yes, “to know him was to love him” But the first thing he would say Is, “put on a smile and chat a while And let’s have fun today.” By Bill Shakespear: I remember how Uncle Layton would pop into the house on one of his trips from Dixie. It seems he always brought some goodies—grapes or pomegranates, etc. Uncle Layton was always so thoughtful and generous that way. He always brought sunshine with him; interrogating me about my current girl friends, pinching me and teasing me about the thickness of my trousers or shirt. If there was watermelon in the house, he always had time for a piece. I remember being amazed at the terribly efficient machinery of his mouth, which allowed him to place large amounts in the front of his mouth and pour seeds out the side of his mouth. I remember the same feeling of awe on an early morning ride from St. George to Tropic as he consumed quickly a large quantity of pine nuts. Then there was his imaginary pair of “girl hobbles”. He always threatened to tie us fellows down with “girl hobbles” to get us through town—fancying that, when we laid eyes on a girl, we were driven to uncontrollable pursuit. As I recall Uncle Layton, I am reminded how important attitude is. The cheerfulness he brought and the look from the world makes him someone we greatly admire. Bill By Virginia and James Ott: SOME OF OUR CHOICE MEMORIES One of the very happy and special experiences of our lives was living in St. George with Mother in her little “home” as she called it, Bessie and Layton across the street, and Garn and Rose around the corner and down a bit. Most of our associations were very happy—some a bit sad, the way the stream of life flows, but we were very close and loved and enjoyed many good times together. We remember Layton telling us, when he was sure we were going to move to Orem, “our lives will never be the same,” and they haven’t. Rose and Garn moved to Salt Lake, Mother had passed away, and we moved to Orem. The circle was broken. We loved those days, only wish we had made them happier than we did. Some mornings Layton would get up early to go to work at Hawthorn and we would be up early, preparing to go to school, and about 6:30 he would come over to visit with us for a few minutes. He always had an interesting experience to share with us, sometimes humorous, sometimes spiritual, but always with a smile and a twinkle in his brown eyes. He told me he was going to get me a walking-(jumping) stick to use up all my surplus energy (I felt barely able to crawl about), and always we had a good laugh, which was a good starter for the day coming up. We always went to work with renewed courage and a sweet smile and twinkling brown eyes to think about during the day. These were choice minutes to James and I. James had another choice visit with him, sharing his testimony of the gospel and discussing gospel principles with him, listening to his experiences as a missionary. This mission experience was a call from our Heavenly Father, and even though was far from good, he accepted it and was greatly blessed. We are thankful and happy for the joy he has given us. Virginia and James Ott By Janet Shakespear Sawyer: Uncle Layton, someone I admired, looked up to, and had a great love for—what a great friend, pal, and someone you could go to for advice. When I was about 9 years old I was out in the hills and saw a coyote go inside a den. I went looking for Uncle Layton. He caught the mother coyote and 8 pups. He gave me $10—I thought I was rich—I was, for having known him. After that, whenever he saw me he would say, “Let’s go coyote hunting, kid.” I am sure you are now having “happy hunting”, my uncle. Janet By Louie and Alton: Dearest Bessie and Family, My little bit of writing goes for all of you because my association with you dates back quite a number of years, and my memories are not only of Layton, for we have had many enjoyable times together. Right now I am thinking of a time when we lived to the ranch, and we came to Henrieville and stayed at your place for the 4th of July which came on a Monday. We had two little ones and you had Layton Pat, but we managed to leave them and went to the dance, which started right after midnight, and we danced until daylight. One thing I remember, especially at that time, was that Layton had bought several boxes of matches up to Aunt Sara Willis’ (this was in the days of the Depression). Well, the truth of the matches was that they had been wet or something, and you had to try four or five times to get one to strike; so he had paid two or three times as much as he would have done for good ones. We really laughed about it. I’ve taken much teasing and I get lonesome for it, but I have nothing but happy memories of Layton, and our associations with all of you. Love always, Louie By Wallace Ott: It is hard to say “goodbye” to a brother like Layton. Although he has been gone more than a year, we still miss him very much—Layton and I had so many good times together—working and roaming through the hills. It was really a pleasure when we went trapping and