Jane Duke Meldrum

23 Aug 1862 - 9 Dec 1941

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Jane Duke Meldrum

23 Aug 1862 - 9 Dec 1941
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Thomas Alexander Meldrum was born in Provo, Utah 14 February 1862. He married Jane Duke in the Logan L.D.S. Temple 16 February 1887. He died 9th May 1912. He was a farmer and plasterer. He also worked in the winter in Provo Canyon cutting logs for a sawmill. He also worked at the sawmill helping saw
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Life Information

Jane Duke Meldrum

Born:
Died:

Provo City Cemetery

610 S State St
Provo, Utah, Utah
United States
Transcriber

crowtherdr

June 1, 2011
Photographer

GraveScavenger

June 1, 2011

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A Brief Sketch of My Father’s Life by Thomas Albert Meldrum

Contributor: crowtherdr Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Thomas Alexander Meldrum was born in Provo, Utah 14 February 1862. He married Jane Duke in the Logan L.D.S. Temple 16 February 1887. He died 9th May 1912. He was a farmer and plasterer. He also worked in the winter in Provo Canyon cutting logs for a sawmill. He also worked at the sawmill helping saw the logs into lumber. His specific job at the sawmill was to start or stop the saw as needed. The men would go high up on the mountains and cut the logs, trim all the branches off them, and then slide them down the mountain to the valley below. Once these logs got started down the mountain they would go at a very rapid speed. Then in the spring when the water in the river was high due to melting snow the men would roll the logs into the river and let them float down to the sawmill. This was called the “tie drive.” Often the men would ride the logs down the river. After the logs were all sawed, dad would come home and start the farm work and the sawmill would close for the summer. Dad was a good farmer. He always had his land plowed and fertilized, planted his crops early and kept them free from weeds. On the farm he raised sugar beets, potatoes, corn, sugar cane (from which we made molasses), grain, alfalfa, and other varieties of vegetables, also many varieties of fruits and berries. The entire family was kept busy during the spring, summer, and fall, for there was much to be done on the farm. Sometimes we boys had to quit school early in the spring to help gets the crops in, and some years we didn’t start school until late in the fall because we had to help harvest the crops. Dad was a plasterer as well as a farmer. He and 3 other men worked together and took contracts to plaster houses. They tried to get big jobs like school houses, court houses and other public buildings. They also plastered homes. They used to work long hours, for the more they did the more money they would make. They usually had plenty of work for they were good, dependable workers. One summer they had a contract to plaster some large buildings in Springville, Utah. Dad would drive from our farm, about 4 miles north of Provo, to Springville. He had a two wheel cart and an old buckskin horse. He would leave from home very early in the morning, often before daylight, and be at the job in Springville by 6 A.M. They would work until 6 P.M., or sometimes later, and it would be after dark before he reached home. He often took me with him to help mix the plaster and carry it into the house or building they were plastering. They would pay me 50¢ a day. Everything had to be done by hand and it was all hard, heavy work. Today they use plaster board and all the hard work is done by machinery. We lived in Provo, Utah when I was born, but when I was about 5 years old Dad traded our home in Provo for a farm about 4 miles north of Provo, in Pleasant View. It is now called Edgemont. We moved from our home to another one during the summer Dad sold our home, while Dad built a home on the farm. He got two rooms of the home built by late summer and we moved to this new farm home just before school started in the fall. This would be in 1896 for I started school that fall and had just turned 6 years old. The school we attended was the Mountain School. They had 8 grades and only one room. Some of the 7th and 8th grade boys and girls were as large and as old as junior and senior high school boys and girls are today. They were always teasing us and playing tricks on us because we were first graders. I remember a rather amusing incident that happened the day we moved to the farm. We had all our furniture, etc. in the wagon, a cow tied behind the wagon, a large crate full of chickens on a kind of rack Dad had made and fastened on the back end of the wagon. We had just got about halfway to the farm when the door of the chicken crate came open and out flew the chickens. We kids were sitting on top of the furniture facing the back of the wagon. We yelled at Dad to stop and told him the chickens were getting out. He stopped and tied the horses to a fence and we all started to chase chickens up and down the road and thru fields. We got most of them, but not all. Dad was an honest, hard working man. His promise was always kept, right to the word. When he told us kids to do something we knew he meant what he said, and he seldom if ever had to tell us a second time. He died 9th May 1912 while being operated on for a perforated stomach ulcer. I never heard him say an unkind word to anyone, and I never heard him or mother say an unkind word to each other or to anyone else. They believed it was better to take an injury than to give one.

