James Monroe Redd

24 Aug 1863 - 30 May 1937

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James Monroe Redd

24 Aug 1863 - 30 May 1937
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James Monroe Redd, son of Lemuel Hardison and Keziah Jane Butler Redd, was born in New Harmony, Kane (now Washington) County, Utah, 24 August 1863. He was named James for James Pace of Mormon Battalion fame. His grandfather, John Hardison Redd, of South Carolina and Tennessee, came into the Church t

Life Information

James Monroe Redd

Born:
Died:

Monticello City Cemetery

Monticello Cemetery Rd
Monticello, San Juan, Utah
United States
Transcriber

tnmbrown

June 22, 2015
Transcriber

Todd Millett

May 23, 2019
Photographer

tnmbrown

June 21, 2015

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JAMES MONROE REDD by Alta Redd Winzenreid

Contributor: tnmbrown Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

James Monroe Redd, son of Lemuel Hardison and Keziah Jane Butler Redd, was born in New Harmony, Kane (now Washington) County, Utah, 24 August 1863. He was named James for James Pace of Mormon Battalion fame. His grandfather, John Hardison Redd, of South Carolina and Tennessee, came into the Church through the missionary efforts of John D. Lee. A meeting was scheduled to be held at the Redd home when a mob came to stop the gathering. All Captain Redd had to do was sit on his front porch, the mob dispersed and the meeting proceeded. Both the Butlers and the Redds owned plantations and had slaves, but they believed that no people should be in bondage so, long before the Civil War, their slaves were freed. Some of them, feeling great loyalty to the families, came to Utah. John Lowe Butler, Keziah’s father, proved to be a very stalwart and valiant member of the Church, being baptized in 1836. During the persecutions in Missouri, the Mormons were being prevented from voting at Gallatin by a mob. With a fence rail John L. Butler beat a path to the polls and the Mormons voted. At one time, being advised by the Prophet Joseph to move his family at once, he immediately packed up their belongings and left before daybreak. Shortly thereafter, the home went up in flames. During the exodus from Missouri the family went through many hardships and they looked forward to the peace and quiet of Nauvoo. But this did not last long for they must again leave their all to join the Saints in the westward move. In Utah, the Redds and Butlers settled, with others, in Spanish Fork. It was here that Lemuel Hardison Redd met and married Keziah Jane Butler. John H. Redd was called to the Las Vegas Mission, where much needed lead had been found. However, it was Lemuel and Keziah who answered the call. When the venture was abandoned because of too much silver mixed with the lead, this couple returned to Spanish Fork where four children were born. Then a call came to participate in the colonization of southern Utah (Dixie) or the Cotton Mission. Along with the Redds, went the Pace family and several others. They settled the town of New Harmony where nine of Lemuel’s and Keziah’s children were born. The fifth child and fourth son was James Monroe, the subject of this sketch. He was the first to be born in New Harmony, 24 August 1863. Following the advice given him by Brigham Young, Lemuel H. married, as his second wife, Sariah Louisa Chamberlain. The large John D. Lee house, on Ash Creek, made an adequate home for the two families, who lived there harmoniously. The boyhood of Monroe was a good one. He always managed to care for the cattle and horses, while Ben and Wayne, of the second family worked on the farm. His brother William recalled that Monroe would hold his breath to get his way. William soon learned to hold his own and often won out. One of the most exciting adventures in Monroe’s life came when he was sixteen years of age—going with the Saints, who were called to the San Juan Mission, down through the famous and historic Hole-in-the-Rock. Monroe, with George Decker and Willard Butts, had the responsibility of caring for the cattle. The purpose of this mission, initiated by President John Taylor, was to make peace with the Indians, to settle outlying places and to assist in establishing law and order. In the autumn of 1879, eighty families were called from Washington, Iron, Garfield and Beaver Counties to colonize the Valley of the San Juan. Their journey is one of the most dramatic and difficult of any trip in the annals of Church History. Instead of six weeks, it took six months, but finally they reached their destination, Bluff, 6 April 1880—the 50th anniversary of the founding of the Church. Two months later, James Monroe went back to New Harmony where he married Lucinda Pace, 2 April 1884, in the St. George Temple, then returned to Bluff in 1887, where he engaged in the livestock business—working with Joshua Stevens, Apostle Brigham Young, Jr., and Platt D. Lyman. Many names, such as Butler Wash, Redd Canyon and Harmony Flats, call to mind these early days and pioneers of this rugged country. At one time Bluff held a record—there were thirteen missionaries (mostly married men) serving at the same time. Monroe was one of them. He left 11 September 1899 and after twenty- five months in the southern states, returned 11 October 1901. He contracted malaria while serving, and it affected his health for the rest of his life. Later Bluff became unique in three ways: Fartherest town from a railroad in Utah; richest town in U.S. per capita; and largest per capita tithing to the Church. In 1905, the family moved to Monticello where he hoped to spend more time at home. Here he was again active in the Church serving as YMMIA president, member of the San Juan Stake High Council and supervisor of ward teachers, sometimes doing the teaching himself to be sure it was done. He literally lived “by the side of the road” for his home and hospitality were shared by everyone. In a tribute to Monroe his sister Luella says, “Dear brother Monroe was known as one of the most humble and unassuming of men. His very life was given for others. It was said that the latch-string of his home was always out both to friend and stranger. I do not believe that anyone ever came to Monroe when tired and hungry and cold, but what his wants were cared for. After all our ticket into eternity will be our service to our fellow men. He was one of the fairest minded of men.” Children of James Monroe and Lucinda Pace Redd are: Isabelle, James Monroe, Jr., Margaret Vivian (McConkie), John Wilson, Alta Alvira (Winzenreid), Alton Pace, Hortence (Erikson), Ray Vernon and Fawn Keziah. These children had given them sixty-six grandchildren and great grandchildren, by 1973. Among them are missionaries, bishops, stake presidents, an apostle, plus other leaders in Church and community. A splendid posterity of which they can be proud.

