Father Janus Jacob Beck

8 Jun 1864 - 12 Mar 1916

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Father Janus Jacob Beck

8 Jun 1864 - 12 Mar 1916
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Janius Jacobson Beck taken from the book 'In Memory of the Beck's' compiled by Stephen F Beck Janius Jacobson Beck was born June 8, 1864, at Aalborg, Denmark. He was the son of Fredrick Jacobson and Henrika Hansen Beck. His parents were converts to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Hi

Life Information

Father Janus Jacob Beck

Born:
Died:

Alpine Cemetery

283 N 300 E
Alpine, Utah, Utah
United States

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father
mother
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Craig Thrasher

May 28, 2011
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Anne Ryan

May 28, 2011
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Karen Cutter

May 28, 2011
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Simini

May 29, 2011
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AmandaCleveland

July 4, 2018
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enjoying the pool

August 8, 2017
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Judiwh

July 17, 2013
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desertrat

July 17, 2013
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sabreid

April 27, 2018
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Donna K. Hansen

April 27, 2018
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pattjenks

April 3, 2020
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goinboatin

March 25, 2016
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White Papio

July 4, 2018
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Catirrel

May 26, 2011

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Father Janus Jacob Beck is buried in the Alpine Cemetery at the location displayed on the map below. This GPS information is ONLY available at BillionGraves. Our technology can help you find the gravesite and other family members buried nearby.

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Obituary and biography for Julius Conrad Beck

Contributor: DavidR.BillionGraves@gmail.com Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Taken from the document added to Family Search by Dale W Adams Julius Conrad Beck one of the seven children of Frederick and Hendeka Hansen Beck, was born in Aalborg, Denmark, November 3, 1860. His father, Frederick Beck was one of a family of ten sons and five daughters and when a young man took part in the war between Denmark and Germany. Shortly after his return home, he heard of Mormonism through some friends and was curious to learn of the new doctrine. He and his wife were at once convinced of its truthfulness and both were baptized. In the spring of 1866, with their three small children, Emma, Janius, and Julius, (who was then six years of age started on the long journey to Utah. They arrived in Salt Lake City in October, 1866, and remained there two years. From there they came to Alpine and established a permanent home. He was baptized when about ten years of age and accepted the ordinations of the Priesthood from Deacon to High Priest, always counting such as a gift from God. When a young man he took up the occupation of farming and has been one of the successful farmers of our community. March 13, 1889 he was married to Rhoda Francis Vance in the Logan Temple and they became the parents of six sons. He was one of the first chairmen of the Old Folks committee in our ward and held the tosition (position) for twelve years. For a long time he was a member of the Home Dramatic Co. and being musically inclined was a great help in the ward choir and various glee clubs. In 1904 he was appointed ward clerk and for twelve years with the help of his good wife the records were neatly and accurately kept. He was active in the quorums of the Priesthood and was set apart in 1905 as one of the seven Presidents of Seventy. He worked at different times in practically all the organizations of the ward and in August, 1903 left his home to fill a mission to his native land. For the entire two years he labored among his own relatives teaching them the plan of salvation. Two years after he returned home he sent his oldest son, Wesley, on a three years mission to New Zealand, and two of his sons, Wesley and Sidney, assisted in the late World War. At the time of his death he was chairman of our new church building committee and often expressed a desire to live it see its completion. His health has been failing the past few years and at times he had suffered intensely. His last illness was only of a few days duration and the family did not realize the end was so near. He had great faith in the administration of the Elders and they were often called in that his suffering might be allayed. In his last moments he called for them but the pain was so intense that he asked for a second administration and while the servants of God prayed that he be relieved of his suffering he passed quietly and peacefully away before the prayer was ended. Besides his wife he leaves five sons: Wesley J of Pleasant Grove, Sidney M and Horace T of American Fork, Owen V and Loy of Alpine. Twelve grandchildren and two sisters, Mrs Emma McDaniel and Mrs Ella Martin also survive.

