James Stratton

20 Dec 1824 - 23 Mar 1907

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James Stratton

20 Dec 1824 - 23 Mar 1907
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From handwriten notes in the book by Emma Evans Stratton. daughter in law, is the following 'Baptized by William Goats 8 Aug 1850; Confirmed by James Horit 9 Aug 1850; James Stratton Sr. received into the Ward Timpanogas, 27 Sept 1883 from Cedar Valley, Cedar Fort. Rebaptised Alfred James Stratton 3

Life Information

James Stratton

Born:
Died:

Provo City Cemetery

610 S State St
Provo, Utah, Utah
United States

Epitaph

Thou hast left us and / thy loss we deeply feel. / But 'tis God that has / Bereft us He can / Our sorrows heal.
Transcriber

Conyngham

June 6, 2011
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David Schiwal

April 13, 2020
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Sdevin03

June 5, 2011

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James Stratton Autobiography

Contributor: Conyngham Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

From handwriten notes in the book by Emma Evans Stratton. daughter in law, is the following "Baptized by William Goats 8 Aug 1850; Confirmed by James Horit 9 Aug 1850; James Stratton Sr. received into the Ward Timpanogas, 27 Sept 1883 from Cedar Valley, Cedar Fort. Rebaptised Alfred James Stratton 30 June 1888 by Samuel N Skinner and confirmed by P. M. Wentz. Additional research done from Provo 1st Ward record of members (#1131 Pt 286); Timpanogas Ward Record of Members (# 6433 Pt 1) Sealing of couples living EH. JAMES STRATTON---A SKETCH OF HIS LIFE--DATE 22 FEB. 1903 AT AGE 48 BY JAMES STRATTON. RESIDING AT PROVO BENCH (OREM) UTAH CO. UTAH. I was born of goodly parents on the 22 day of December 1824 in the parish of Ware, Hartford, England. My parents were Barton Stratton and Susan Vyse Stratton. I was placed in school at the town of Ware, and attended the same until the age of 12 years. My parents by this time lived on a farm in the village of Breat Amwell. I was employed there as chore boy until the age of about 15. I then went to work for Deacon & Sons Freighters. My duty was to deliver freight to business towns in the city of London. First located at Padeston and delivered freight that came by canal for the city of London. I delivered the freight that was brought in heavy wagons from the manufacturing cities in the north and east countries. When a railway was completed from the north to the south of London, called Camden town 4 miles from the office of Deacon and Company. I delivered freight from Camden town to merchants and others in various parts of the city of London and when my load was all delivered I called at the city office for orders to collect freight at different docks at which the shipping landed the freight they brought from different parts of the world. This freight, I took to the freight depots at Camden Town, a round trip every day. I will say the freight from the north was manufactured goods and the return freight for the south was the products of other countries. Such as sugar and rum from the West Indies, teas and silks from China, hops and wool and home products and wine and raisins from France and Spain and so by being brought in contact with ships from different nations. It was natural for a boy of my temperament to have a desire to visit some of those countries so with the consent of my parents, I left London on the 8 Feb 1843 for the city of New York, USA and was about 12 weeks on the voyage. As I had no other object in coming to America than to see the world, I turned tramp only I did not beg. I would work and then when I had a few dollars, I would start out on foot. When I got to the place I wanted to see I would work again. So I made my way from New York, then to New Jersey and Pennsylvania, Delaware, and then to Baltimore. I remained in Maryland until the Spring of 1844; by this time, I was homesick and as I did not like working in a slave state, I went down to the shipping docks with the intention of going by water to New York, and there put in a summers work and save enough to pay my way home in the fall. Down by the shipping’s, I saw a US flag hung out of the upstairs window and men going in, and I thought I would go up to. There I was induced to ship in the US Navy for 3 years and was sent to join the U S troops of Ware Plymouth at New York navy yard. The vessel was sent to Vera Cruz in Mexico, with Governor Shannon of Ohio as minister and relieve Mr. Waddy Thomson. From Vera Cruz we came to Pensacola Florida for to refix and get orders with the result that we was ordered to stay on that station. We had orders to cruise around the West Indies Island and Mexico and Texas that was our round. And return to Pensacola for provisions and fefit and receive orders from Washington. The Falmouth was the only vessel on that station until Texas Reign came to the front. We remained on duty until General Taylor's army was sent down to protect Texas against Mexico then we was ordered to go to the mouth of the Mississippi to escort General Taylor to the mouth of the Rio Grande and assist in landing the army stores. From there we went to Vera Cruz with duty blockading that part if we heard of General Taylor being attacked by the Mexican Army. After a short time, the news arrived--Falmouth was ordered to cruise off the mouth of the harbor and capture all vessels attempting to go into the city of Vera Cruz. We had a lively and exciting time and captured several, some gave us a run for it. Others would surrender at the first fire. We was relieved by other vessels taking a turn. As by this time there was a small squadron of warships at that station with Commodore Camner. When news arrived that there was to be another army to take the field and land at Vera Cruz with General Winfield Scot in command. The Commodore had all the ships inspected to see if any of them was unfit to attack the Castle of St. Juan; Falmouth pronounced unfit and ordered home to Boston. This was the 1st of December or late in November. We came to Pensacola and took on provisions and water and sailed for Boston Mass. where we arrived near Christmas time; this was a cold Douch for us after serving 3 summers in a hot climate to come to a frozen country to be paid off. This servitude extended from the first week in March 1844 until December 1846 and was under treatment when discharged. I spent the winter of 1846 and 1847 in the city of Lowell Mass. but still remained unwell and was compelled to go to the hospital at Boston and from there to one in New York. After getting a good start toward recovery in health, I enlisted in the Navy again; this was the summer of 1847. I was sent to Brigg Perry of 10 guns and sailed from Philadelphia for Isthmus of Panama to take a bearer of dispatches to Army in California; from there to Vera Cruz. By this time, the city and forts of Vera Cruz had been captured and General Scot and army was on the march to the city of Mexico ordered to proceed to Pensacola and refit and replenish the state of provisions. There took sick and was placed in the hospital and the Brig of War ordered Rio De Janeiro Brazils South America and I remained in the hospital until the yellow fever broke out on the Warship and Vera Cruz. The yellow fever sick was sent to Pensacola Hospital, 180 of the old patients were transferred to the Navy Hospital at New York. I remained there until the beginning of December and was discharged as an invalid and recommended to go home to the place of birth and remain there at least 3 years. I did so and arrived home and found my father and mother and the children well after a ramble of five years. In the spring of 1848, home did not satisfy me and seeing my mother getting along in years and was very much opposed to my taking on a sailors life anymore, I promised not to and went to the city of Cambridge and took a position to deliver freight for the Railway Company and kept that position three years according to the doctors advice, I realized his promise of good health. During the summer of 1850 I had the privilege of hearing for the first time the first principles of the gospel. I was then convinced of the truth after attending some preaching meetings and testimony meetings. I was very much taken with the same and at the close of the same, they ask me if I wished to be baptized and I told them I did not know if I was a fit subject, remembering that the Methodist had their subjects on trial for a time. He asked me if I was a sinner and I said I was. He said it was sinners he wanted. I said I was willing. In the evening of the 3 of August, I was baptized by Elder William Goats; on the following Sunday I was confirmed a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of LDS, and received a new birth for I was born of the water and confirmed by the Spirit. It was not long before I received the spirit of the gathering for I could not feel satisfied and really comfortable only in the company of Latter-Day Saints and the principle conversation was upon the principles of our religion. As soon as I possibly could save enough money to pay for two tickets for myself and companion to New Orleans, I bid farewell to friends and country to cast my lot in with the LDS in the valley of Salt Lake. I left Liverpool 8 August 1851, being 8 years from the time of my leaving my native land and 3 years after returning home. The first Sunday after the Saints recovered from sea sickness, Apostle Orson Pratt held several well attended meetings. The captain and crew were there; we had a very good meeting. At the close of Apostle Pratt’s discourse I was married to Francis Clark of the city of Cambridge England. Our voyage to New Orleans was tolerable--pleasant. We had meetings on the quarter deck every pleasant Sunday. To the best of my memory, our voyage lasted 6 weeks. I remained at New Orleans to wait for the next ship and by the time that arrived, myself and wife had taken sick caused by the river water. We were held by circumstances, several weeks and by the time we arrived at St. Louis, it was too late to leave for Salt Lake City. I remained in St Louis