James Newton Wallace

2 Jun 1875 - 2 Nov 1955

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James Newton Wallace

2 Jun 1875 - 2 Nov 1955
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History of Melford Acel Wallace bY Albert Parson Wallace My people was not a religious people. I never knew more than half a dozen of them who ever professed any kind of religion, though as long as I can remember a Bible was always on a little center table in the living room. My Father was always re

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James Newton Wallace

Born:
Died:

Clearfield City Cemetery

1046-1098 Utah 126
Clearfield, Davis, Utah
United States
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smithc

June 8, 2012
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phil

November 19, 2014
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MDSIMS

May 31, 2012

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Melford Acel Wallace

Contributor: smithc Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

History of Melford Acel Wallace bY Albert Parson Wallace My people was not a religious people. I never knew more than half a dozen of them who ever professed any kind of religion, though as long as I can remember a Bible was always on a little center table in the living room. My Father was always reading it and this book was his text book. We had no newspaper,although a passerby would occasionally give father copy of the Louisville Courier Journal. Father was a well read man, but was not educate in the general underetanding of te ter. My father, Melford Acel Wallace was born in Cloverdale, Barren County.Kentucky on the 16th of December 1849 to George Washington and Rutha Clark Wallace. He had a twin brother George Alfred. We know very little of his early life but we do know that he grew up on his father's farm, and helped there as his father was a large land owner, had a large family, so there would be lots of work for the children. On the 11th of July 1872 he married Mary Ann Henderson, ho was the daughter of Ambrose Brokemn and Cedelia Williams Henderson. To them was born six children , namely Alevia Isadora, James Newton, George Robert, Fannie Crittenden, Mrha Ann and Albert Parson Wallace. They, like his father, ived n a farm ad aise corn and tobacco, and he children helped with these tasks. Occasionally an itinerant preacher would come into the community and hold what was called protracted meetigs which lated two ee weeks. These gatherings were always held in the summer time, in the shady groves of trees. We always attended them when time permitted for want of something else to do, but could never see anything to them. usually each one would always defile and railed the other, no one was right but themselves, Such meetings would usually result in a few getting religion, but it didn't last very long, and when a different preacher came along they would get religion all over again. Such was the religious environment of our people at this time. My Father was a very hospitable man. any person coming our home asking for a meal or a place to sleep was always taken care of, as long as he acted and deported himself a gentleman and showed no signs of drunkenness. This kind of treatment of strangers was traditional in our home for many years. In as much as early Mormon History in the area in which father lived, and the active partr he payed in i, I feel it is a tribute tohim, and should be inclded in his history. I can remember very well the fall of 1895 , about two in th afternoon, on a foggy and rainy day, a knock came at the door, and when Father opened the door two young men stood there. They wore long tailed coats, derby hats, and each had an umbrella and a grip. They introduced themselves as missionaries of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, commonly known as the "Mormons." Father said, "Yes, I remember hearing something about them many years ago. But I thought they all died off or had been killed." As near as I can remember they were Israel Canfield and A. w. Platt. They started talking and it continued all afternoon and well into the evening. After spending the night they departed the next morning. This started a friendship that was to be a home for the Elders for many years. The next spring two otrher Elders of the Church came into the district. Their names were William King and Thomas Martin. These Elders had made the acquaintance of a member of our people before they arrived at our home. In tracting around the district they had scheduled a cottage meeting on a Thursday night at the home of a Mrs. Mary Scott, who owned the farm adjoining our place The Elders were staying at my father's brother's place - Jame M. Wallace- which was located about a half mile away. About midnight Wednesday a mob assembled at my uncle's place and told the Elders they had to be out of Metcalf County Thursday midnight. My uncle came next Morning and told my father what had happened, and asked mu father what he should do about it. Father asked him "What is the mob going to do about it?" Uncle Jim said, "I don't know, but the Elders are going to hold their meeting." Father told him to go on and not pay any attention to it and say nothing about it, and see if the mob tries to top the meeting." That night my father, mother and myself attended the meeting. The room was filled with people, some of whom were members of the mob, who were there to see what was done and to see where the Elders went after the meeting. though they never created any disturbance. The Elders held their meeting and sang the closing song. Then Elder King told about the mob coming the night before and ordering them out of the County by midnight. He said they were traveling without purse or script and asked if there was anyone who would like to give them shelter for the night, that they were there in the work of the Lord and did not feel that they should run away. I was sitting between my parents and while Elder King was talking father reached over and put his hand on mother's knee and said, "Mary Ann, I am going to ask those boys to go ome with us." She replied, "Mell (for Meford) you know best." Then Elder Martin dismissed the meeting. For a few seconds you could hear a pin drop. The crucial moment had arrived. Their spirits were at a very low ebb. My father was the first to move. He arose and went to the Elders and introduced himself to them and asked them to go home with him. This is what the mobocrats wanted to know, and they slipped out to notify the others while we walked home with our company. As soon as we reached home, father