Life history of Janius Jacobson Beck

Contributor: DavidR.BillionGraves@gmail.com Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Janius Jacobson Beck taken from the book "In Memory of the Beck's" compiled by Stephen F Beck Janius Jacobson Beck was born June 8, 1864, at Aalborg, Denmark. He was the son of Fredrick Jacobson and Henrika Hansen Beck. His parents were converts to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. His father was born at Leda and his mother at Aalborg, Denmark. They were married March 23, 1856. His father served in the war of 1864 between Denmark and Germany. Shortly after returning home from war, he heard of the Mormon missionaries. He was curious to hear them and when the opportunity came, he at once became interested, and soon was convinced of the truth. He and his wife were baptized December 27, 1865. The following spring the spirit of gathering was strongly manifested in the little home circle by the preparation to come to Utah. On May 20, 1866, Fredrick, his wife Henrika, and three children, Emma, Julius, and Janius sailed for America with six other families of Saints. One of them was his brother, Christian Beck. They crossed the Atlantic on the ship, "Kenilworth". It was an old sail ship and that was its last voyage across the ocean. It took eight weeks and three days to make the trip. While crossing, it caught on fire three times and was so badly burned it was condemned in the New York Harbor. Upon reaching New York, many of the little company died with the severe heat. The rest were rushed to Omaha, Nebraska, where they rested for a week while arrangements were made for the trip across the plains. Equipment being very scarce made it necessary for those who were able, to walk most of the way. They arrived in Salt Lake City October 1866, under the command of Captain Rawlins. Andrew Jensen, the church historian, was in this company. They lived in Salt Lake City two years and then moved to Alpine. Although "Yan," as he was called, remembered little of 75 this trip, as he was between two three years old at this time, his parents never tired of telling him about it. His early life was spent much the same as other children of pioneers. It required young and old to work to make a livelihood. Yan spent a lot of his time in the surrounding hills and canyons herding cattle and sheep. Although barefoot the entire summers, roaming the hills, his boyfriends had a lot of good times and made their work their play. His education was limited to one season with Richard T. Booth as his teacher. It was remarkable, his intelligence with such little schooling. He grew to manhood never idle and always willing to take part in anything that was of upbuilding nature. He was married to Mary Jane Hemmett (Hamnett) May 2, 1885. Their first home was a little adobe home just north of his father's home. Here their first child was born. They lived for a short time on Highland while he was employed by Jacob Beck. Later, they bought a two room adobe house from Mr. Poulson. As their family grew, he built on and remodeled until a comfortable home was theirs. Here he and his wife lived until they died. He was a good provider. He owned a good farm some of the best of livestock. He was always interested in everything that went on in the little community, especially in recreation. He and his wife belonged to the Alpine Glee Club which spent many an evening at their home and homes of their friends enjoying their singing and games. This is one way they had of supplying their own amusement. This club sang at many of the gatherings in the ward . He was one of the organizers, and the largest stockholder of the Alpine Amusement Hall, built just east of where our city hall now stands. This was a great place of amusement and dancers from all over the county came here to enjoy themselves. Some of the best dramatic talent was frequently engaged to entertain the people of Alpine. He was continuously a member of the Water Board of which he was president part of the time. He was also president of the alpine Cattle Range until his death. He was chairman of the Democratic party for several years and always ready to uphold what he believed to be right. He and his wife worked on the old folks committee for years. Part of this time he spent as chairman until his death. His Iove and devotion for his mother was outstanding and many happy hours they spent together. Although not too religiously inclined, he always cheerfully paid his donations and obligations to his church. They were the parents of 12 children, ten of whom are still living. They are, Josephine Mayne, Charles Elmer, James Henry, David Fredrick, Melva, Leland, Jennie, Lerve, Orlean, and James Milton. Although a young man when he died, he had accomplished a great deal. He was a highly respected citizen and did a great deal in making our community what it is today. He died March 12, 1916, in the Provo hospital.