hunting coyotes. We used to catch as many as 100 coyotes in a season. We used to enjoy it, as well as earning a lot of our spending money. Several times we got two dens in one day. One time we got sixteen coyotes out of one hole. This we would do in the spring of the year, during the ”denning” season. In the fall and winter we would have trap lines and catch them for their fur. It was a great time. We enjoyed it very much. It has been said that Layton and I could make good wages trading with each other. In our lives we made a good many trades, and helped each other out. There was seldom a time in fifty years that I didn’t owe Layton, or he owed me some. We kept our account in a little book, and there were 100 cents in every dollar. We never had an argument about it. A short time before Layton left for his mission we got together and settled up our business. We helped each other out—when I needed help I went to Layton—when he needed help he came to me. I am really thankful now that I had that privilege of working with him and knowing him as well as I did. No matter how long I live, I’ll always have fond memories of the time we spent together. Wallace By Sara and Malen Littlefield: It is a pleasure for our family to pay a special tribute to Layton—one of the joys of our lives was knowing him. As a younger sister at home, I remember him for the little extras he did for everyone. He always seemed to have an extra dime to slip me when I pressed his suit. He had the first car in Henrieville owned by a single boy. He was so generous and good about taking all the kids in town for a ride. Then there were those dark days of the hotel in Kanab—Malen and I will never forget him for the way he tried to cheer us up and keep us going. He would say to us, “There is always going to be a brighter day.” He would “dig” right in and do whatever the jobs were that needed to be done. He was very special to our family too. Each one expressed how they loved to be around him—Jim says he remembers as a boy taking the cows to pasture—how Uncle Layton always took time to stop and tease him about the armful of books he always carried back and forth. He said lots of times he would wait for him to get the cow in the pasture, so he could give him a lift back to town. Very often he would have a goodie to share with him. Janell says she’ll always remember him for the way he teased her. She was so lonesome and homesick while we were in Kanab—one day she told Uncle Layton she knew she’d be old and shaggy before she got to move back to Tropic. She was about seven years old at the time. Of course Layton never let her forget it. On her wedding day (she was married on Layton’s birthday—June 11, 1960) Layton was in the hospital in Salt Lake where he had had an operation the day before. She wanted him to meet Chuck, so before she was married that day she took Chuck down to the hospital to meet Uncle Layton. On the way she told Chuck, “Don’t be surprised when Uncle Layton calls me old and shaggy”. She said as sick as he was, he still smiled and called her old and shaggy. She said she would have been disappointed if he hadn’t. Steve was too young to remember him when we lived in Tropic, but he remembered when he came to Layton & Bettye’s place in Bountiful, and always wanted to go there when he knew Layton and Bessie would be there. He says, too, he’ll always remember the special way Layton teased him by calling him that “Stevie Starvy Kid.” Malen says he loved him as a brother, and he’ll always remember him when he plants cucumbers. Layton used to tell him to plant an extra vine and put his name on it. I’ll never forget him for the good stories he told—always a good yarn to tell and a good, clean joke to share. He loved us all so, and made each one of us feel that we were someone special. I’m sure he will be remembered by so many—family and friends, and just people he met, for the generosity he showed. I heard one of the General Authorities say that the things we take with us in the next world are the things we give away while we are in this life—truly Layton will have much—how we all love him! Malen, Sara, Jim, Janell & Steve Littlefield By Rose Ott Olsen: There are many things that I could say—both humorous and serious about my brother Layton, so I think I’ll start by relating a few things when I was a kid at home. He always had a knack for teasing, even though we got disgusted with him sometimes, we still liked it very much. Of course there are too many things to mention, so I’ll choose a few that come to mind at the present time. For instance, when I first started dating boyfriends, he was never afraid to tease them in some way. I remember one boyfriend who was very bashful, so he’d tell me exactly what time he’d pick me up, and would tell me to be sure to answer the door myself. He knew that if Layton opened the door he would be in for plenty of teasing. My cousin, Maxine, used to come and stay with us at times. There was one fellow who had broken his elbow—it hadn’t been set properly—so his arm curved. Maxine really didn’t like him