until the next spring and came on to Salt Lake in a wagon in company with the first Pare Fund Company that came from England. In St.Louis, I was ordained an Elder. I arrived in Salt Lake on the 31st of August 1852 and located in the Sugar House Ward. I made adobes for the schoolhouse, the penitentiary, and Sugar House. I was there a member of the 31 Quorum of Seventies in the time of its organization in the old tabernacle in SLC. In the summer of 1853, there was trouble in Sanpete Co. with the Walker Indians and I went with a Company of Volunteers to guard and help the brethren harvest their crops. I returned home some time before October conference and assisted in guarding the mouth of Parleys Canyon at night, and making adobes for the Fort on the Co. road at Mill Creek. The next trouble that came along was grasshoppers. This was very serious. In the spring and summer of 1855, they cleared every field of wheat and some of the Brethren sowed them again the second time and lost that also. When they arose, they were like a thick snowstorm and darkened the sun then divided and flew to the four corners of the earth. Those that went across the lake fell in and was washed ashore; was reported a foot thick deep. I will say here that as my chief reason for coming to Utah was to be one with the Saints and be free from gentile influences. I preferred to be near the Tabernacle so that I could attend meetings and there was always some of the Twelve Apostles and almost every meeting, President Young and Heber Kimball. We had excellent meetings and it was a time of rejoicing and I had no desire to go to any outside settlements to live more easily. So I kept my home in SLC until Johnson’s Army came up and I had the opportunity of serving as a soldier in Echo Canyon until Johnson's Army went into winter quarters. During the winter, the way was paved for peace and the people commenced to move South. In the Spring I was to do picket at the head of Echo Canyon to watch for the coming of Johnson's army and there I remained until work came for us to break camp and come to Salt Lake and allow the army to come in. When I got home, my family had been moved south and Salt Lake was deserted and I could not find out where my family had gone to. I slept in my deserted house and during the next day I fixed fences, slept the night alone, not even the cat was left to tell the tale. Next day I started on foot to Lehi and hoped to hear at that place, to learn something of my family but could not so I shouldered my rifle and bedding and started South and met my wives in Provo City. They had gone South from SL and landed in a bowery at Spanish Fork and been taken in by a family that lived in a dugout. Their furniture and bedding had shelter under a shed and they had the privilege of getting out of the wet and sun by taking shelter in a dugout with the family of the owner of the premises, making 17 persons in a room about 14 feet square. I searched the town of Springville for a house, but could not get one. Every house was full to the utmost and I could not even get a tent for my family or even a covered wagon. Springville at that time was surrounded by a mud wall built for protection from the Indians. There was many families camped by the side of the wall and was shaving the wall down to make bobbies for building rooms to get into. The trouble soon settled and the people went back to Salt Lake. I went back to Salt Lake and sold my home and went and settled in Provo. The Army settled at Camp Floyd in Utah County. I built me up a little home in the 1st Ward of Provo, and made rope. I made the first rope in Utah and made adobes and other jobs until I had a little start in life. In the Spring, I was called by President Young and Authorities along with other families to go settle the Dixie Country. I went, took my wife Eliza and a few household goods and provisions. A good span of mules and went to the muddy country in Dixie We stayed there three years but the climate was so hot and water scarce and Indians so troublesome, we could do but little After a time the President called us away; my wife laid down her life for a new born babe and the Gospel of Jesus Christ. I was left alone with eight little children under 14. I came back to Utah to Utah where I had a married daughter to help me with my family. She was living at Cedar Fort. I stayed there a number of years. The children grew up and when the land on Provo Bench (Orem) was thrown open for settlers; I went with my children I had left and took up an 80 acres where I live now. James Stratton --Died on 23 March 1907. Height 5'9"; Black hair; Gray Eyes; & heavy eyebrows. Came to Utah 8-31-1852--High Priest, Missionary, Indian War Veteran.. THE FOLLOWING WAS WRITTEN BY FAMILY MEMBERS & added to the History. After the death of his wife, James moved to Santa Clara where he was able to hire a woman to take care of the baby for awhile until it was old enough that he and the girls could take care of him. When James moved his family back North, he went to Cedar Fort where Louisa and Harry lived so that she could help him with the children. He went into the butcher business and would take fresh meat to Opher and Merker Mining camps south and west of Cedar Fort. When he had earned enough to pay for the home he had bought, he rented land and farmed. They lived in Cedar Fort for several years. Ruth and Annie had grown up and married brothers, John and William Handily. Eliza was in her early teens, she was now to take over, be housekeeper and home-maker for her father and brothers. She did very well with it. Samuel died and was buried at Cedar Fort. New land was opened to homestead. James and his family went to Provo Bench, the stretch of land between Provo and Pleasant Grove, Utah. James secured a piece of ground west of the highway about 1/4 mile and 5 miles north of Provo. (Now SW of intersection of Center St & State St. Orem Utah). He and his boys brought timber from the canyon and built a log house, made sheds and corrals and broke up sagebrush and made a farm. They dug ditches and soon were able to raise hay, grain, and later, fruit and vegetables. They helped dig the canal (Big Bench) to bring water from Provo River to their farm on Provo Bench. When John was married, he built a birch home on the Northeast field. When David was married, he built a large log home and later replaced it with a nice brick home on the west field facing the street that ran past. Eliza had married Newel James Knight in 1884 whose father had homesteaded a section of land that cornered her father's place. This home was built on the twenty of his fathers' land that was on the west side of the highway. Newel later bought more land joining his. As was said in Eliza's history, she was close to her fathers home and could still help him with the boys, and this she gladly did. James the oldest son, whose mother was Francis Clark, was married and he and his wife Mary Agnes Smith were very happy but when their baby was but a few days old, she and the baby died. They had named the baby Ethel. James was a lonesome, brokenhearted young man. He later married a woman by the name of Emiline Cole who had two children. Later, he and Emiline had four children; two boys and two girls. Her son was John and daughter was Bertha. James & Emiline's sons were Roy and Ray, and the girls were Mary and Clara. When Alberta, Canada was opened for homesteaders, James took his oldest boy Roy and went to Canada. There he made good, and the son grew to be a fine healthy man. In 1920 they sold the property and came to Aberdean Idaho. James Jr. died and was buried there. Also Emiline who also made her home with Roy, died in Aberdean. Ray and the two girls married. Roy never married. John married Emma Evans. They had two girls and four boys. They lost one girl and 2 boys when small children. David married Caroline Dittmore of Pleasant Grove; they had 7 children; 3 boys and 4 girls. Allie died of Typhoid Fever at the age of 21, at the home of his sister Eliza. He had been ill for a long time and she and the Dr. thought him out of danger, his fever had broken, then suddenly he died. After James Stratton Sr. had raised his family, his first wife, Francis Clark, came to Provo Bench and rented a house not far from James. And as he passed walking to Church, she would come out and walk to Church with him. She was sorry for her foolish mistakes and wanted to be taken back as his wife. He forgave her, but though sorry for her he felt that he could not take her back. He worried about it and before giving her his answer, went to the Church Authorities and told them the whole story and asked their advise. They told him it depended entirely upon how he felt. He need not feel obligated, but if he wanted to take her back it was alright. But he couldn't accept her as his wife again. She went back to Salt Lake or the East, no doubt to where her daughter by the soldier lived and the family saw her no more. After all the children were married and in homes of their own, James Stratton Sr. got along as best he could. Years before he had built a four room rock house with a porch. He had beautiful trees, lawn, and flowers. The old log cabin stayed south of the new house. It was there until long after he died. He had a very good variety fruit farm, was prosperous and comfortable. He hired a housekeeper, at one time, a niece Rebecca C Crone came from Harimon Fork (South and west of Salt lake)kept house for him for some time. And his daughter Eliza was always near to help him, also John's wife. When he could no longer run his farm, he rented it and went and lived with his son John and his family. He came often to the other children's homes, but he also had many friends. He was a good mixer. He sometimes went to Idaho and visited with his oldest daughter Louisa who lived there. He loved to go there for a while in the summer. He enjoyed going to Salt Lake to visit Annie. Ruth lived in Park City for many years, finally moved to being closer. Every one loved him. He had a keen sense of humor. He was very well read, could talk on most any subject. He died on 23 March 1907 and is buried in the Provo City Cemetery.

