Jane Sanford

13 Apr 1808 - 26 Jan 1893

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Jane Sanford

13 Apr 1808 - 26 Jan 1893
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I, Jane Sanford, The eldest daughter of Soloman and Elenor Sanford, was born in the Township of Kitty County of Geeds upper Canada on the 18th of April, 1808. I was married on the 18th of March, 1827, to John Mills. After our marriage we lived with my husband's grandparents, George and Sarah Boil, u
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Life Information

Jane Sanford

Born:
Died:

Provo City Cemetery

610 S State St
Provo, Utah, Utah
United States
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crex

June 8, 2011
Photographer

CaseyMonc

June 7, 2011

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  • John Mills
    Buried here
    24 Jul 1804 - 20 Mar 1876

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Jane Sanford Mills' Diary shared by Matilda Lewis. Farmington, New Mexico.

Contributor: crex Created: 9 months ago Updated: 9 months ago

I, Jane Sanford, The eldest daughter of Soloman and Elenor Sanford, was born in the Township of Kitty County of Geeds upper Canada on the 18th of April, 1808. I was married on the 18th of March, 1827, to John Mills. After our marriage we lived with my husband's grandparents, George and Sarah Boil, until after the birth of our first child, a daughter, on the 1rst of March, 1828. We named her Sarah Elenor in honor of her great-grandmother, Sarah Boil, and her grandmother, Elenor Sanford. In the month of June we moved out on a farm where we lived until after our son was born, August 30, 1830. We named him Martin Waldufin. My husband built a sawmill and then sold out and moved ten miles and settled on Duffans Creek, and built another sawmill. The county was then new and infested with bears, wolves, and other animals. And many times I had to pass lonesome days and nights with my little children while my husband was away tending to his business which was subject to the settling of a new country. On July 1rst, 1836, my third child, a daughter, was born; We called her Barbara Belinda. About this time my husband sold his place, intending to go to a warmer country for his health, which was bad every winter and while we were preparing to move, Elder John Taylor brought the Gospel to us and on the 6th of February, 1837, we went with my mother, my sister Rhoda, and her husband, John Lawrence, and my husband and brother Cornelious, to the mill pond that my husband had first made and they cut a hole through the ice and we were all baptized by Elder John Taylor and in about two weeks he confirmed us members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. February, 1838, we started to gather with the Saints. We stopped a short time at Kirtland and then proceeded to Missouri and arrived in time to witness the distress of the saints in consequence of the mob who had gathered to persecute them while they were weak and without homes and many were sick. My family all had the ague and fever. Some had it every day while others had it every other day or every second day. I had it every other day, so I labored my well days to prepare for my sick ague days. We had to scald corn to make it stick to the cob while we grated it into meal for bread, because the mob made it unsafe for our men to go to the mill. One day I had no bread for my children. I felt the chills coming on me, and I knew I must grate corn for bread. I got the grater, (which was a piece of tin punched full of holes to make it rough and then the tin was nailed on a board) well, I got the grater and went to work and I prayed that the sickness would leave me, and the sickness did leave me and I was able to go ahead with my work, yet I was so weak that I would often stumble and fall on to the frozen ground with my knees. My hardships seemed at times to be more than I would be able to bear. But the Lord did spare our lives and temper the elements for our sakes so that we could bear the cold. Surely He "Tempers the wind to the shorn lamb."In the month of March, 1839, we left Far West and came to Pike Co., Illinois and stayed till Joseph Smith escaped from the mob of Missouri and located a gathering place at Nauvoo. We then moved to Iowa, five miles from Nauvoo, in a little town called Nashville. We lived in Nashville till the spring of 1843. We sold our place in Nashville and moved to Nauvoo and remained there until the Temple was completed. Where my husband and myself with our oldest daughter had the privilege to enter in and receive our endowments, this was in the latter end of 1845 or the beginning of 1846. When the exodus of the Saints commenced from the City in 1846, we moved to Nashville to prepare for the journey to the West, not knowing where, but supposed to California or Vancouvers Island, anywhere to get out of reach of the mob. October 1846, we traveled to Winter Quarters where again there were many hardships to endure, with cold weather, hunger and sickness. But our family was blessed with good health, while there were many that died, overcome with hardships we had to endure. In the Spring of 1847 we moved to Kanesville where on the 15th of July I gave birth to a girl, dead born. In the Spring of 1850, my husband, finding it hard to make an outfit to go to the valley of the mountains (as that had been proclaimed the Saints' gathering place), so he concluded to go himself and make a home, and then we would come. He left what means he could with me to come the next Spring. On the 18th of August, 1850, my daughter, Sarah Elenor, gave birth to a son and named him John Mills. She died September 2 and I had the care of her baby. June 27, 1851, I started across the plains in Morris Philps Company and arrived at Lihi Valley, Utah in October where I met my husband. He had a place there but was not quite satisfied to stay there. So we went to Provo.