Janius Jacobson Beck

Contributor: DavidR.BillionGraves@gmail.com Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Janius Jacobson Beck was born June 8, 1864, at Aalburg, Denmark. He was the son of Fredrick Jacobson and Henrika Hanson Beck. His parents were converts to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. His father was born at Leda and his mother at Aalburg, Denmark. They were married March 23, 1856. His father served in the War of 1864 between Denmark and Germany. Shortly after returning home from war, he heard of the Mormon missionaries. He was curious to hear them and when the opportunity came, he at once became interested, and soon was convinced of the truth. He and his wife were baptized December 27, 1865. The following spring the spirit of gathering was strongly manifested in the little home circle by the preparation to come to Utah. On May 20, 1866, Fredrick, his wife Henrika, and three children, Emma, Julius, and Janius, sailed for America with six other families of Saints. One of them was his brother, Christian Beck. They crossed the Atlantic on the ship Kendleworth. It was an old sail ship and that was its last voyage across the ocean. It took 8 weeks and 3 days to make the trip. While crossing, it caught on fire three times and was so badly burned it was condemned in the New York harbor. Upon reaching New York, many of the little company died with the severe heat. The rest were rushed to Omaha, Nebraska, where they rested for a week while arrangements were made for the trip across the plains. Equipment being very scarce made it necessary for those who were able, to walk most of the way. They arrived in Salt Lake City October 1866, under the command of Captain Rawlins, Andrew Jensen, the church historian was in this company. They lived in Salt Lake two years and then moved to Alpine. Although “Yan,” as he was called, remembered little of this trip, as he was between two and three years old at this time, his parents never tired of telling him about it. His early life was much the same as other children of pioneers. It required young and old to work to make a livelihood. Yan spent a lot of his time in the surrounding hills and canyons herding cattle and sheep. Although barefoot the entire summers roaming the hills, he and his boyfriends had a lot of good times and made their work their play. His education was limited to one season with Richard T. Booth as his teacher. It was remarkable, his intelligence with such little schooling. He grew to manhood never idle and always willing to take part in anything that was of upbuilding nature. He was married to Mary Jane Hamnett May 2, 1885. Their first home was a little dobe home just north of his father’s home. Here their first child was born. They lived for a short time on Highland while he was employed by Jacob Beck. Later, they bought a two room dobe house from Mr. Poulson. As their family grew, he built on and remodeled until a comfortable home was theirs. Here he and his wife lived until they died. He was a good provider. He owned a good farm and some of the best of livestock. He was always interested in everything that went on in the little community, especially in recreation. He and his wife belonged to the Alpine Glee club which spent many an evening at their home and homes of their friends enjoying their singing and games. This is one way they had of supplying their own amusement. This club sang at many of the gatherings in the ward. He was one of the instigators and largest stock holder in the Alpine Amusement Hall, built just east of where our city hall now stands. This was a great place of amusement and dancers from all over the county came here to enjoy their selves. Some of the best dramatic talent was frequently engaged to entertain the people of Alpine. He was always interested in civic affairs. He was city councilman for two terms and mayor from 1914 until Dec. 1915 before he died March 1916. He was constantly a member of the Water Board of which he was president part of the time. He was also president of the Alpine cattle range until his death. He was chairman of the Democratic party for several years and always ready to uphold what he believed to be right. He and his wife worked on the Old Folks Committee for years. Part of this time he spent as chairman until his death. His love and devotion for his mother was outstanding and many happy hours they spent together. Although not too religiously inclined, he always cheerfully paid his donations and obligations to his church. They were the parents of 12 children—ten of whom are still living. They are: Josephine Mayne, Charles Elmer, James Henry, David Fredrick, Melva, Leland, Jennie, Lerve, Orlean, and James Milton. Although a young man when he died, he had accomplished a great deal. He was a highly respected citizen and did a great deal in making our community what it is today. He died March 12, 1916, in the Provo hospital.

