James Nix

30 Aug 1799 - 6 Dec 1878

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James Nix

30 Aug 1799 - 6 Dec 1878
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The History of James Nix Written by Margaret Nix White (Granddaughter) Submitted to Daughters of Utah Pioneers by Kathy LaVerne Schory Ford Retyped by Anjanette Stone Lofgren (This history was compiled from the following sources: two short histories written by Margaret Nix White, a granddaughter of
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Life Information

James Nix

Born:
Died:

Tooele City Cemetery

Sagers Circle
Tooele, Tooele, Utah
United States

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Son / Father / Mother
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trishkovach

March 13, 2013
Transcriber

Patty C

March 13, 2013
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cindykay1

March 13, 2013

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James Nix History Excerpt

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

The History of James Nix Written by Margaret Nix White (Granddaughter) Submitted to Daughters of Utah Pioneers by Kathy LaVerne Schory Ford Retyped by Anjanette Stone Lofgren (This history was compiled from the following sources: two short histories written by Margaret Nix White, a granddaughter of James Nix; Nix histories submitted by Thelda Nix in The History of Tooele County, published by the DUP in 1961; Nix family group sheets, including archive records from the LDS church files; the 1851 English census record; the marriage certificate of James Nix and Sarah Lane Elsey; LDS temple records of sealings; Orme family group sheets; and two books about Mormon maritime migration history by Conway B. Sonne—(1) Saints on the Seas: A Maritime History of Mormon Migration; and (2) Knight of the Kingdom (The Story of Richard Ballantyne). This history is submitted by Kathryn LaVerne Schory Ford, a fourth great granddaughter of James Nix and a member of Camp Timp View, North Center County Company, Orem, Utah, Daughters of the Utah Pioneers) James Nix was born on August 30th, 1799 in Dowsby, Lincolnshire, England to James Nix and Ann Elsey. He was the fifth of ten children. James had five brothers and four sisters. When James was about thirteen his father, James Sr., died as a result of a broken neck. He had fallen from a narrow bridge near Dowsby. At the time of his death the children ranged in age from about nineteen down to two years. Ann Elsey Nix never remarried and she remained in Dowsby, raising her family. She died in 1855 at the age of about 85. In 1824, James married Mary Ann Love. They had four children: Mary Ann (who died as an infant), Thomas, Sarah, and James III. When his son Thomas was still an infant, James let his brother-in-law, William Love, and his wife, Caroline, take Thomas to live with them. William was a ship builder and contractor. When Thomas was six years old, William and Caroline took him to America. On the way Caroline died of Cholera. Six months after landing in New Orleans, William died also, leaving Thomas alone. Thomas begged for food and slept where he could. Finally when he was about ten years old he hid aboard a ship bound for England. When the ship was halfway to England the crew found him. As it was too late to turn back, Thomas was put to work scrubbing decks in exchange for food. He found his way back to his parent’s home in Dowsby where they rejoiced greatly for his safe return. Thomas’ family listened eagerly to his tales of adventure in the New World and they began saving every cent for coming over to America as a family. James Nix worked as a farmer for Seth Dean, who owned all the land in Dowsby. Not long after Thomas returned home, his mother, Mary Ann Love Nix, died. She was about thirty-eight, and she died in 1838. Thomas was eleven, Sarah was eight, and James III was five. James Nix remarried on May 20th, 1840. His new wife was a widow named Sarah Lane Elsey. She had four children from her first marriage. The names of the children that I found include Susan, Mary and William. Together that gave them seven children and then James and Sarah had a son on August 5th, 1842. They named him Samuel... This story is on file with the Daughters of Utah Pioneers and can be purchased for a minimal fee. dupinternational.org