at all, but every time Layton would get around her, he’d hold his arm out and tell her that 45-degree angle would just fit around her. A lot of the young kids used to get together at our home and James would always make up plenty of scary stories to tell us. Everyone would be so engrossed in the story, Layton would slip out and just at the right time, and he’d rap on the window, which always gave the story a real effect. Layton was always very popular with the girls. Anytime a new girl came into town, they always tried to find out about Layton Ott. Many times I have had good-looking girls stop me and ask if I was Layton Ott’s sister. Layton was always sporty in his dress, and had dark, black hair, which he combed straight back, and put plenty of hair oil on to hold it down, which was the style at that time. He had so many cowlicks, sometimes before a dance when he really wanted to look sharp, he’d wear a skullcap during the day. Now—just to tell a little incident—one year we had a very big crop of pine nuts and he went out and gathered pine nuts to sell and made extra spending money. He went into Nevada where he gathered some huge pine nuts. He had gathered several seamless sacks full. He kept them in the closet with the door locked. One day while he was gone, I happened to find the key and went in and really got my fill of pine nuts. I told no one about this, and that night when Mother called us to supper, I was very ill and sick to my stomach. Of course, Mother was quite concerned when I turned down eating my dinner. Just as they sat down to eat I ran out the door and made it barely in time to get relieved of all my pine nuts. The several years I was ill in St. George, when Layton would come over to see how I was, he’d say, "Cheer up, kid, you’re going to be alright—it’s just the meanness coming out.” All of my family have been close to their Uncle Layton, and they too, enjoyed his teasing. Rose By Sally Olsen: I remember Uncle Layton dropping by our house in St. George to visit. Occasionally he would time it just right to join us in a game of Rook. He would bid and outrageous amount, and enjoy every play—win or lose. He always seemed to know the right card to play. He lived life the way he played cards—he lived to win, but he had to have a lot of warmth, love, happiness and laughter along the way. No matter what was needed—a kind word, a bit of teasing, learning to laugh at your own mistakes, or money—he was always there. I know—for he never let me down. I loved him for all the thoughtful things he did. I will always consider myself lucky for knowing him and blessed by being related to him! Sally By Diana Olsen Tucker: I have fond memories of Uncle Layton from the St. George days. As we just lived around the corner from Uncle Layton, he often walked over to visit. I hadn’t dated much until I met my husband, Reed. And when Uncle Layton found out I was going pretty steady with Reed, he couldn’t resist doing a little teasing. As soon as Uncle Layton would pop in, head in the door, he would smile that wide grin of his and say, “The same old geek?” The first time he said that, I couldn’t figure out what he was talking about, but all the explanation he would give was another large grin before he wandered back into the house to find someone else to tease. Every time he visited after that, the first thing he’d say to me was “Same old geek?” As I never again went with anyone but Reed, I have to say, “Yes”. Reed worked as a part-time disk jockey at the local radio station while he went to school. When Uncle Layton found out he worked there, he asked Reed if he could play a request. Reed said, “Of course, what do you want to hear?” The next day we got the radio turned on at the appointed time and we heard Reed say, “We’ve had a special request for a certain song, and I had to dig clear down to the bottom of the stack, but I finally found it—for Layton Ott. Here’s On Top of Old Smokey.” Uncle Layton was really tickled. About three for four years after Reed and I were married, we finally got to one of the family reunions at Tropic Reservoir. I was excited to see everyone, because I hadn’t seen most of them since our wedding. As soon as I saw Uncle Layton, I went over to hug him. Of course, the first thing he said to me was--you guessed it--“Same old geek?” Then he added, “Boy, you’ve filled out so nice.” I’d gained some unneeded weight since he had last seen me. I’ll always remember Uncle Layton as the world’s biggest teaser, with that 50-cent grin on his face. Diana By Agnes Ott Littlefield: In memory of a loving brother I write these few lines, as the song reads—“Memories are treasures locked in my heart, I can keep evermore.” I do have very fond memories of my brother, Layton—some from long ago, during the Depression times, and of course of these last few years. And always, as I have him in my thoughts, I can see that smile on his face and know that he was getting ready to tease you about something. In later years our children looked forward to his visits, for they liked to have him tease them and