Ella Henrietta Beck Martin

Contributor: DavidR.BillionGraves@gmail.com Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Ella Henrietta Beck Martin By Cleone Cleghorn taken from book “In Memory of the Becks” by Stephen F Beck. Nestled below rugged mountains, which rise as a fortress to ever shield its villagers from harm, lies the little city of Alpine, Utah. It was in this peaceful community that Ella Henrietta Beck was born, April 7, 1871. She was the fourth child in a family of seven born to Fredrick and Henricka Hansen Beck. Her older brothers and sisters were: Emma, Julius and Janius, and the younger ones were: Francis, Fredrick and Henry. Fredrick died in childhood. Ella lived to be the last original member of the Fredrick Beck family. Grandpa Beck, a mason by trade, along with his two brothers Christian, a farmer, and Stephen, a carpenter, were natives of Denmark. After their conversion to the Latter Day Saints Church they left their comfortable homes, relatives, and friends and all their earthly possessions and in a company of saints with Andrew Jensen as their Captain brought their families to Utah. The ocean voyage in the sailing vessel “Kenilworth,” began May 20, 1866 and covered a period of nine weeks. Another nine weeks crossing the plains with ox teams brought them to Salt Lake City in October 1866. Grandpa and Grandma Beck and their three children, Emma, Julius and Janius remained in Salt lake City for two years, then in 1868 came to Alpine where the remainder of their lives was spent and where four more children were born to them. Many of the homes built by Grandpa Beck in those early days are still standing and occupied at the present time. The original home he built for his own wife and family has served as a home for three generations of his posterity. It was in this adobe home Mother was born. As a child, Mother’s days were not carefree for she, too, knew the trials and hardships of a pioneer family. She helped care for the younger children and I’ve often heard her tell of the one hour after the noon meal was over she had in which to play. She helped herd cows too on the “High Bench” some distance from her home, barefooted, and she told us how the stones and rough trails would hurt her feet. She had but one pair of shoes and they were kept for special occasions. Her lunch, while herding the cows, would be only bread. As a young girl, Mother took advantage of all opportunities offered in an educational, religious and social way. She was blessed with the gift of wit and humor and with her fun-loving disposition she was popular with both young and old. She loved music and had a sweet soprano voice and she loved to sing in the ward choir which she did for a long time. Grandmother taught her daughters the value of knowing how to work and the art of home-making. How to sew, how to cook and this training along with her own natural aptness made Mother a homemaker, a seamstress and a cook of rare ability. It seemed this preparation helped her greatly and made it much easier for Mother as a homemaker and mother to care for her own home and family with the meager means which she had. She was married to Esdras martin in the Salt Lake Temple by john R Winder, February 12, 1896 and they were the parents of three sons and three daughters. Soo after their marriage, they went to Colorado where Dad worked on a ranch and she was employed as cook for the ranch hands. Then they moved to American Fork where their first child, Huron Esdras, was born December 21, 1896 and later for about four years they made their home in Scipio. Two more of their children were born there. Erma was born March 22, 1898 and Glen Beck was born February 19, 1900. After that they came to Alpine which was their home for many, many years. Here Inez was born November 17, 1903, Cleone was born December 13, 1906 and Angus Jay born June 23, 1909. Inez died November 23, 1915 of ruptured appendix and Angus Jay died April 4, 1910 of scarlet fever. These deaths were heartaches indeed of our parents. After Grandfathers’ death on December 18, 1906 Dad and Mother moved into the old home and cared for Grandmother until she passed away December 18, 1915. Mother served on the Old Folks committee in the Alpine ward for many years and was one of its most valuable members. Perhaps her most outstanding characteristic was her willingness to help others with no thought of herself No day was too long nor nights too dark if she could be of service to one in need. As a Mother she was an ideal in our lives. She never sought a public position herself but was found in the background making it possible for others. She taught us the principles of right living and encouraged us in every way to be of service in the church organizations. While she enjoyed to the last moments of her life, a good joke we never heard fall from her lips a story that was not clean. Our friends were always welcome in our home and Mother kept a home that was immaculate and inviting to all of us. Her bread and pastries were enjoyed too by both her family and friends. She gave freely of her limited means to help every worthy cause, in fact she loved to work, help and give. It was her life. In 1924 she gave up housekeeping and made her home with my husband and me the greater part of the time. She was with the other children for a few weeks at a time and wherever she chose to go she received a hearty welcome and was counted as one of the family. She was helpful, congenial and jovial and never interfered with family affairs. She was generous to a fault with her grandchildren and seemed never to miss an opportunity to make every special occasion in their lives a little brighter by a thoughtful gift. They all idolized her and as one of them said, “She was like a grandmother out of a story book.” Her health began to fail in the fall of 1943 and she steadily grew weaker. She had her one great desire and wish fulfilled, never to be a burden on her children and she was only bedfast one or two days. When Mother passed away it left a vacancy in the hearts of her children and grandchildren that no other can fill and while the years of her greatest activity had passed we felt a source of strength and security in her presence. She was 73 years old when she passed away, February 4, 1944. God sent his choicest spirit upon the earth to dwell, That she might teach his children and of His love would tell, Her heart was full of goodness so loving and so kind And we could meet with millions; but never would we find A Pal that we could talk to and trust from day to day. For in our hours of sorrow, she made our hearts feel gay. And never could we hope to find or feel there is another For God has blessed us most of all, He made this soul our Mother, So when God calls us back to Him, we pray our reward will be, A place beside our Mother, in sweet Eternity.

Joseph Henry Beck and Nora Henefer

Contributor: DavidR.BillionGraves@gmail.com Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Joseph Henry Beck and Nora Henefer Taken from the book, “In Memory of the Becks” by Stephen F Beck. Joseph Henry Beck was born April 7, 1874, the seventh child of Fredrick and Henricka Beck. His older brothers and sisters were Emma, Julius, Janius, Ella and Francis: then young Henry came to make their home very happy. He must have been a happy child because his daughter Wanda tells us that as a man he was always singing and was very often telling them stories of his happy boyhood. Henry’s life was spent on the farm and helping others with their farm work. He worked often for his cousin, Jacob Beck, on his ranch at Highland. He married Nora Henefer on December 26, 1899, in Salt Lake City, Utah. They were married on Nora’s birthday. Nora was born in Salt Lake City, December 26, 1883. As a boy Henry like to ride horses and he was always taking part in the horse races. One day while he was racing his horse he ran over some sheep on the street and he was knocked unconscious for several days. He never did entirely recover from this injury. Henry and Nora were the parents of five children, Wanda, Syble, Elaine, Myra, and Welton. Dorcas Wanda was born November 24, 1900. Xenia Syble was born October 10, 1902. Elaine was born December 23, 1903. Julia Myra was born August 12, 1907 and Welton Henry born September 30, 1910. Henry was very good to his children. He had a farm upon the high bench and he nearly always brought home a bouquet of wild flowers in the evening. He came home singing most of the time. In 1918 after a short illness his beloved wife Nora died with the flu. She died the 28th of October 1918 and Henry was broken-hearted. Wanda at this time was just eighteen and she helped her father to take care of the younger children. Henry died after a short illness the 29th of October 1927. This was just nine short years after his wife Nora died. They are both buried in the Alpine City Cemetery. He was only 52 years old when he died. He was a fine father and was much loved by his family and friends.