Biographical Sketch of Jane Sanford Mills Written by Sister Ellen Jakeman, and read at the funeral by Bishop J. E. Booth

Contributor: crex Created: 9 months ago Updated: 9 months ago

Biographical Sketch of Jane Sanford Mills Written by Sister Ellen Jakeman, and read at the funeral by Bishop J. E. Booth Jane Sanford Mills was born in the Township of Kitley, Leeds, Upper Canada, on the 13th day of April, A. D. 1808. Her father was a descendant of Holland ancestors, and her mother’s parents were Irish and English. Her father moved with his family into the State of New York in 1817, settling in a place called Lime, on Lake Ontario, but after four years returned to Canada, locating in Pickering Township. In 1827 she was married to John Mills, and for about a year resided with her husband’s grand parents, bearing with patience and cheerfulness all the hardships incident to a new country. Their first child, a daughter, Sarah Eleanor, was born in 1828, their second child, a son, Martin Walderfin, in 1830, after they had removed to their own farm. They subsequently sold this place, after building a sawmill. This necessitated another move into the wilderness, this time to a place called Duffins’ Creek, where another sawmill was erected. The woods abounded in bears and other dangerous animals, and many a day and night of loneliness and alarm was spent by her in her home in the almost untroden forest, while her husband was absent on business. In this wilderness, in 1836, their third child a daughter, Barbara Belinda, was born. The failing health of her husband made it necessary that they remove to a warmer climate, and again the frontier home and improvements were sold. About this time Elder John Taylor brought the Gospel. They heard and believed rejoicing, and on the 6th day of February, Sister Mills, her husband, her mother, her sister Rhoda, and husband John Lawrence, and her husband’s brother, Cornelius Mills, were baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. The place of baptism was the mill pond, and a hole was cut in the ice before the sacred ceremony could be performed. The spirit of gathering was upon them, and in 1838 they reached Kirtland, remaining there but a short time, arriving at Far West, Missouri, in time to witness and share all the sorrows and sufferings of the people of God, in that time of cold, hunger, sickness and danger; receiving their recompense in the many manifestations of God’s goodness and mercy toward them; that strengthened their faith and made it as a rock. The bitterness of her trials coupled with her faith and patience shone out in her declining years like stars from a dark sky, a solace to herself, and a strong testimony to her descendants. In 1839, they left the State of Missouri and after living at Pittsfield, Illinois and Nashville, Iowa, they removed to Nauvoo, where in 1845-6, Sister Mills, her husband and their eldest daughter, Sarah Eleanor, received their endowments. With the fortunes of the Saints, their never failing faith sustained them through the sufferings of Winter Quarters and Kanesville, where thousands of the Saints died, overcome by the hardships and exposure of that dreadful time. The ultimate destination of the Saints was not then known, but she like thousands of others, was ready to go to California, Vancouver's Island, or any other place when the word was given. At Kanesville a dead baby was born. In 1847, another move located them at Bluff Branch, where her daughter Sarah Eleanor was married to Thomas Ashton. Brother Mills, left his family at that point, and in 1850, came to the valleys alone, making a home in Levi where his family joined him a year later. The daughter who married, died, and her infant son, John Mills, was brought to the valley by his grandmother who raised him. She and her husband moved into Provo, in 1852, living in various places in that city sharing the vicissitudes of a new country, passing through the alarms and dangers of the Indian troubles, helping to train the young and build up Zion with all her strength and understanding. In 1853, her daughter Barbara Belinda, was married to William Wallace Haws. Brother Mills built and ran a sawmill for a number of years. In 1874, Sister Mills went with her husband to St. George where he had been called to labor on the Temple, returning in 1875. On the 20th of March, Brother Mills died, and was buried in the Provo cemetery. After this sad event Sister Mills twice had the privilege of officiating in the temple at St. George, doing the work for a great number of her dead. She was energetic and never weary in doing good to others. She was a member of, and an energetic worker in the first Relief society organized in Provo, and so long as bodily strength permitted. She lived in her own apartment, and preferred waiting upon herself, and did it till within one week of her death. Her last illness of a week, was not attended with any pain, but like ripe fruit that gently lets go its hold upon the parent tree, she seemed to fade into death gently and willingly at the Lord’s behest, retaining her faculties and affections to the last. Sister Mills would have been 85 years of age on the 13th day of April next. Her descendants are: Three children, twelve grand children, and thirty eight great grand children. Of these, one child, on grand child, and three of her great grand children are dead. Her life, like that of every earnest and honest Latter day Saint, would, if properly written, make a book that would be entertaining, instructive and a testimony to every person who would receive its lesson.