told moter to 'show these boys to their bed at once." While we were at the meeting, my two brothers, James Newton and George Robert, and a friend ot theirs, Henry Trent, had come home, they being emplayed away from home. Father told them what was up and that he was expecting the mob to come any minute and he wanted their pistols. He requested them to get to bed and all lights out. They were very disappointd that they could not be in on the proceedings but when father said, "No," they knew he meant it. Each turned his pistol over the father. He took the pistols, put them in a sack and took two shotguns and a rifle that were in the house and carried them to the barn and hid them. Then he came back into the house and told them what he had done with the guns and said he wouldn't want any shooting as someone in their excitment might let one go off and then shooting would start and maybe mother or one of the girls would get hurt. He then made everyone go to bed, ut out the lights and left the house. He went out and took up his vigil by the front gate. Our home sets back in the yard about 75 feet from the fence and on each side of the walk just beside the gate father was standing when about 11:30 o'clock the mob rode up to the gateand the leader started to get off his horse when father spoke and said: 'Underwood, what do you want?" They were all masked, thoughjt night was dark. The man stopped getting off the horse and was dumbfounded at being called by his name. He finally answered: "You have got those Mormon Elders in there and we have come after them." Father replied, "Men, I have lived here in the neighborhood for several years. I have always tried to behave myself and tend to my own business. I have never interfered in any of your affairs. Any one you have seen fit to take into your home was strictly your own affair and none of my business;likewise andy person who have come to my home and asked to stay all night; as long as the behaved themselves and acted the part of a gentleman, I have taken care of and that was none of your business. Yes those boys are in my house and asleep and as I see it they arew going to stay as long as they want to and as long as they behave themselves. My advice to you is to go home and mind your own busainess. There are about fifty of you and I thnk I can call everyone of you by name. I know you that well. Now if you think you still want to go in and get them, then it is up to you." Father stepped back and open the gate and opened the gate and stood by the honeysuckle vine and said no more. The leader of the mob turned to his brother and said, "John Kell, I am going home; and I don't believe Mr. Wallace would like it if we went in there." He turned his horse and rode away, followed by the other members of the mob, and in a few minutes all had gone. We never knew for a long time just what had traspired that night, only father stayed up all night to see that no one slipped back and tried to start something. Several months later, finally, mother got him to tell her just what he was up to that night. She said she had never seen before on father's face the look he had that night and she knew he was determined in his mind to do something he had never before done. He said to her, "It was dark and to try and defend the place with guns was foolish, so I hid them and brought my hand axe and set it on the honeysuckle. and when I stepped back from the gate as they thought to let them come in if they wanted to, I reached for the hatchet and if they had started to come in the gate I was going to make it kind of expensive for them. I knew I could get ten or a dozen of them before they knew what was happening to them." Theae Elders sayed in our district for several weeks. A number of people werew baptized, among them some of my people. On July 19,1896, the Junction Branch of the church was oranized with my uncle Benjamin Bruce Wallace as presiding officer, Also the Junction Sunday School was organized the same day. After the organization of the branch many of my people, including my mother and three sisters joined the church and many of the Elders came to our place to stay Ont trhe 6th day of May 1896, the first baptism was held in the East Fork, at the junction the East and South Forks of the little Barren Fiver on the county lines of Green and Metcalf Counties. There were nine people baptized, and this began the starting and founding of a branch of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, which has made and maintained a strong and permanent branch of the Church to this day. On the 19th of July 1896, The Junction Branch, Sulphur Well, Metcalf County Kentucky was organized with 35 members and two more werebaptized that day. Benjamin Bruce Wallace was presiding Elder (he was baptized by William King 26 May 1886). Also on the same day the Junction Sunday School was organized at Liletown, with Allen Slinker as Superintendent, (or presiding officer). The two places mentioned were just across the river from each other a short distance. Thus began a period of change for a goodfly number of people who had never taken much stock in religion before, in fact there were only two people in the whole Wallace family who had ever taken any interest at all and that only slight. Now that the Mormon Elders were gaining ground and many people were becoming intereste, there started plenty of opposition, and mobs threatened the Elders with all manner of evil and dangerous threats if they did not leave the country. These threats were never carried out in this particular part of the country, and the membership only grew stronger. Early in 1897, it was decided to build a church building. Father, Uncle Bruce, and Uncle Wister Wallace, together with the help of others, planned and started the building. Father was not a member of the church. By fall of that year the buildsing was completed in time for them to hold the Semi Annual Confrence, of the Kentucky confrence of the Southern States Mission. Ben E. Rich, who was President of the Mission, together with Apostles Francis M. Lyman and Mathias F Cowley were the visitors. Also present were fifty tow Elders who wer laboring in the mission at the time. In 1947, my Uncle Wister Wallace told me the foregoing story. When he was in Kentuckyabout fifteen years ago on a short term mission, he visited the old homestead. While he was there a man by the name of Lester Porter came to the meeting held by my uncle and insisted that he go to his home and stay overnight. The man had never associsted with our people and Uncle Wister thought it strange that he was so insistent in asking to go to his