Frances Maria Beck Cayton and Edward Cayton

Contributor: DavidR.BillionGraves@gmail.com Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Frances Maria Beck Cayton and Edward Cayton Taken from the book “In Memory of the Becks” by Stephen F Beck. Frances Maria Beck Cayton was born on April 25, 1873. Her father, Fredrick Beck and his wife Renricka (Henricka) Hanson, had been asked by President Brigham Young to settle in Alpine to work at his trade as a stone mason, and so with their three children, Emma, Julius, and Janius they moved to the region known as the High Bench. There were five more children born to the couple and two did not survive. Ella was the fourth surviving child, Francis the next, Fredrich and Henry the youngest. In Denmark, the family had enjoyed living in comfortable surroundings, but getting started in a new land, with a new language brought with it the hardships and sacrifice that have been repeated thousands of times in the lives of our immigrant converts. The incident in the lives of these hardy people have come down by way of mouth to their children and children's children and the written records will make monuments forever of their faith and integrity. So Frances, as the next youngest of the Fredrick Becks, grew from infancy under conditions that were far different from the times when even her own children were small. From her home on the high bench, she and her brothers and sisters walked to church, to town, or over to the fort. The only shoes she remembered wearing until she was twelve, were made by hand of several thicknesses of overall cloth, with soles of pads of paper or card-board. Frances and Henry being the youngest, were given the work of looking after the animals — so in their shoes made from overalls, they herded the cows and sheep through the hay stubble after the hay had been cut. On one occasion when they were gathering eggs from a nest in the sage brush, Frances almost put her hand in a nest where a rattlesnake was curled up eating the eggs. When Ella was about thirteen and Frances was a couple of years younger, they had their first pair of "store bought" shoes — together. Of course these were just for Sunday, and the girls walked barefooted to the Dry Creek Bridge and carried the precious shoes. One Sunday Ella would put on the shoes at the bridge and the next Sunday Frances would wear the shoes. In 1887 Frances was fourteen, and at the time she came to Salt Lake City to work. She was fortunate in finding work in the home of the Willard Richards on 9th East in Sugarhouse. There were five Richards' children and their home was large, so there was a lot of hard work. Sister Richards was a good manager, and had the means to run her household well. Two girls lived in with the family most of the time. One day the upstairs was swept and dusted, another day the downstairs was swept and dusted, another day the washing was done which took all the day on the washboard, another day was for the ironing. The house was kept immaculate always. Frances worked hard for a girl in her teens, but Brother and Sister Richards were good and kind to her. Through the next four or five years, she lived with them and it was only natural that through this formative period of her life she spoke of the Richard's home as being her home, almost more than the one at Alpine. In the summer of 1891 Frances went home to Alpine for a visit and while there was taken ill with what was called inflammation of the bowels, but was later believed to be a ruptured appendix. She was sick all summer and it was during that summer that a young man, Edward Clark Cayton came to Alpine from Logan, Nebraska, to visit his Uncle, Lee Clark. Edward liked the little town, nestled at the foot of the mountain with the streams of water running through it. He liked the people too, so he stayed and made it his home. He immediately became interested in the activities of the church and attended meetings in the Alpine Ward regularly. In this way he became acquainted with the young people of the town, and in due time began to take out Ella and Frances Beck, at first it was one then the other, and sometimes both. But soon he became seriously interested in Frances and they "kept steady company" for about two years. During that time, Edward or Ed as he was always called, was working in the mines at Bingham, so when Frances had recovered completely from her illness, she went to Bingham to work. At Christmas time 1893 they drove home together from Bingham on a two-wheel cart. They had bought some chocolates to take home for a Christmas treat. It started to snow and kept snowing all the way to Alpine. Frances was carrying the chocolates in her lap and by the time Ed and she arrived home, the chocolates had melted and run all over them and the cart too. The dollars worth of chocolates was gone. It was while they were at home that they decided to get married. They went to American Fork and were married December 28, 1893. Ed had not yet joined the church, his people were very much opposed to his being baptized, and consequently were not too pleased when he married a Mormon girl. However, he was baptized soon after and four years later they came to t the Salt Lake Temple and received their endowments and were sealed together for time and all eternity. They made the trip to Salt Lake City in a covered wagon, and slept in the wagon in the tithing yard while they were there. After their marriage in 1893 they went , back to Bingham—but not to stay, because by then Ed had no job. The "Panic of '93" was very real, and everyone was feeling the depression. The newly weds went back to American Fork and lived with Ed's s sister and her husband that winter. Utah Lake was frozen over and Ed cut and hauled cedar post over the lake in a bobsled for grocery money. One