James Healey

31 Mar 1824 - 16 Nov 1907

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James Healey

31 Mar 1824 - 16 Nov 1907
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I got this information from the James and John Healey History book; which is in the possession of my father: Ephraim was the son of James and Elizabeth Smith Healey, both natives of England. His parents and a number of their relatives became converts to the teaching of the Mormon Church in 1845, and
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Life Information

James Healey

Born:
Died:

Alpine Cemetery

283 N 300 E
Alpine, Utah, Utah
United States
Transcriber

doddemagen

May 28, 2011
Photographer

Catirrel

May 26, 2011

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Short History

Contributor: doddemagen Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

I got this information from the James and John Healey History book; which is in the possession of my father: Ephraim was the son of James and Elizabeth Smith Healey, both natives of England. His parents and a number of their relatives became converts to the teaching of the Mormon Church in 1845, and in 1854, saled for America on board the "Golconda." After a long and hard journey of ten weeks they landed at New Orleans and went by boat to Kansas City, Missouri. Though but a lad of seven years, it was on this journey that he was called to pass through one of the sad experiences that are known and felt keenly only by the early pioneers. They started with a party of nine relatives and between New Orleans and St. Louis, cholera broke out, and death claimed his mother, sister, and four others of the party. He, his father, his brother William, and his grandmother being the sole survivors. Upon arriving in Utah in September 1854, they first settled in Pleasant Grove, and in the following spring the father came to Alpine with his son William. Ephraim remained in Pleasant Grove for seven years living and working for his uncle, Joseph Smith (not the prophet) mostly herding cows. Indians were very often crossing the hills east of Pleasant Grove where he was herding. One day a big buck came up to the rock where he was sitting. He did not run, the indian pointed a gun at him but he was not afraid until the indian pulled the trigger, then he jumped behind a big rock. The indian said, "heap brave boy, me no hurt." He remained in Pleasant Grove until he was fourteen years old and then came to Alpine, going to work for Worthy Nash. He lived there about three years. In 1868, he was sent on a mission to the Missouri River for immigrants, with an ox team, three yoke of oxen to a wagon. On this trip, he brought back a little charter oak stove for himself. One of the families who came back with him was the Harris family of Pleasant Grove. Returning on the trip, they were troubled with indians, they had one hundred head of cattle stolen one night belonging to the immigrants. In February 16, 1869, he married Mary Matilda Watkins and were the parents of nine children. Their first home was built by John Carlisle which they bought from him in September 1869. This home was known as the Bill Hamnett home. He was not a great leader in church affairs but accepted the ordinations of the Priesthood, the last being a High Priest to which he was ordained by Andrew R. Anderson, on March 28, 1909. He held the office of Justice of the Peace for twenty years . His wife passed away on February 11, 1907 when she was 57 years old. He later married Mary Reed Healey, widow of Hyrum Healey, his cousin. They were married at Provo, Utah on May 6, 1908. She was known by all the people of Alpine as "Aunt Polly." His health began to get poor. His last illness was diabetes. He passed away on August 22, 1916.

Death of Elizabeth and Mary Ann Healey

Contributor: doddemagen Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Excerpted from a site entitled Smith Family History (http://emoryandverlandsmithfamily.blogspot.com/2010/02/mary-carlisle-james-healey.html), part of a life sketch of the second wife of James Healey, Mary Carlisle. This speaks of how James's first wife and daughter, Elizabeth and Mary Ann, died before they came to Utah. "Another great sorrow awaited her when she reached the valley, news came that her husband (John James) had started to Utah, but contracted cholera while enroute and had passed away. Her father had preceded her to Salt Lake and made his home in Cottonwood and Mary made her home with him once again. She was obliged to seek employment and was successful in finding work in the home of David McOlney of Alpine. There she met a man by the name of James Healey who was also working at the same place. James had lost his wife with cholera at New Orleans, and was left with two small boys, Ephraim and William. They were married in 1855, and she raised and loved his sons as her own children."

History of James Healey (Eley)