home. The next morning when he was prepaing to leave, the man said to Uncle Wister, "Mister, maybe you wondered why I asked you to come and stay with me. I will tell you. You remember the mob that went to yur brother Mell's place years ago after those two Mormon Missionaries? Well I was in the mob, and I want to tell you what happened to me after I left there that night, As I was going home alone. I became weak, I fell off my horse. I had three of these spells and fell off the horse each time, and each time I saw what a horrible thing I had taken part in. I did not get home until after four o'clock that morning. I have never said anything to anybody about it but I made up my mind that if I ever had a chance to help one of those Elders I would do it. You was my chance and now I feel better. I slept better last night, knowing you was in my house, than I have slept for many, many years. Although father's home was located about six miles from the church, it was selected as headquarters for the confrence and there wqs very little time ater that when his family was alone. There were usually Elders present all the time, and when there weren't any the family felt lost without them. This family would get up on Sunday morning, get the chores done, hitch a team of mules to the wagon, put chairs in for seats and dribe the six miles to the Sunday School and never one time were they ever late. Rain or shine, snowing or blowing, it did not keep them from going to their meetings. Such was the devotion of this newly converted family to the Gospel of Jesus Christ. At one time the six Elders, Who were laboring in the Sulphur Well District, needed to go to Christian County to a Conference, which was three hundred miles away. Other folks wanted to go too so father said he would take them in his wagon withe the trusty, faithful span of mules. Mother bought some heavy 'factory" (muslin) and made a cover for the wagon, chairs were placed in for seats, and this was to be their transportation to go to conference. My father, sisters Fannie and Dora, and Aunt Dell, three other saints, the six elders departed on their journey. They had a very wonderful trip as they traveled and at the conference. Many were the incidents and happenings that followed in those years that gave this family a testimony of the Gospel and of it's righteousness. They were a family of just ordinsatry circumstances, living on a small farm which was not paid for and father having a hard time to make ends meet and enough each year to make his payments, and feed and clothe his family. When the Elders started going to their place it caused Mr. Cutlet Thompson, who held the mortgage on the farm much concer. He knew the Elders travel without purse or script and there were so many of them he couldn't understand how this family was feeding all them, and he instructed a nephew who was a neighbor of theirs to keep and eye on things for him, but the only thing that his nephew had to report to his uncle was that Mr. Wallace's crops were better than they had ever been before, and for the first time there was a fine crop of wheat on the place. They had never been able to raise wheat, just a garden, corn and tobacco. After the elders started coming to their place this family always testified they prospered, and father was always able to meet his obligations and they lived better. The following is a true incident that happened so repeatedly that it finally became to be looked for. They had an old red cow.which had been in the family for years, in fact she just seemed to be a permanent fixture. Two to three quarts of milk a day was all that she had ever given and he milking periods were not very long. She was dry most of the time. When the Elders began to stay at their place the old red cow would increase her milk, and when they would leave give less. This happened so much that she was called by the Elders "The Mormon Cow." Mother always did the milking and she had a small one and a half gallon pail that she used for a milk bucket. One afternoon there came eight elders and all were staying that night. When mother went to milk that evening her milk bucket was not to be found though she and the girls hunted everywhere. Finally she took a a five gallon brass bucket that had never been used for anything but cooking fruit and preserves. As she left the house one of the girls told her that she would lose the milk in that bucket. It is the family'ds testimony that as mother came in from milking the foam was running over the rim of the bucket, and all from that one cow, as she was the only milk cow on the place. This cow became the talk of the community. As time went on our place became the conference headquarters and the milk production was steadily maintained during this time. In later years, when the farm was sold the cow was also sold with the farm, but immediately after the cow dried up and it was a long time before she came fresh again and then she gave barely enough milk to feed the calf, and this happened when a second calf was born, after which she died. After time the Lord made manifest that He was taking care of his faithful children. It was a time when one of the General Conferences had been held, and all the assignments of Elders had been made. As here to fore mentioned father had not joined the Church but his council and advice had many times been sought and adhered to and all sincerely believe that he was inspired in the council he gave. President Edwin G. Wooley had invited father to sit in the priesthood meeting after conference that Sunday afternoon while the Elders and their district assignments were made. There were forty six Elders in the Kentucky Conference at that time. all assignments were made and all but four were to labor in the western part of the state, and four were to go to the north and east part. These four were given their final instructions, Those going west would have to pass the Wallace home and they were all to stop there as they passed. They were all given instructions to fast and pray before the started to go to their different fields of labor. The meeting was dismissed and the Elders went to different homes to spend the night before starting. Father had sat in that meeting and had seen and heard sll that had taken place and after going home something began to bother him and he did not sleep very well that night, so he arose very early and went to President Wooley's door and awakened him and told him he wanted to talk to him. He hurriedly dressed and came out of his room to see what could have happened that Brother Wallace (as he was called) should make such an urgent