Time Line -John Mills and Jane Sanford And Barbara Belinda Mills and William Wallace Haws

Contributor: crex Created: 9 months ago Updated: 9 months ago

John Mills and Jane Sanford And Barbara Belinda Mills and William Wallace Haws 1 Jul 1836 - Daughter Barbara Belinda Mills was born in Duffin’s Creek, Pickering Township, Leeds, Upper Canada. February 1837 - John and Jane Mills were taught the Gospel by John Taylor and joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints two years after their daughter’s birth. The family moved to Kirtland, Ohio and later to Far West, Missouri to be with the Saints. They suffered sorrow, sickness, and hunger due to mob persecution. 1838 - John Mills and his wife, Jane left their quiet home in Canada, going to Kirtland, Ohio, and from there moved to Nauvoo, Illinois, where the family was neighbors to Joseph Smith, the prophet. 6 Feb 1845 - Barbara Belinda Mills was baptized. Barbara was baptized in the Mississippi River by Lorenzo Young. 1846 – The Mills family left Nauvoo with the exodus (including their ten-year-old daughter, Barbara) and started west. They crossed the Mississippi on the ice and spent the winter in Kanesville, Iowa. 1847 – The Mills family moved to Council Bluffs where they lived in a dugout where they remained until the family established a home in what is now Lehi, Utah, in the spring of 1851. 1850 - Barbara's father went to Utah to secure a home for the family. 1851 - Barbara, her mother, brother, and nephew traveled with the Morris Phelps Wagon Company and arrived in the Salt Lake Valley on September 28, 1851, then moved to Provo Again the family moved, this time to Provo Canyon where John Mills operated a sawmill at the time of the outbreak of the Black Hawk War when they, with others of the community, were driven into Provo City by the Indians. December 1853 - Barbara Mills married William Wallace Haws ( Born: 18 Feb 1835, Green Township, Wayne, Illinois) of Provo. She became the mother of eight children, knitted and wove the clothing for her entire family, and cared for the many chores, which fell to the lot of the pioneer homemaker. William and Barbara had the following children: Hannah Jane, 6 Sep 1854 William Wallace, 20 Sep 1856 George Martin, 15 Dec 1858 Sarah Elenor "Ellen," 13 Mar 1861 John Gilbert, 16 Feb 1864 Mary Angeline "Ann," 13 Apr 1867 Rhoda Matilda, 14 Jan 1870 Millie Mary "May," 18 May 1873 They lived with Barbara's parents for three years until they could get their own home. The grasshoppers made things difficult the first two years, but they survived. When word came of Johnston's Army, William was made captain and sent to Echo Canyon. He was soon made major. William was often gone serving in the army to fight Johnston's Army, working away from home, and serving a mission. Barbara was left to care for the children and the farm. Barbara would knit, weave, and sew the clothing for her family with her own sewing machine. In 1858, William sold his home and purchased another lot where he built a house. 11 Feb 1858 - Barbara was endowed in the Endowment House. 1871 – William Wallace was called on a mission. Upon his return, he sold his home and worked for the Salt Lake Police. 8 November 1875 - William married second wife, Martha Barrett (Born: 13 Mar 1859 in Pontypool, Mammouth, England; Died: 2 September 1916, SLC, UT) in Salt Lake City, Utah. Children of William and Martha JOHN WALLACE, b. 21 Feb 1878. D. 19 Feb 1902. CHARLES JAMES, b. 15 Apr 1881. D. 7 Aug 1906. JOSEPH FOREST, b. 19 Dec 1882. D. 17 May 1968. LAURA PHOEBE, b. 10 Feb 1885. D. 16 Oct 1964. WILLIAM GILBERT, b. 24 Mar 1887. D. 20 May 1955. ERASTUS SNOW, b. 10 May 1889. D. 13 Aug 1969. CHLOE, b. 2 Feb 1891. D. 14 Nov 1965. MARY (twin), b. 3 Aug 1894. D. 28 Jan 1989. MARTHA (twin), b. 3 Aug 1894. D. 6 May 1984. 1879 - William Wallace Haws took his two wives and children and moved from Provo to Arizona, their destination being Showlow settling on a ranch that was on the main freight road. They brought with them a large herd of milch cows and with two yoke of oxen and a tem of horses hauled everything they owned overland, a two-month journey at that time. Because of the lack of feed for their cattle the couple went to the “Forks of the Road” where the road from St. Johns and Showlow connected with the road to Fort Apache. Barbara would often feed the mail carrier and invited the freighters to camp at her place. She made cheese and butter. She raised chickens for the eggs. These items were sold to support the family. They camped there awhile and then moved on to