would enjoy the attention he would give them. These last few years, as he would come out this way to check on his farms and livestock, he would stop in for a very short visit, but it was always so nice to have him come, as he always had a way of making the day more cheery. With his short “hello, how are you, kid?” He was greatly missed last August, and he will be missed this year, but I’m sure that he would be so happy to have his own family carry on for him. There comes a time for all of us when there is a break in the link of that chain, and we all have to weld it back together with memories and trying to live the lives that he will be proud to take us by the hand when we meet him, and he will say, “How are you, kid, sure is good to see you.” I send these few lines written this 16th day of July 1975 in memory of my dear brother—Layton Ott. Agnes By Deena Ott: I remember one time Grandpa and Grandma Ott had gotten back from Mexico and brought all the grandkids a present. On Thanksgiving Day we were all at Uncle Layton and Aunt Bettye’s house. It was snowing. All the little kids were in the living and out came Grandpa dressed up in a funny Santa Claus suit, with a paper sack hat, a big plastic nose with glasses on, and he passed out the presents. I remember how excited we all were at Grandpa and his Santa Claus suit. Grandpa was always doing something special, like when he worked at the tent factory, he gave me my first sleeping bag. He also made me a doll tent that was just like a big tent, with windows, except it was smaller. He was always playing games with us kids, like he’d put money in his hand behind his back and say, “Hey, diddle, diddle, what hand is the money in?” If we’d guess right, he’d give us the nickel or dine; even if we guessed wrong, he would still give us the money. Another game was the “chin-pie” game. He rubbed his whiskers on my cheeks and said, “Aren’t those good chin pies?” Deena By Rosalyn Ott: My Dad My Dad was jolly, My Dad was gay, My Dad was friendly To everyone, all the time—every day. My Dad was generous, My Dad was kind, My Dad was outspoken, And always spoke his mind. My Dad was honest, My Dad was true, My Dad had knowledge— More than some highly educated do. My Dad was simple, My Dad was plain, My Dad loved nature, All animals, and their terrain. My Dad loved his neighbors, My Dad loved his friends, He especially loved his family— With a love only Heaven sends. My Dad had religion, My Dad spread the word, My Dad loved the Church And let it be, so many people heard. All I have said, And more in my heart Are the very reasons he’s missed Since we’ve been apart. I’m so proud of this man And love him so much— You might ask— What was my Dad? A man, Who loved, Gave love, And was loved by all! He Was A Success !!!!!!!!!! Rosalyn--1975 By Jan Slade Ott: The first time I met Dad Ott, Jim was having a party at his home. There was a house full of people. He walked in and said to Jim, “Well, which one belongs to you?” From that day on he always made me feel welcome in his home. After Jim and I were married and Jim was going to school at Dixie, we played Pinochle with the folks a lot. I have never known anyone who would “shoot to the moon” all the time, and usually made it. When I graduated from business school at Cedar City, he gave me an extra nice sleeping bag. He said, “Now, kid, this is the best sleeping bag they make so take good care of it.” He always gave me the best. One year for Christmas I couldn’t decide what to get him for Christmas as we were going to school and didn’t have a lot of money. I knew how he loved house slippers. He would even wear them to the fields. I picked out a nice leather pair. When he opened them, he said, “Pretty fancy.” I told him they were just to wear in the house and not in the field. He laughed and said, “What good are they?” Whenever we would stop by and he would have them on he’d say, “Here’s my fancy house slippers—too fancy to wear outside.” When we lived in St. George and Deena was a baby, he dearly loved to stop by each morning to see her. If she wasn’t awake when he came, she was by the time he left. She rolled off the sofa when she was two months old. He gave me some money to, “Go buy that baby a chair so that wouldn’t happen again.” When we moved to Kanab, Jim and Dad Ott started ranching together. I couldn’t see where they were making much profit. When Layton (the son) was doing our income tax, I had kept records on everything that was for the ranch. I was telling Dad the list of things, and he said, “You can’t keep track of everything, like gas, or Jim will never make a profit on cows.” Then he said like he always said, “Kid, things will look better next year.” I always felt that we had a special relationship, but looking back I realized he had a special relationship with everyone, because he always made them feel special. Jan *************** MOTHERS DAY LETTERS TO LAYTON’S SISTERS (Written by Layton) Mothers Day 1974 Dear sister Rose and Garn, You may not be able to read this letter as you know how poor a writer I am, but