request for his presence. Fathe told him that he didn't like what he had done the night before in telling all those boys to start their journey fasting. They would all have to go through Hart and Barren Counties and as he very well knew those two counties were the most bitter against the Elders of all the entire conference, and they would probably not find any food or lodging the entire distance. President Wooley stood for a long time before he said a word, then replied, "Brother Wallace you are right but how in the world can I help it now, There in no method of communicating withe them and they will all be here within the hour." My father replied, "With your permission I will take care of that, I will go and call Mary Ann and the girls and get them busy cooking." Brother wooley replied, "you can't feed all of these men, there is forty two of them." But father answered, "Well we will go as far as we can and as long as there is anything to go on. Again it is the testimony of each member of this family, that by eleven o"clock that morning that every one of those forty two Elders had a good substantial breakfast and had departed on their way. No notice whatever had been given mother and the three girls. Father had just awakened them and told them that the Elders would be there for breakfast, they got up and did what was asked of them never questioning where the food was all to come from to feed therm with. I have heard my mother say that every time she went to that can to get flour to make another pan of biscuits there were always just enough flour in the bin, if not more that the time before. By 11 o'clock that mornign 42 Mormon Elders had had breakfast and departed for their fields of labor. We were poor people, fifty pounds of flour wass all that father could get at a time and that was mostly on special occasions. True, provisions had been made for extras for conference but not for an occasion of this kind. The provision fo that breakfast was made by and unseen power that always provides for His children in righteousness. And true to fathers prediction, When reports began to come in, without one exception not one of the Elders had a bite to eat nor a bed to sleep in until they had walked across the two hostile counties before mentioned. Some of the Elders had slept out two night and had cone into the second day before they had anything to erat. You can never tell this family any different but that the Lord furnished the food supply that day to feed his humble servants. I have heard mother say how thankful they were that this opportunity came to them to strengthen their testimonies, and give them this great blessings. There were numerous such experiences that happened to father's family which they always considered a great blessing for having cared for these Elders that had brought them the Gospel. From the spring of 1896 to the fall of 1900, when the Elders were so much with us, I can say were the happiest years of our lives. We will always remember these years with sacred feelings, They bring tears to our eyes when we think of them. In the sring of 1900 father suggested we sell the homestead and go to Utah, to which mother and all of us heartily agreed. W left our home and loved ones on the 21st of November, 1900, to seek a new home in the west. In the devotion father and his family manifested to the great cause of the Latter-day work, in spreading of the Gospel, God blessed and prospered us, the relating of which is given. In May 1898, the first emigrants from the Junction Branch left Kentucky to come to Utah, leaving their homes and families, to journey to Zion, the promised land. The first two were my Aunt Betty and Uncle Wister G. Wallace. Thus began the exodus of saints from Kentucky to Utah, Idaho, Arizona and Oregon. In the spring os 1900 father and Mother decided they wnted to sell the home and go to Utah. so after the crops were harvested they prepared to leavel corn fodder was pulled and bundled in=to bundles and sold to Mr. All Scott (a merchant) for enugh money to pay for my half fare emigrant ticket from Horse Cave ,, Kentucky to Ogden, Utah. Arriving in Ogden, Uthat the 25th day of November, 1900 and were met at the station by Joseph Later, a former Elder in Kentucky and visited in his home in Harrisville for a few days and then went to Plain City, to the home of Franklin D Richard (also a former Elder in Kentucky) to make their new home. Later father and mother went to Coyoto where my sisters Dora and Marthwere living, both having married brother of Elder William King. Mother died there in Coyoto, and from there father visited around with his children. I remember him so well, his little mustache and beautiful graying hair. So well I remember the night he was killed. He had been visiting in Bear River City, Utah and he was going to go to Garland to visit the folks there. He was going to go to Garland to visit the folks there. He was going to catch the train which had to be flagged because the stop at Evans was just a flag stop. He had gone there alone, and as it was getting quite dark, he misjudged the distance of the train and stayed to close to the track, waving his hat, and the engine struck him causing his derath. This happened the 12th of October 1917, and he was buried in Garland on the 15th of October. As a final tribute I would like to quote from book A#6765, in the HIstorians Office, Salt Lake City, Aouthern States Mission, Record of Members, page 33, November 1900, On the 21st of the month M.A. Wallace and family gathere together their plunder and headed westr, and it can truthfull be said that although M. A. Wallace was not a baptized member of our churdh, few in the conference compares to him in helping the work along for the past four years, he has been, we might say, entirely devoted to caring for the Elders. It mattered not what was wanted, if we asked M.A. we were sure we would get it, and many are the Elders that during the midnight hours have come to his domicile, tired, hungry and cold and wet, and there have had their wants supplied and his wife waw not one whit behind M.A. in kindness and was a good Saint besides. We the Elders hope they have a joyful trip and a contented home in the west.] We could never understand why father did not join the Church, but I have heard by folks say the seeral baptism dates were arranged and each time something would happen to prevent it, but his life was as good and devoted as any best of member. After waiting the required period of time, work was performed in the Temple for him. Thus we feel he and mother are united as the were here in this earthly life.