Contributor: doddemagen Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

James Eley (Healey) By Anne Richards Bowen Nestled among the foothills of the Pennine Mountains in Derbyshire England is the beautiful little village of Heanor.(1) It was here on 10 April 1824 that James Healey was born to Thomas and Mary Eggleshaw Eley. At that time, the major industries in Heanor were coal mining and textiles.(2) Records show that Thomas was a “stockinger,” a weaver or knitter of stockings(3) and most likely worked at the local hosiery mill. Thomas also wrote and taught music whenever he could to make additional money for the family. (5) Thomas and Mary’s family included seven children: Benjamin (b. 1822), James (1824), Phoebe (1826), John (1828), Richard (1830), George (1836) and Jane (1838). In addition to this large family, Thomas was also supporting some of his children from a previous marriage to Phoebe Wilds, who had died in 1820. (4, 5) James’s early years were very difficult. Because there were many mouths to feed and the Eleys were poor, the children had to go to work to help provide for the family. James and John found jobs at the local coal mine. James began working there when he was only eight years old and John started working at age 14. James had the responsibility of opening and shutting the doors as the donkeys passed through with their loads of coal. James would enter the mine each day before daylight and leave work after dark, never seeing the sun, except on Sunday. (5) When he was almost 21 years old, James married Elizabeth Smith. The marriage took place on 2 March 1845 in Whitwick, Leicestershire, England. Shortly before James was married, his father passed away (18 February, 1845). James’s mother, Mary, who was only 42, was left with a large family to raise and support on her own. (5) On 26 December 1846, James was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. His wife, Elizabeth, and her family had joined the Church in 1844. This may have been the catalyst that brought about James’s conversion. The 1851 England Census shows James and Elizabeth living in Whitwick, Leicestershire, England, with Elizabeth’s parents, William and Mary Ann Heathcote Smith. James was working as a coal miner and they had two small sons, Ephraim, age 4 and William, age 1. (6) In the mid-1800s, many members of the Mormon Church in England were immigrating to the Utah Territory in the United States. The Healey and Smith families had a great desire to join with other saints and made plans to travel together and settle in the Rocky Mountains. James and Elizabeth, their two sons Ephraim (7) and William (4), and a tiny daughter, Mary Ann (2), departed from Liverpool England on 30 January 1854 on the ship Golconda. Records show that Elizabeth’s parents, William and Mary Ann Smith accompanied them on the journey. Sarah & Joseph Heathcote, (the brother and sister-in-law of Mary Ann Smith) were also among the party. (7) The trip across the ocean was without incident. The company included 454 Saints traveling to the Utah. The Elders in charge organized the Saints into seven groups called “branches.” According to one traveler, “Meetings were held five times a week in which the Saints were richly blessed with the gifts of the Spirit, in tongues, interpretations, visions, revelations and prophecy. The winds were rather contrary for two of three days after leaving Liverpool, but after that they became more favorable and continued so during the greater part of the voyage. Two marriages were solemnized on board, and one death occurred. The company arrived safely in New Orleans on Saturday 18 March 1854, after a passage of forty-two days from Liverpool.” (Millennial Star, Vol. XVI: pp.106, 141, 255, 281, 297, 447.) The group continued their journey by steamboat up the Mississippi River en route to St. Louis, Missouri. One passenger gave an interesting description of the journey by steamboat: Now we are going, yes faster and faster. The steamboat a puffing and snorting and pushing hard against the stream, but oh, what dirty water for us to use. We dip it up for to settle it but don’t get much better. Never mind, we will do the best we can with it. I must drink it, anyhow, because I am very thirsty. And what a rackety noise, it makes me shudder. The captain a shouting and the water a splashing and the band a playing and some of us singing and some of the sisters a washing and the babes a crying. And the sailors a talking and many of them a smoking. And all of us trying to do something and the boat a tugging and snorting. . . (8) The company arrived in St. Louis on April 10, 1854. They stayed two weeks in the city and then resumed their trip. At this time tragedy struck and the deadly disease of cholera began to spread among the group (probably due to the unsanitary water and conditions on the steamboat). The Healey family and those in their party suffered greatly. On 29 March 1854, Elizabeth died and her baby daughter passed away the following day on 30 March. Elizabeth’s father William and relatives Joseph and Sarah Heathcote also succumbed to the disease. Out of the party of nine family members, only James Healey, his two sons and his mother-in-law, Mary Ann Smith, survived. (10) With broken hearts, the little party turned their hearts toward Zion and began the final part of their journey. On the 16 June 1854, the family departed from Westport, Missouri, with the Pioneer Company of Job Smith. The group consisted of 217 individuals and 45 wagons. The journey went well, almost without incident. Captain Job Smith described their experience: We made good time every day except Sundays on which day we always rested and once in a while for a general washing day. We also gathered for prayers at night, after which guard was set, every man taking turn half a night. Good order observed and religious services held on Sundays. In this way we made moderately good speed and kept our teams up in good spirits, and soon passed the behind ones which had traveled too fast at first and thus worn out their teams. (13) As they were traveling through Wyoming, the group encountered a great number of Indians. One company member described the experience in the following words: Before reaching Laramie the company passed a very large number of Sioux Indians. There seemed to be thousands of them. They did not appear to be very friendly. It was afterwards we learned that there were some differences between them and the soldiers situated at Fort Laramie, and next day it culminated in a fight, when one of the chiefs were killed. . . Next morning a Crow Indian, and special friend of a post trader whose place was not far from camp, gave him the news of the Laramie trouble with the Sioux Indians, and warned him to flee immediately, as they would probably murder all the white people they could find, for they were on the warpath and traveling westward. The trader and Indian visited the camp and informed Job Smith, the captain, of the situation. . . The cattle had been driven off two or three miles to get feed. Willie and three others were sent after them and brought them up with all possible speed. In a few minutes the cattle were yoked up and the wagons rolled out. The cattle also seemed to partake of the fear felt by the people, and traveled much faster than usual. About two o'clock p.m. they stopped at a swampy place, where the grass was good, and gave them a good feed, then rolled out again and traveled till sunset. A corral was formed, and the cattle with yokes were chained to the wheels inside. Many of the sisters especially were alarmed at fires seen on distant hills, which were said to indicate the presence of Indians. As soon as darkness came on, the company moved onward again. The cattle seemed frightened and traveled remarkably fast till nearly morning, and in this way the company succeeded in avoiding trouble with the Indians. (14) Thankful that the experience with the Indians proved harmless, the company traveled on without further incident. They arrived in the Salt Lake Valley on 23 September 1854. (10) When the family arrived in Utah, records and family histories show that they moved to different communities. By 1855, James had settled in Mountainville (now Alpine, Utah). Mary Ann Smith moved to Pleasant Grove (a few miles south of Alpine) to live with her son Joseph W. Smith who had come to Utah in 1851. It appears that James’s two boys, Ephraim and William, may have stayed with their grandmother for a time until James could make a start for the family. A history of Alpine City’s early settlers gives some information about James’s son, Ephraim Healey. It states that “Ephraim Healey came to the United States with his family in 1854. He was seven years old at the time. He