History of Thomas Nix

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

History of Thomas Nix Source: Alice Davis Gollaher (granddaughter) When: Unknown HISTORY OF THOMAS NIX Researched by his daughter Alice Davis Gollaher My grandfather, Thomas Nix was born May 20, 1827 at Dowsby, Lincolnshire, England. He was the son of James Nix and Mary Love. I remember him very well, having lived with him and his two daughters in Tooele, Utah for several years. My two aunts were not married at the time. Aunt Margaret married later but Aunt Mary Ann never married. These two devoted daughters took care of him for many years and during his final illness. I was married at his home in Tooele in 1904. He took great pride in my wedding and insisted on having a complete dinner served to over 300 guests. He took great delight in my many wedding gifts. He was always very kind to me and loved to have me read to him in the evenings. He could read, but he never learned to write. He told me that he smoked a pipe in his youth and Aunt Mary Ann told me that on his fortieth birthday he laid his pipe on a shelf over the fireplace and said, "I will never smoke again." He never did. His daughters would dust around it, being careful not to disturb it and after many years he threw it out. This is one example of his very determined character. I remember many things about him-his broad shoulders, his pointed beard, always well kept, and his many stories of the sea and of England, his positive sturdy walk, his very "set in his ways", but even as a child I had a feeling that my grandfather was "set" in the right direction. When he was a baby, his parents allowed his aunt and uncle to take him to live with them. They had the care of him and when he was six years old, they took him to America. This uncle was a ship builder and contractor. His name was William Love and his wife's name was Caroline. This aunt died during the ocean voyage and was buried in the ocean. Uncle William Love landed in New Orleans with the child. Six months later he took cholera and died, leaving grandfather alone in a strange land. He wandered around the docks watching the ships come and go, begging his food and sleeping wherever he could. When he told me about it, he could not remember much about those years and how he survived, but his mind was very clear about hiding on a ship bound for England. He would chuckle whenever he told about the ships crew finding him when they were too far out to sea for them to turn back. They told him that he would have to work for his food. He said that he worked very hard scrubbing the deck. The order was no work-no food. His eyes would always twinkle when he would say, ìI always had plenty of food." When he landed in England, he made his way to his father's house, where there was great rejoicing. His parents had not heard a word about William and Caroline Love or the little boy since they had left some four years before. His father had yearned to come to the land of promise, "America." Now the little boy was as full of tales of the new world that they talked and talked about it, saving every cent they could for the journey. When the Mormon elders came to them with the gospel message they were ready to accept it and were soon baptized. When my grandfather was 23 years old, he married the one love of his life, Mary Holmes Banks. This marriage took place in 1850. At the time, he was converted and baptized and he had one child, George. Soon after, my mother, Emily Altheria was born. When she was 2 or 6 weeks old, the journey to Zion was begun. They sailed on the ship called the Charles Buck. It took eleven weeks in the crossing and landed at New Orleans the later part of March 1855. They sailed from Liverpool, England. From there they went by boat to Mormon Grove to wait until a company was ready to leave for the west. They crossed the plains in Mil Andrews' company, arriving in Salt Lake City 24 October 1855, just nine months from the time they started on their journey. The authorities were then colonizing and the Nix family was asked to settle in Tooele, which they did, arriving there Nov. 3, 1855. The family had been gardeners in England for many generations, so it was natural for them to work with the soil and raise their own food. Shortly after arriving, they had their farm started. Grandfather was called to go to Echo Canyon to assist in keeping out Johnson's Army. He assisted Hugh Gowans in making bread and cake for the soldiers. He helped to build a mud wall around the town for protection against the Indians. My great grandfather had the first log house built in Tooele. The families had a very hard time to exist the first winter in their new home and the hardships were terrible, but my grandfather never wanted to talk much about these early days. He was a good shot and kept his family well provided with meat, but bread was a luxury, I have heard. My mother tells about digging sago lily bulbs for food and of gathering pig weeds for greens. Once they had an apple, which grandmother carefully divided between the children. My grandfather had 9 children, 4 boys and 5 girls, three of whom died in infancy. Grandmother died when the 9th child was born on April 24, 1873. Grandfather lived a widower for many years. He worked the farm and Aunt Mary Ann and Aunt Margaret sewed for the town folks to help out with the finances. Later they took boarders and earned the money to pay the expenses for his long illness. He died with a cancerous condition on September 18, 1913 at the age of 86. I think that from this sturdy pioneer, we his descendents have inherited much to be proud of, physically, mentally, and morally. If we try to emulate him, we will add honor to his memory. Most of this information was copied from a record kept by my Aunt Margaret Nix White, who knew much more about this than anyone of my generation. Alice Adelia Davis Gollaher