just once in my life I want to write and tell you on my sister’s Mothers Day how much you have meant in our lives. You were so good to us at St. George and you and Pat seemed to get such a great friendship between you two. I just want to tell you this day I love my sisters and your missionary brother. Just want you to remember at this time I want you to know how much my sisters have meant in my life. So, on your Mothers Day, we just thank you for what you have done in our lives. You’ve been very close to us because of your sickness and living in St. George. So glad you are all feeling better, and we are happy to be seeing you soon. Then we can talk; you know how I can talk, but I just can’t write. We had so many wonderful experiences—so marvelous. I am so glad I did go on a mission and will be able to meet my mother as she wanted it so. Time moves on and we’ll be moving to Lovelock, Nevada. If you don’t write before the 1st of June, just address the letters to Lovelock, Nevada, general delivery. We’re kind of looking forward to going home. It’s been wonderful, but as it nears the end and our health could both be better, we’ll kind of be glad to get home and see all the folks. Like I say, I can’t write but can talk, and we have had many wonderful experiences—very outstanding things to tell you about. May our Heavenly Father watch over one of my wonderful sisters I have and her family. We love you very much and, on this Mothers Day, this letter from your missionary brother Layton and what you have meant to us in our lives. May God watch over you all always. Thanking you for coming to see us last summer. Love, Layton and Pat Mothers Day 1974 Dearest sisters in the little town that means so much to us, My sisters are so important to me and, it being Mothers Day and you are mothers, I guess you will have to try and make out this letter as I take after my own Grandfather Johnson in writing. I’m very poor at it, and it’s a job for me and I don’t do it too often. Pat does most of the letter writing, so please give her the credit in writing and working on me to write. It’s not that I don’t think of you often and, as the years go by, I don’t tell you enough about what you have meant to us. I sometimes think back on our childhood days and wish we could go back, maybe just for a little while. As time goes on, those days at Yellow Creek I have wished I had known what I know now and I may have done a little better about enjoying what we had there. This much, my sisters mean much in my life, and on this Mothers Day, quite late in life I want you to know just how much you mean and how you have helped me in shaping my life—the way you have lifted us up and helped me, so we thank you again. To all three of you that live in the little town of Tropic, we hope before long, if all is well, to be seeing you soon. I can’t write, but you know how I can talk. I ask our Father in Heaven to watch over you all and give you the things in life to help in health and the other things. Well, about a few of the things that are so outstanding, I have so much I could say but to write it is very hard for me. But last night we baptized two people. We worked so hard giving them lessons. It was worth all our mission, and I laid my hands on their heads and made them members of the true Church of Jesus Christ. Then we worked so hard to get a building, and with the help of us all, it looks like we’re going to make it. The branch up here is small and we have to work very hard with the members to help them realize all they should do, but as we meet in the little building—our little church—as we make it over it will be a nice one. Wish I could write about it, but I’ll wait and tell you later how the Lord helped us get it. I am glad I did get to go on a mission, and I’m so glad I waited and Pat could go with me, for I don’t know how I could have done without her to help me. I could talk by the hours the marvelous things that have happened, and then, again, I will be able to meet my mother up there and say, “I did it.” You all know how hard she hoped and I now know why. It looks like we will be going back to Lovelock for the last part of our mission. When we were sent to the Indian mission, there was one such a nice young woman that had gone to California and was not home. I think, if we find her back to her home in Lovelock, she will join the Church. She told her friend, if anyone made her a Mormon it would be Elder Ott. It sure made us feel good, and the mission president said we could go back there for the last, as we have to be out of the little cottage at Gold Run on the first of June. Once again, as I write the letter addressed to you, my younger sister, please let them all read and tell them it means the same. I love my sisters very much, so this letter is to all of you there. And please write; we need your letters. Love, Layton and Pat P.S. The new address at Lovelock will be General Delivery at Lovelock, Nevada, 89419. But don’t wait until then to write. We’ll be here until the first of June, so write here and don’t wait until then.