Willow Springs. Mrs. Haws became acquainted with many of the Indians who frequently passed their home and they were always friendly toward her. Once, while she was at Fort Apache where she had been called to aid an ill friend, Indians attacked the fort, killed one soldier and wounded another. Then the Haws family decided to move again and Barbara went back to Utah to visit, while her husband searched for a new home. 1883 - Indian troubles caused them to move to Pima, Arizona and soon she was left to make a living for herself and youngest child, as the older ones were all married. Because of the persecutions of polygamy, William moved to Mexico with his second wife hoping to send for the rest of his family. He married a third wife and stayed in Mexico. 1 March 1888 – William Wallace married 3rd wife, Gertrudis Guaneros (Born: abt 1845; Died: 1929) Children of William and Gertrudis ELIZABETH, b. 17 Nov 1888. ALMA, b. 14 Jul 1891. 1907. GERTRUDIS, b. 8 Aug 1893. D. 9 Jul 1894. Barbara would visit Mexico whenever circumstances allowed. She would supply them with clothing and other items they needed. It was hard for Barbara to accept the law of plural marriage, which took him into Old Mexico where he lived until his death on March 6, 1895 March 6, 1895 – William Wallace Haws: died of pneumonia in Mexico in Colonia Pacheco, Chihuahua, Mexico Her granddaughter, Annie Haws Burrell, wrote the following: “When my father was called to be bishop in Colonia Pacheco, Grandma came down to see us often and always brought some of her other grandchildren from Arizona with her. We loved her and looked forward to her visits as she always had such interesting stories to tell. She would manage to get some sugar and lard, which at that time were luxuries, and make us cookies and pies. Many times she would take us on a long nature walk and we would have a picnic. Often Grandma Haws, my mother and Aunt Etta, who lived with us, measured off yards and yards of yarn and then would see which one could knit theirs first, as they had to knit all the stockings we wore. Grandma could not read so it was a pleasure for her when Aunt Etta would read to her and to my mother as they knitted. I loved to hold her skein of yarn as she wound it into a ball. “ I have heard her tell of living neighbors to the Prophet Joseph Smith and playing with his children. She said many times she sat on his knee as his own children did. She remembered when word came that Joseph and Hyrum were killed and their bodies were laid by a low window in their home. In this manner you could see them twice, once as you passed through the room and again from the outside as you passed the window. Grandma was very independent and walking was her surest way of going the six-mile trip from Pima to Central and on to Thatcher, always taking a short cut up the railroad track. She pieced quilts for people, made over a hundred for one lady on shares and by doing so was able to give all her grandchildren a hand-sewn pieced quilt, which today are family treasures. “Grandma Haws, as everyone called her, lived with me in Safford, Arizona during her last years and my children often speak with reverence of the time when ‘Great Grandma’ came to stay with us. She had an accident, which made her bedfast the last two years of her life. She calmly went to sleep and died April 1, 1936, just three months before she would have been one hundred years of age. Four of her children survived her, as did 80 grandchildren, 266great-granchildren and 28 great-great-grandchildren.” Funeral services for Mrs. Haws were held in the Pima church. The choir sang three songs and Harvey Mangum said a beautiful prayer. Eva Lines gave a talk on her recollection of Mrs. Haws and told of her wonderful life. Ben Blake gave a history of the life and accomplishments of Mrs. Haws and her activities in the communities in which she lived. Elder Spencer Kimball sang the love song, “Tired” and gave a short talk on the wonderful things that had happened in the world during Mrs. Haws’ long and interesting life. The benediction was pronounced by Joseph H. Lines. Burial was made in the Pima cemetery and the grave was dedicated by Arthur Lines. Amanda Haws Mantle Barbara loved the Church and lived for it. She had an accident that left her bedfast the last two years of her life, then passed away at the age of ninety-nine. 30 Mar 1936 - Barbara Belinda Mills Died in Pima, Graham, Arizona, USA 1 Apr 1936 - Barbara Belinda Mills was buried in Pima, Graham, Arizona, USA 6 Mar 1952 - Sealed to parents on in the Mesa Arizona temple.