JAMES MONROE REDD by Alta Redd Winzenreid

Contributor: Todd Millett Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

James Monroe Redd, son of Lemuel Hardison and Keziah Jane Butler Redd, was born in New Harmony, Kane (now Washington) County, Utah, 24 August 1863. He was named James for James Pace of Mormon Battalion fame. His grandfather, John Hardison Redd, of South Carolina and Tennessee, came into the Church through the missionary efforts of John D. Lee. A meeting was scheduled to be held at the Redd home when a mob came to stop the gathering. All Captain Redd had to do was sit on his front porch, the mob dispersed and the meeting proceeded. Both the Butlers and the Redds owned plantations and had slaves, but they believed that no people should be in bondage so, long before the Civil War, their slaves were freed. Some of them, feeling great loyalty to the families, came to Utah. John Lowe Butler, Keziah’s father, proved to be a very stalwart and valiant member of the Church, being baptized in 1836. During the persecutions in Missouri, the Mormons were being prevented from voting at Gallatin by a mob. With a fence rail John L. Butler beat a path to the polls and the Mormons voted. At one time, being advised by the Prophet Joseph to move his family at once, he immediately packed up their belongings and left before daybreak. Shortly thereafter, the home went up in flames. During the exodus from Missouri the family went through many hardships and they looked forward to the peace and quiet of Nauvoo. But this did not last long for they must again leave their all to join the Saints in the westward move. In Utah, the Redds and Butlers settled, with others, in Spanish Fork. It was here that Lemuel Hardison Redd met and married Keziah Jane Butler. John H. Redd was called to the Las Vegas Mission, where much needed lead had been found. However, it was Lemuel and Keziah who answered the call. When the venture was abandoned because of too much silver mixed with the lead, this couple returned to Spanish Fork where four children were born. Then a call came to participate in the colonization of southern Utah (Dixie) or the Cotton Mission. Along with the Redds, went the Pace family and several others. They settled the town of New Harmony where nine of Lemuel’s and Keziah’s children were born. The fifth child and fourth son was James Monroe, the subject of this sketch. He was the first to be born in New Harmony, 24 August 1863. Following the advice given him by Brigham Young, Lemuel H. married, as his second wife, Sariah Louisa Chamberlain. The large John D. Lee house, on Ash Creek, made an adequate home for the two families, who lived there harmoniously. The boyhood of Monroe was a good one. He always managed to care for the cattle and horses, while Ben and Wayne, of the second family worked on the farm. His brother William recalled that Monroe would hold his breath to get his way. William soon learned to hold his own and often won out. One of the most exciting adventures in Monroe’s life came when he was sixteen years of age—going with the Saints, who were called to the San Juan Mission, down through the famous and historic Hole-in-the-Rock. Monroe, with George Decker and Willard Butts, had the responsibility of caring for the cattle. The purpose of this mission, initiated by President John Taylor, was to make peace with the Indians, to settle outlying places and to assist in establishing law and order. In the autumn of 1879, eighty families were called from Washington, Iron, Garfield and Beaver Counties to colonize the Valley of the San Juan. Their journey is one of the most dramatic and difficult of any trip in the annals of Church History. Instead of six weeks, it took six months, but finally they reached their destination, Bluff, 6 April 1880—the 50th anniversary of the founding of the Church. Two months later, James Monroe went back to New Harmony where he married Lucinda Pace, 2 April 1884, in the St. George Temple, then returned to Bluff in 1887, where he engaged in the livestock business—working with Joshua Stevens, Apostle Brigham Young, Jr., and Platt D. Lyman. Many names, such as Butler Wash, Redd Canyon and Harmony Flats, call to mind these early days and pioneers of this rugged country. At one time Bluff held a record—there were thirteen missionaries (mostly married men) serving at the same time. Monroe was one of them. He left 11 September 1899 and after twenty- five months in the southern states, returned 11 October 1901. He contracted malaria while serving, and it affected his health for the rest of his life. Later Bluff became unique in three ways: Fartherest town from a railroad in Utah; richest town in U.S. per capita; and largest per capita tithing to the Church. In 1905, the family moved to Monticello where he hoped to spend more time at home. Here he was again active in the Church serving as YMMIA president, member of the San Juan Stake High Council and supervisor of ward teachers, sometimes doing the teaching himself to be sure it was done. He literally lived “by the side of the road” for his home and hospitality were shared by everyone. In a tribute to Monroe his sister Luella says, “Dear brother Monroe was known as one of the most humble and unassuming of men. His very life was given for others. It was said that the latch-string of his home was always out both to friend and stranger. I do not believe that anyone ever came to Monroe when tired and hungry and cold, but what his wants were cared for. After all our ticket into eternity will be our service to our fellow men. He was one of the fairest minded of men.” Children of James Monroe and Lucinda Pace Redd are: Isabelle, James Monroe, Jr., Margaret Vivian (McConkie), John Wilson, Alta Alvira (Winzenreid), Alton Pace, Hortence (Erikson), Ray Vernon and Fawn Keziah. These children had given them sixty-six grandchildren and great grandchildren, by 1973. Among them are missionaries, bishops, stake presidents, an apostle, plus other leaders in Church and community. A splendid posterity of which they can be proud.