Melford Acel Wallace

Contributor: phil Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

History of Melford Acel Wallace bY Albert Parson Wallace My people was not a religious people. I never knew more than half a dozen of them who ever professed any kind of religion, though as long as I can remember a Bible was always on a little center table in the living room. My Father was always reading it and this book was his text book. We had no newspaper,although a passerby would occasionally give father copy of the Louisville Courier Journal. Father was a well read man, but was not educate in the general underetanding of te ter. My father, Melford Acel Wallace was born in Cloverdale, Barren County.Kentucky on the 16th of December 1849 to George Washington and Rutha Clark Wallace. He had a twin brother George Alfred. We know very little of his early life but we do know that he grew up on his father's farm, and helped there as his father was a large land owner, had a large family, so there would be lots of work for the children. On the 11th of July 1872 he married Mary Ann Henderson, ho was the daughter of Ambrose Brokemn and Cedelia Williams Henderson. To them was born six children , namely Alevia Isadora, James Newton, George Robert, Fannie Crittenden, Mrha Ann and Albert Parson Wallace. They, like his father, ived n a farm ad aise corn and tobacco, and he children helped with these tasks. Occasionally an itinerant preacher would come into the community and hold what was called protracted meetigs which lated two ee weeks. These gatherings were always held in the summer time, in the shady groves of trees. We always attended them when time permitted for want of something else to do, but could never see anything to them. usually each one would always defile and railed the other, no one was right but themselves, Such meetings would usually result in a few getting religion, but it didn't last very long, and when a different preacher came along they would get religion all over again. Such was the religious environment of our people at this time. My Father was a very hospitable man. any person coming our home asking for a meal or a place to sleep was always taken care of, as long as he acted and deported himself a gentleman and showed no signs of drunkenness. This kind of treatment of strangers was traditional in our home for many years. In as much as early Mormon History in the area in which father lived, and the active partr he payed in i, I feel it is a tribute tohim, and should be inclded in his history. I can remember very well the fall of 1895 , about two in th afternoon, on a foggy and rainy day, a knock came at the door, and when Father opened the door two young men stood there. They wore long tailed coats, derby hats, and each had an umbrella and a grip. They introduced themselves as missionaries of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, commonly known as the "Mormons." Father said, "Yes, I remember hearing something about them many years ago. But I thought they all died off or had been killed." As near as I can remember they were Israel Canfield and A. w. Platt. They started talking and it continued all afternoon and well into the evening. After spending the night they departed the next morning. This started a friendship that was to be a home for the Elders for many years. The next spring two otrher Elders of the Church came into the district. Their names were William King and Thomas Martin. These Elders had made the acquaintance of a member of our people before they arrived at our home. In tracting around the district they had scheduled a cottage meeting on a Thursday night at the home of a Mrs. Mary Scott, who owned the farm adjoining our place The Elders were staying at my father's brother's place - Jame M. Wallace- which was located about a half mile away. About midnight Wednesday a mob assembled at my uncle's place and told the Elders they had to be out of Metcalf County Thursday midnight. My uncle came next Morning and told my father what had happened, and asked mu father what he should do about it. Father asked him "What is the mob going to do about it?" Uncle Jim said, "I don't know, but the Elders are going to hold their meeting." Father told him to go on and not pay any attention to it and say nothing about it, and see if the mob tries to top the meeting." That night my father, mother and myself attended the meeting. The room was filled with people, some of whom were members of the mob, who were there to see what was done and to see where the Elders went after the meeting. though they never created any disturbance. The Elders held their meeting and sang the closing song. Then Elder King told about the mob coming the night before and ordering them out of the County by midnight. He said they were traveling without purse or script and asked if there was anyone who would like to give them shelter for the night, that they were there in the work of the Lord and did not feel that they should run away. I was sitting between my parents and while Elder King was talking father reached over and put his hand on mother's knee and said, "Mary Ann, I am going to ask those boys to go ome with us." She replied, "Mell (for Meford) you know best." Then Elder Martin dismissed the meeting. For a few seconds you could hear a pin drop. The crucial moment had arrived. Their spirits were at a very low ebb. My father was the first to move. He arose and went to the Elders and introduced himself to them and asked them to go home with him. This is what the mobocrats wanted to know, and they slipped out to notify the others while we walked home with our company. As soon as we reached home, father told moter to 'show these boys to their bed at once." While we were at the meeting, my two brothers, James Newton and George Robert, and a friend ot theirs, Henry Trent, had come home, they being emplayed away from home. Father told them what was up and that he was expecting the mob to come any minute and he wanted their pistols. He requested them to get to bed and all lights out. They were very disappointd that they could not be in on the proceedings but when father said, "No," they knew he meant it. Each turned his pistol over the father. He took the pistols, put them in a sack and took two shotguns and a rifle that were in the house and carried them to the barn and hid them. Then he came back into the house and told them what he had done with the guns and said he wouldn't want any shooting as someone in their excitment might let one go off and then shooting would start and maybe mother or one of the girls would get hurt. He then made everyone go to bed, ut out the lights and left the house. He went out and took up his vigil by the front gate. Our home sets back in the yard about 75 feet from the fence and on each side of the walk just beside the gate father was standing when about 11:30 o'clock the mob rode up to the gateand the leader started to get off his horse when father spoke and said: 'Underwood, what do you want?" They were all masked, thoughjt night was dark. The man stopped getting off the horse and was dumbfounded at being called by his name. He finally answered: "You have got those Mormon Elders in there and we have come after them." Father replied, "Men, I have lived here in the neighborhood for several years. I have always tried to behave myself and tend to my own business. I have never interfered in any of your affairs. Any one you have seen fit to take into your home was strictly your own affair and none of my business;likewise andy person who have come to my home and asked to stay all night; as long as the behaved themselves and acted the part of a gentleman, I have taken care of and that was none of your business. Yes those boys are in my house and asleep and as I see it they arew going to stay as long as they want to and as long as they behave themselves. My advice to you is to go home and mind your own busainess. There are about fifty of you and I thnk I can call everyone of you by name. I know you that well. Now if you think you still want to go in and get them, then it is up to you." Father stepped back and open the gate and opened the gate and stood by the honeysuckle vine and said no more. The leader of the mob turned to his brother and said, "John Kell, I am going home; and I don't believe Mr. Wallace would like it if we went in there." He turned his horse and rode away, followed by the other members of the mob, and in a few minutes all had gone. We never knew for a long time