lived in Pleasant Grove with an uncle for seven years before coming to Alpine.” (11) It is very probable that the uncle Ephraim was living with at this time was Joseph W. Smith and that his grandmother, Mary Ann Smith, was caring for Ephraim and his younger brother William, who would have been 4 at the time of their arrival in Utah. (15) One account explains that upon arriving in Mountainville (Alpine), “James Healey found employment in the home of Davis McOlney. While there he became acquainted with Richard Carlisle, who was also working for Mr. McOlney. Richard had a daughter named Mary Carlisle James.” (12) Mary’s husband John James had also perished from cholera while immigrating to Utah. (According to family histories, “Mary (Carlisle) and John James had been anxious to go to Zion, and as money was very scarce, John arranged for Mary to precede him with a company who were leaving shortly after their marriage. He planned to follow just as soon as he could make proper arrangements and earn enough money. John contracted cholera as he started on his journey and passed away in route to Utah.”) (15) In addition to the heartbreak of losing spouses, James Healey and Mary James found that they had many other things in common. The pair fell in love and were married in Alpine on 26 September 1855. Davis McOlney proved a very dear friend and allowed them to buy some of his land and pay for it in labor, grain, or anything they could spare. This is how they got their start.” (12) Records show that the winter of 1854 and 1855 was a harsh one. The valleys had four to six feet of snow, but there was very little snow in the mountains. This caused a shortage of water the next summer. Crops were poor and the hordes of crickets finished off what little did grow. The following winters of 1855 and ‘56 were some of the most severe ever experienced in Utah. (11) Most of the cattle in the area died, either from exposure or hunger. Money was scarce and many of the men had to go away to work at logging, on the railroad, or anywhere they could find a job. (11) Although the Healey family somehow managed to survive and stay in Alpine, they lived in impoverished conditions. A family history records: “Their bedstead was a wagon box turned over and a straw tick for a mattress. Their stove was an old fashioned fireplace. Under these conditions, Mary’s first baby, Mary Alice, was born (1856). She [Mary] came close to losing her life as there was no good help to be had and it took several days to make the trip to Salt Lake by ox team.” (11) James and Mary were blessed with five more children: Elizabeth (b. 1858), Jane Fields (1861), Martha (1863), James Carlisle (1865) and Richard Joseph (1868.) In addition, James’s two sons from his previous marriage returned to join the family and it is recorded that Mary “raised and loved his sons as her own children.” (12) James and Mary worked hard to establish a home in Alpine. In addition to the extreme weather conditions and hordes of crickets that repeatedly attacked their crops, they also had difficulties with the Indians. In the spring of 1853, the people of Alpine had been counseled by President [Brigham] Young to move into a fort because of expected Indian trouble. The residents complied and the structure was built. By 1855, the city had outgrown the fort and made plans to “mark out the location for a larger fort.” The new wall was built about 30 feet outside the previous fort and enclosed ten acres of ground. James Healey had a home in the northwest area of the new fort. His brother, John Healey, who emigrated from England in 1863, built a log home on the plot next door. This fort was used until 1868, when the Indian threat finally subsided. (11) The Healeys were active in Church affairs and kept busy serving the community. When the small town outgrew the little log church, James and Mary offered their home as a meeting place. Church was always held on Sunday morning at 10 o’clock. Their home consisted of one large room built of logs, with a dirt roof and floor. A large fireplace was in the east end of the room. Slabs placed on blocks of cottonwood were used for benches. The children sat on the floor between the fireplace and benches where the adults were seated. Church was held here until a new meetinghouse was built. (11) The little town of Alpine began to grow more rapidly. When the fort could no longer accommodate everyone, residents began building outside the walls. Some town members, including James and Mary, still resided within the fort, but began tearing sections of it down to more easily access their farmland. “When the fort was constructed, only two gates were built, one on the north and one on the south of the Main street, which ran north and south, parallel to the west wall.” A city hall was built on this road and further north was the home of James Healey. When the walls came down, the city buildings and the Healeys’ home remained on what is presently Main Street in Alpine. James’s home was on the corner of what is now First North and Main streets. (11) James was a farmer and grew hay, grain, corn and potatoes. His brother, John grew a fruit orchard of peaches and strawberries on what is now the east slope of Alpine Cemetery. (11) Family histories state that Mary was a dedicated mother, deeply religious and “very ladylike and refined. Her language was beautiful, never using slang or light words.” (5) She loved learning and was self educated, “using all her spare time reading books and magazines. In the early days when newspapers were very scarce, she was called on to read to the neighbors. They would gather in each other’s homes and by the light of the tallow candle she would read to the groups, in turn with Brother R. T. Booth, father of Sister Talmage.” (5) Hard work was a part of everyday life for Mary Ann. “She was a very industrious woman, making her own candles, soap, and many times making lye from ashes in which soap was made. She made clothing from bed ticking, canvas, blue denims, and skins.” (5) Pioneer life was full of adversity and hardship for Mary and James. Their eldest daughter, Mary Alice, who married William Thomas Brown, died when her first baby was nine days old. This was a great shock to James and Mary. They lived in close proximity to their children and were a devoted, loving family. (5) One of the great challenges of Mary Ann’s life was the loss of her eyesight, but she was able to adapt to this difficulty. “Because her memory was far above average, she was able to memorize long poems and even books right up to the time of her death. Throughout this great handicap she went ahead trying to make other people happy with her stories and poems, doing all she could in Church affairs.” (5) Mary died at the age of 78, on 2 September 1902, in Alpine, Utah. James died five years later in Alpine on 2 May 1907. Together, James and Mary Ann raised their children and established a life in a new land where their family and future generations could enjoy lives of freedom, opportunity, and prosperity. They laid a great foundation of hard work, faith, love and devotion for their posterity to build on. SOURCES: 1. http://www.gigaflop.demon.co.uk/heanor.htm 2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heanor 3. http://rmhh.co.uk/occup/s.html 4. Ancestry.com. 1841 England Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc, 2010. 5. “Mary Carlisle James Healey, “ Family history submitted by Lori Pugmire http://trees.ancestry.com/tree 6. Ancestry.com. 1851 England Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005. 7. Ancestry.com. New Orleans Passenger Lists, 1820-1945 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2006. 8. Ancestry.com, http://trees.ancestry.com/tree - .” (Millennial Star, Vol. XVI: pp.106, 141, 255, 281, 297, 447.) 9. History of Joseph W. Smith, by Guy Hillman and Gwen Richards, in possession of Anne Richards Bowen. 10. Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847-1868 Database http://lds.org/churchhistory/library/pioneercompanysearch/1,15773,3966-1,00.html 11. Alpine Yesterdays, A History of Alpine, Utah County, Utah, 1850-1980, by Jennie Adams Wild, Blaine Hudson Printing, November 1982 12. “Life in Utah,” History of James Healey and Mary Carlisle James Healey, submitted by Lori Pugmire, http://trees.ancestry.com 13. Smith, Job, Autobiography, [ca. 1902], 41-42. Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847-1868 Database http://lds.org/churchhistory/library/pioneercompanysearch/1,15773,3966-1,00.html 14. Burton, William W.], "Little Willie," Juvenile Instructor, 1 Apr. 1893, 204, 206-Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847-1868 Database http://lds.org/churchhistory/library/pioneercompanysearch/1,15773,3966-1,00.html