JAMES MONROE REDD by Alta Redd Winzenreid

Contributor: Todd Millett Created: 1 year ago Updated: 2 months ago

James Monroe Redd, son of Lemuel Hardison and Keziah Jane Butler Redd, was born in New Harmony, Kane (now Washington) County, Utah, 24 August 1863. He was named James for James Pace of Mormon Battalion fame. His grandfather, John Hardison Redd, of South Carolina and Tennessee, came into the Church through the missionary efforts of John D. Lee. A meeting was scheduled to be held at the Redd home when a mob came to stop the gathering. All Captain Redd had to do was sit on his front porch, the mob dispersed and the meeting proceeded. Both the Butlers and the Redds owned plantations and had slaves, but they believed that no people should be in bondage so, long before the Civil War, their slaves were freed. Some of them, feeling great loyalty to the families, came to Utah. John Lowe Butler, Keziah’s father, proved to be a very stalwart and valiant member of the Church, being baptized in 1836. During the persecutions in Missouri, the Mormons were being prevented from voting at Gallatin by a mob. With a fence rail John L. Butler beat a path to the polls and the Mormons voted. At one time, being advised by the Prophet Joseph to move his family at once, he immediately packed up their belongings and left before daybreak. Shortly thereafter, the home went up in flames. During the exodus from Missouri the family went through many hardships and they looked forward to the peace and quiet of Nauvoo. But this did not last long for they must again leave their all to join the Saints in the westward move. In Utah, the Redds and Butlers settled, with others, in Spanish Fork. It was here that Lemuel Hardison Redd met and married Keziah Jane Butler. John H. Redd was called to the Las Vegas Mission, where much needed lead had been found. However, it was Lemuel and Keziah who answered the call. When the venture was abandoned because of too much silver mixed with the lead, this couple returned to Spanish Fork where four children were born. Then a call came to participate in the colonization of southern Utah (Dixie) or the Cotton Mission. Along with the Redds, went the Pace family and several others. They settled the town of New Harmony where nine of Lemuel’s and Keziah’s children were born. The fifth child and fourth son was James Monroe, the subject of this sketch. He was the first to be born in New Harmony, 24 August 1863. Following the advice given him by Brigham Young, Lemuel H. married, as his second wife, Sariah Louisa Chamberlain. The large John D. Lee house, on Ash Creek, made an adequate home for the two families, who lived there harmoniously. The boyhood of Monroe was a good one. He always managed to care for the cattle and horses, while Ben and Wayne, of the second family worked on the farm. His brother William recalled that Monroe would hold his breath to get his way. William soon learned to hold his own and often won out. One of the most exciting adventures in Monroe’s life came when he was sixteen years of age—going with the Saints, who were called to the San Juan Mission, down through the famous and historic Hole-in-the-Rock. Monroe, with George Decker and Willard Butts, had the responsibility of caring for the cattle. The purpose of this mission, initiated by President John Taylor, was to make peace with the Indians, to settle outlying places and to assist in establishing law and order. In the autumn of 1879, eighty families were called from Washington, Iron, Garfield and Beaver Counties to colonize the Valley of the San Juan. Their journey is one of the most dramatic and difficult of any trip in the annals of Church History. Instead of six weeks, it took six months, but finally they reached their destination, Bluff, 6 April 1880—the 50th anniversary of the founding of the Church. Two months later, James Monroe went back to New Harmony where he married Lucinda Pace, 2 April 1884, in the St. George Temple, then returned to Bluff in 1887, where he engaged in the livestock business—working with Joshua Stevens, Apostle Brigham Young, Jr., and Platt D. Lyman. Many names, such as Butler Wash, Redd Canyon and Harmony Flats, call to mind these early days and pioneers of this rugged country. At one time Bluff held a record—there were thirteen missionaries (mostly married men) serving at the same time. Monroe was one of them. He left 11 September 1899 and after twenty- five months in the southern states, returned 11 October 1901. He contracted