History Of Eliza Briggs born 1836

Contributor: Conyngham Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

HISTORY OF ELIZA BRIGGS, DAUGHTER OF JOHN & RUTH BUTTERWORTH BRIGGS: WIFE OF JAMES STRATTON----COMPILED BY CORA STONE BIGLER DAUGHTER OF LOUISA STRATTON STONE—ALSO EDITED AND MATERIAL ADDED BY JUDY EDWARDS GREAT GREAT GRAND DAUGHTER. Eliza Briggs was born in Italy Bridge, Danshire, England 29 of Sept 1836. In 1840 the missionaries of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints found their way to the Briggs home and their message of truth was heard and accepted. Her parents were baptized in 1840. Eliza was baptized in March of 1851. The family’s greatest desire now was to emigrate to Zion, but due to financial conditions they were not able to do so until the year 1856, when the First Presidency of the Church impressed upon the Saints of the British Isles the use of handcart transportation. John Briggs and his family entered into the spirit of handcart transportation with enthusiasm, because with handcarts they could make the journey from Liverpool to Salt Lake City for about forty-five dollars, coming by way of New York to Iowa City, where they were to be fitted out with their handcarts. to cross the plains. Her father John Briggs, was a weaver by trade. When John Briggs and his family left England, he was 42 years old: his wife Ruth was 39. Eliza was the eldest at 19, her brother Thomas 13, James 11, Mary Hannah 7, Sara Ann 4, Rachael 3, and Emma, the baby was 9 months old. They left Liverpool England, the 25th of May 1856 on the ship Horizon. It took them about six weeks to make the trip across the ocean. After reaching the United States, they crossed the plains with the Martin Handcart Company, under the Captaincy of Edward Martin. The members of the Martin Handcart Company and the Willis Handcart Company were to be fitted out in Iowa City, Iowa, and the journey to begin the last of June or the first of July. The emigrants were disappointed to discover that the tents and handcarts for their use were not ready for them when they arrived in Iowa City. Consequently they were delayed until these articles could be manufactured or purchased. This delay was dangerous as the season was advancing. The journey across the plains should not have been undertaken as late as the middle of July. The first company, the Willie Company, left July 15the. The second company, belated, was the fifth company of the season, under Edward Martin, left Iowa City July 29th, about 2 weeks later. In this Martin Company, there were 576 persons, 146 Handcarts, 5 wagons, 6 mules, and 50 cows, oxen and beef cattle. The company was divided into two sections with three wagons drawn by mules and two by oxen to each section. While at Florence Nebraska, the question whether they should continue their journey or go into Winter Quarters was discussed. The brethren were advised by Elder Levi Savage that such a journey so late in the season should not be undertaken; that it would be better to stay in Winter Quarters until Spring. Elder Savage had been over the route and knew the dangers they would likely encounter. However, he was overruled and they decided to go on; they fully hoped to reach Salt Lake before the chilling blasts of winter. Elder Savage said, "What I have said I know to be true, but seeing you are to go forward I will go with you, will suffer with you, and if necessary die with you. May God in His mercy bless and preserve us". This was a fatal error but unexpected by most of the company for the winter came much earlier than usual and was most severe. With longing in their hearts for the Great Salt Lake, these two companies pressed on with all possible speed. In the first few weeks, they made favorable progress but as they continued, the roads became rough and repairs were constantly necessary, their progress was delayed. Due to the lightness of their handcarts and the hasty manner in which they were constructed of unseasoned wood, they began to fall to pieces and to repair them required time and delay. They had taken so much time that their food supply was getting low and it soon became necessary to discard some of their handcarts, as they were beyond repair. This was indeed a hard journey; The Martin Handcart Company suffered most severely, as there were more women and children in this company, there was more loss of life. Death occurred frequently during their journey. Their rations were getting less every day and the people were getting weaker. After one severe storm 15 members died in one day while others suffered greatly. This loss was indeed a sad one, these courageous men and women faced the certainty of death within their ranks, which is always the price of pioneering, but they surely didn't expect anything like this. Eliza Briggs was like a mother to her brothers and sisters. She carried her sister, 13 months old, under her clothing so that she might get warmth from her body. It is believed that without Eliza's tender care, the baby would have never reached Salt Lake alive. Eliza was always very tired and hungry when they made camp but she shared her rations with her small sisters and helped her mother care for them. Although hungry and weak she would join in the singing. The chorus of her favorite song was "For some must push, and some must pull, as we go marching up the hill, and merrily on our way we go, until we reach the valley 'O'. Eliza and her mother and several other women who had small children would keep a fire burning all night to keep them from freezing. It was not long until it was found necessary to cut the rations. The pound of flour per day was to be cut to 3/4, then to 1/2 and later to something less than nothing. By the time they reached Fort Laramie the company was so hungry that those who could were glad to exchange their watches and other valuables for provisions. At Deer Creek, October 17th due to the growing weakness of emigrants and teams, the baggage, including bedding and utensils were reduced to 10 pounds per person, children under 8, 5 pounds. Good bedding and clothing were burned as they could not be carried though needed more than ever for there were yet 400 miles of winter to go through. On the 19th of October, these pioneers awoke to find their beds covered with snow. There was a high wind blowing that drove particles of snow in every direction. They camped near the last crossing of the Platte River. During the day the river had to be crossed, the water was exceedingly high and the current strong. Some of the women and children were carried across by men, but Eliza, along with most of the women tied up their skirts and waded through as they had done through many other rivers and creeks. It was so cold that the bottom of their skirts that got damp, froze as they walked along. Many had frozen feet. The company was just barely across the river when snow, hail and sleet began to fall accompanied by a piercing north wind. That night was a nipping night, and it told its tale on the oxen as well as the people. For several days, the snow continued until it was 15 inches deep on the level, but they struggled on. Many fell by the way. John Briggs gave most of his portion of food to the children, thinking he could get along until the relief party arrived. Only those who have experienced this trial could realize the heartaches of those parents seeing their children hungry and having to live on rations. He became weaker every day and very sick, but he tried very hard to help his wife and children to the end of their journey. One Cold Morning (November 3, 1856), Near Devils Gate, In spite of his courage and will to live, Eliza’s mother found her husband dead in his bed with his mouth and nostrils frozen full of ice. Picture this brave mother, with her children, putting their father in his grave, without proper ceremony and in compelling haste, then under such adverse conditions they were forced to push on- for emergency demanded haste, less the grim and merciless winter embrace them all in the grasp of death. Eliza was a great comfort to her mother and helped in may ways to lighten her mother's burden. At Martin’s Cove Near Devils Gate they held an earnest council to determine whether to winter there or push on to Salt Lake. But fearing it might be impossible to send supplies to them later in the season, they decided to go on. It was necessary again to leave some of their belongings at Martin’s Cove to lighten their loads. The crossing of the Sweetwater proved to be a terrible ordeal to the weary travelers. Standing shivering with cold on the river bank they watched huge pieces of ice floating down stream. The water at the crossing was about 2 feet deep and it was evening, the coldest hour of the day. In spite of the cheering information that this was the last river they would have to cross, it seemed impossible for them in their weakened condition, to make the attempt. Not only women and children wept but men shed tears freely. Some of the stronger men made camp on the bank of the Sweetwater that night. Another Tragedy Struck the family with the loss of Eliza’s brother Thomas age 13 who was so weak with cold and frostbite he no longer could carry on so on November 11, 1856 he was laid to a wintry grave. The mountains were getting steeper and the roads rougher. The Rocky Ridge and South Pass were crossed November 18th, a bitter cold day. The snow fell fast and the wind was piercing cold. As the company traveled up the Sweetwater and over the mountain they began to meet more relief wagons from the valley and in a few days there were plenty of wagons for the first time to carry all the people. The traveling became more rapid. There were about 104 relief wagons by the time they reached Salt Lake. The Big Mountain was crossed November 29th. So close to their destination but it did not stop the death of Eliza’s 7 year old sister Mary Hannah. She died in Eliza’s arms the day before they reached the Salt Lake Valley. That night they camped at the head of Emigration Canyon and arrived in Salt Lake about noon November 30th. The story of the courageous pioneers was indeed a sad one for each one had a mark of the hard 1300 mile journey. Mary Taylor, an only child and very young wife, buried her father Joseph by the wayside the 8th of October and her young husband William Upton and mother Harriet Sidwell were buried in the same grave November 10th. Another Young Mother and Wife was traveling with her husband and two teenage sons. She buried her husband at Devil's Gate, Wyoming, and before they reached Salt Lake it was necessary to amputate her 13 year old son's badly frozen feet with her scissors. He managed to go around without his feet and lived to be an old man. He said it was a painful ordeal but that it didn't hurt any worse than his badly frozen feet. When the two belated companies, the Willis and Martin Handcart Companies, arrived in Salt Lake, the people living there who had comfortable homes and large enough to accommodate them, were asked to share their homes with the weary homeless people until permanent homes could be arranged for. Ruth Briggs was badly frozen by the time they reached Salt Lake and was in bed most of the winter. She was given refuge in the home of Benjamin Thomas Clark and was soon taken as his 3rd wife. On Aug 4 1860, during the night while the family was in bed asleep, Ruth was bitten on the neck by a scorpion and died from the effects. Eliza Briggs was placed in the home of James and Frances Clark Stratton. Eliza's feet were badly frozen and she was several months recovering. James and Frances felt sorry for Eliza and did what they could to make her comfortable and happy. She was a refined and modest girl and they became very fond of her. After a time, President Young advised those who had taken young women into their homes, if they were financially able and felt that they could all be happy in plural marriage, that the husband marry the young women and thus give her a permanent home. Frances was in favor of James marrying Eliza. She felt sorry for this lonesome girl and wanted to share her home with her. They got along nicely, working together, and made a pleasant home. Frances and James had two little girls. In a year a baby was born to each of the wives, Frances a son and Eliza a daughter. In a year and seven months Eliza had another little girl. The first girl was named Ruth for her Mother. These little girls were very fond of each other and when they were grown they married brothers.. The Stratton’s moved to Provo Utah in 1869. Shortly after arriving there Frances gave birth to another son; they now had six children and it was hard for James to earn enough to feed them. When the soldiers at Camp Floyd needed new clothes, a call was made for those who were able to make men’s' clothing to go to Camp Floyd to sew. Frances had been a tailor in England and, wishing to help James feed and cloth the children, she took her small baby and second small girl, about 4 years old, and went there to sew. Away from home and without proper influence, Frances became infatuated with a soldier and when the company of solders were released and went back East to their homes, Frances went with the soldier, taking her two children with her. James and Eliza lived in Provo for several years and while there a young man about 17, a convert from England, made his home with them. James taught him to make rope and they would trade it for flour or other food they needed. This young man was very kind to Eliza and did what he could to help her. In later years he remembered how she had to soak her crippled feet in warm water before going to bed each night. He said there was very little flesh on her heels. Her feet never recovered from being frozen so badly. In 1869, James and Eliza and other families were called on the Muddy Mission in Southern Utah. It was a long hard trip. They took their clothing, bedding, food a few pieces of furniture. The roads were rough and dusty. The weather was hot and still hotter when they reached their destination. This was a shorter journey than the journey across the plains but never-the-less it was another hare trip for Eliza with her seven children. After traveling all day in the hot sun, the children were tired and often cross, but then were always ready to find a shady place and play when they made camp for the night. After supper, Eliza would tell them stories about her trip across the plains and how cold and hungry she was. They enjoyed the stories very much and it helped them to forget the heat. When they arrived at their destination they began at once to establish a home by putting up their tents. They put a wagon box on the ground and canvas cover over it for a bedroom for the small children. They carried their water in buckets from the creek. The children never forgot the burning sand on their bare feet. When they went for water, they would fill the buckets from the creek and then run as fast as possible as far as they could, then stop and spill a little water on the ground and stand in it to cool their feet, then run on. Their feet soon became sore from the hot sand. James and his little boys worked hard preparing the ground to plant. The wind blew a lot, the soil was sandy, the ditches and rows they made to water the crops would blow full of dirt and sand. They worked hard to keep them shoveled out. When the corn was ready for use, the Indians would take it as fast as it came on. The Indians were very troublesome, but the settlers tried hard to be patient, they must not have trouble with them. Pres. Young said "It was better to feed them than to fight them." The Indian children would watch the children play. To them the covered wagon box on the ground was a funny thing; they would sing, "A Wikee-up with a wagon in it, a Wikee-up with a wagon it." Because of the climate, marshy ground and poor living conditions, most of the settlers became ill with ague, an intermittent fever, and some had malaria. Eliza's family was no exception and it was impossible to give them proper care, but Eliza did the best she could and never complained although she was ill herself. A few months before Eliza's 8th child was born, James wanted to take her back to Provo so she could have better care, but the courageous and unselfish woman she was, refused, saying, "No, the President of the Church called us here on a mission to build homes and cultivate the soil for other settlers and we will stay until he calls us back." Eliza did not live to be called back, when her baby was 2 days old, she passed away January 9 1871. In 15 short years in Utah she had accomplished a great deal. Her life had been full and eventful. She was buried in the section called "The Muddy" and is now Overton Nevada. After the death of Eliza, James moved his family to Santa Clara where he was able to hire a woman to take care of the baby until it was old enough for the little girls to help care for him. A very short time after Eliza's death, the call came for the settlers to return to their homes; so when the baby was about 3 months old, James and his family went to Cedar Fort Utah. During this journey they led a cow behind the wagon and it was the chore of the little girls to stop ever so often and milk the cow to feed the baby. Though Eliza's eldest daughter Ruth was about fourteen and a very capable girl, James made his home in Cedar Fort for several years so that he could be near his married daughter Louisa and she could help him with his little family. Eliza's family cherished her memory always. She was a real pioneer and she left her family a great heritage. By CORA STONE BIGLER, daughter of Louisa Stratton Stone History of Eliza Briggs Stratton "The Cheevers said that Frances was more in favor of James marrying Eliza than James was. Perhaps because of her sympathy for the lonesome girl, she wanted to share her home with her. They got along nicely, working together and made a pleasant home. Frances and James had two little girls when Eliza came into their home, Susan Louisa and Maria Jane (called Jennie)". Provo 1st Ward Rec of Mem (#1131 pt 286) Timpanogos Ward Rec of Mem (#6433 pt 1) Sealing of Couples (living) in EH