History of James Nix

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

History of James Nix Source: Margaret Nix White (granddaughter) and George M Nix (grandson) When: Unknown James Nix By Margaret Nix White, a granddaughter George M. Nix, a great grandson In the year 1799, there was born in England a boy who was to become the heir to one of the greatest works that would be done in these the last days—that of beginning the work for his dead in the temple of the Lord. If there is anything that would give one a testimony of the truthfulness of the restored gospel of Jesus Christ, it is the fact that the Lord does inspire his children and lead them to do things that will bring bout righteous purposes. The Lord has said that we cannot become perfect in this life or in the life to come, only as we are connected by sealing into one great family from Adam down unto the end of the earth. He has also revealed to the Prophet Joseph Smith that now is the time to do that work. The Prophet Isaiah said that in the last days the Lord's House would be built in the tops of the mountains and all nations would come unto it. The Prophet Malachi also said the Lord would send Elijah the Prophet to turn the hearts of the fathers to their children and the hearts of the children to their fathers. The prophecies have been fulfilled, Elijah has come and temples have been built in the tops of the mountains. People of all nations are coming and doing work for their dead. James Nix, Heir On the 30th day of August, 1799, James Nix was born in the little town of Dowsby, Lincolnshire England, being the son of James Nix and Ann Elsey. Little is know of his early life, only that he lived in Dowsby, which is near the North Sea in the south of Lincolnshire. In 1824, when he was twenty five years old, he married Mary Love and to this union were born four children: Mary Ann, who died in her infancy, Thomas, Sarah, and James Jr. Sometime about 1838, his wife, Mary, died, leaving him with his three children, the oldest, Thomas being eleven years of age. James Nix Sr. married again, a widow by the name of Mrs. Elsey. To this union was born a son who they called Sam. When Thomas, the oldest son, was about twenty four years old, he married Mary Banks and on September 13, 1852, their first child was born and christened George. It was about this time that the elders of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints were preaching the gospel in that part of old England and their message found a ready response in the hearts of many of the truth loving people. Among them were James Nix, Sr. and his wife. Shortly afterwards, his son Thomas and wife and then Sarah and James Jr. accepted the gospel. The spirit of gathering, which took possession of most of the converts in the foreign lands, seems to have prevailed with those new found converts, for in early December 1851, they all, except Sarah, started for America and Utah. They were eleven weeks on the ocean and eleven months on the journey from their old home to Great Salt Lake City. They crossed the plains by ox team in Mil Anderson's company. Richard Balentine was their captain. They arrived in Tooele, which was to be their new home on November 1, 1855, but the long tiresome journey ended in sadness for the mother of Sam died at eleven o'clock the same night. James Nix Sr. lived in Tooele for twenty three years. During that time he married again and on December 6, 1878, at the age of seventy nine years, he died and was buried in the Tooele cemetery. Thus came to an end the life of a good man and the first Nix to join the church in this dispensation. Sam Nix, the youngest son, was drowned in Rush Valley Lake while swimming. James Nix, Jr. joined a company of emigrants who were traveling through California and it is not know what became of him. Thomas Nix became a farmer, owning a piece of land on the west side of Tooele City and a lot in town where be built a log home for his wife and family, which by the year 1873 had grown to number 11 souls. Their first two children, George and Mary Ann, were born in England, and seven were born to them in Tooele. On April 15, 1873, William Ernest, was born and on April 24th, nine days later, his mother, Mary died of childbed fever. This a terrible blow to the family, to be left without a wife and mother. No one can measure the sadness of the father to lose his loving wife and companion who had shared the hardships of early pioneer life and just when they were beginning to enjoy the comforts of their hard work, to be separated so suddenly. There was now left in the family, George, twenty one years old, Emily, nineteen, Thomas Jr. sixteen, Mary Ann, twelve, James, seven, and Margaret, two and baby Will, nine days old. Two children, Sarah Elizabeth and Lucy Jane had already died. Baby Will was taken and reared by an aunt, a sister to his mother. Thomas Sr. lived the remainder of his life in Tooele City. He became a high Priest and in every way a respected citizen. He was God fearing and true to the faith he had accepted in a foreign land. He died at his home on September 18, 1918 and rests near his wife and children who had proceeded