Story of William and Mary Ann Heathcote Smith Family (Including story of family tragedy while immigrating to America)

Contributor: doddemagen Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

William & Mary Ann Heathcote Smith William Smith was christened on August 16, 1801, in the village of Arnold, Nottinghamshire, located in the East Midlands of England. (1) The town, part of the larger Nottingham area was located near the famous Sherwood Forest. At that time, Arnold was the center of the framework industry and numerous factories and associated businesses were located in the area. (2) William’s parents were Able and Elizabeth Kirk Smith and he was the firstborn of five children: John (b. 1805,) Joseph, (b.1806,) Job (b.1808) and a sister, Elizabeth born in 1813. (3) Mary Ann Heathcote was born on June 22, 1795 in Whitwick, Leicestershire, England. Her parents were John Heathcote and Elizabeth Vaun (or Vann.) It is known that she had at least one sibling, a brother John, born in 1799. (3) There is no record of the events of William’s or Mary Anns’s childhoods, but family records show that the two were married on March 1, 1824. They had four children, including Elizabeth, born on August 26, 1823, Ann, (born on April 10, 1827), a little son, Joseph who was born in 1831 and lived only for a short time, and Joseph William (born on November 20, 1833.) (3) The 1841 England Census shows William (age 49) and Mary Ann (age 45, living in Whitwick, Leicestershire, England, with their children, Elizabeth, age 15 and Joseph, age 7 years. (4) William’s occupation is listed as a “stockinger,” which was a knitter, weaver, or dealer of stockings. (5) In 1851, the Smith family was still living in Whitwick, with their daughter, Elizabeth, her husband James Elley (Healey), and and their two sons, Ephraim and William. Mary Ann’s brother, Joseph Heathcote, also was living with the family. William’s occupation had changed and he was now working as a stoker, probably in the coal mines where his son-in-law, James, also worked. (6) Family records show that William, Mary Ann, and others in their family joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in May of 1844. In the mid-1800s, many members of the Mormon Church in England were immigrating to the Utah Territory in the United States. The Smith family joined these saints in their migration to Utah. (3) William and Mary Ann departed from Liverpool England on 30 January 1854 on the ship Golconda. Their daughter Elizabeth, her husband James Eley (Healey) and their three children Ephraim (7), William (4) and Mary Ann (2), accompanied them on the journey. Sarah & Joseph Heathcote, (the brother and sister-in-law of Mary Ann Smith) were also among the party. (7) The trip across the ocean was without incident. The company included 454 Saints traveling to the Utah. The Elders in charge organized the Saints into seven groups called “branches.” According to one traveler, “Meetings were held five times a week in which the Saints were richly blessed with the gifts of the Spirit, in tongues, interpretations, visions, revelations and prophecy. The winds were rather contrary for two of three days after leaving Liverpool, but after that they became more favorable and continued so during the greater part of the voyage. Two marriages were solemnized on board, and one death occurred. The company arrived safely in New Orleans on Saturday 18 March 1854, after a passage of forty-two days from Liverpool.” (Millennial Star, Vol. XVI: pp.106, 141, 255, 281, 297, 447.) The group continued their journey by steamboat up the Mississippi River en route to St. Louis, Missouri. One passenger gave an interesting description of the journey by steamboat: "Now we are going, yes faster and faster. The steamboat a puffing and snorting and pushing hard against the stream, but oh, what dirty water for us to use. We dip it up for to settle it but don’t get much better. Never mind, we will do the best we can with it. I must drink it, anyhow, because I am very thirsty. And what a rackety noise, it makes me shudder. The captain a shouting and the water a splashing and the band a playing and some of us singing and some of the sisters a washing and the babes a crying. And the sailors a talking and many of them a smoking. And all of us trying to do something and the boat a tugging and snorting. . ." (8) The company arrived in St. Louis on April 10, 1854. They stayed two weeks in the city and then resumed their trip. (7) At this time tragedy struck and the deadly disease of cholera began to spread among the group (probably due to the unsanitary water and conditions on the steamboat.) The Smith family and those in their party suffered greatly. On 29 March 1854, daughter Elizabeth died and her baby passed away the following day on 30 March. William died on April 7, 1854 and relatives Joseph and Sarah Heathcote also succumbed to the disease. Out of the party of nine family members, only Mary Ann Smith, her son-in-law James Healey, and grandsons Ephraim and William survived. (3) With great sorrow, the little party turned their hearts toward Zion and began the final part of their journey. On the 16 June 1854, the family departed from Westport, Missouri, with the Pioneer Company of Job Smith. The group consisted of 217 individuals and 45 wagons. (10) The journey went well, almost without incident. Captain Job Smith described their experience: "We made good time every day except Sundays on which day we always rested and once in a while for a general washing day. We also gathered for prayers at night, after which guard was set, every man taking turn half a night. Good order observed and religious services held on Sundays. In this way we made moderately good speed and kept our teams up in good spirits, and soon passed the behind ones which had traveled too fast at first and thus worn out their teams." (11) As they were traveling through Wyoming, the group encountered a great number of Indians. One company member described the experience in the following words: "Before reaching Laramie the company passed a very large number of