James Hood

25 Sep 1862 - 18 Mar 1950

Register

James Hood

25 Sep 1862 - 18 Mar 1950
edit Edit Record
photo Add Images
group_add Add Family
description Add a memory

Read at the Hood family reunion August 15, 1924 at Salt Lake City, Utah. Nicol Hood, son of James Hood and Elizabeth Smith Hood, born November 30, 1828 at Claybarns, Edinburgshire, Scotland. Angelina O’Neil Hood, daughter of Andrew O’Neil (a claim is made that his name is Graham) and Agnes Baird
Register to get full access to the grave site record of James Hood
Terms and Conditions

We want you to know exactly how our service works and why we need your registration in order to allow full access to our records.

terms and conditions

Contact Permissions

We’d like to send you special offers and deals exclusive to BillionGraves users to help your family history research. All emails ​include an unsubscribe link. You ​may opt-out at any time.

close
close
Thanks for registering with BillionGraves.com!
In order to gain full access to this record, please verify your email by opening the welcome email that we just sent to you.
close
Sign up the easy way

Use your facebook account to register with BillionGraves. It will be one less password to remember. You can always add an email and password later.

Loading

Life Information

James Hood

Born:
Died:

Provo City Cemetery

610 S State St
Provo, Utah, Utah
United States
Transcriber

dayle

June 1, 2011
Photographer

Provo City Cemetery

January 1, 1970

Nearby Graves

See more nearby graves
Upgrade to BG+

Find more about James...

We found more records about James Hood.

Grave Site of James

edit

James Hood is buried in the Provo City Cemetery at the location displayed on the map below. This GPS information is ONLY available at BillionGraves. Our technology can help you find the gravesite and other family members buried nearby.

Download the free BillionGraves mobile app for iPhone and Android before you go to the cemetery and it will guide you right to the gravesite.
android Google play phone_iphone App Store

Memories

add

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF FATHER AND MOTHER BY JAMES HOOD

Contributor: dayle Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Read at the Hood family reunion August 15, 1924 at Salt Lake City, Utah. Nicol Hood, son of James Hood and Elizabeth Smith Hood, born November 30, 1828 at Claybarns, Edinburgshire, Scotland. Angelina O’Neil Hood, daughter of Andrew O’Neil (a claim is made that his name is Graham) and Agnes Baird O’Neil, born January 19, 1833 at Calder, Lanarkshire, Scotland. There is little known of Father up until he, at the age of 16 years, had accepted and secretly embraced the Gospel. His parents, on learning this, were very much surprised, his father indignant. Out of this incident his father required him to renounce his new religion or leave the house. He chose the latter and traveled westward in search of employment. There is little of record of Mother up until the time she and Father met, except she and her family members had also accepted the Gospel. Five years or so after Father’s dismissal from home, he had decided on a change in his life, so he “wooed” and won”. On July 15, 1850 they were married by Elder Joseph Claimants. To them were born the following children: Agnes, Elizabeth, Mary, Nicol, Margaret, Andrew, James, Hane, John, William, and Angelina. A few years after their marriage, Father met with a serious accident in a coal pit, by which he was blown almost to pieces. A most remarkable case of healing came to him at this time. His life was despaired, he was so bruised and mangled, that the attending physicians held out now hope. Blood poisoning had already set in. He asked for the Elders, they came and administered to him. The testimony of living witnesses to the writer of this sketch is that as the elders removed their hands from his head the mortified flesh fell from his left shoulder, and that during the sealing of the ordinance it has been testified to, by those taking part in the administration, that they heard his bones grind into their places. Six weeks from the day of this accident he, in company with Mother, walked into the street and were greeted by his attending physician, D. R. Clark. Father was a man of exceeding faith in the Gospel and always had a reverence for the Priesthood. In his testimony of the Gospel he was never known to waver. In a crippled condition—the loss of the left arm and with only two fingers and thumb on the right hand, he reared his family in the midst of poverty. He was given, as an indemnity from the Monkland (?) Iron and Steel Company a life’s position as watchmen at night around the Peep-o-day pit at eleven shillings per weeks with free house and coal. In the midst of these days of poverty he was approached by a committee from the Presbyterian Church of Calderbank where most of their children were born and raised, and offered the Presentorship (Chorister) of the Church, with free house and garden. This was some inducement to a man in his condition and circumstances, for it offered better salary with improved surroundings and better house in which to live. He was gifted with an excellent Baritone voice, was something of a musician and poet and could have filled the position most capable. When told by this committee that to fill this position, it would be necessary for him to renounce his religion and become a member of this Presbyterian Church, his emphatic “never” came with suddenness that it surprised and shocked this pious committee. His greatest sorrow came on March 1, 1874 when Mother from this life to her reward. She had always been by him; in his accident and the subsequent trials that followed; his companion in life, his councilor in trial, the mother of his children, she, who stood by him as only a wife and mother can, was not snatched from him by the hand of death. Agnes, the oldest of 11 children, woman grown; Angelina, the youngest and only a few weeks old. No one of the family will ever forget that day. It was truly a house of mourning. Mother, too, had an unwavering faith in her Redeemer and an abiding testimony of the Gospel. Firm in her conviction of duty, bore her trials without murmur. Her first impulse, to care for her children with a love that was divine. Her outstanding characteristics, patience, kindness and devotion, drew her closer and closer year by year to her friends. She possessed a high sense of morality which enabled her to imbue her children with a legacy of eternal value. No tongue has ever told all the trials they endured while pressing on o the goal of their cherished faith, i.e. to rear their children in fear and admonition of God. They knew little of life’s pleasures other than the joy that comes from a consistent life. They had known to an extreme degree the keenness of hunger, for many times they went without food that the “barnies” might be supplied. They were ever ready and capable in defense of the truth, of firm character and high moral ideals. They taught chastity by being chaste, fidelity by being true to every trust reposed in them. Consistent as Latter-Day Saints, constant in their devotion of its requirements and believed all its laws to be the plan of Redemption. Soon after Mother’s death, Father moved the family to Benhar, Linlithgoshire. Here a branch of the Church was organized and he became its president. As the few remaining months of his life passed, they brought grief and sickness. A stroke necessitated for him to return (? Unreadable) to New (?) Lanarkshire where he too was taken from our lives on the 18th of November 1875 to join his companion. The work of their endowments has been finished; also the sealing of all members of the family (except one) has been accomplished. There are many memories sacred and dear to us, chestering around Calderbank, the Monkland Wool, the Auld Forge Row, the Brae and the Burn. Dear as these memories are to us, there are the forms of those that life made double dear. They are part of us. We live now in the fond hope that they will be ours still throughout eternity. No one of us need let his dead droop in shame for being a descendant of such parents, no one of us but can lift his head in pride for such parents. We are happy in this assurance the Gospel gives, they are ours, we are theirs forever. The older members of the family will recall many of the virtues of these dearest dead. They, too, will recall many incidents and trials that the younger members cannot know, yet we can all recall the songs that were often sung, the admonitions given, the prayers offered, all of which have helped us become what we are. Were our children, or our children’s children to return to our native land, they would learn that Father and Mother came from honorable people and whose names are held in sacred respect. Therefore, the Hood Family Organization can point with a high sense of pride, to its progenitors, and live in the hope and keen anticipation that sometimes, somewhere, in the providences of God we shall meet with them and live with them in peace and eternal progress. 