malaria while serving, and it affected his health for the rest of his life. Later Bluff became unique in three ways: Fartherest town from a railroad in Utah; richest town in U.S. per capita; and largest per capita tithing to the Church. In 1905, the family moved to Monticello where he hoped to spend more time at home. Here he was again active in the Church serving as YMMIA president, member of the San Juan Stake High Council and supervisor of ward teachers, sometimes doing the teaching himself to be sure it was done. He literally lived “by the side of the road” for his home and hospitality were shared by everyone. In a tribute to Monroe his sister Luella says, “Dear brother Monroe was known as one of the most humble and unassuming of men. His very life was given for others. It was said that the latch-string of his home was always out both to friend and stranger. I do not believe that anyone ever came to Monroe when tired and hungry and cold, but what his wants were cared for. After all our ticket into eternity will be our service to our fellow men. He was one of the fairest minded of men.” Children of James Monroe and Lucinda Pace Redd are: Isabelle, James Monroe, Jr., Margaret Vivian (McConkie), John Wilson, Alta Alvira (Winzenreid), Alton Pace, Hortence (Erikson), Ray Vernon and Fawn Keziah. These children had given them sixty-six grandchildren and great grandchildren, by 1973. Among them are missionaries, bishops, stake presidents, an apostle, plus other leaders in Church and community. A splendid posterity of which they can be proud.

Life timeline of James Monroe Redd

James Monroe Redd was born on 24 Aug 1863
James Monroe Redd was 16 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
James Monroe Redd was 26 years old when The Eiffel Tower is officially opened. The Eiffel Tower is a wrought iron lattice tower on the Champ de Mars in Paris, France. It is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower.
James Monroe Redd was 35 years old when Spanish–American War: The Treaty of Paris is signed, officially ending the conflict. The Spanish–American War was fought between the United States and Spain in 1898. Hostilities began in the aftermath of the internal explosion of the USS Maine in Havana Harbor in Cuba, leading to US intervention in the Cuban War of Independence. American acquisition of Spain's Pacific possessions led to its involvement in the Philippine Revolution and ultimately in the Philippine–American War.
James Monroe Redd was 42 years old when Albert Einstein publishes his first paper on the special theory of relativity. Albert Einstein was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics. His work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. He is best known to the general public for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2, which has been dubbed "the world's most famous equation". He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect", a pivotal step in the development of quantum theory.
James Monroe Redd was 49 years old when The British passenger liner RMS Titanic sinks in the North Atlantic at 2:20 a.m., two hours and forty minutes after hitting an iceberg. Only 710 of 2,227 passengers and crew on board survive. RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early hours of 15 April 1912, after colliding with an iceberg during its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City. There were an estimated 2,224 passengers and crew aboard, and more than 1,500 died, making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history. RMS Titanic was the largest ship afloat at the time it entered service and was the second of three Olympic-class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line. It was built by the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast. Thomas Andrews, her architect, died in the disaster.
James Monroe Redd was 57 years old when The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified, guaranteeing women's suffrage in America. The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibits the states and the federal government from denying the right to vote to citizens of the United States on the basis of sex. It was adopted on August 18, 1920.
James Monroe Redd died on 30 May 1937 at the age of 73
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for James Monroe Redd (24 Aug 1863 - 30 May 1937), BillionGraves Record 31306653 Monticello, San Juan, Utah, United States

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