load bought groceries for two days. In the spring, Ed and Frances went in debt for a piece of property on the Bench between Alpine and American Fork. There was a two-room house on the ground and this was their first home. It was situated on the road leading to American Fork Canyon and at that time in the winter the snow drifted until they were completely isolated. In the summer following their move to the Bench, Ed fell out of a cherry tree, while he was picking cherries and broke his leg. Money being non-existant and doctors a distance away, he did not have it taken care of, instead, made himself a wooden leg. He did all his work and harvested his crops that summer on his broken leg, supported by the homemade wooden one. The following winter Frances and Ed decided to move to Alpine. They were expecting their first baby and were fearful of being snowed in as they had been the winter before—so they moved into a room in Joseph Beck's home. After spending another summer in the little house on the bench, they lived the next winter in Ren Vance's home. The next spring they bought a house on Back Street and this was their home for five years. On June 12, 1903 while they were living on the Back Street their second child, Edward Rumel was born. During the next period of time the little family prospered and the years of hard work were starting to pay off. There was never any work too hard or under too bad conditions for Ed to do, to help him give Frances and the family the necessities of life. He bought what the family called "The Field", and raised potatoes and cabbage on it in the summer, then in the winter sold them in Salt Lake City. It would take nearly three days to make the trip with his wagon and team. He worked all winter selling the harvest of the summer. Whenever he could spare time from his own work, he used his team to haul ore out of American Fork Canyon. After about two years, the family moved to the house on Front Street. By now, the farm was paying well, it was good ground and Ed worked it wisely and well and ever mindful of the comfort of Frances and the children. They were very happy and it seemed that everything was favorable for a comfortable and prosperous life. The third child, James Orland, was born October 4, 1907 and from that time on, Frances' health was never very good. In 1909 the baby Jim had scarlet fever followed closely by polio. The strain and shock of this crippling illness left its mark on Frances, too, she still under the doctor's care following Jim's birth. When Dr. Kerr, whom she liked so much, and had so much faith in, moved to Salt Lake from Provo, the Cayton family also moved to be near him. After living in Salt Lake City for about two years, they sold all the property they had in Alpine and bought a home in Salt Lake City. Frances and Ed and their children, lived in several wards, in the Sugarhouse area, —Sugarhouse, Waterloo and finally Emerson Ward. They were well known and active in ward affairs, and did a great deal of geneological research and temple work. Ed's Mother came often to stay with them and would stay for several months each year for a number of years. She had no home of her own after her husband's passing. She was always asked to attend church with Frances and Ed, but she remained bitter toward the church and against Ed for having married a Mormon and joining the church. Ed was the only one of his family who had affiliated himself with the church until very recently. Bessie, the daughter received a letter from a granddaughter of one of Ed's nieces, a young girl of twenty-two, who had met the missionaries and had been baptized. The family have since kept in touch with her and she is very happy in her activities and very much interested in her geneological background. Thanks to the efforts of Frances and Ed, the work is all finished and recorded. The last time that Ed's Mother visited the Cayton home in Salt Lake, she attended church with them quite regularly. Ed arranged for her to attend an Old Folk's Party in the Granite Stake House. She was very much impressed with the people she met and the program. She began to talk more favorablely about the church and some of the principles she had learned about. Before leaving to go to a daughter's home; she asked Frances if she would do her Temple work for her, after she passed away. This was the only admission she ever made that they or the church had made any impression on her. As soon as possible after her death her work was done as was her husband's and two daughters that had passed away previously. It was in 1920 that Frances and Ed moved into Emerson Ward, and here it was that they were happier than anywhere since leaving Alpine. They had been burdened always by heavy doctor bills and medical care for Frances and also Jim, but they managed to get along. Ed had an ingenious way of making enough money to keep going. They made many close friends and were respected and loved by their neighbors and ward members. Ed was well known all over Salt Lake. He drove a team of little white horses and worked with them on the school grounds for the Salt Lake School Board. He went from school to school, doing landscaping and cleaning up the grounds during the summer. He was remembered everywhere for his cheery "hello's" and was never too busy to pick up some children and give them a ride or let them help eat his lunch. Some of the best times Bessie's boys remember, are when they went to the school grounds with grandpa and his team, and he gave them a quarter to go alone to the store to buy what they wanted for lunch. In the winter time the wagon became a bob-sled and Ed took the young people out on sleighing parties. On the days preceeding the sleigh parties, Frances would spend the afternoon heating rocks and bricks in the oven to