Jane Sanford Mills

Contributor: crex Created: 9 months ago Updated: 9 months ago

This is a copy of a letter taken from the Utah Stake jubilee box in the year 1930 in April. The letter was written by my great grandmother Jane Sanford Mills and placed in the box by her. Provo City, Mar 21, 1881 Soloman Sanford, son of William and Cristina Sanford, born Sep 20, 1788 in the state of New York of Holland decent married Elenor Barry daughter of Patric Barry of Ireland and Debora Smith of England born Apr 2, 1786. They had eight daughters and one son, namely Jane Sanford, born April 13, 1808, married John Mills; Sophia Sanford, born April 17 1810, married Ira Thornton; Rhoda, born June 15, 1812, married John Lawrence; Lucinda, born July 4, 1815 and died June 4, 1828; Ephraim, born February 6, 1818, married Mary Jones; Belinda, born March 8, 1820, married Orin Green; Charlotte, born June 9, 1822, married Thomas L. Durfee; Mary, born June 8, 1828, married America Jones; Angeline, born March 8, 1831, married William Pim Taylor. I, Jane Sanford, the eldest daughter of Solomon and Elenor Barry Sanford, was born in the township of Kitley, county of Leeds, Upper Canada on the 13th of April 1808. I was married on the 13th of March 1827 to John Mills, son of Mathew Mills and Hannah Boils, he was born on the 24th day of July 1804. He had two brothers and two sisters as follows; Martin, born September 3, 1806, died July 1828; Elizabeth, born December 22, 1807, married John Degear; Jemima, born December 23, 1809, died November 27, 1811 and Cornelius, born october 16, 1812, married Nancy Barry. After our marriage we lived with my husbands grandparents, George and Sarah Boils till after the birth of our first child a daughter on the 1st of March 1828. We named her Sarah Elenor in honor of her great grandmother Sarah Boils and her grandmother Elenor Berry Sanford. In the month of June we moved out on a farm where we lived till after our son was born August 30, 1830. We named him Martin Walderfin in honor of his uncle Martin Mills and some of his father’s relatives. My husband built a saw mill and then sold out and moved ten miles and settled on Duffins Creek and built another saw mill about 1830 - 1832. The country was then new and infested with bears, wolves and other wild animals and many times I had to pass lonesome days and nights with my little children while my husband was away tending to his business which was subject to the settling all new countries. On the 1st day of July 1836, my third child, a daughter, was born. We called her name Barbara Belinda in honor of her father’s cousin Barbara Johnson and my sister Belinda Sanford. About this time my husband sold his place intending to go to a warmer country for his health which was bad every winter and while he was preparing to move, Elder John Taylor brought the gospel to us and on the 6th of February 1837 we went with my mother and my sister Rhoda and her husband John Lawrence and my husband’s brother Cornelius Mills to the mill pond that my husband had first made and they cut a hole through the ice and we were all baptized by Elder John Taylor and in about two weeks he confirmed us members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. February 1838 we started to gather with the Saints,we stopped a short time at Kirtland and then proceeded to Missouri and arrived at Far West in time to witness the distress of the Saints in consequence of the mob who had gathered to persecute them while they were weak and without homes and many were sick. My family all had the ague and fever some had it every day while others had it every second day, I had it every other day, I labored my well day to prepare for my sick day. We ha to scald corn to make it stick to the cob while we grated it into meal for bread because the mob made it unsafe for our men to go to a mill. I had no bread for my children I felt the chill a coming on me and I thought that I must grate some corn and I got the grater (which was a piece of tin punched full of holes to make it rough and then nailed on a board) and went to work and the sickness left me and I was able to go ahead with my work, yet I was so weak that I would often stumble and fall on the frozen ground with my knees. My