just what had traspired that night, only father stayed up all night to see that no one slipped back and tried to start something. Several months later, finally, mother got him to tell her just what he was up to that night. She said she had never seen before on father's face the look he had that night and she knew he was determined in his mind to do something he had never before done. He said to her, "It was dark and to try and defend the place with guns was foolish, so I hid them and brought my hand axe and set it on the honeysuckle. and when I stepped back from the gate as they thought to let them come in if they wanted to, I reached for the hatchet and if they had started to come in the gate I was going to make it kind of expensive for them. I knew I could get ten or a dozen of them before they knew what was happening to them." Theae Elders sayed in our district for several weeks. A number of people werew baptized, among them some of my people. On July 19,1896, the Junction Branch of the church was oranized with my uncle Benjamin Bruce Wallace as presiding officer, Also the Junction Sunday School was organized the same day. After the organization of the branch many of my people, including my mother and three sisters joined the church and many of the Elders came to our place to stay Ont trhe 6th day of May 1896, the first baptism was held in the East Fork, at the junction the East and South Forks of the little Barren Fiver on the county lines of Green and Metcalf Counties. There were nine people baptized, and this began the starting and founding of a branch of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, which has made and maintained a strong and permanent branch of the Church to this day. On the 19th of July 1896, The Junction Branch, Sulphur Well, Metcalf County Kentucky was organized with 35 members and two more werebaptized that day. Benjamin Bruce Wallace was presiding Elder (he was baptized by William King 26 May 1886). Also on the same day the Junction Sunday School was organized at Liletown, with Allen Slinker as Superintendent, (or presiding officer). The two places mentioned were just across the river from each other a short distance. Thus began a period of change for a goodfly number of people who had never taken much stock in religion before, in fact there were only two people in the whole Wallace family who had ever taken any interest at all and that only slight. Now that the Mormon Elders were gaining ground and many people were becoming intereste, there started plenty of opposition, and mobs threatened the Elders with all manner of evil and dangerous threats if they did not leave the country. These threats were never carried out in this particular part of the country, and the membership only grew stronger. Early in 1897, it was decided to build a church building. Father, Uncle Bruce, and Uncle Wister Wallace, together with the help of others, planned and started the building. Father was not a member of the church. By fall of that year the buildsing was completed in time for them to hold the Semi Annual Confrence, of the Kentucky confrence of the Southern States Mission. Ben E. Rich, who was President of the Mission, together with Apostles Francis M. Lyman and Mathias F Cowley were the visitors. Also present were fifty tow Elders who wer laboring in the mission at the time. In 1947, my Uncle Wister Wallace told me the foregoing story. When he was in Kentuckyabout fifteen years ago on a short term mission, he visited the old homestead. While he was there a man by the name of Lester Porter came to the meeting held by my uncle and insisted that he go to his home and stay overnight. The man had never associsted with our people and Uncle Wister thought it strange that he was so insistent in asking to go to his home. The next morning when he was prepaing to leave, the man said to Uncle Wister, "Mister, maybe you wondered why I asked you to come and stay with me. I will tell you. You remember the mob that went to yur brother Mell's place years ago after those two Mormon Missionaries? Well I was in the mob, and I want to tell you what happened to me after I left there that night, As I was going home alone. I became weak, I fell off my horse. I had three of these spells and fell off the horse each time, and each time I saw what a horrible thing I had taken part in. I did not get home until after four o'clock that morning. I have never said anything to anybody about it but I made up my mind that if I ever had a chance to help one of those Elders I would do it. You was my chance and now I feel better. I slept better last night, knowing you was in my house, than I have slept for many, many years. Although father's home was located about six miles from the church, it was selected as headquarters for the confrence and there wqs very little time ater that when his family was alone. There were usually Elders present all the time, and when there weren't any the family felt lost without them. This family would get up on Sunday morning, get the chores done, hitch a team of mules to the wagon, put chairs in for seats and dribe the six miles to the Sunday School and never one time were they ever late. Rain or shine, snowing or blowing, it did not keep them from going to their meetings. Such was the devotion of this newly converted family to the Gospel of Jesus Christ. At one time the six Elders, Who were laboring in the Sulphur Well District, needed to go to Christian County to a Conference, which was three hundred miles away. Other folks wanted to go too so father said he would take them in his wagon withe the trusty, faithful span of mules. Mother bought some heavy 'factory" (muslin) and made a cover for the wagon, chairs were placed in for seats, and this was to be their transportation to go to conference. My father, sisters Fannie and Dora, and Aunt Dell, three other saints, the six elders departed on their journey. They had a very wonderful trip as they traveled and at the conference. Many were the incidents and happenings that followed in those years that gave this family a testimony of the Gospel and of it's righteousness. They were a family of just ordinsatry circumstances, living on a small farm which was not paid for and father having a hard time to make ends meet and enough each year to make his payments, and feed and clothe his family. When the Elders started going to their place it caused Mr. Cutlet Thompson, who held the mortgage on the farm much concer. He knew the Elders travel without purse or script and there were so many of them he couldn't understand how this family was feeding all them, and he instructed a nephew who was a neighbor of theirs to keep and eye on things for him, but the only thing that his nephew had to report to his uncle was that Mr. Wallace's crops were better than they had ever been before, and for the first time there was a fine crop of wheat on the place. They had never been able to raise wheat, just a garden, corn and tobacco. After the elders started coming to their place this family always testified they prospered, and father was always able to meet his obligations and they lived better. The following is a true incident that happened so repeatedly that it finally became to be looked for. They had an old red cow.which had been in the family for years, in fact she just seemed to be a permanent fixture. Two to three quarts of milk a day was all that she had ever given and he milking periods were not very long. She was dry most of the time. When the Elders began to stay at their place the old red cow would increase her milk, and when they would leave give less. This happened so much that she was called by the Elders "The Mormon Cow." Mother always did the milking and she had a small one and a half gallon pail that she used for a milk bucket. One afternoon there came eight elders and all were staying that night. When mother went to milk that evening her milk bucket was not to be found though she and the girls hunted everywhere. Finally she took a a five gallon brass bucket that had never been used for anything but cooking fruit and preserves. As she left the house one of the girls told her that she would lose the milk in that bucket. It is the family'ds testimony that as mother came in from milking the foam was running over the rim of the bucket, and all from that one cow, as she was the only milk cow on the place. This cow became the talk of the community. As time went on our place became the conference headquarters and the milk production was