From James Stratton History

Contributor: Conyngham Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

When the two belated companies, the Willie and Martin Handcart Companies arrived in Salt Lake, the people living there, who had comfortable homes large enough to accommodate them, were asked to share their homes with some of the weary, homeless people, until permanent homes could be arranged for. Eliza Briggs was placed in the home of James and Frances Stratton. Eliza had had her feet frozen during the storms and cold weather on the way across the plains. It took time for them to heal enough so she could be on her feet without suffering. She needed care and no doubt James and Frances felt sorry for her. Eliza was twenty years old, a refined and modest girl. ... They said that after a time, President Young advised those who had taken young women into their homes, if they were financially able and felt that they could all be happy living together in plural marriage, that the husband marry the young girl and thus give her a permanent home. ... The Cheevers said that Frances was more in favor of James marrying Eliza than James was. Perhaps because of her sympathy for the homeless girl, she wanted to share her home with her. They got along nicely, working together, they made a pleasant home. ... When the call came for the Strattons to go to Dixie, (Southern Utah) on the mission of helping settle the country, they were soon on their way. It was a long hard trip with the children, bedding, food, and a few household pieces of furniture. The roads were rough, the weather hot and still hotter when they reached their destination. ... When the time drew near for Eliza’s eighth baby to be born, James wanted to take her back to Provo where she could have proper care, but she said, “No, the President of the Church called us here, and we will stay until he calls us back.” But she did not live to be called back. When her baby was two days old, she died. It was the 8th of January, 1871. In fifteen short years in Utah, she had accomplished a great deal. Her life was full and eventful. Eliza was buried there in the section called “The Muddy,” now Overton, Nevada. Many years later, James bought a grave marker and had it shipped from Provo where he then lived, and he went there to see that it was properly placed at the grave. Without wife and mother, they were a despondent group. After the death of his wife, James moved to Santa Clara, where he was able to hire a woman to care for the baby awhile until he was old enough that he and the girls could care for him. ...

James Stratton

Contributor: Conyngham Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

History of James Stratton Written by Cora Stone Bigler Great Great Grandfather of Norman Shelley Copied by Karen Shelley Hacking I was born of respectable parents on the 22nd day of December 1824, in the Parish of Ware, County of Hertfordshire, England. My parents were Barton Stratton and Susan Vise Stratton. I was the father of Susan Louisa Stratton Stone. At the age of six I was placed in school in the town of Ware, and attended the same until I was twelve years old. At this time my parents lived on a farm in the village of great Armwell. I was employed there as a chore boy until I was about fifteen, then I went to work for “Deacon and Sons Freighters”. My duty was to deliver freight to business in towns. I first located at Padeston and delivered the freight that came in the canal for the City of London. I delivered freight in heavy wagons from the manufacturing cities in the North and East Counties. The freight from the North was manufactured goods. The return freight from the South was products of other countries such as sugar and rum from the West Indies, teas and silks from China, wool, home products, wine and raisins from France and Spain. By being brought in contact with ships from different nations, it was natural for a boy of my temperament to have a desire to visit some of those Countries. I loved the adventure stories of the seaman. So with the consent of my parents, I left London on the 8th February, 1843, for New York City in America. It took about twelve weeks for the voyage. As I had no other object in coming to America than to see the world, I turned tramp, only I did not beg. I would work a while and then I‘d have money to move one and see another state. I made my way through New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and Maryland until the spring of 1884. By this time I got homesick and I was going to go back to New York and back to England. Down by the docks, I saw a United States Flag in one of the windows. I went in and was induced into the Unites States Navy for three years. My ship was the Ware Palmouth. We helped protect Texas against Mexico. Then we were ordered to capture all vessels attempting to go into the city of Vera Cruz. We had a lively and exciting time and captured several. Then the Palmouth was pronounced unfit and so we were in Boston around Christmas. This was a cold change for us after serving three summers in a hot climate. I was under treatment when I was released from the Navy. I was in the hospital in Massachusetts, Boston and finally in New York. I got well and enlisted in the Navy again, but I became ill again. Yellow Fever broke out on the ship in Vera Cruz and they were sent to the Pensacola Hospital. To make room for the Yellow Fever patients, 180 patients were transferred to the Navy Hospital in New York. I was discharged as an invalid and told to go back to England and remain for at least three years. I had rambled around for five years. So I was glad to be home with my family again. My Mother was getting along in years and very much opposed to my being a sailor and going out to sea. I promised her that I wouldn’t join the Navy again. In the spring of 1848, home didn’t satisfy me. I went to the City of Cambridge and took a position to deliver freight for the railroad company. I worked there three years. That was the Doctor’s advice and I realized his promise of good health. During the summer of 1850, I had the privilege of hearing for the first time, the principles of the gospel. I attended several meetings, I was impressed with Mormonism. At the close of one meeting, I was asked if I wished to be baptized. I told them I didn’t know if I were a fit subject. I was asked if I were a sinner, and I said I was. He said it was sinners he wanted. I said I was willing to be baptized. So on the 3rd of August I was baptized by Elder William Goats. On the following Sunday I was confirmed a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, by Elder Heart, and received a new birth, for I was born of the water, and confirmed by the spirit. It was not long until I received the spirit of gathering for I felt comfortable only in the company of the Latter-day Saints. I wanted to know more about the gospel. As soon as I could save enough money for tickets for myself and companion, Miss Francis Clark, I wanted to go to Salt Lake City, Utah. The time soon came when I bid farewell to my family, friends and country. We left Liverpool, England, the 8th of February 1851, on the ship Helen Mona. After the people recovered from sea sickness, Apostle Orson Pratt held several well attended meetings. On the first fine Sunday, at the close of Apostle Pratt’s discourse, Francis Clark and I were married. The Captain and crew were there. We landed in New Orleans and were there several weeks until we could go to St. Louis Missouri. I worked to get money. I was ordained an Elder there. We crossed the plains in a wagon and arrived in Salt Lake 31 August 1852. We settled in the Sugar House Ward. Out first child, a girl, was born there. I did odd jobs for a living. I helped make adobes for the school. In the summer of 1853, there was trouble with the Walker Indians, in Sanpete County. I volunteered with others to guard and help the farmers harvest their crops. Then later I guarded the mouth of Parley’s Canyon at night and I made adobes for the Fort on the County Road at Mill Creek. The next trouble was grasshoppers. This was very serious. It was the summer of 1855. They cleared every field of wheat. They were like a heavy snow storm, they darkened the sun. I was made a member of the 31st Quorum of Seventies in the old Tabernacle in Salt Lake. I loved to go to meetings in the Tabernacle. In November 1856, the Edward Martin Handcart Company came to the city. The people took them into their homes. Eliza Briggs came to live with us. Her feet were badly frozen and the flesh was almost gone from her heels. She had walked the entire distance across the plains. I became very fond of her and asked if she would marry me in polygamy. She accepted and we were married. Johnson’s Army came to Utah to investigate the activities of the Mormons. I was a soldier in Echo Canyon to defend the City if necessary. We were there 8 months. Our families were to evacuate at a moment’s notice. Finally we could return to the city and the army came too. The Army then founded Camp Floyd. I didn’t know where my family was. I went to Lehi, but I finally found my family in Provo. My brother-in-law, Thomas lived there. A kind gentleman offered me his home for the summer and winter, because I couldn’t find a home. We were together again and happy. We had to work very hard getting our winter fuel and provisions though. We had been living in plural marriage for about three years when we settled in Provo, Utah. My family had increased to six and I found it hard to feed and clothe them. My wife, Francis was a seamstress and General Johnson called for women to sew for the soldiers. The pay was good, so she took our baby and the second little girl about 4 years old and went to Camp Floyd. She never returned home. When the soldiers were released, Francis went with the soldier of her choice. Our baby passed away before he was two years old. I never knew where his little body was laid to rest. Eliza and I continued our lives together. We raised 8 children of our own and daughter, Louisa, and a son James, belonging to Francis and I. Five of the 8 children were born in Provo. I made adobes and rope. I made the first rope in Utah. We would go to the lake and gather rushes to make the rope, then we would trade if for flour and other foods of things we could use. In about 1864, were called with other families to the Muddy Mission in Nevada, about 80 miles from St. George. We were called by President Young. We were to plow the land, build houses and seed the ground. We stayed 3 years, but the climate was so hot and water so scarce and the Indians so troublesome, we accomplished very little, so Pres. Young called us back to our homes. Eliza died a few months before we came home, giving birth to our baby. The baby was 2 days old when she died. I had wanted to take her back to Provo, but she said that the President called us here and we’ll stay until we are released. I was left alone with nine children, the oldest, a girl about fourteen years old. I had a married daughter, Louisa, at Cedar Fort, Utah, which was west of Lehi. I decided to go there, so that she could help me with my little family. I was a butcher for a short while in Cedar Fort. I delivered fresh meat to the mining camps south and west of Cedar Fort. I did not marry again. With the help of my married daughter, until my other girls were older, we got along fine. The children had learned to work and do for themselves. We lived in Cedar Fort for a number of years. When land was opened to homesteading on Provo Bench (now Orem) we moved back. My boys and I built a comfortable log home, sheds, and corrals for our animals. We broke up sagebrush and farmed the land. We raised hay and grain. We helped dig the canals to bring water from the Provo River to our farms. Soon we were able to raise nice fruit and vegetables on our farm. Then we built a four room rock house, planted trees and grass. This was the first nice home we had and we did enjoy it. My first wife, Frances, came to Provo Bench and rented a place near my home. She came to church often. She was sorry for her mistake and wanted me to take her back as my wife. I asked the church authorities about it. They said that I need not feel obligated. I forgave her and I felt sorry for her, but I could not accept her as my wife again. She returned to the East and we never saw her again. Our daughter, Jenny, whom she took with her, married a man from New York and never returned to Utah. Later, when I felt I could no longer live alone, I went to live with my son, John, and family. I am still here and very thankful and happy. I enjoy visiting my other children. In the summers I spent some time in Idaho with my daughter, Louisa. My hearing is very bad, but I am well and in spite of all my trials and heart aches, I have many, many things to be thankful for. James Stratton was five feet nine inches tall, well built, gray eyes, heavy eye brows, firm mouth and dark brown hair. He had a keen sense of humor. Everyone loved him. He was a High Priest and a Missionary. He loved the gospel and was a man with great faith. He was an Indian War Veteran. He served three years in the United States Navy. He was one of 12,050 men guarding the city of Salt Lake from Johnson’s Army. He helped fight the crickets when they destroyed the crops. He was very well read and could talk on most any subject intelligently. He had the strength of character to do what he thought best. He was honest, dependable, and loyal. He was happy in America, but it wasn’t easy for him to leave his family in England and never see them again. James Stratton died on the Provo Bench, Utah, March 23, 1907, at the age of 83 years, 3 months, and 1 day. He was buried in the Provo City Cemetery. He left many descendants! 1

