James Udy

1820 - 1905

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James Udy

1820 - 1905
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James Udy was born August 16, 1820 at Tervilmick in the Parrish of Lanlivery, Cornwall England, a son of Hart and Ann Brokenshire Udy. Little is known of his early life in England, however, before leaving England he learned the blacksmith trade working as an apprentice for seven years for which he r

Life Information

James Udy

Born:
Died:

Farmington City Cemetery

311 Spencer Way
Farmington, Davis, Utah
United States
Transcriber

patyoshi

July 10, 2012
Photographer

Brandinonian

June 7, 2012

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James Udy is buried in the Farmington City Cemetery at the location displayed on the map below. This GPS information is ONLY available at BillionGraves. Our technology can help you find the gravesite and other family members buried nearby.

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James Udy

Contributor: patyoshi Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

James Udy was born August 16, 1820 at Tervilmick in the Parrish of Lanlivery, Cornwall England, a son of Hart and Ann Brokenshire Udy. Little is known of his early life in England, however, before leaving England he learned the blacksmith trade working as an apprentice for seven years for which he received only his board and clothing. He was also an armor in the British Royal Navy. This was the same as a machinist, similar to a blacksmith. There was a Navy yard in Woolwich, Kent. He married Mary Ann Trengrove. To them were born three sons. After hearing the Gospel and being converted they joined the church in England and emigrated to America, landing in New Orleans. The voyage on the slow crowded ship was hard on him, but more so on his wife, Mary Ann who was a small woman and very frail. Upon arriving in New Orleans they both felt they had fulfilled a lifetime dream. They settled down in New Orleans with their sons for a time. But the long voyage and the life in the new country was too much for his frail wife, and she died. All he could remember of her was a fleeting shadow that had been with him for an instant, and then was snatched away. One son died in England and another son died soon after his mother, leaving the remaining son (William Henry Udy) the only tangible thing that James had from his family and life in Cornwall. New Orleans held no future for James and at length he and his son took a boat up the Mississippi. Often he had thought of joining the Saints for the journey to Salt Lake but always it was thoughts of his sickly wife that held him back. It was there on the boat chugging slowly up the river that he met Isabelle Ann Cowley, she was from the Isle of Man. Isabelle had taken the small boy to heart and James found in her an answer to his dreams. A few months later they were married and on their way to Zion with a company of fellow converts. They traveled in the Henry Bryant Manning Jolley Company in 1852. Isabelle’s parents appear to have been in this company as well. They eventually moved to Farmington as well. I will have a post about them soon. On the journey west there was much sickness, deaths and massacre. Isabelle was pregnant and she suffered with the heat and the terror of the Indians. A week before they reached Zion it seemed she could not go on. She begged James to go without her, but he doggedly plodded on, working night and day to make things easier for her. The last miles were torture for Isabelle, every bounce of the wagon an intense thrust of pain. The rest of her life, Indians, friendly or not, caused goose pimples to stand out on her flesh, and her hands grew clammy with sweat. In a short time Isabelle and James were settled in a tiny cabin of their own and James had set up a blacksmith shop in Salt Lake City. There was need for a good blacksmith and James Udy was most efficient in his trade. In fact there was no one in Utah during his lifetime that could surpass him in welding or any kind of blacksmithing. Even the old master himself had admitted that he had a magic touch with an anvil. In coming across the plains many of the wagons had been destroyed by Indians, broken or lost in fording the rivers and there was need for more wagons. He began to build wagons with some new friends. Money was scarce in the valley and all work was taken out in trade. Land was free to be taken up, wheat and other food stuffs raised by the settlers were traded for labor of all kinds. In this manner James acquired fourteen lots of land in Salt Lake City by the time their first child was born on November 4, 1852 and she was named Elizabeth Ann. James and Isabelle ended up having 10 children. They lived in Salt Lake City two years when James decided to set up a shop in the new settlement north of Salt Lake called Bountiful. It had developed into a thriving community, and James anxious to find new trade and made plans to move Isabelle and his family there. Before leaving he traded his 14 lots of land for a yoke of oxen. A number of those lots on main street would have brought him a small fortune a few years later. They lived in Bountiful for a time until news spread that there was plenty good land and water in Farmington and James had been thinking of moving there. Things were not so good in Bountiful as another blacksmith shop had gone up and he felt the need to move. So it was in 1856 that the family moved to Farmington. For over four years James and Isabelle made themselves a part of the community of Farmington when news spread that Cache Valley had been settled. Pictures of the new land north came into James' mind. Seeing an opportunity to take up some more of this land, James sold his home and told Isabelle they were going to move to Cache Valley. For the first time and the only time in their marriage, Isabelle openly defied James. She refused to go, he tried to make her see that a good living would be made, but Isabelle stood pat and shook her head and flatly refused to move. The terror of the trip across the plains was so instilled in her mind that it could not be easily erased. They did not move to Cache Valley. But with their home sold James and Isabelle took up 30 acres of land just over and below the hill from the Stewart family. Here James set up a rock shop and built a new home for his family. Up until a short time ago part of the rock shop stood on the hill. Now that the wanderlust in him was gone, James was content to farm his acres and work in his shop. Lately he had been making iron parts for threshing machines. There were only a few of the more intricate castings that they had to send east for. Most of them he could iron out on his anvil with little difficulty. Many of the settlers could not understand how it was possible for a small town blacksmith to make such difficult pieces of iron work as those for the threshing machine. But James Udy had been a good apprentice in England and he was a good master of the trade in America. James and Isabelle lived in Farmington for many years. Isabelle died very suddenly while preparing for a trip to Salt Lake City on December 4, 1893 at the age of 61. Always strong and healthy James Udy lived to be nearly 85. He died June 19, 1905. Both James and Isabelle Ann (Cowley) Udy are buried in the Farmington City Cemetery, as are his other wife Mary Sophia Hansen and three babies. This history was compiled by Marva Udy Earl (grand-daughter) for the Daughter's of the Utah Pioneers Histories. I shortened it quite a bit but you can read the whole thing here. Also several members of the Udy family moved to Australia and New Zealand and were some of the first pioneers there. I have a book that goes into great detail about the Udy family in Cornwall called, "Udy, A Pride of Lions." written by an Australian relative. It briefly mentions James Udy. It was very interesting.

Life timeline of James Udy

1820
James Udy was born in 1820
James Udy was 11 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
James Udy was 20 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
James Udy was 39 years old when Charles Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
James Udy was 42 years old when U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring the freedom of all slaves in Confederate territory by January 1, 1863. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
James Udy was 59 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
James Udy was 65 years old when Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is published in the United States. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a novel by Mark Twain, first published in the United Kingdom in December 1884 and in the United States in February 1885. Commonly named among the Great American Novels, the work is among the first in major American literature to be written throughout in vernacular English, characterized by local color regionalism. It is told in the first person by Huckleberry "Huck" Finn, the narrator of two other Twain novels and a friend of Tom Sawyer. It is a direct sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.
James Udy was 75 years old when George VI of the United Kingdom (d. 1952) George VI was King of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Commonwealth from 11 December 1936 until his death in 1952. He was the last Emperor of India and the first Head of the Commonwealth.
James Udy died in 1905 at the age of 85
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for James Udy (1820 - 1905), BillionGraves Record 1685413 Farmington, Davis, Utah, United States

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