him, in the Tooele Cemetery. Thomas Nix Sr., like his father, had little or no education in the schools of England and was unable to read or write when he came to America, but he studied and soon learned to read so that he was able to enjoy his newspaper and other literature. He never learned to write, therefore, he left no records of his forefathers, only the things he was able to remember and tell to his children, for no record of his forefathers had been kept so far as he knew and very little was known of them. On September 1, 1918, Margaret, the youngest daughter of Thomas Nix Sr., dreamed a dream that was the beginning of the search into the past and the bringing to light of many of the Nix ancestors. The dream as told by Margaret and what become of it: "I dreamed that a man came into my home dressed in a gray suit. He resembled father a great deal, but still I know that it was not him. This man was carrying a box and as he came near, he seemed to be searching through his pockets for something. I asked him what he was looking for and he replied, I am hunting for the key to this box, but I have lost it, but it makes no difference, I will tell you what is in it. This box contains the names of all your dead, then I awoke. I was very much impressed. This dream seemed so real, as though I had been wide awake. Many times I pondered over the singularity of it. It was about a year after I had this dream that I dreamed again. I saw myself layed out as though I was dead and my friends were preparing to lay me in a coffin. I spoke and said to them "No, I am not dead. I have work to do in the temple," then I awoke. The day after I had dreamed this second dream, my sister. Mary Ann and I were walking down the street when we met John A. Bevan, Patriarch of the Tooele Stake. After greeting us he said that he was on his way to our home to have a talk with us. We invited him to go back to our home with us but he said, "No, I will tell you what my visit was for. For the last three nights I have been unable to sleep, thinking about you and wondering if you were doing anything for your dead." I related the dream I had had and he said, "It is time you are getting busy. There is lots of work to be done for your ancestors and you have the key to unlock the past." I wondered about those things a great deal but was at a loss to know where to begin or how I was ever going to find out anything about my father's family of the past generations. The song says, "God moves in a mysterious way, His wonders to perform." And Prophet Nephi said, "I will go and do the thing which the Lord bath commanded for I know that the Lord giveth no commandments unto the children of men, save He shall prepare a way for them that they may accomplish the thing which He commandeth them." It was March 20, 1920, that the postman delivered a letter to our door addressed to George Nix or any of his kin. This seemed singular. George Nix was my oldest brother, but in as much as the letter was addressed to any of his kin, I opened it. The writer was a Mr. Edwin Eyre, of Minorsville, Utah. He said that he was interested in the Nix line of genealogy and had done some work for them in the Manti Temple. He also said that years ago he had been on a mission to England and had spent some time in Dowsby and was well acquainted with many of the people there. He mentioned the name of Mr. George Taylor and said that if I would write a letter to this man in Dowsby, England, I would get more information. After corresponding with Mr. Eyre for some time, I wrote to Mr. Taylor in England, enclosing a self-addressed envelope and money for return postage. This was early in 1921. Months passed and even years and yet no answer came. Ten years passed away and I had almmost forgotten all about writing, when one day a letter came from England, addressed in my own handwriting. I wondered how it could be possible that I was writing to myself I soon found out. For upon opening it, I discovered that it was from the son of the George Taylor that I had written to ten years before. He said that his father had been dead ten years and that he had been looking an old trunk, of his father's and had found my letters still unopened. He opened and read it and the was the answer. (Note: Incomplete in original-this is the original wording.) Surely the Lord was giving me the key to the box that I might unlock the past and find my dead. Through corresponding with this new found relative, as he proved to be and also others whom he directed me to, in England, I have found hundreds of names of my ancestors and have done much work in the temples for them and there is yet a great deal to be done. The Lord had blessed me in my labors and I have found a great joy in work in the temples for them. The Lord has said that we cannot be saved without our dead. Neither can they come to a fullness of joy until work is done here in the house of the Lord for them. Therefore, I say unto the descendents of our line who are living, let us go to and labor with our might and become saviors on Mt. Zion, that when we have passed to the other side, our kindred there will bless us for the work we have done here.