History of the James Stratton Family

Contributor: Conyngham Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

History of James Stratton Family Hand written by Maud Knight Brown a granddaughter in possession of Paul Oscarson, grandson of Maud Knight Brown. [Text missing] page 10 office was tendered as a debt for party service. Many of them were extremely bitter against the Saints, and resorted to falsehood & misrepresentation in order to bring the majority of the inhabitants of the territory into dispute at Washington and throughout the nation, under such conditions conflict was constant and inevitable. As time went on clouds gathered because some of the men over them who were without principal made trouble for the Mormons by sending in fake reports to Washington. Others of these men were gentlemen and preformed their work faithfully without partiality. On 28 of May 1857 orders [came] from the war department for the assembling of an army to march to Utah. All mail to Utah was stopped. It was practically a declaration of war by the United States against one of her dependent units, without investigating for just cause, a thing without a parallel in the annals of our country. The army was coming without warning –the Saints would not have known had not Utah men carrying mail who had arrived at Independence where they heard from several parties who desired to secure contracts from the government for handling the supply trains, that (11)movement was an-foot against Utah & the supply trains would be going to Salt Lake and that government troops would soon be following. One of the men was Abraham O. Smoot. He was also informed that Brigham Young had been superseded as governor and that new federal officers had been appointed for Utah. Gaining all the information he could[,] Elder Smoot commenced his homeward journey, leisurely at first for fear of arousing suspicion but increasing speed as he neared his destination. A short distance from Laramie, Wyoming he met Orin Rockwell. They and Judson Stoddard hurried to Salt Lake arriving 23rd of July. 1857. On the morning of the 24th Mayor Smoot of Salt Lake, Judson L. Stoddard, Judge Elias Smith & Orrin P. Rockwell rode to the scene of the celebration. Their first view to attract their gaze was the Stars & Stripes unfurled from two lofty peaks and some tall trees. With grave countenances these messengers bearing evil tidings approached Govern[or] Young & told him their story. That evening after a council of the brethren was called and the situation discussed, & general Daniel H. Wells of the militia informed the group that an army was on its way to Utah. Early next morning the people so happy the day before, returned to their homes with bowed heads (12)and hearts filled with sadness. Twice in Missouri & once in Illinois had the saints been driven from their homes at the point of bayonets and that too by aid of State authorities. Saints had been murdered & robbed while the nation looked on with out interference. And now they were coming to their distant home, a body of troops organized and equipped by the President of the United States. They were coming without warning without valid excuse. Was it not natural under the circumstances for the people to feel that once again they may be butchered, robbed & driven, Where to ---no one could tell. They knew they must take a stand and if fight was the intentions of the troops, then fight it should be, they were determined to maintain their inherent & constitutional rights. If the government of the United States desired to install new officers they could com in peace and welcome. As President Young said, “We have transgressed no law, neither do we intend to do so, but as far as any nation coming to destroy this people, with the help of our Heavenly Father it shall not be.” Early in Nov. 1857 General Albert Sidney Johnson with troops & supplies over took the main body at Black Fort. He was a capable and popular officer and he soon enthused the troops who had become discouraged (13)because of their many reverses. The Indians had run off many of their cattle. They had suffered with the cold[.] Many were ill but Johnston was determined to march into Salt Lake with his troops and take over. They started on their long journey on the 6th of Nov. their trains extended for miles, they were forced to face the snow & sleet, their teams were goaded until they dropped dead in their tracks. Their cattle died for lack of food and from exposure. It became apparent that it would impossible to reach Salt Lake Valley before Spring. With great reluctance the disappointed general had to give orders that the troops go into winter quarters. Mean time in Salt Lake City the people were trying to show the misinformed government men from Washington that the Mormons had been misrepresented, though the Mormons were prepared to defend themselves if necessary. They had a well trained Militia and they were ordered to be held in readiness to repel any attempted invasion but instructions were given that no blood should be shed unless absolutely unavoidable. Following the proclamation of governor Young and Lieutenant General Daniel H. Wells of the Nauvoo Legion (the name by which the Militia was known) (14)established headquarters at “The Narrows” in Echo Canyon. A defile rugged and steep [place], where a few men could hold off an army. To this point about twelve hundred & fifty men from several companies of the Militia were ordered to report and maintain the pass by force of arms against any attempted invasion. James Stratton was one of these soldiers. This was where he was when (as he said in his journal “my family had been taken south & (I met my wives’ in Provo.” General Johnston was from the south, proud and haughty. He looked upon the “Mormons” and spoke of them as rebels, and was inclined to treat them as such. The spirit among his troops was that the Mormons were their common pray and while on the march they boasted of what they would do when they arrived in Salt Lake. They would inhabit, take the farms, property & woman [women] were to be distributed. “Beauty & Booty” were their watchword. The gardens, orchards, vineyards, fields, wives and daughters were to be spoils. But how different it turned out to be. As many of the men sent west by the government were good honest men who were able to see things as they were. A group of these men President Young and other leaders (15)in Utah met together and the whole situation was thoroughly discussed. It was agreed that there should be no opposition the General Johnston’s army passing thru the city providing they were not permitted to stop[,] but should pass on to make their camp at least forty miles away. An agreement having been reached the commissioners addressed a communication to General Johnston advising him of what had been done and requesting him to make proclamation among his troops. His army, many of them were greatly disappointed for they were to be denied the privilege of plunder of which they hoped and had talked of. The commander was surprised but stated that the army would not trespass upon the rights or property of the peaceable citizens. On the 26 of June 1858 the army under command of General Johnston entered the Salt Lake Valley Through Emigration Canyon. They marched thru the city, now without inhabitants, only a few men were left to guard the homes and to set fire to them should the army attempt to take position [possession] of them. The army passed on to a place west of the Jordan river. Three days later they passed on the south west where they founded “Camp Floyd”—named after the secretary of war, and here was to be their scene of action for several years to come. The saints returned to their homes and life went on. (16)When the two belated companies –The Willie & Martin handcart companies arrived in Salt Lake the people living there who had comfortable homes large enough to accommodate them were asked to share there homes with some of the weary, homeless people until permanent homes could be arranged for, Eliza Briggs was placed in the home of James & Frances Stratton. Eliza had had her feet frozen during the storms and cold weather on the way across the plains. It took some time for them to heal enough so she could be on her feet much without suffering. She needed care and no doubt James & Frances felt sorry for her. Eliza was twenty years old, a refined modest girl. Among the friends of this young couple was the Cheevers. Henry A. and his wife Mary Jane Cheever who many years later became the grand-parents of Walter Cheever Brown and he became the husband of Maud Knight, a grand-daughter of James & Eliza Stratton. They enjoyed telling the young people of their early pioneer life and they were pleased to discover that the Cheevers and Stratton descendents had united in marriage. They said that after a time Pres. Young advised those whom had taken young women into their homes, if they were financially able & felt that they could all be happy living together in plural marriage that the husband marry the young women and thus give her a permanent home. The Cheever’s said that Frances was more in favor (17)of James marring Eliza than James was. Perhaps because of her sympathy for the lonesome girl, she wanted to share her home with her. They got along nicely, worked together and made a pleasant home. Frances & James had two little girls when Eliza came into their home, Susan Louisa & Maria Jane –(called Jennie.) In a year a baby was born to each of the wives. To Frances a boy they called James Barton. After his father and his grandfather who’s name was Barten Stratton, he was born 11 Sept. 1857 and Eliza’s was a girl Ruth Briggs Stratton, She was born 12 Feb. 1858, just five months after Frances’ little boy James. Eliza had another little girl born 12 Sept. 1859 just a year and seven months younger than little Ruth. These two girls almost like twins were always especially near and dear to each-other. And when they were grown they married brothers, and their nearness was continued thru their lives. Ruth married John Handly and Annie married William Handly. Brothers. (18) The Stratton’s moved to Provo, Utah, while living there several children were born. Charles William was born to Frances in 1859 but died when only two years old. To Eliza was born John Henry 16 July 1861, Joseph William born in Jan. 1863, but died when only two years old. Eliza (mother of Maud Knight Brown who is writing copies of this) born 3 Feb. 1865, David Thomas born 19 Dec. 1866. & Samuel born 21 Sept. 1868. (19) When the soldiers at Camp Floyd needed new cloths a call was made for those who were able to make men’s clothing to come to Camp Floyd & sew. Francis had been a tailorist in England & was capable. Perhaps wishing to add to their income she went there to work. She took with her her youngest daughter “Jennie” and her baby Charles. And left James and Louisa with her husband and Eliza. Away from her home & without proper influences she became infatuated with a soldier & when the company of soldiers were released and went back east to their homes Frances went with the soldier & took her two children. Charles died when still a baby, just two years old. Jennie grew to be a woman, a very beautiful woman, she married a man by the name of Phil Ryan. They lived in the east. After some time they moved west to Salt Lake City. She became acquainted with her family and they loved her & she them. After years she & her husband moved back to the east. They had no family, they had paid into a home for the aged & after Phil died Jennie went there to live. The home was in Eastern Canada. Jennie & Louisa kept up a correspondence. In the summer of 1936 or 37 Louisa came from her home in St. Anthony to Idaho to visit her sister Eliza Stratton Knight. Mother of Maud K. (20) who was visiting her daughter