Poem written by James Hood for Margaret Hood Smith

Contributor: dayle Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

THE PATHWAY OF LIFE To my sister Maggie on her 75th birthday 5 February 1858 to 1933 By James Hood, her brother “Tis a long, long trail you’ve traveled, Sister, Life’s pathway leads always up hill; The burden of life was made light, Sister, You were true to the Master’s will. They who adhere to the Savior’s decree, At the end of life’s trail find victory. In faith you have never faltered, Sister, “Mid the trials of all these years; The steady unseen hand of God, Sister Was brushing aside all the fears. The joy of you faith, ‘neath cumbersome load, Brings bless and reward at the end of life’s road. The love of your home-folks and home, Sister, Is still loyal and warm and true: ‘Twas a power unseen but felt, Sister “Twas God’s way to bring you up through, These same dear home-folks would lighten your load And bless with their love to the end of life’s road. There’s a heart-song throbbing within, sister, “Tis the song of the pure in heart, A life well-spent brings real content, Sister, And a fountain of bliss “twill start. The tiniest rosebud that hangs near a thorn May flush into bloom ere the dawn of morn. At the end of life’s road, as you go, Sister, There are dear ones waiting for you, To welcome you there, and love you, Sister, As in lifetime they used to do. The end of life’s roadway one cannot see, It merges right into eternity.

Life timeline of James Hood

1862
James Hood was born on 25 Sep 1862
James Hood was 17 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
James Hood was 21 years old when Krakatoa begins to erupt; the volcano explodes three months later, killing more than 36,000 people. Krakatoa, or Krakatau, is a volcanic island situated in the Sunda Strait between the islands of Java and Sumatra in the Indonesian province of Lampung. The name is also used for the surrounding island group comprising the remnants of a much larger island of three volcanic peaks which was obliterated in a cataclysmic 1883 eruption.
James Hood was 30 years old when Electrical engineer Nikola Tesla gives the first public demonstration of radio in St. Louis, Missouri. Nikola Tesla was a Serbian American inventor, electrical engineer, mechanical engineer, physicist, and futurist who is best known for his contributions to the design of the modern alternating current (AC) electricity supply system.
James Hood was 41 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
James Hood was 50 years old when The British passenger liner RMS Titanic sinks in the North Atlantic at 2:20 a.m., two hours and forty minutes after hitting an iceberg. Only 710 of 2,227 passengers and crew on board survive. RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early hours of 15 April 1912, after colliding with an iceberg during its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City. There were an estimated 2,224 passengers and crew aboard, and more than 1,500 died, making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history. RMS Titanic was the largest ship afloat at the time it entered service and was the second of three Olympic-class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line. It was built by the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast. Thomas Andrews, her architect, died in the disaster.
James Hood was 67 years old when The New York Stock Exchange crashes in what will be called the Crash of '29 or "Black Tuesday", ending the Great Bull Market of the 1920s and beginning the Great Depression. The New York Stock Exchange, is an American stock exchange located at 11 Wall Street, Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York. It is by far the world's largest stock exchange by market capitalization of its listed companies at US$21.3 trillion as of June 2017. The average daily trading value was approximately US$169 billion in 2013. The NYSE trading floor is located at 11 Wall Street and is composed of 21 rooms used for the facilitation of trading. A fifth trading room, located at 30 Broad Street, was closed in February 2007. The main building and the 11 Wall Street building were designated National Historic Landmarks in 1978.
James Hood was 77 years old when World War II: Nazi Germany and Slovakia invade Poland, beginning the European phase of World War II. World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most global war in history; it directly involved more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. In a state of total war, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.
James Hood was 83 years old when World War II: Hiroshima, Japan is devastated when the atomic bomb "Little Boy" is dropped by the United States B-29 Enola Gay. Around 70,000 people are killed instantly, and some tens of thousands die in subsequent years from burns and radiation poisoning. World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most global war in history; it directly involved more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. In a state of total war, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.
James Hood died on 18 Mar 1950 at the age of 87
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for James Hood (25 Sep 1862 - 18 Mar 1950), BillionGraves Record 6321 Provo, Utah, Utah, United States

Loading