A Brief Sketch of My Mother’s Life by Thomas Albert Meldrum

Contributor: crowtherdr Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Jane Duke was born in Provo, Utah 23 August 1862. She married Thomas Alexander Meldrum 16 February 1887 in the Logan L.D.S. Temple. She died 9 December 1941. She was a house wife and an active church worker. She had a very limited formal education because she was only in the 5th grade when her father died and she, with her other older brothers and sisters had to quit school and get jobs to help support the family. She and some of her older brothers and sisters worked in the Provo Woolen Mills. They worked long hours and received very small wages for their work. Mother’s first job at the factory was picking up scraps of cloth around the machines. As she got older she learned how to operate the weaving machines. She worked there until she was married. Mother and Dad lived in Provo until 1896 when they moved to the farm Dad had acquired. Mother was a neat person and kept her house clean and orderly. She liked flowers and always had a lot of nice flowers either indoors or outside in her flower garden. She also liked to help in the vegetable garden and never allowed a weed to grow in it. When the berries were ready to pick she would always help pick them and leave my older sister, Emma, to do the house work and cook the meals. Mother was not only a good house-keeper, but also a good cook. We raised all our own meat, eggs, vegetables, fruits, milk, etc. and she always had plenty on hand to cook. If any company or visitors were at the house about noon hour they were always invited to stay and have dinner with us. Mother often cooked a delicious chicken dinner on Sunday and would invite a few of our friends to enjoy it with us. Mother worked in the Relief Society and the Primary organizations. She also attended Sunday School and Sacrament Meetings. When she was working in the Primary she would usually drive down to the meeting house, which was about 3 miles from our house, with the horse and buggy. Sometimes Dad would take us down in the wagon. He would then go on down to Provo to transact some business and be back in time to take us home. When Dad was working in the canyon with the horses or was using them on the farm, mother would put the two youngest kids in the baby buggy and with the rest of us following along, make our way thru the dust or mud, depending on the season of the year, hike 3 miles to the meeting house. Unless she was sick, she never missed a meeting. She always paid her tithing. This was in produce rather than in money as we do today, for at that time money was not very plentiful. She made her own butter and every 10th pound of butter, and every 10th dozen of eggs was put away separately to be sent to the tithing office. This she would do about once a month, when she went to town. Sometimes she would send us kids with it. She also made butter to sell and had plenty of customers who were anxious to get her butter and eggs, because they could depend on them being good and fresh. One of her customers was a dentist who lived in Salt Lake City. He would ride from Salt Lake City to Provo on the train Monday morning and stay in Provo thru the week and leave Saturday evening after office hours for Salt Lake. Before he left Saturday afternoon, mother would always take him 2 or 3 pounds of butter to take home. This helped pay our dental bills. Mother made all of our clothes, knit our stockings, gloves, sweaters; bought cloth and made our shirts, overalls, and dresses for the girls. She would patch them, and always kept us neat and clean. She never spoke a cross word to us, but sometimes, in a good natured way, would threaten to paddle us, but we knew she wouldn’t. After Dad died in 1912, Mother remained on the farm until she died 9 December 1941 or about 29 years. My brother Reed ran the farm most of this time. My older sister Emma also lived with her part of this time. She liked her home and was glad she could take care of it and herself.

Jane Duke

Contributor: crowtherdr Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Jane Duke was the daughter of Jonathan Oldham Duke and Martha Thompson. Her father died when she was young. With her older brothers and sisters she had to quit school and work in the Provo Woolen Mills to help earn money for the family to survive. She was very active in the church. She served in both the Primary and the Relief Society. They lived 3 miles from their church building. My grandfather said that she was a very good cook and that they had a chicken dinner every Sunday. She made all of the clothes for her family. She and Thomas had a farm in Edgemont, about 4 miles from Provo. Thomas died in 1912 and she was a widow for almost 29 years. She lived on the farm all of this time. Her son Reed ran the farm most of this time. Two of her half brothers were patriarchs, and she received a Patriarchal Blessing from both of them. She passed away on December 9, 1941, which was two days after Pearl Harbor.

Life timeline of Jane Duke Meldrum

1862
Jane Duke Meldrum was born on 23 Aug 1862
Jane Duke Meldrum was 17 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Jane Duke Meldrum was 25 years old when Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West Show opens in London. William Frederick "Buffalo Bill" Cody was an American scout, bison hunter, and showman. He was born in Le Claire, Iowa Territory, but he lived for several years in his father's hometown in Toronto Township, Ontario, Canada, before the family returned to the Midwest and settled in the Kansas Territory.
Jane Duke Meldrum was 29 years old when Thomas Edison patents the motion picture camera. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Jane Duke Meldrum was 43 years old when Albert Einstein publishes his first paper on the special theory of relativity. Albert Einstein was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics. His work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. He is best known to the general public for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2, which has been dubbed "the world's most famous equation". He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect", a pivotal step in the development of quantum theory.
Jane Duke Meldrum was 50 years old when The British passenger liner RMS Titanic sinks in the North Atlantic at 2:20 a.m., two hours and forty minutes after hitting an iceberg. Only 710 of 2,227 passengers and crew on board survive. RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early hours of 15 April 1912, after colliding with an iceberg during its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City. There were an estimated 2,224 passengers and crew aboard, and more than 1,500 died, making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history. RMS Titanic was the largest ship afloat at the time it entered service and was the second of three Olympic-class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line. It was built by the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast. Thomas Andrews, her architect, died in the disaster.
Jane Duke Meldrum was 58 years old when The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified, guaranteeing women's suffrage in America. The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibits the states and the federal government from denying the right to vote to citizens of the United States on the basis of sex. It was adopted on August 18, 1920.
Jane Duke Meldrum was 77 years old when World War II: Nazi Germany and Slovakia invade Poland, beginning the European phase of World War II. World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most global war in history; it directly involved more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. In a state of total war, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.
Jane Duke Meldrum died on 9 Dec 1941 at the age of 79
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Grave record for Jane Duke Meldrum (23 Aug 1862 - 9 Dec 1941), BillionGraves Record 6725 Provo, Utah, Utah, United States

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