in Burley, Idaho. They spent many happy hours, talking of their past experiences and each telling of her children and grand-children. When Louisa heard that Newel Brown (Eliza’s grandson) was on a mission in Canada she was so pleased and wondered if he could go see Jennie, so they wrote to hem sending the name of the “Home” and the address. When Newel was able to get a leave of absence, he hitch hiked four hundred miles to see Aunt Jennie but was disappointed, after reaching the city and finely finding the address the lady who come to the door would not let him in to see Jennie. When Louisa wrote and told Jennie what had happened she felt terrible. She was so lonesome for someone of her own. So alone, so terribly disappointed. (21)(21) While living in Provo the Stratton were real friends to a young man who was also a convert from England. He was alone. They took him in and treated him as they would a brother. He was seventeen years old, his name was William Winterton. Many years after[,] he became acquainted with a grand-daughter (and her family) of James and Eliza Stratton. They [the daughter Maud Knight Brown] lived in Charleston, Wasatch Co. Ut. From 1927-1931. [this is how they made the connection] It was a party given in honor of Van Winterton at the home of his Uncle William Winterton Jr. Van was leaving for a mission to New Zealand soon. A game was being played. A genealogy game and when it became her turn she said “I Maud Knight Brown, daughter of Newel James and Eliza Stratton Knight” etc. When the game was over Brother William Sr. who was a beloved father and grand-father of many Wintertons who lived in Charleston, came to the grand-daughter of James and Eliza Stratton and said: “Did you say James and Eliza Stratton? Are you their grand daughter?” When she assured him she was he said. “I knew those wonderful people. I came to America when I was just seventeen years old. A convert from England. They took me in and treated me as one of the family. James taught me to help him. We would go to the lake and gather rushes and make rope. James had learned to make rope while in the Navy. We would trade it for flour and other food or things we could use. Those were hard times.” He added. He was thoughtful for a few minutes and then said “I will never forget a conversation I once (22) over-heard. A friend of James said to him one day ‘James why do you keep that boy around? He eats a lot. You can’t afford to keep him.’ My heart sank but James’ reply was reassuring. He said “you don’t understand, that boy helps me. I need him. I just couldn’t get along with-out him.” Then he mentioned Eliza. He said “She was a wonderful woman, a kind and loving wife and mother. I remember her soaking her poor crippled feet in warm water each night before going to bed. They had been frozen and there was but little flesh on her heels. They ( her feet) were always so tired by night.” William Winterton had gone to Wasatch County years before. He and his sons, William, Hyrum (Van’s father) and Fred all had good homes, were prosperous cattle raisers and farmers in the community. Grandpa Winterton was pleased to find descendents of his old and much loved friends; their paths had not crossed in many years. And the descendents of James and Eliza Stratton were just as happy to meet him and hear this story. The Browns and Wintertons became dear friends. Perhaps the close friend-ship of the ancestors of both families deepened the relationship between them. (18)(20) combined Back to the story of James and Eliza. The Cheevers had moved to Provo too and their friendship with the Strattons was renewed. They often visited and now the subject of the call by President Young for families to go to southern Utah was often discussed. There were new settlements started and still other pioneers must go and help establish (strengthen) them. When the call came to the Strattons they prepared to go and before long were on their way. It was a long hard trip with their children, three girls and four boys, their clothing, bedding and food, a few household pieces of furniture. The roads were rough, the weather hot especially after they reached their destination. Louisa didn’t go. She was fifteen and she was a woman. She knew how to keep house and to cook and how to take care of children. She had helped Eliza do everything. She was sweet and good. Her sweetheart was a convert from Bristol, England. His name was Henry (called Harry) J. Stone. He had been baptized when he was twelve years old and had come to America with a sister. They had left England the 4th of June 1863 and crossed the plains with Edward Wooley’s team which arrived in Salt lake in October of that year. He was then seventeen. He was born 15 December 1846. He had been un Utah five years. He was now twenty-two years old. They were married in Cedar Fort, Utah 22 March 1868. To them were born fifteen children. Twelve of whom were still living when they celebrated their Golden Wedding anniversary in Teton City, Idaho where they lived then, 1918. Harry proceeded her in death but she had children near her as long as she lived and many descendants are still living. Most of them in Idaho. Her last home was in St. Anthony, Idaho. She was born in Sugar House Salt Lake, Utah 21 March 1853. Her oldest daughter Effie, who became Effie Emmit, lived in Ashley near Vernal, UT. She has descendants there. (26) After James Stratton Sr. had raised his family his first wife Francis Clark came to Provo Bench and rented a house not far from James. And as he passed walking to church she would come out and walk to church with him. She was sorry for her foolish mistakes and wanted to be taken back as his wife. He forgave her but though sorry for her, felt that he could not take her back. He worried about it and before giving her his answer went to the church authorities and told them the whole story and asked their advice. They told him it depended entirely upon how he felt. He need not feel obligated, but if he wanted to take her back it was all right. But he couldn’t accept her as his wife again. She went back to Salt Lake or the East. No doubt to where her daughter by the soldier lived and the family saw her no more. (27) After all the children were married and in homes of their own, James Stratton got along as best he could. Years before he had built a four room rock house with a porch. He had beautiful trees, lawn and flowers. The old log cabin still stayed south of the new house. It was there until long after he died. He had a very good variety fruit farm, was prosperous and comfortable. He hired a house-keeper. At one time a niece Rebecca Crone, from Harriman Fork, Utah (south and west of Salt Lake) kept house for him for some time and his daughter Eliza was always near to help him, also John’s wife. When he could no longer run his farm he rented it and he went and lived with his son John and his family. Everyone loved him. He had a keen sense of humor, he was very well read. [He] could talk on most any subjects intelligently. He loved the gospel and was a man of great faith. Whenever Eliza [daughter], who always lived close to him, had sickness in the home she sent for her father to administer to them. The oldest girl often had ear-ache when small. She would ask for Grandpa Stratton to come and through her faith and his and Eliza, the mothers, the administering always helped. After she was married and moved away he often came to see her. When her first baby was born and she was very ill (her mother at that time was not well) but grandpa came and stayed close and prayed for her. The sick girl knew that grandpa was there and it helped her. It was exactly what she needed; grandpa’s faith and prayers. (28) James Stratton was not a tall man but he was well built. His shoulders were broad. His eyes were brown and very expressive, his lips were firm. He had the strength of character to do what he thought was right, he was honest, dependable and loyal. He was a student. He read a great deal. He was a worker. He loved flowers. When it was time to think of Decoration day, he would encourage the grand-children (Maud and Leo Knight) to go out in the sage-brush and gather wild flowers. They would be put into pails of water and the next day (Decoration Day) they would be taken to the cemetery and placed on the graves of the loved ones there. (23) Years had changed the looks of his home. He had built a four room rock house and large porch. Trees [he] planted had grown, the flowering ones were beautiful. The lawn was green. South of the house stood, for many years, the old log house built when they first came and homesteaded the place. [It] was still standing long after he died. The last years of his life he lived with his son, John and family. He came often to the other children’s homes. He sometimes went to Idaho in the summer and spent a few weeks with his daughter Louisa and family. He often went to Salt lake to visit with Annie and her family. Ruth lived in Wasatch County for many years at Charleston and later Park City. They finely moved to Provo Bench and James enjoyed seeing them often. (28 again) He died at the home of John and Emma Stratton on Provo Bench, Utah the 23rd of march 1907 and buried in the Provo Cemetery. He was the father of twelve children. He has many descendents –Louisa had fifteen children, James 4, Ruth 5, Annie 5 John 6 Eliza 8, David 7. all these except those who have been mentioned died young have married and had children except one of James’ sons. Roy has never married. Most of his descendents are active in the church he so loved. All are honorable men and women. May all of his descendents live in a way to be a credit to this noble man, a convert from England (29) who came to America where he could worship God according to the dictates of his own conscience. And who helped in different settlements in Utah to make “the desert blossom as the rose.” He was happy in America but it was not easy to leave his family in England, never to see them again. He crossed the ocean and the plains and shared the hardships of the early pioneers. He was in Salt Lake at the time the crickets came and devoured the crops. He helped to fight them. He served as a sailor in the navy for his country “Old England” and had volunteered and served in the U.S. Navy when they were in war with Mexico. He was a soldier who stood on guard at the mouth of “the Narrows” at Echo Canyon. ]He was] one of the 1,250 med of the militia under General Wells to hold back any attempted invasion of a U.S. Army. He also served as a soldier to help p0ut down trouble with the Indians in Utah. He was indeed a noble pioneer. Maud Knight Brown Daughter of Eliza Stratton Knight, Granddaughter of James Stratton (26) Regarding son of James Stratton, James Barton Stratton He later married a woman by the name of Emeline Cole who had two children. Later he and Emeline had four children; two boys and two girls. Her son was John and daughter was Bertha. James and Emelines sons were Roy and Ray and the girls were Mary and Clara. When Alberta, Canada was opened for homesteaders, James took his oldest boy Roy and went to Canada. There he made good and the son grew to be a fine healthy man. In 1920 they sold the property and came to Idaho. “Aberdeen” James Jr. died and was buried there. Also Emeline who also made her home with Roy died in Aberdeen. Ray and the two girls married. Roy never married. John married Emma Evans. They had two girls and four boys They lost one girl and two boys when small children. David married Caroline Ditmore of Pleasant Grove. They had seven children. 3 boys and 4 girls. Allie died of typhoid fever at the age of twenty-one. At the home of his sister Eliza S. Knight. He had been ill for a long time and she and the Doctor thought him out of danger. His fever had broken, then suddenly he died.