Sioux Indians. There seemed to be thousands of them. They did not appear to be very friendly. It was afterwards we learned that there were some differences between them and the soldiers situated at Fort Laramie, and next day it culminated in a fight, when one of the chiefs were killed. . . Next morning a Crow Indian, and special friend of a post trader whose place was not far from camp, gave him the news of the Laramie trouble with the Sioux Indians, and warned him to flee immediately, as they would probably murder all the white people they could find, for they were on the warpath and traveling westward. The trader and Indian visited the camp and informed Job Smith, the captain, of the situation. . . The cattle had been driven off two or three miles to get feed. Willie and three others were sent after them and brought them up with all possible speed. In a few minutes the cattle were yoked up and the wagons rolled out. The cattle also seemed to partake of the fear felt by the people, and traveled much faster than usual. About two o'clock p.m. they stopped at a swampy place, where the grass was good, and gave them a good feed, then rolled out again and traveled till sunset. A corral was formed, and the cattle with yokes were chained to the wheels inside. Many of the sisters especially were alarmed at fires seen on distant hills, which were said to indicate the presence of Indians. As soon as darkness came on, the company moved onward again. The cattle seemed frightened and traveled remarkably fast till nearly morning, and in this way the company succeeded in avoiding trouble with the Indians. (12)" Thankful that the experience with the Indians proved harmless, the company traveled on without further incident. They arrived in the Salt Lake Valley on 23 September 1854. (10) When the family reached Utah, records and family histories show that they moved to different communities. By 1855, James had settled in Mountainville (now Alpine, Utah) and had married Mary Carlisle, whose husband had also perished from cholera while immigrating to Utah. (13) Mary Ann Heathcote Smith moved to Pleasant Grove (a few miles south of Alpine,) to live with her son Joseph William Smith who had immigrated to Utah earlier and was anxiously awaiting the arrival of his family. It appears that James Healey’s two boys, Ephraim and William, may have stayed with their grandmother for a time until James could make a start for the family. A history of Alpine City’s early settlers gives some information about James’s son, Ephraim Healey. It states that “Ephraim Healey came to the United States with his family in 1854. He was seven years old at the time. He lived in Pleasant Grove with an uncle for seven years before coming to Alpine.” (14) It is very probable that the uncle Ephraim was living with at this time was Joseph W. Smith and that his grandmother, Mary Ann Smith, was caring for Ephraim and his younger brother William, who would have been 4 at the time of their arrival in Utah. Mary Ann stayed with her son, Joseph, in Pleasant Grove for about seven years, and then moved to Mount Pleasant, Utah to live with other family members. She died in Mount Pleasant on 12 November 1871 at the age of 76. (3) What Mary Ann and her family endured while coming to Utah has always been heart wrenching to our family. The nine family members began their journey from England with hope and anticipation for a better life in Utah. Upon arrival only four of the original nine members had survived. Mary Ann Heathcote Smith had lost her husband, daughter, a little granddaughter and her brother and his wife during the trip. She and her son-in-law and two grandsons completed the journey to Utah, heartbroken and alone. The sacrifice of the Smith and Healey families stands as a monument to the bravery and perseverance of the Mormon pioneers. These men and women were willing, because of their faith, to leave their homes and familiar surroundings to come to an unknown land, no matter the cost. They paved the way for a better life for their posterity. Our family is indebted to them for their courage, faith and determination. Written by Anne Richards Bowen 1. Arnold, Nottinghamshire, England; Date Range: 1792 - 1804; Film Number: 503471. Ancestry.com. England & Wales Christening Records, 1530-1906 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2008.Original data: Genealogical Society of Utah. British Isles Vital Records Index, 2nd Edition. Salt Lake City, Utah: Intellectual Reserve, copyright 2002. Used by permission. 2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arnold 3. Smith Family Records in possession of Anne Richards Bowen 4. Ancestry.com. 1841 England Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. 5. Old English Occupations: http://www.worldthroughthelens.com/family-history/old-occupations.php 6. Ancestry.com. 1851 England Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005. 7. Ancestry.com. New Orleans Passenger Lists, 1820-1945 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2006. 8. Ancestry.com, http://trees.ancestry.com/tree - .” (Millennial Star, Vol. XVI: pp.106, 141, 255, 281, 297, 447.) 9. History of Joseph W. Smith, by Guy Hillman and Gwen Richards, in possession of Anne Richards Bowen. 10. Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847-1868 Database http://lds.org/churchhistory/library/pioneercompanysearch/1,15773,3966-1,00.html 11. Smith, Job, Autobiography, [ca. 1901], 42-42 Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847-1868 Database http://lds.org/churchhistory/library/pioneercompanysearch/1,15773,3966-1,00.html 12. Burton, William W.], "Little Willie," Juvenile Instructor, 1 Apr. 1893, 204, 206-Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847-1868 Database http://lds.org/churchhistory/library/pioneercompanysearch/1,15773,3966-1,00.html1 13. “Life in Utah,” History of James Healey and Mary Carlisle James Healey, submitted by Lori Pugmire, http://trees.ancestry.com 14. Alpine Yesterdays, A History of Alpine, Utah County, Utah, 1850-1980, by Jennie Adams Wild, Blaine Hudson Printing, November 1982