hardships seemed at times to me to be more than I would be able to bear. But the Lord did spare our lives and tempered the elements for our sake so that we could bear the cold. Surely he tempers the wind to the shorn lamb. In the month of March 1839 we left Far West and came to Pike County Illinois and stayed till the Prophet Joseph Smith escaped from the mob and of Missouri, and located a gathering place at Nauvoo. We then moved to Iowa five miles from Nauvoo in a little town called Nashville. We lived at Nashville till the spring of 1843. We sold our place and moved to Nauvoo and remained there until the temple was completed, where my husband and myself with my oldest daughter had the privilege to enter in and receive our endowments in the latter end of 1845 or beginning of the year 1846. When the exodus of the Saints commenced from the City of Nauvoo in 1846, we moved to Nashville to prepare for the journey to the west not knowing where but supposed to California or Vancouver Island to get out of the reach of the mobs. October 1846 we traveled to winter quarters where again there were many hardships to endure with cold, hunger, and sickness, but my family was blessed with good health. While there, many died overcome by the hardships which we had to endure while their husbands and fathers had been forced to go and leave them camped on the prairie destitute. In the spring of 1847 we moved to Kanesville where on the 15th of July I gave birth to a girl still born. In the fall of 1847 we moved to a place called Bluff Branch 5 miles north from Kanesville which is now called Council Bluff City. Sept 23, 1849 my daughter Sara Elenor was married to Thomas Ashton. In the spring of 1850 my husband, finding it hard to make a fit out to go to the valleys of the mountains as that had been proclaimed the Saints gathering place, concluded to go himself and make a home. He left what means he could with me to come the next spring. On the 18th day of August 1850 my daughter Sarah Elenor gave birth to a son and named him John Mills in honor of his grandfather and she died the 3rd day of September and I had the care of her baby. June 27, 1851, started across the plains in Morris Phelps company and arrived at Lehi, Utah Valley in October where I again met my husband. He had a place there but he was not quite satisfied to stay there so we went to Provo and settled near where the main road goes on the Provo bench. In June 1853 we had to move together for safety on account of a war with the Indians. We settled on the block where the Provo meeting house now stands. December 1, 1853 my daughter Barbara Belinda was married to William Wallace Haws. We lived here till 1857 during this time my husband built a saw mill one mile and 1/2 north of here and we moved to it where we lived till 1868. We sold the mill and moved to the block which now the Brigham Young Academy stands. In the fall of 1874 I went with my husband and our grandson to Southern Utah to spend the winter with our son and labor on the temple. March 1875 returned to Provo, March 20, 1876 my husband died and was buried in Provo cemetery. November 1877 I went to St. George temple and was baptized for Deborah Smith, Cristina Sanford, Lucinda Sanford, Almira Churchill, Hannah Boils Mills, and Sarah Johnson. I did other work for myself and my dead then returned to Provo. In the fall of 1878 I returned to the temple and was baptized for Mary Sanford, Mary Jan Green, Sarah Mills Boils, Mary Boils Johnson, and Sarah Boils Johnson. I labored for my dead a short time then returned to Provo where I now live. I have thus committed this short account of my family hoping that it may be a benefit to my posterity in a way to stimulate them to carry on what I have had the privilege to commence for the benefit and salvation of them and their progenitors. I am now getting old in my seventy third year and according to the laws of nature must soon pass off of the stage of action having seen many hardships on account of the enemies of the truth, I might write many things more which would be too lengthy in detail and a part would not suffice so I will close hoping that the ones that receive what words this will be able to carry out what I have neglected through