keep him warm while he drove in the cold night air. In June 1922 after completing three and one half years of high school, Rumel was called to California on a mission. The family knew it would not be possible on its income so Rumel went to work that summer for a State surveying crew, and left for his mission in September. He had a little Jersey cow that had been his main support during high school, so Bessie produced further and helped pay his missionary expense. Jim delivered the milk in bottles to the neighbors, and boy-like, he sometimes referred to the white bottles of milk as "Ambassadors of Truth". Mel was able to stay on his mission for twenty-eight months. He fulfilled his mission honorably, and made many friends for himself and his church. He helped establish branches and Sunday Schools in towns, where now there are several stakes organized. The last nine months, he was President of the Long Beach Conference. These were long months of waiting for Frances and even though she was not well, she wanted him to remain as long as there was need of him in California. As was mentioned before, Frances health was not good from the time of Jim's birth. She suffered intensely with nervousness and had a bad inward goiter, which affected her digestion. So in 1928 the Doctor advised a rest in the hospital for a couple of weeks. While there her attending doctor and Dr. Ralph Richards of the Salt Lake Clinic made daily calls on her. The two weeks became six weeks but by that time the Doctors persuaded her to have the goiter removed. Dr. Richards performed the operation and at that time remarked that it was one of the worst he had ever seen. Before the operation took place, the Relief Society of the Emerson Ward called a special prayer meeting. Bishop Joseph Lloyd offered a prayer in her behalf, and promised Frances that she would live to enjoy her children and grandchildren more than she ever had before. The summer following she realized Bishop Lloyd's prayer was answered. The terrible goiter she had feared and hated nearly all of her life was gone. Her body mended and strength returned — she looked ahead to years of feeling good and enjoying her family. Her whole attitude was different and once again she had hopes of doing her own work and many thing that had passed her by, having friends in for an afternoon or evening—even going to the Temple again. By Christmas she did her own house cleaning and all of her Christmas shopping. With the return of vitality there seemed to be an aura of happiness and contentment radiate from her that had been lacking for so long. On December 28, 1928 the family gathered at Mel's home for a family dinner honoring the 35th wedding anniversary Frances and Ed. In the night following their return home, Frances was taken desperately ill. She was terribly sick for four days and then operated on, but spite of all the medical help available the time, and the faith and prayers of her family and friends she passed away January 1, 1929. Her death was the result of peritonitis, but the doctors were doubt as to what caused it. Frances had been a wonderful wife, mother, and homemaker. She was happy with her husband and family, and matter how little or how much she had to do with, she took a great deal of pride in taking care of them. She will long remembered for her fine cooking and a daughter-in-law often remarked admiringly, "There never was a lose button or an undarned sock in her house." Ed survived Frances eighteen years, and although he never recovered from the deep hurt of losing his Frances, he was always cheerful and happy. He spent a great deal of time continuing the Temple work and searching the geneological records that he and Frances enjoyed doing so much together. In spite of a serious accident he was in, a few years prior to his death, he recovered enough so that every available name in his family was recorded in his family record and the Temple work finished. This was an answer to a blessing given him by President Chipman of the Salt Lake Temple at the time when he lay with a broken hip and arm and it looked as though he could not survive. President Chipman promised him he would live to finish the work for his family. The three years preceding his passing, he went to the Temple on crutches and often went through two sessions each day. Although his body was crippled the same cheerfulness and good humor that had characterized his whole life, and brought him through so many trials, and heart breaks, endeared him to everyone he met and was forever a part of his nature. It was said of him, "He never met a stranger in his life." He passed away quietly on May 1, 1946 after five years of suffering from the accident. Both Frances and Ed are resting in the quiet surroundings of Wasatch Lawn Cemetery, and we who remember them, know that they are again together and happy, the sickness and trials of their earthly existance past, and they are going on working together in the wonderful plan of eternal salvation. The oldest child a daughter, Bessie Frances, married Oscar R. Holbrook of Bountiful and they live in Salt Lake City. They have three grown children, all married, Everett LeRoy, Donald Cayton, and Maxine Ruth Holbrook Nelson. The second child, a son, Edward Rumel, married Gwendolyn Nelson, of Ogden, a California Missionary Companion, and they have three daughters, Lou Jen Cayton DeJong, Marilyn Cayton, and Frances Ruth Cayton Wagstaff. They also live in Salt Lake. The youngest child, James Orland lives in Torrance, California with his wife, the former Margaret Helen Green of Salt Lake City. They have four children, James Richard, David Walter. Charles Edward, and Margaret Helen. The posterity now numbers twenty-eight— three children, ten grandchildren and fifteen great-grandchildren, one deceased.