Eliza Briggs

Contributor: Conyngham Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Here is a story with lots of history.         History Of Eliza Briggs born 1836 · 15 April 2013 · HISTORY OF ELIZA BRIGGS, DAUGHTER OF JOHN & RUTH BUTTERWORTH BRIGGS: WIFE OF JAMES STRATTON----COMPILED BY CORA STONE BIGLER DAUGHTER OF LOUISA STRATTON STONE—ALSO EDITED AND MATERIAL ADDED BY JUDY EDWARDS GREAT GREAT GRAND DAUGHTER. Eliza Briggs was born in Italy Bridge, Danshire, England 29 of Sept 1836. In 1840 the missionaries of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints found their way to the Briggs home and their message of truth was heard and accepted. Her parents were baptized in 1840. Eliza was baptized in March of 1851. The family’s greatest desire now was to emigrate to Zion, but due to financial conditions they were not able to do so until the year 1856, when the First Presidency of the Church impressed upon the Saints of the British Isles the use of handcart transportation. John Briggs and his family entered into the spirit of handcart transportation with enthusiasm, because with handcarts they could make the journey from Liverpool to Salt Lake City for about forty-five dollars, coming by way of New York to Iowa City, where they were to be fitted out with their handcarts. to cross the plains. Her father John Briggs, was a weaver by trade. When John Briggs and his family left England, he was 42 years old: his wife Ruth was 39. Eliza was the eldest at 19, her brother Thomas 13, James 11, Mary Hannah 7, Sara Ann 4, Rachael 3, and Emma, the baby was 9 months old. They left Liverpool England, the 25th of May 1856 on the ship Horizon. It took them about six weeks to make the trip across the ocean. After reaching the United States, they crossed the plains with the Martin Handcart Company, under the Captaincy of Edward Martin. The members of the Martin Handcart Company and the Willis Handcart Company were to be fitted out in Iowa City, Iowa, and the journey to begin the last of June or the first of July. The emigrants were disappointed to discover that the tents and handcarts for their use were not ready for them when they arrived in Iowa City. Consequently they were delayed until these articles could be manufactured or purchased. This delay was dangerous as the season was advancing. The journey across the plains should not have been undertaken as late as the middle of July. The first company, the Willie Company, left July 15the. The second company, belated, was the fifth company of the season, under Edward Martin, left Iowa City July 29th, about 2 weeks later. In this Martin Company, there were 576 persons, 146 Handcarts, 5 wagons, 6 mules, and 50 cows, oxen and beef cattle. The company was divided into two sections with three wagons drawn by mules and two by oxen to each section. While at Florence Nebraska, the question whether they should continue their journey or go into Winter Quarters was discussed. The brethren were advised by Elder Levi Savage that such a journey so late in the season should not be undertaken; that it would be better to stay in Winter Quarters until Spring. Elder Savage had been over the route and knew the dangers they would likely encounter. However, he was overruled and they decided to go on; they fully hoped to reach Salt Lake before the chilling blasts of winter. Elder Savage said, "What I have said I know to be true, but seeing you are to go forward I will go with you, will suffer with you, and if necessary die with you. May God in His mercy bless and preserve us". This was a fatal error but unexpected by most of the company for the winter came much earlier than usual and was most severe. With longing in their hearts for the Great Salt Lake, these two companies pressed on with all possible speed. In the first few weeks, they made favorable progress but as they continued, the roads became rough and repairs were constantly necessary, their progress was delayed. Due to the lightness of their handcarts and the hasty manner in which they were constructed of unseasoned wood, they began to fall to pieces and to repair them required time and delay. They had taken so much time that their food supply was getting low and it soon became necessary to discard some of their handcarts, as they were beyond repair. This was indeed a hard journey; The Martin Handcart Company suffered most severely, as there were more women and children in this company, there was more loss of life. Death occurred frequently during their journey. Their rations were getting less every day and the people were getting weaker. After one severe storm 15 members died in one day while others suffered greatly. This loss was indeed a sad one, these courageous men and women faced the certainty of death within their ranks, which is always the price of pioneering, but they surely didn't expect anything like this. Eliza Briggs was like a mother to her brothers and sisters. She carried her sister, 13 months old, under her clothing so that she might get warmth from her body. It is believed that without Eliza's tender care, the baby would have never reached Salt Lake alive. Eliza was always very tired and hungry when they made camp but she shared her rations with her small sisters and helped her mother care for them. Although hungry and weak she would join in the singing. The chorus of her favorite song was "For some must push, and some must pull, as we go marching up the hill, and merrily on our way we go, until we reach the valley 'O'. Eliza and her mother and several other women who had small children would keep a fire burning all night to keep them from freezing. It was not long until it was found necessary to cut the rations. The pound of flour per day was to be cut to 3/4, then to 1/2 and later to something less than nothing. By the time they reached Fort Laramie the company was so hungry that those who could were glad to exchange their watches and other valuables for provisions. At Deer Creek, October 17th due to the growing weakness of emigrants and teams, the baggage, including bedding and utensils were reduced to 10 pounds per person, children under 8, 5 pounds. Good bedding and clothing were burned as they could not be carried though needed more than ever for there were yet 400 miles of winter to go through. On the 19th of October, these pioneers awoke to find their beds covered with snow. There was a high wind blowing that drove particles of snow in every direction. They camped near the last crossing of the Platte River. During the day the river had to be crossed, the water was exceedingly high and the current strong. Some of the women and children were carried across by men, but Eliza, along with most of the women tied up their skirts and waded through as they had done through many other rivers and creeks. It was so cold that the bottom of their skirts that got damp, froze as they walked along. Many had frozen feet. The company was just barely across the river when snow, hail and sleet began to fall accompanied by a piercing north wind. That night was a nipping night, and it told its tale on the oxen as well as the people. For several days, the snow continued until it was 15 inches deep on the level, but they struggled on. Many fell by the way. John Briggs gave most of his portion of food to the children, thinking he could get along until the relief party arrived. Only those who have experienced this trial could realize the heartaches of those parents seeing their children hungry and having to live on rations. He became weaker every day and very sick, but he tried very hard to help his wife and children to the end of their journey. One Cold Morning (November 3, 1856), Near Devils Gate, In spite of his courage and will to live, Eliza’s mother found her husband dead in his bed with his mouth and nostrils frozen full of ice. Picture this brave mother, with her children, putting their father in his grave, without proper ceremony and in compelling haste, then under such adverse conditions they were forced to push on- for emergency demanded haste, less the grim and merciless winter embrace them all in the grasp of death. Eliza was a great comfort to her mother and helped in may ways to lighten her mother's burden. At Martin’s Cove Near Devils Gate they held an earnest council to determine whether to winter there or push on to Salt Lake. But fearing it might be impossible to send supplies to them later in the season, they decided to go on. It was necessary again to leave some of their belongings at Martin’s Cove to lighten their loads. The crossing of the Sweetwater proved to be a terrible ordeal to the weary travelers. Standing shivering with cold on the river bank they watched huge pieces of ice floating down stream. The water at the crossing was about 2 feet deep and it was evening, the coldest hour of the day. In spite of the cheering information that this was the last river they would have to cross, it seemed impossible for them in their weakened condition, to make the attempt. Not only women and children wept but men shed tears freely. Some of the stronger men made camp on the bank of the Sweetwater that night. Another Tragedy Struck the family with the loss of Eliza’s brother Thomas age 13 who was so weak with cold and frostbite he no longer could carry on so on November 11, 1856 he was laid to a wintry grave. The mountains were getting steeper and the roads rougher. The Rocky Ridge and South Pass were crossed November 18th, a bitter cold day. The snow fell fast and the wind was piercing cold. As the company traveled up the Sweetwater and over the mountain they began to meet more relief wagons from the valley and in a few days there were plenty of wagons for the first time to carry all the people. The traveling became more rapid. There were about 104 relief wagons by the time they reached Salt Lake. The Big Mountain was crossed November 29th. So close to their destination but it did not stop the death of Eliza’s 7 year old sister Mary Hannah. She died in Eliza’s arms the day before they reached the Salt Lake Valley. That night they camped at the head of Emigration Canyon and arrived in Salt Lake about noon November 30th. The story of the courageous pioneers was indeed a sad one for each one had a mark of the hard 1300 mile journey. Mary Taylor, an only child and very young wife, buried her