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=12551998

Contributor: crex Created: 9 months ago Updated: 9 months ago

Birth: Apr. 13, 1808 Ontario, Canada Death: Jan. 26, 1893 Provo Utah County Utah, USA Daughter of Soloman Sanford and Eleanor Barry Sanford. Married John Mills 13 Mar 1827. In her words: After our marriage we lived with my husband's grandparents, Geroge and Sarah Boils till after the birth of our first child, a daughter, on the 1st of March, 1828. We named her Sarah Elenor in honor of her great grandmother Sarah Boils and her grandmother Elenor Barry Sanford. In the month of June we moved out on a farm where we lived til after our son was born Aug 30, 1830. We named him Martin Walderfin in honor of his uncle, Martin Mills and some of his fathers relatives. My husband built a saw mill and then sold out and moved ten miles and settled on Duffins Creek and built another saw mill about 1830-32. Elder John Taylor brought the gospel to us on the 6th of February 1837, we went with my mother and my sister, Rhoda and her husband John Lawrence and my husband's brother Cornelius Mills to the mill pond that my husband had first made and they cut a hole through the ice and we were all baptized by Elder John Taylor and in about 2 weeks he confirmed us members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. February 1838 we started to gather with the saints; we stopped a short time at Kirtland, Ohio, and then proceeded to Missouri. In the month of March 1839 we left Far West and came to Pike County, Illinois and stayed till the Prophet Joseph Smith escaped from the Mob. We then moved to Iowa, 5 miles from Nauvoo, in a little town called Nashville. We lived at Nashville till the spring of 1843. We sold our place and moved to Nauvoo and remained there until the temple was completed. When the exodus of the saints commenced from the City of Nauvoo in 1846, we moved to Nashville to prepare for the journey to the west, not knowing where but supposed to California or Vancouver Island to get out of the reach of mobs. October 1846 we traveled to Winter Quarters. In the spring of 1847 we moved to Kansville where on the 15th of July I gave birth to a girl – a dead born. In the fall of 1847 we moved to a place called Bluff Branch, 5 miles north from Kanesville, which is now called Council Bluff City. September 23, 1849, my daughter Sarah Elenor was married to Thomas Ashton. On the 18th day of August 1850 my daughter Sarah Elenor gave birth to a son and named him John Mills in honor of his grandfather and she died the 3rd day of September 1850 and I had the care of her baby. June 2, 1851, started across the plains in Morris Phelps Company and arrived at Lehi, Utah Valley in October (6th 1851) where I again met my husband. He had a place there but he was not quite satisfied to stay there so we went to Provo and settled near where the main road goes on the Provo Bench. In June 1853 we had to move together for safety on account of the war with the Indians. We settled on the block where to Provo Meeting House now stands (Tabernacle block), December 1, 1853, my daughter Barbara Belinda (17 years) was married to William Wallace Haws. We lived here till 1857 during this time my husband built a saw mill one mile and one half north of here and we moved to it where we lived till 1868. We sold the mill and moved to the block which now the Brigham Young Academy stands. In the fall of 1874 I went with my husband and our grandson to southern Utah to spend the winter with our son and labor on the temple March 1875 returned to Provo; March 20 1876 my husband died and was buried in Provo Cemetery. Family links: Parents: Solomon Santvoord (1787 - 1847) Eleanor Barry Sanford (1786 - 