steadily maintained during this time. In later years, when the farm was sold the cow was also sold with the farm, but immediately after the cow dried up and it was a long time before she came fresh again and then she gave barely enough milk to feed the calf, and this happened when a second calf was born, after which she died. After time the Lord made manifest that He was taking care of his faithful children. It was a time when one of the General Conferences had been held, and all the assignments of Elders had been made. As here to fore mentioned father had not joined the Church but his council and advice had many times been sought and adhered to and all sincerely believe that he was inspired in the council he gave. President Edwin G. Wooley had invited father to sit in the priesthood meeting after conference that Sunday afternoon while the Elders and their district assignments were made. There were forty six Elders in the Kentucky Conference at that time. all assignments were made and all but four were to labor in the western part of the state, and four were to go to the north and east part. These four were given their final instructions, Those going west would have to pass the Wallace home and they were all to stop there as they passed. They were all given instructions to fast and pray before the started to go to their different fields of labor. The meeting was dismissed and the Elders went to different homes to spend the night before starting. Father had sat in that meeting and had seen and heard sll that had taken place and after going home something began to bother him and he did not sleep very well that night, so he arose very early and went to President Wooley's door and awakened him and told him he wanted to talk to him. He hurriedly dressed and came out of his room to see what could have happened that Brother Wallace (as he was called) should make such an urgent request for his presence. Fathe told him that he didn't like what he had done the night before in telling all those boys to start their journey fasting. They would all have to go through Hart and Barren Counties and as he very well knew those two counties were the most bitter against the Elders of all the entire conference, and they would probably not find any food or lodging the entire distance. President Wooley stood for a long time before he said a word, then replied, "Brother Wallace you are right but how in the world can I help it now, There in no method of communicating withe them and they will all be here within the hour." My father replied, "With your permission I will take care of that, I will go and call Mary Ann and the girls and get them busy cooking." Brother wooley replied, "you can't feed all of these men, there is forty two of them." But father answered, "Well we will go as far as we can and as long as there is anything to go on. Again it is the testimony of each member of this family, that by eleven o"clock that morning that every one of those forty two Elders had a good substantial breakfast and had departed on their way. No notice whatever had been given mother and the three girls. Father had just awakened them and told them that the Elders would be there for breakfast, they got up and did what was asked of them never questioning where the food was all to come from to feed therm with. I have heard my mother say that every time she went to that can to get flour to make another pan of biscuits there were always just enough flour in the bin, if not more that the time before. By 11 o'clock that mornign 42 Mormon Elders had had breakfast and departed for their fields of labor. We were poor people, fifty pounds of flour wass all that father could get at a time and that was mostly on special occasions. True, provisions had been made for extras for conference but not for an occasion of this kind. The provision fo that breakfast was made by and unseen power that always provides for His children in righteousness. And true to fathers prediction, When reports began to come in, without one exception not one of the Elders had a bite to eat nor a bed to sleep in until they had walked across the two hostile counties before mentioned. Some of the Elders had slept out two night and had cone into the second day before they had anything to erat. You can never tell this family any different but that the Lord furnished the food supply that day to feed his humble servants. I have heard mother say how thankful they were that this opportunity came to them to strengthen their testimonies, and give them this great blessings. There were numerous such experiences that happened to father's family which they always considered a great blessing for having cared for these Elders that had brought them the Gospel. From the spring of 1896 to the fall of 1900, when the Elders were so much with us, I can say were the happiest years of our lives. We will always remember these years with sacred feelings, They bring tears to our eyes when we think of them. In the sring of 1900 father suggested we sell the homestead and go to Utah, to which mother and all of us heartily agreed. W left our home and loved ones on the 21st of November, 1900, to seek a new home in the west. In the devotion father and his family manifested to the great cause of the Latter-day work, in spreading of the Gospel, God blessed and prospered us, the relating of which is given. In May 1898, the first emigrants from the Junction Branch left Kentucky to come to Utah, leaving their homes and families, to journey to Zion, the promised land. The first two were my Aunt Betty and Uncle Wister G. Wallace. Thus began the exodus of saints from Kentucky to Utah, Idaho, Arizona and Oregon. In the spring os 1900 father and Mother decided they wnted to sell the home and go to Utah. so after the crops were harvested they prepared to leavel corn fodder was pulled and bundled in=to bundles and sold to Mr. All Scott (a merchant) for enugh money to pay for my half fare emigrant ticket from Horse Cave ,, Kentucky to Ogden, Utah. Arriving in Ogden, Uthat the 25th day of November, 1900 and were met at the station by Joseph Later, a former Elder in Kentucky and visited in his home in Harrisville for a few days and then went to Plain City, to the home of Franklin D Richard (also a former Elder in Kentucky) to make their new home. Later father and mother went to Coyoto where my sisters Dora and Marthwere living, both having married brother of Elder William King. Mother died there in Coyoto, and from there father visited around with his children. I remember him so well, his little mustache and beautiful graying hair. So well I remember the night he was killed. He had been visiting in Bear River City, Utah and he was going to go to Garland to visit the folks there. He was going to go to Garland to visit the folks there. He was going to catch the train which had to be flagged because the stop at Evans was just a flag stop. He had gone there alone, and as it was getting quite dark, he misjudged the distance of the train and stayed to close to the track, waving his hat, and the engine struck him causing his derath. This happened the 12th of October 1917, and he was buried in Garland on the 15th of October. As a final tribute I would like to quote from book A#6765, in the HIstorians Office, Salt Lake City, Aouthern States Mission, Record of Members, page 33, November 1900, On the 21st of the month M.A. Wallace and family gathere together their plunder and headed westr, and it can truthfull be said that although M. A. Wallace was not a baptized member of our churdh, few in the conference compares to him in helping the work along for the past four years, he has been, we might say, entirely devoted to caring for the Elders. It mattered not what was wanted, if we asked M.A. we were sure we would get it, and many are the Elders that during the midnight hours have come to his domicile, tired, hungry and cold and wet, and there have had their wants supplied and his wife waw not one whit behind M.A. in kindness and was a good Saint besides. We the Elders hope they have a joyful trip and a contented home in the west.] We could never understand why father did not join the Church, but I have heard by folks say the seeral baptism dates were arranged and each time something would happen to prevent it, but his life was as good and devoted as any best of member. After waiting the required period of time, work was performed in the Temple for him. Thus we feel he and mother are united as the were here in this earthly life.