Sketch of Elizabeth Smith Healey

Contributor: doddemagen Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Elizabeth Smith was born in Whitic, Leistershire, England, in the parish of Heanor, August 1825. She was the daughter of William and Mary Ann Heathcot Smith. Nothing is known of the girlhood days of Betsy Smith. She was tall, light complexion, with large blue eyes. She became a wonderful seamstress, and a milliner by trade, or hat maker they were called in England. In 1846, Betsy, as she was always called, married James Healey. That same year they heard the Mormon Elders and became converted to the Gospel and were baptized in December. They moved to the town of Heanor, where James was raised; he was the means of converting his brother John and many others. She was a kind, loving wife and mother, a careful, saving, thrifty helpmate. Judging by her sister, Mary Ann Wheeler of Salt Lake, a brother of Joseph of Pleasant Grove, they came from very dependable, honest, progressive parents. On January 1, 1851, Betsy’s only brother Joseph, her sister Mary Ann, and brother-in-law John Wheeler left England for America. They were eleven weeks on the ocean. This company of saints arrived in Salt Lake City on 27 October 1851. Joseph worked hard to earn all the money he could to send to England to help bring his parents and Betsy and her family to Zion. On 2 January 1854, they set sail on the Galconda from Liverpool for America. James, his wife Betsy, three children: Ephraim, 7 years; William 5 years; Mary Ann, 2 years, also Betsy’s father and mother, William and Mary Ann Smith, her uncle Joseph Heathcot and wife Sarah; nine in all. After their long and tiresome journey of 10 weeks in the sailing vessel on the ocean, they landed in New Orleans. Just before they landed, the President of the Mormon Company called a meeting. He told them their food ration had run so low, and all were in such a rundown condition they must be very careful, eat very sparingly of food, especially meat, or they would all be sick upon landing. They started by boat up the Mississippi River for St. Louis, Missouri. On their way Cholera broke out and five members of their family died with this dreadful disease within a week. Betsy, age 29 years, died 29 March 1854, and also her Aunt Sarah Heathcot, age 50, on that same date. Her daughter 2 years old, Mary Ann, by name and her uncle Joseph Heathcot died on 30 March 1854 at the age of 55 years. Just when they felt they could endure no more, her father, William Smith, age 52 years died also on 7 April 1854. James, with his two little boys, Ephraim and William, his mother-in-law, Mary Ann, had to buy their loved ones on the banks of the Mississippi River and complete their journey alone. Wi8lliam Smith was a very large man and James being sick himself, had to place the casket by the side of the bed and roll him into it, then with his mother-in-law, they drug the casket to the door, and they were taken from the boat and buried on the river bank. They had to prepare their own dead for burial. It has been believed by her son, Ephraim that the remains of his mother and her family have long ago been washed down into the ocean during high water of the Mississippi. In this company were Herbert and Sarah Price, John and Mary Platt, very dear friends of the family in England. These kind people did all they could to help with these two little motherless boys on that long journey across the plains to Salt Lake City, Utah. James took his mother-in-law and his two boys over to Pleasant Grove, where his brother-in-law, Joseph, was living, and stayed about a year, when he moved to Alpine, Utah. Found in Verland Healey's genealogy Submitted by Yvonne Williams

Thomas Healey (Eley)

Contributor: doddemagen Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Thomas Healey (Eley) Thomas Healey was born 25 October 1784, in Heanor, Derby, England, near the border of Nottinghamshire, 9 miles north east from Derby, in the parish of that name. It has a population of about 2,672. This town is pleasantly situated on a hill on the road from London to Matlock and in the neighborhood are several collieriers, (coal mine, or those who deal in coal business), and some extensive iron-works, affording employment to considerable portion of the inhabitants. A navigable part of the Erewash River passes along the eastern boundary of this parish. It is o__ssed by Langley bridge, on the Derby and Mansfield Road, near which a railway branches off and extends to the coal its south of the town. The principal branches of manufacturing are cotton goods, hosiery, and bobbinet lace, where several females were employed. Thomas was the son of John Eley, born about 1756, and Martha Martin, about 1755. They were married 30 September 1782 and Thomas Eley was born 2 October 1784, so perhaps was the first child. He had a sister, Elizabeth, who was christened 21 March 1790. There is another child listed, but no date is given. Thomas was christened 5 November 1784 in Heanor, Derby, England. We know nothing about his early life until he was married on 4 November 1806, when he was 22 years old, to Pheobe Wilds, who was christened 7 February 1785 at Marpool, Derby, England. To this union was born 5 children: Hannah, born 22 December 1808; Mary, 10 June 1811; John, 28 July 1814, who died at 2 months; Ann, 1 June 1816, and Thomas, 17 December 1818. They were only married 13 years when his wife died, 23 January 1820. She lacked only 1 month of being 35 years old. This was so very young to die and leave a small family. The oldest child was 12 years and the youngest 13 months. This was indeed a great tragedy and a responsibility to be left to be father and mother both to his family. How he met and exactly when he was married again is not known, but it must have been in 1821. He married Mary Eggleyshaw, about 19 years his junior, daughter of Thomas and Mary Kirkham Eggleyshaw of the same place. They had 8 children: Benjamin, born 22 August 1822, died 16 June 1839 (when nearly 17 years); James, 31 March 1824; Pheobe, 12 August 1826; John, 22 May 1828; Richard, 10 June 1830, who died 15 December 1864 (32 years); George, 1 June 1836, who died when about 3 months old; and Jane, 16 August 1838, dying when 23 years old. Mary took most of the responsibility of the family, as Thomas wasn’t very strong. He earned what he could from teaching and writing music. They were very poor and so his wife had to be very conservative. She was known to have walked 3 miles to save one cent on a loaf of bread and out of necessity, allowed each member a certain amount of food a day. Members of the family had to go out to work at a very early age to help support the family. James and John worked in the coal mines nearby, James starting when he was only 8 years old. His work was opening and shutting the doors as the donkeys passed through with their loads. He would enter the mine before daylight and leave after dark, never seeing the sun for years, except on Sunday. His son John went to work in the mine when 14 years old. We have no information about him from that time on, except that he died at the age of 61 years, 18 February 1845, in Heanor, Derby, England, leaving Mary, his wife of 42 years of age, with a family to raise alone, her youngest child being 7 years old. His son James was married the same year as his father’s death. Three of the 8 children had died, leaving James, Phoebe, John, Joseph, and Jane to survive their father, plus his children by the previous marriage. Mary died just 4 years after her son, James, went to Utah with his family, on 18 February 1858, at Heanor, Derby, England. She was survived by James, Pheobe, John, Joseph, and Jane. Found in Verland Beck's genealogy Submitted by Yvonne Williams