1877) Spouse: John Mills (1804 - 1876)* Children: Sarah Eleanor Mills Ashton (1828 - 1850)* Martin Walderfin Mills (1830 - 1925)* Siblings: Jane Sanford Mills (1808 - 1893) Rhoda Sanford Skeen (1812 - 1896)** Ephraim Sanford (1818 - 1898)** Belinda Sanford Green (1820 - 1900)* Charlotte Amelia Sanford Durfee (1824 - 1906)* Mary Ann Sanford Jones (1828 - 1868)* Angeline Sanford Taylor (1833 - 1870)* *Calculated relationship **Half-sibling Burial: Provo City Cemetery Provo Utah County Utah, USA Plot: Block 6 Lot 7 Maintained by: L Despain Originally Created by: Broncyn (inactive) Record added: Nov 30, 2005 Find A Grave Memorial# 12551998

Life timeline of Jane Sanford

1808
Jane Sanford was born on 13 Apr 1808
Jane Sanford was 4 years old when Charles Dickens, English novelist and critic (d. 1870) Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world's best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era. His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime, and by the 20th century critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are still widely read today.
1812
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Jane Sanford was 18 years old when The Erie Canal opens: Passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie. The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System. Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.
1825
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Jane Sanford was 24 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
1831
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Jane Sanford was 32 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
1840
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Jane Sanford was 52 years old when Charles Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
1859
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Jane Sanford was 61 years old when Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton founded the National Woman Suffrage Association, breaking away from the American Equal Rights Association which they had also previously founded. Susan B. Anthony was an American social reformer and women's rights activist who played a pivotal role in the women's suffrage movement. Born into a Quaker family committed to social equality, she collected anti-slavery petitions at the age of 17. In 1856, she became the New York state agent for the American Anti-Slavery Society.
1869
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Jane Sanford was 70 years old when Thomas Edison announces his invention of the phonograph, a machine that can record and play sound. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
1877
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Jane Sanford was 77 years old when Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is published in the United States. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a novel by Mark Twain, first published in the United Kingdom in December 1884 and in the United States in February 1885. Commonly named among the Great American Novels, the work is among the first in major American literature to be written throughout in vernacular English, characterized by local color regionalism. It is told in the first person by Huckleberry "Huck" Finn, the narrator of two other Twain novels and a friend of Tom Sawyer. It is a direct sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.
1885
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Jane Sanford died on 26 Jan 1893 at the age of 84
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Jane Sanford (13 Apr 1808 - 26 Jan 1893), BillionGraves Record 12584 Provo, Utah, Utah, United States

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