Fredrick Beck

Contributor: DavidR.BillionGraves@gmail.com Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Fredrick Beck Taken from book “In Memory of the Becks” by Stephen F Beck Frederick was born in or near Fredricks Haven, Denmark, February 13, 1831. He was the seventh child in a family of 15. There were 10 sons. His father was Stephen Jensen Beck who was a minister in the Lutheran Church. He completed a common school education at the age of fourteen. For five years thereafter he was apprenticed to a mason and he as a very good mason. He served in the war of 1864 between Denmark and Germany. Two companions were shot down by his side. Shortly after returning to his home, he heard of the Mormons through some friends and was curious to hear them. He was converted to the church the first time he heard their Gospel. He and his wife were baptized on January 28, 1865. The following spring with the help of his brother Christian they were able to leave for Utah. On May 20, 1866, they left parents, relative and friends and the native land they loved and commenced their journey to Utah. They crossed the Atlantic on the ship “Kendelworth”. It was an old sailing ship and the journey was a long, timesome one, and they had three small children. They were often hungry and the food they did get was of very poor quality. They also suffered much from lack of good water. They were nine weeks on the ocean and the ship caught fire three times while they were on it. When they reached the New York Harbor the ship was condemned. Upon reaching New York it was so hot that quite a few of the company died from the heat and the rest were rushed by freight cars to Omaha, Nebraska to escape the heat. Here they rested for a week while arrangements were made to get the equipment to make the long, hard journey across the plains. Equipment was scarce and it was necessary for all those that were old enough and able to walk. They were on the plains about nine weeks reaching Salt Lake City in October . The only fuel they had on the plains to cook with was buffalo chips. They met many bands of hostile Indians along the way. On one occasion they stopped for the night and the Captain had the wagons make a circle this particular night. He then called the people together and forbade anyone to go outside the circle. This was the very spot he told them, where one of the bloodiest battles ever fought between white man and Indian had occurred. On another occasion where the town of Laramie, Wyoming, now lies they stopped for the night. Early in the afternoon after they had cooked their meal they left their cooking utensils beside the camp fire and in the distance they saw a band of Indians riding horseback toward their camp. When they got quite close they stopped and talked to each other. Suddenly two whipped up their horses and rode through the camp scattering pots and kettles. The rest of the Indians talked with Captain Rawlings and told him if they were Brigham’s people they would not harm them . They arrived in Salt Lake City in October, 1866, under the command of the Captains. Church historian, Andrew Jensen crossed the plains in their company. They lived in Salt Lake City for nearly two years and then moved out to Alpine. Fredrick Beck was a faithful, honest, hardworking man and was loved by all who knew him. He was a farmer and a brick layer by trade, when he got the nickname of “Mason Beck” . He served as city councilman during the years of 1883-1884. Samuel W Brown was Mayor, with R T Booth, Stephen Moyle, William J Strom and Ephriam Nash as other councilmen and Angus Vance as recorder. Again he served during 1885-1886 with Samuel W Brown, Mayor, and R E Both, Stephen Moyle, W J Strong, Albert Marsh, councilman, and James W Vance, recorder. Seven children blessed their home: Julius Conrad, born November 3, 1860 in Aalborg, Denmark, died November 21, 1929 in Alpine; Emma Beck McDaniel, Janus J, born June 8, 1864; Fredrick born January 20, 1868; Ella H born April 7, 1871; Fransian, born April 25, 1873, and Joseph Henry, born April 7, 1875. Fredrick Beck died November 21, 1906 in Alpine, Utah.

Life timeline of Father Janus Jacob Beck

Father Janus Jacob Beck was born on 8 Jun 1864
Father Janus Jacob Beck was 16 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Father Janus Jacob Beck was 21 years old when Louis Pasteur successfully tests his vaccine against rabies on Joseph Meister, a boy who was bitten by a rabid dog. Louis Pasteur was a French biologist, microbiologist and chemist renowned for his discoveries of the principles of vaccination, microbial fermentation and pasteurization. He is remembered for his remarkable breakthroughs in the causes and prevention of diseases, and his discoveries have saved many lives ever since. He reduced mortality from puerperal fever, and created the first vaccines for rabies and anthrax. His medical discoveries provided direct support for the germ theory of disease and its application in clinical medicine. He is best known to the general public for his invention of the technique of treating milk and wine to stop bacterial contamination, a process now called pasteurization. He is regarded as one of the three main founders of bacteriology, together with Ferdinand Cohn and Robert Koch, and is popularly known as the "father of microbiology".
Father Janus Jacob Beck was 35 years old when Spanish–American War: The Treaty of Paris is signed, officially ending the conflict. The Spanish–American War was fought between the United States and Spain in 1898. Hostilities began in the aftermath of the internal explosion of the USS Maine in Havana Harbor in Cuba, leading to US intervention in the Cuban War of Independence. American acquisition of Spain's Pacific possessions led to its involvement in the Philippine Revolution and ultimately in the Philippine–American War.
Father Janus Jacob Beck was 44 years old when Ford puts the Model T car on the market at a price of US$825. Ford Motor Company is an American multinational automaker headquartered in Dearborn, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit. It was founded by Henry Ford and incorporated on June 16, 1903. The company sells automobiles and commercial vehicles under the Ford brand and most luxury cars under the Lincoln brand. Ford also owns Brazilian SUV manufacturer Troller, an 8% stake in Aston Martin of the United Kingdom, and a 49% stake in Jiangling Motors of China. It also has joint-ventures in China, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, and Russia. The company is listed on the New York Stock Exchange and is controlled by the Ford family; they have minority ownership but the majority of the voting power.
Father Janus Jacob Beck died on 12 Mar 1916 at the age of 51
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Father Janus Jacob Beck (8 Jun 1864 - 12 Mar 1916), BillionGraves Record 784 Alpine, Utah, Utah, United States

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