James Healey

Contributor: doddemagen Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

By Verland Grace Healey Beck, Granddaughter James Healy, son of Thomas and Mary Eglashaw Healey, born at Ener Derbyshire, England, March 31, 1824. His early life was spent in working in the coal mines. He entered the mines at eight years, going before daylight in the morning never seeing the sun except on Sunday. On account of conditions, he received no education. In September 1845 he married Elizabeth Betsy Smith and in December of same year he was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; In 1854, he with his wife and their children (Ephraim 7; William, 5; and Mary Ann, 2) and other relatives came to America or to Utah with a number of his wife’s relatives with the Job Smith Company. He married Elizabeth Smith in 1846 in Wittake Lercestershire, England in 1846 in William Smith and Sarah Ethcott of Wittake. She was born 1825, died March 29, 184. They reached New Orleans as an epidemic of cholera was raging and after leaving for St. Louis by rivers and boat, five of the family died with the disease, including his wife and daughter 2 years of age, his father-in-law William Smith, 52; and nephew Jos Heathcoat, 53; and his niece Sarah Heathcoat, 50. They were buried on the banks of the Missouri River. Their children were Ephraim, born January 26, 1847 who married Mary Matilda Watkins, and William, born November 14, 1849 and married Clara Hansen who died. James Healey took part in everything of an uplifting and building nature and passed through all the trials incident to early life in these valleys. Three years in succession, his crops were destroyed by grasshoppers. On many occasions he was called to go out and fight the Indians as they were very bitter against the white people at that time. He hauled rock for the Temple, furnished a team to go back for immigrants and spent his life trying to do good. The survivors of the group finally reached Pleasant Grove, Utah, and settled there. After a years sojourn there he moved to Alpine 1855 and there he spent the remainder of his life. Soon after moving to Alpine he met Mary Carlisle and married her. Six children were born to this union. He and his family suffered many hardships incident to Pioneer life. In early days the Saints built “Lookout towers” where they go in turns and keep watch for fear of Indians raids on the settlement. Grandfather was always on hand to take his turn. James and Mary went to the Endowment on 2 Mar. 1861 to get their endowments and on the advice of the authorities were sealed for time to each other and for eternity to their first mates. On the advice of Pres. Stephen L. Chipman, work was done by proxy to have James and Mary sealed to each other and their children sealed to their parents on 5 December 1938. He was a very devout Latter-day Saint, although he had not had the opportunity of securing an education, he by the help of his wife; who was a student of the scriptures became very familiar with the doctrine of the church. He used to talk in tongues, this he did on several occasions in fast meeting. He furnished an ox team and helped to haul granite rock that the temple is built of. He also furnished an ox team to cross the plains for the emigrants. He was called all hours of the to go and administer to the sick, and many times has there been great manifestations of healing, under his laying on of hands through the spirit of the Lord. He was considered one of the most successful of farmers in the little town of Alpine. After his wife died on 2 September 1902, having lost her eyesight previous to that time, James spent a great deal of time living with his children. His grandson Rich, son of Richard Joseph, recalls that he sat beside him at the table in their home when he stayed with them. He used to go with his grandfather often while he husked corn at the top of his lot (located where Merlin Whitby’s home now stands). James would sit by the hours in the fall and early winter husking the corn in large piles and tieing the corn stalks in bundles and covering the piles of corn with them for protection from the winter snows. He would take Rich by the hand and take him down to his old cabin, which by the way, still had the original furniture and cupboard with the dishes still in it. He would prepare a pot of onion gruel and he and Rich would sit down to eat it together. He loved to attend church and almost every Sunday found him there. On June 1907 he had the misfortune to fall and break his hip and was confined to his bed until the final summons came to relieve him of his suffering. On November 16, 1907, he was called to his reward, being 83 years and eight months and sixteen days old. He was holding the office of a High Priest at the time of his death. In 1855 he married Mary Carlisle and six children blessed their union, two boys and four girls. Mary Alice, born September 7, 1856, married W.T. Brown on March 11, 1885, and died March 6, 1886. Married at Logan, Utah, and had one child named Richard. Elizabeth, born August 15, 1858, was married to Jacob S. Beck Jane Fields, born June 18, 1861, was married to Hans Olsen Martha, born May 12, 1863, was married to Davis J. Strong James Carlisle, born November 14, 1865, was married to Hannah Alice Devey Richard Joseph, born January 20, 1868, was married to Jane Amelia Winn