History of James Nix and Sarah Lane (Elsey) Nix

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

History of James Nix and Sarah Lane (Elsey) Nix James Nix was born on August 30, 1799 in Dowsby, Lincolnshire, England to James Nix and Ann Elsey. He was the fifth of ten children. James had five brothers and four sisters. When James was about thirteen his father, James Sr., died as a result of a broken neck. He had fallen from a narrow bridge near Dowsby. At the time of his death the children ranged from age from about nineteen down to two years. Ann Elsey Nix never remarried and remained in Dowsby, raising her family. She died in 1855 at the age of about 85. In 1824 James married Mary Ann Love. They had four children: Mary Ann (who died as an infant), Thomas, Sarah, and James III. When his son Thomas was still an infant, James let his brother-in-law, William Love, and his wife, Caroline, take Thomas to live with them. William was a ship builder and contractor. When Thomas was six years old, William and Caroline took him to America. On the way Caroline died of Cholera. Six months after landing in New Orleans, William died also, leaving Thomas alone. Thomas begged for food and slept where he could. Finally when he was about ten years old he hid aboard a ship bound for England. When the ship was halfway to England the crew found him. As it was too late to turn back, Thomas was put to work scrubbing decks in exchange for food. He found his way back to his parents’ home in Dowsby where they rejoiced greatly for his safe return. Thomas’ family listened eagerly to his tales of adventure in the New World and they began saving every cent for coming over to America as a family. James Nix worked as a farmer for Seth Dean, who owned all the land in Dowsby. Not long after Thomas returned home, his mother, Mary Ann Love Nix died. She was about thirty-eight, and she died in 1838. Thomas was eleven, Sarah was eight and James III was five. James Nix remarried on May 20, 1840. His new wife was a widow named Sarah Lane Elsey. She had four children from her first marriage. The names of the children that I found include Susannah, Mary and William. Together that gave them seven children, and then James and Sarah had a son on August 5, 1842. They named him Samuel. Around 1850 the elders of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints came preaching the gospel in Dowsby. James and Sarah were among the first converts in Lincolnshire. They were baptized in 1850. Apparently Susannah and Mary Elsey (Sarah’s daughters) were baptized then also and James and Sarah sent the girls to America. Susannah and Mary came to Salt Lake and were married. Susannah, the oldest, married Thomas Tanner; Mary Ann married a man by the name of Bradshaw. Their families were both sent to settle Tooele. Thomas Nix married his childhood sweetheart, Mary Holmes Banks, in December of 1851. On April 6th, 1852 Thomas was baptized (I believe his wife was baptized at the same time). In September of 1852 their first son was born and they christened him George. When Thomas and Mary Holmes Nix had their second child, Emily Altheria, in October of 1854, they were preparing to go to Zion with James and Sarah and the rest of the family. When Emily was six weeks old, the family was ready to depart—it was December of 1854. All of the Nixes (except daughter Sarah) made the trip. There was James Nix and his wife Sarah, Thomas and his wife Mary and two children George and Emily, William Elsey, and James III. Richard Ballantyne was commissioned by Franklin D. Richards to be a company leader to bring the saints from Liverpool to Utah. They boarded the ship Helios, but it sprang a leak and the immigrants repacked their belongings and left the ship. Six weeks later passage was secured aboard the ship Charles Buck. It must have been quite a hardship on the Saints waiting to come, but 403 saints boarded the Charles Buck on January 17th, 1855 and set sail from Liverpool. They were fifty-six days in ocean passage to New Orleans. Sarah Elsey Nix was sick all the way across the ocean. Since there was no doctor aboard ship, Richard Ballantyne became the physician and gave what medical aid he could along with priesthood blessings. He had developed his own remedies too, which he administered to all the sick. One of the remedies was a composition tea. While he was a sympathetic doctor, he did not trifle with any patient who puckered up face and tried to avoid taking his share of the treatment. The missionary spoke sternly to the recalcitrant and commanded that a liberal dose be taken. There were other remedies, too. To the patient with dysentery he prescribed this concoction: “Take one pint of good vinegar, and a half a pound of loaf of sugar, and simmer them together in a pewter vessel with a pewter cover. Let the patient drink of this during the day, a small quantity at a time either clear or accommodated to the palate by diluting it with water.” As might be expected many doses were liberally diluted with water. He offered the following for a cough medicine: “Take a paregoric elixir, two drachms; Carbonate of Soda, one drachm; treacle, one ounce; barley water, five ounces—mix. A tablespoon full to be taken frequently when the cough is troublesome.” One evening as the food was being rationed, a startling discovery was made. A check of the supplies revealed that a large quantity was not reloaded when the transfer was made from the Helios to the Charles Buck. It was either an oversight or a matter of theft. In any case, the fact remained that there was not enough food to provide a wholesome diet throughout the voyage. Nothing could be done except to cut the daily rations, and so far the rest of the voyage the immigrants were reduced to a minimum subsistence. Nor