Life timeline of James Newton Wallace

1875
James Newton Wallace was born on 2 Jun 1875
James Newton Wallace was 14 years old when The Eiffel Tower is officially opened. The Eiffel Tower is a wrought iron lattice tower on the Champ de Mars in Paris, France. It is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower.
James Newton Wallace was 19 years old when Mahatma Gandhi forms the Natal Indian Congress (NIC) in order to fight discrimination against Indian traders in Natal. Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was an Indian activist who was the leader of the Indian independence movement against British rule. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The honorific Mahātmā – applied to him first in 1914 in South Africa – is now used worldwide. In India, he is also called Bapu and Gandhi ji, and known as the Father of the Nation.
James Newton Wallace was 33 years old when Ford puts the Model T car on the market at a price of US$825. Ford Motor Company is an American multinational automaker headquartered in Dearborn, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit. It was founded by Henry Ford and incorporated on June 16, 1903. The company sells automobiles and commercial vehicles under the Ford brand and most luxury cars under the Lincoln brand. Ford also owns Brazilian SUV manufacturer Troller, an 8% stake in Aston Martin of the United Kingdom, and a 49% stake in Jiangling Motors of China. It also has joint-ventures in China, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, and Russia. The company is listed on the New York Stock Exchange and is controlled by the Ford family; they have minority ownership but the majority of the voting power.
James Newton Wallace was 37 years old when The British passenger liner RMS Titanic sinks in the North Atlantic at 2:20 a.m., two hours and forty minutes after hitting an iceberg. Only 710 of 2,227 passengers and crew on board survive. RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early hours of 15 April 1912, after colliding with an iceberg during its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City. There were an estimated 2,224 passengers and crew aboard, and more than 1,500 died, making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history. RMS Titanic was the largest ship afloat at the time it entered service and was the second of three Olympic-class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line. It was built by the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast. Thomas Andrews, her architect, died in the disaster.
James Newton Wallace was 54 years old when The New York Stock Exchange crashes in what will be called the Crash of '29 or "Black Tuesday", ending the Great Bull Market of the 1920s and beginning the Great Depression. The New York Stock Exchange, is an American stock exchange located at 11 Wall Street, Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York. It is by far the world's largest stock exchange by market capitalization of its listed companies at US$21.3 trillion as of June 2017. The average daily trading value was approximately US$169 billion in 2013. The NYSE trading floor is located at 11 Wall Street and is composed of 21 rooms used for the facilitation of trading. A fifth trading room, located at 30 Broad Street, was closed in February 2007. The main building and the 11 Wall Street building were designated National Historic Landmarks in 1978.
James Newton Wallace was 56 years old when Great Depression: In a State of the Union message, U.S. President Herbert Hoover proposes a $150 million (equivalent to $2,197,000,000 in 2017) public works program to help generate jobs and stimulate the economy. The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s. It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century. In the 21st century, the Great Depression is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline.
James Newton Wallace was 69 years old when World War II: The Allied invasion of Normandy—codenamed Operation Overlord—begins with the execution of Operation Neptune (commonly referred to as D-Day), the landing of 155,000 Allied troops on the beaches of Normandy in France. The Allied soldiers quickly break through the Atlantic Wall and push inland in the largest amphibious military operation in history. The Allies of World War II, called the United Nations from the 1 January 1942 declaration, were the countries that together opposed the Axis powers during the Second World War (1939–1945). The Allies promoted the alliance as a means to control German, Japanese and Italian aggression.
James Newton Wallace died on 2 Nov 1955 at the age of 80
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for James Newton Wallace (2 Jun 1875 - 2 Nov 1955), BillionGraves Record 1378413 Clearfield, Davis, Utah, United States

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