James Healey & Mary Carlisle

Contributor: doddemagen Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

James Healey was born to Thomas Healey and Mary Eggleshaw on 21 March, 1824 in Heanor, Derbyshire, England. He was the 2nd of 8 children having 2 sisters and 6 brothers. Thomas was a “stockinger” and most likely worked at the local hosiery mill. He also wrote and taught music whenever he could as he was supporting children from a previous marriage to Phoebe Wilds who had died in 1820. Because the Healeys were poor, the children had to go to work to help provide for the family. James worked at the local coal mine when he was only 8 years old, opening and shutting the doors as the donkeys passed through with their loads of coal. When he was almost 21 years old, James married Elizabeth Smith on 2 March, 1845. Her family had joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in 1844; James was baptized 26 December, 1846. The Healey and Smith families made plans to travel together to the Rocky Mountains. With 454 people, James and Elizabeth, their 2 sons and baby daughter departed from Liverpool, England on 30 January, 1854 on the ship Golconda. After 42 days, the company arrived in New Orleans on 18 March, 1854. The group continued by steamboat up the Mississippi River to St. Louis, Missouri, arriving on 10 April, 1854. They resumed their trip 2 weeks later but then tragedy struck with an outbreak of Cholera. Elizabeth died on 29 March, 1854 and their baby daughter died the following day. Out of the party of 9 family members, only James Healey, his 2 sons and his mother-in-law survived. With heavy hearts the family turned their sights toward Zion and began the final part of their journey, leaving Missouri on 16 June, 1854 with the Pioneer Company of Job Smith. They arrived in the Salt Lake Valley on 23 September, 1854. Mary Carlisle was born10 September, 1824 in Sturton, Lincolnshire, England to Richard Carlisle and Jane Field. She was the 2nd of 12 children, having 8 brothers and 3 sisters. With marriage plans Mary saved a year’s wages but after she was baptized & confirmed on 26 April, 1850 her fiancé deserted her. She was also given a year’s wages when a lady she cooked for died. With these monies she was able to help get her family to America. Sailing on the “Ellen” they arrived in New Orleans 4 March, 1851 Mary married John Alcorn James in 1851 in St. Louis City, Missouri. They were anxious to go to Zion, and as money was very scarce, John arranged for her to precede him. He planned to follow but contracted Cholera as he started his journey to Utah; he died 18 June, 1852 in Leavenworth, Kansas. Mary travelled with her father and siblings to Utah arriving 15 September, 1852. Upon arriving in Utah, James Healey found employment in the home of Davis McOlney of Alpine, Utah and became acquainted with Richard Carlisle, (Mary’s father) who was also working there. James and Mary were married 26 September, 1855 in Alpine, Utah. McOlney sold them some of his land and let them pay for it in labor or grain. The next few years proved difficult with extreme weather conditions and hordes of crickets. They also had difficulties with the Indians and at the counsel of Brigham Young a fort was built which is where they lived farming hay, grain, corn and potatoes. Mary was self-educated and in the days when newspapers were very scarce, she was called on to read to the neighbors. She was very industrious making her own candles and soap and made clothing from bed ticking, canvas, blue denims and skins. James and Mary were blessed with 6 children, and Mary also raised and loved James’ 2 sons as her own. Their home sat on what is now First North and Main Street and when the small town outgrew the little log church, James and Mary offered their home as a meeting place. It consisted of one large room built of logs, with a dirt roof and floor Mary died 2 September, 1902 in Alpine, Utah. James died 5 years later on 2 May, 1907, also in Alpine. Both are buried in the Alpine, Utah Cemetery.

Life timeline of James Healey

1824
James Healey was born on 31 Mar 1824
James Healey was 8 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
1831
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James Healey was 16 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
1840
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James Healey was 35 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
1859
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James Healey was 37 years old when American Civil War: Fort Sumter surrenders to Confederate forces. The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865. As a result of the long-standing controversy over slavery, war broke out in April 1861, when Confederate forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina, shortly after U.S. President Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated. The nationalists of the Union proclaimed loyalty to the U.S. Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States, who advocated for states' rights to expand slavery.
1861
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James Healey was 51 years old when Winston Churchill, English colonel, journalist, and politician, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1965) Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill was a British politician, army officer, and writer, who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. As Prime Minister, Churchill led Britain to victory in the Second World War. Churchill represented five constituencies during his career as Member of Parliament (MP). Ideologically an economic liberal and British imperialist, he began and ended his parliamentary career as a member of the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955, but for twenty years from 1904 he was a prominent member of the Liberal Party.
1874
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James Healey was 65 years old when The Eiffel Tower is officially opened. The Eiffel Tower is a wrought iron lattice tower on the Champ de Mars in Paris, France. It is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower.
1889
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James Healey was 69 years old when Electrical engineer Nikola Tesla gives the first public demonstration of radio in St. Louis, Missouri. Nikola Tesla was a Serbian American inventor, electrical engineer, mechanical engineer, physicist, and futurist who is best known for his contributions to the design of the modern alternating current (AC) electricity supply system.
1893
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James Healey died on 16 Nov 1907 at the age of 83
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for James Healey (31 Mar 1824 - 16 Nov 1907), BillionGraves Record 1466 Alpine, Utah, Utah, United States

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