Life timeline of Jenis Ott (Layton)

Jenis Ott (Layton) was born on 11 Jun 1906
Jenis Ott (Layton) was 6 years old when The British passenger liner RMS Titanic sinks in the North Atlantic at 2:20 a.m., two hours and forty minutes after hitting an iceberg. Only 710 of 2,227 passengers and crew on board survive. RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early hours of 15 April 1912, after colliding with an iceberg during its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City. There were an estimated 2,224 passengers and crew aboard, and more than 1,500 died, making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history. RMS Titanic was the largest ship afloat at the time it entered service and was the second of three Olympic-class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line. It was built by the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast. Thomas Andrews, her architect, died in the disaster.
Jenis Ott (Layton) was 23 years old when The New York Stock Exchange crashes in what will be called the Crash of '29 or "Black Tuesday", ending the Great Bull Market of the 1920s and beginning the Great Depression. The New York Stock Exchange, is an American stock exchange located at 11 Wall Street, Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York. It is by far the world's largest stock exchange by market capitalization of its listed companies at US$21.3 trillion as of June 2017. The average daily trading value was approximately US$169 billion in 2013. The NYSE trading floor is located at 11 Wall Street and is composed of 21 rooms used for the facilitation of trading. A fifth trading room, located at 30 Broad Street, was closed in February 2007. The main building and the 11 Wall Street building were designated National Historic Landmarks in 1978.
Jenis Ott (Layton) was 33 years old when World War II: Nazi Germany and Slovakia invade Poland, beginning the European phase of World War II. World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most global war in history; it directly involved more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. In a state of total war, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.
Jenis Ott (Layton) was 36 years old when World War II: The Imperial Japanese Navy made a surprise attack on Pearl Harbor in Hawaii, intending to neutralize the United States Pacific Fleet from influencing the war Japan was planning to wage in Southeast Asia. World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most global war in history; it directly involved more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. In a state of total war, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.
Jenis Ott (Layton) was 47 years old when Jonas Salk announced the successful test of his polio vaccine on a small group of adults and children (vaccination pictured). Jonas Edward Salk was an American medical researcher and virologist. He discovered and developed one of the first successful polio vaccines. Born in New York City, he attended New York University School of Medicine, later choosing to do medical research instead of becoming a practicing physician. In 1939, after earning his medical degree, Salk began an internship as a physician scientist at Mount Sinai Hospital. Two years later he was granted a fellowship at the University of Michigan, where he would study flu viruses with his mentor Thomas Francis, Jr.
Jenis Ott (Layton) was 63 years old when During the Apollo 11 mission, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first humans to walk on the Moon. Apollo 11 was the spaceflight that landed the first two people on the Moon. Mission commander Neil Armstrong and pilot Buzz Aldrin, both American, landed the lunar module Eagle on July 20, 1969, at 20:17 UTC. Armstrong became the first person to step onto the lunar surface six hours after landing on July 21 at 02:56:15 UTC; Aldrin joined him about 20 minutes later. They spent about two and a quarter hours together outside the spacecraft, and collected 47.5 pounds (21.5 kg) of lunar material to bring back to Earth. Michael Collins piloted the command module Columbia alone in lunar orbit while they were on the Moon's surface. Armstrong and Aldrin spent 21.5 hours on the lunar surface before rejoining Columbia in lunar orbit.
Jenis Ott (Layton) died on 20 Jun 1974 at the age of 68
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Jenis Ott (Layton) (11 Jun 1906 - 20 Jun 1974), BillionGraves Record 31158463 Cannonville, Garfield, Utah, United States

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