father Joseph by the wayside the 8th of October and her young husband William Upton and mother Harriet Sidwell were buried in the same grave November 10th. Another Young Mother and Wife was traveling with her husband and two teenage sons. She buried her husband at Devil's Gate, Wyoming, and before they reached Salt Lake it was necessary to amputate her 13 year old son's badly frozen feet with her scissors. He managed to go around without his feet and lived to be an old man. He said it was a painful ordeal but that it didn't hurt any worse than his badly frozen feet. When the two belated companies, the Willis and Martin Handcart Companies, arrived in Salt Lake, the people living there who had comfortable homes and large enough to accommodate them, were asked to share their homes with the weary homeless people until permanent homes could be arranged for. Ruth Briggs was badly frozen by the time they reached Salt Lake and was in bed most of the winter. She was given refuge in the home of Benjamin Thomas Clark and was soon taken as his 3rd wife. On Aug 4 1860, during the night while the family was in bed asleep, Ruth was bitten on the neck by a scorpion and died from the effects. Eliza Briggs was placed in the home of James and Frances Clark Stratton. Eliza's feet were badly frozen and she was several months recovering. James and Frances felt sorry for Eliza and did what they could to make her comfortable and happy. She was a refined and modest girl and they became very fond of her. After a time, President Young advised those who had taken young women into their homes, if they were financially able and felt that they could all be happy in plural marriage, that the husband marry the young women and thus give her a permanent home. Frances was in favor of James marrying Eliza. She felt sorry for this lonesome girl and wanted to share her home with her. They got along nicely, working together, and made a pleasant home. Frances and James had two little girls. In a year a baby was born to each of the wives, Frances a son and Eliza a daughter. In a year and seven months Eliza had another little girl. The first girl was named Ruth for her Mother. These little girls were very fond of each other and when they were grown they married brothers.. The Stratton’s moved to Provo Utah in 1869. Shortly after arriving there Frances gave birth to another son; they now had six children and it was hard for James to earn enough to feed them. When the soldiers at Camp Floyd needed new clothes, a call was made for those who were able to make men’s' clothing to go to Camp Floyd to sew. Frances had been a tailor in England and, wishing to help James feed and cloth the children, she took her small baby and second small girl, about 4 years old, and went there to sew. Away from home and without proper influence, Frances became infatuated with a soldier and when the company of solders were released and went back East to their homes, Frances went with the soldier, taking her two children with her. James and Eliza lived in Provo for several years and while there a young man about 17, a convert from England, made his home with them. James taught him to make rope and they would trade it for flour or other food they needed. This young man was very kind to Eliza and did what he could to help her. In later years he remembered how she had to soak her crippled feet in warm water before going to bed each night. He said there was very little flesh on her heels. Her feet never recovered from being frozen so badly. In 1869, James and Eliza and other families were called on the Muddy Mission in Southern Utah. It was a long hard trip. They took their clothing, bedding, food a few pieces of furniture. The roads were rough and dusty. The weather was hot and still hotter when they reached their destination. This was a shorter journey than the journey across the plains but never-the-less it was another hare trip for Eliza with her seven children. After traveling all day in the hot sun, the children were tired and often cross, but then were always ready to find a shady place and play when they made camp for the night. After supper, Eliza would tell them stories about her trip across the plains and how cold and hungry she was. They enjoyed the stories very much and it helped them to forget the heat. When they arrived at their destination they began at once to establish a home by putting up their tents. They put a wagon box on the ground and canvas cover over it for a bedroom for the small children. They carried their water in buckets from the creek. The children never forgot the burning sand on their bare feet. When they went for water, they would fill the buckets from the creek and then run as fast as possible as far as they could, then stop and spill a little water on the ground and stand in it to cool their feet, then run on. Their feet soon became sore from the hot sand. James and his little boys worked hard preparing the ground to plant. The wind blew a lot, the soil was sandy, the ditches and rows they made to water the crops would blow full of dirt and sand. They worked hard to keep them shoveled out. When the corn was ready for use, the Indians would take it as fast as it came on. The Indians were very troublesome, but the settlers tried hard to be patient, they must not have trouble with them. Pres. Young said "It was better to feed them than to fight them." The Indian children would watch the children play. To them the covered wagon box on the ground was a funny thing; they would sing, "A Wikee-up with a wagon in it, a Wikee-up with a wagon it." Because of the climate, marshy ground and poor living conditions, most of the settlers became ill with ague, an intermittent fever, and some had malaria. Eliza's family was no exception and it was impossible to give them proper care, but Eliza did the best she could and never complained although she was ill herself. A few months before Eliza's 8th child was born, James wanted to take her back to Provo so she could have better care, but the courageous and unselfish woman she was, refused, saying, "No, the President of the Church called us here on a mission to build homes and cultivate the soil for other settlers and we will stay until he calls us back." Eliza did not live to be called back, when her baby was 2 days old, she passed away January 9 1871. In 15 short years in Utah she had accomplished a great deal. Her life had been full and eventful. She was buried in the section called "The Muddy" and is now Overton Nevada. After the death of Eliza, James moved his family to Santa Clara where he was able to hire a woman to take care of the baby until it was old enough for the little girls to help care for him. A very short time after Eliza's death, the call came for the settlers to return to their homes; so when the baby was about 3 months old, James and his family went to Cedar Fort Utah. During this journey they led a cow behind the wagon and it was the chore of the little girls to stop ever so often and milk the cow to feed the baby. Though Eliza's eldest daughter Ruth was about fourteen and a very capable girl, James made his home in Cedar Fort for several years so that he could be near his married daughter Louisa and she could help him with his little family. Eliza's family cherished her memory always. She was a real pioneer and she left her family a great heritage. By CORA STONE BIGLER, daughter of Louisa Stratton Stone History of Eliza Briggs Stratton "The Cheevers said that Frances was more in favor of James marrying Eliza than James was. Perhaps because of her sympathy for the lonesome girl, she wanted to share her home with her. They got along nicely, working together and made a pleasant home. Frances and James had two little girls when Eliza came into their home, Susan Louisa and Maria Jane (called Jennie)". Provo 1st Ward Rec of Mem (#1131 pt 286) Timpanogos Ward Rec of Mem (#6433 pt 1) Sealing of Couples (living) in EH Views: 694 James Stratton Not attached to the tree Attach to Family Tree Memories Eliza Briggs Not attached to the tree Attach to Family Tree Memories Albums containing this story: Add this Story to another album: Comments: Add Comment Date and Place Delete Event Date? Delete Cancel Event Date Delete Event Place? 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Life timeline of James Stratton

1824
James Stratton was born on 20 Dec 1824
James Stratton was 7 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
James Stratton was 16 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
James Stratton was 35 years old when Charles Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
James Stratton was 44 years old when Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton founded the National Woman Suffrage Association, breaking away from the American Equal Rights Association which they had also previously founded. Susan B. Anthony was an American social reformer and women's rights activist who played a pivotal role in the women's suffrage movement. Born into a Quaker family committed to social equality, she collected anti-slavery petitions at the age of 17. In 1856, she became the New York state agent for the American Anti-Slavery Society.
James Stratton was 55 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
James Stratton was 57 years old when The world's first international telephone call is made between St. Stephen, New Brunswick, Canada, and Calais, Maine, United States. A telephone call is a connection over a telephone network between the called party and the calling party.
James Stratton was 74 years old when Spanish–American War: The Treaty of Paris is signed, officially ending the conflict. The Spanish–American War was fought between the United States and Spain in 1898. Hostilities began in the aftermath of the internal explosion of the USS Maine in Havana Harbor in Cuba, leading to US intervention in the Cuban War of Independence. American acquisition of Spain's Pacific possessions led to its involvement in the Philippine Revolution and ultimately in the Philippine–American War.
James Stratton died on 23 Mar 1907 at the age of 82
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for James Stratton (20 Dec 1824 - 23 Mar 1907), BillionGraves Record 11394 Provo, Utah, Utah, United States

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