were all the dangers from short rations and the elements, for one day the captain, William Smalley, sighted a pirate ship carrying a gang of cutthroats and robbers. It caused excitement bordering on panic, but the quick-witted seamen ordered every person on the ship to appear on deck. As there were eight hundred in all, this great number of people caused the pirates to reconsider whatever designs they had on capturing the ship. They tacked their vessel about and sailed away. Richard Ballantyne was determined that there would be no idle hands in his company, and so before leaving England he arranged for the purchase of large quantity of canvas. He then set the passengers to work cutting out the material and sewing it into tents and wagon covers. Frequently meetings were held, sometimes at night under lanterns between the main mast and galley. Singing and preaching kept spirits high, and any evidence of grumbling was immediately dealt with by the organization leaders. The immigrants were divided into four wards, over which were a president and two counselors. Sometimes they had the problem of the crew expressing enmity against the Latter-day Saints and the Irish immigrants who were also aboard. Disease was a problem and short rations a worry. The Charles Buck fought strong headwinds most of the voyage, which considerably slowed the speed and rapidly exhausted the already inadequate food supply. However, during the trip the company manufactured twenty-one tents and twenty wagon covers for the trip across the plains. Finally on March 14, 1855 they landed in New Orleans. From there they traveled by river boat to St. Louis, where they were greeted by Apostle Erastus Snow. When Elder Ballantyne reported the trip up the Mississippi to Elder Snow he indicated that the captain’s conduct had been disgraceful in the extreme, several deaths had occurred and the provisions had cost them dearly—on the average the cost per passenger for the trip thus far was five dollars and six cents (for each adult). At St. Louis the Saints remained for a week waiting for the ice to clear from the upper Mississippi. Elder Snow in the meantime had engaged a steamboat to take the immigrants to Atchison, Kansas. When Richard Ballantyne inspected the steamboat he found it to be old and dilapidated. He told Brother Snow he didn’t feel right about it. They found a new one, named the Michigan. The original boat they had chartered met with an accident on the river and had sunk. The lives of hundreds of Saints were spared. At Atchison, Kansas four companies were formed of roughly 400 people in each company. My ancestors went with the Milo Andrus Company, thus parting company with Elder Ballantyne, who headed the Poor Fund Company to Salt Lake. From Atchison the companies went on three miles west to Mormon Grove. This was the chief outfitting place for the Saints who crossed the plains in 1855. The Nixes reached Salt Lake in November of 1855. Susannah and Mary (who had emigrated earlier) came from Tooele with their husbands to Salt Lake to greet the family and bring them to Tooele. They got to Tooele on November 5th, 1855 around five in the evening. Sarah Elsey Nix died that same night at eleven o’clock. In September of 1865 James Nix married for the third time. He married Sarah Ann Orme. Sarah Orme was about 31 and James was 46. They were sealed in the Endowment House. In about 1866 Sarah gave birth to twins. She and the twins died and were buried in the snow. In the spring their remains were not to be found. James married for the final time to a Jane McDonald. She outlived him but I find not record of her bearing any children. Sam Nix drowned in Stockton Lake on July 8th, 1873 while he was swimming. James III went to California hunting for gold. He had working on an LDS church farm by Salt Lake where immigrants and gold hunters passed through. They persuaded James III to go with them. He was nineteen then when he left. He sent his father one letter from San Bernardino. That was the last time James heard from his son. Thomas and his wife and family stayed in Tooele and raised a large family. They had nine children and then Mary Banks Nix died in 1873. Thomas never remarried. In 1871 James Nix was sealed by proxy to his first two wives, Mary Ann Love Nix and Sarah Lane Elsey Nix. Temple work was also completed for other relatives during that sealing. In 1874 James received his patriarchal blessing. He was told that his last days would be his best days for it would be given to him to know the voice of the Good Shepherd. James Nix died on December 6th, 1878 at the age of seventy-nine. He was sealed up to eternal life with the forgiveness of sins through his faith and obedience to the Lord. Today his posterity is in the hundreds and although not all are in the church, many are and bless his name for the sacrifices he and his family made in accepting the gospel and coming here to Zion. (This history was compiled from the following sources: two short histories written by Margaret Nix White, a granddaughter of James Nix; Nix histories submitted by Thelda Nix in The History of Tooele County, published by the DUP in 1961; Nix family group sheets, including archive records from LDS church files; the 1851 English census record; the marriage certificate of James Nix and Sarah Lane Elsey; LDS temple records of sealings; Orme family group sheets; and two books about Mormon maritime migration history by Conway B. Sonne—(1) Saints on the Seas: A Maritime History of Mormon Migration; and (2) Knight of the Kingdom (The Story of Richard Ballantyne). This history is submitted by Kathryn La Verne Schory Ford, a fourth great granddaughter of James Nix and a member of Camp Timp View, North Center County Company, Orem, Utah, Daughters of the Utah Pioneers.

Sarah Lane Elsey Nix

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

SARAH LANE ELSEY NIX 1803 Sarah was christened in Semperingham, England on September 11, 1803. She had five sisters and four brothers. Her father was William Lane and her mother was Susannah Bills. When she was twenty-four years old she married Joseph Elsey on 8 Jan 1827. They were the parents of six children. Mary Ann born 25 Jun 1829; William christened 15 May 1831; Joseph born 7 Oct 1832; Sarah born 22 Mar 1834; Susannah was born 25 Oct 1835; Richard christened 20 Mar 1838. Her husband Joseph died on 14 Apr 1839. After the death of her husband, she met and married James Nix on 20 May 1840. From a previous marriage (Mary Ann Love) he had three children. Mary Ann (died in infancy), Thomas, Sarah, and James III. Sarah and James had one son who they named Samuel born on 5 Aug 1842. In 1850 Sarah and James were baptized and became members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Sarah was one of the first converts in Lincolnshire. Her daughters Mary Ann and Susannah were baptized at the same time and were sent to America. In 1854 Sarah and James boarded the ship “Hilos,” but it sprang a leak and six weeks later passage was secured aboard the ship “Charles Buck.” They set sail on January 17, 1855. They were fifty-six days on the water and Sarah was sick all the way across the ocean. They landed at New Orleans and traveled by boat to St. Louis where they waited a week for the ice to clear from the river. A steamboat had been engaged by Apostle Erastus Snow to take them to Atcheson, Kansas. When it was inspected by Richard Ballantyne, their company leader, he found it was unsafe and arranged for them to travel on the “Michigan.” The first boat they chartered met with an accident and sank. At Atcheson, Kansas four companies were formed of about four hundred people in each and James and Sarah went with the Milo Andrus Company. They reached Salt Lake in November of 1855. Her daughters, Mary Ann and Susannah with their husbands had come from Tooele to greet the family and take them to Tooele. They arrived at Tooele on November 5, 1885 around five o’clock in the evening. Sarah died that night at eleven o’clock. Sarah Lane Elsey Nix was a courageous woman and faithful Latter-day Saint to the end.

Life timeline of James Nix

1799
James Nix was born on 30 Aug 1799
James Nix was 5 years old when The Lewis and Clark Expedition departs from Camp Dubois and begins its historic journey by traveling up the Missouri River. The Lewis and Clark Expedition from May 1804 to September 1806, also known as the Corps of Discovery Expedition, was the first American expedition to cross the western portion of the United States. It began near St. Louis, made its way westward, and passed through the Continental Divide of the Americas to reach the Pacific coast. The Corps of Discovery was a selected group of US Army volunteers under the command of Captain Meriwether Lewis and his close friend Second Lieutenant William Clark.
James Nix was 19 years old when Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles founds Singapore. Sir Thomas Stamford Bingley Raffles, FRS was a British statesman, Lieutenant-Governor of British Java (1811–1815) and Governor-General of Bencoolen (1817–1822), best known for his founding of Singapore and the British Malaya.
James Nix was 26 years old when The Erie Canal opens: Passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie. The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System. Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.
James Nix was 32 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
James Nix was 41 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
James Nix was 60 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
James Nix was 63 years old when U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring the freedom of all slaves in Confederate territory by January 1, 1863. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
James Nix died on 6 Dec 1878 at the age of 79
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for James Nix (30 Aug 1799 - 6 Dec 1878), BillionGraves Record 3250103 Tooele, Tooele, Utah, United States

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