James Backhouse

1819 - 1909

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James Backhouse

1819 - 1909
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Grave site information of James Backhouse (1819 - 1909) at Pleasant Grove City Cemetery in Pleasant Grove, Utah, Utah, United States from BillionGraves

Life Information

James Backhouse

Born:
Died:

Pleasant Grove City Cemetery

301-945 Utah 146
Pleasant Grove, Utah, Utah
United States
Transcriber

danoble1

November 19, 2011
Transcriber

sandyhamilton

August 7, 2012
Photographer

PapaMoose

November 18, 2011

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James Backhouse

Contributor: danoble1 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

As a young boy he became a spinner in one of the cotton mills of the district and was able to earn a very good living as he grew older. He came from a long line of thrifty English people who, for many and years had been outstanding in the textile industry and who were active in the Society of Friends, or Quakers. James was a cotton spinner and a bachelor living at Nova Scotia, Blackburn, Lancaster at the time of his first marriage to Mary Aspinall. The wedding certificate listed his father as William Backhouse, a shoemaker. Mary also lived in Nova Scotia, Blackburn. She was a weaver, a minor and a spinster, whose father, Thomas Aspinall was a bookkeeper. They were married by Jonathan Glide an Independent Minister. James was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints on October 6 1843 by James Araitistant and was a member of the Blackburn Branch Preston Conference. He was ordained an Elder by Thomas Williams on September 16 1983. He was among the first group of Preston Saints to become members of the new faith. He became a very close friend of John Taylor, who in later years became President of the Church, and they worked, ate, and slept together for some time. James and Mary were living at Hopwood Square, Blackburn in 1845 at the birth of their first child, Hannah. Mary died just a few weeks later at age 19. James, as informant to both these events to the registrar, signed his name with an X mark. James married Jane Williams on July 26, 1846. She was received on May 12 1845 into the Blackburn Branch by letter from Burnley where she had been baptized into the Church February 13 1844 by Robert Jackson. Because of English law James and Jane were married in the Parish Church by W. F. Pierson. The marriage certificate listed his father as William Backhouse a cordwainer (same as shoemaker). Jane's father, Samuel Williams, is listed as a cordwainer. The family was assisted by The Perpetual Emigrating Fund Company, so that they might go to Zion to live with the Saints. The family sailed on April 16 1861 on the ship "Manchester" for America. Ages listed: James 42, Jane 38, Mary Alice 12, James 6, John T. 3 and Sarah Jane infant. They took their very best clothes, dishes, and household equipment. They were on the ocean for four or five weeks and finally landed at Castle Gardens, New York in May. The trip from England had been quite an eventful one for the ship they traveled on was a sailing vessel and was not equipped to carry many passengers, but was carrying over 400 on this particular trip. They sailed from Liverpool, being the first ship to travel the Atlantic Ocean from England that year. When the ship reached New York and the passengers were all unloaded, the ship caught fire and burned so that it could never be used again. Mr. Trask was the captain of the ship and David John was the leader of the Latter Day Saint emigrants. Jane was an exceptional bread baker and even on shipboard she had done a good deal of baking. Just before they reached port she baked a large amount of good bread and after they got off the ship she and her husband took a large sack full of this bread and sold it on the street in New York City. When leaving New York they traveled by way of Niagara Falls and were thrilled at the beauty of the Falls. Then on to Nauvoo. Then on to travel on the Mississippi River and then the Missouri River to Florence, Nebraska. There they waited several weeks before they could purchase wagons and oxen to make the long trip to Salt Lake City. When the Backhouse family was ready to begin the trip across the plains, James bought a large tent so that his family might be more comfortably taken care of during the nights. They were well equipped and had good oxen and a very strong wagon in which the smaller children were permitted to ride. Just before the trip with ox teams began, Jane made up a large supply of yeast cakes from hops and cornmeal. Thinking there would be plenty of the same ingredients available when they reached the Salt Lake Valley, she shared the yeast with other emigrants, until there was not enough left for them to finish the journey. Great was her dismay when she found that it was quite impossible to obtain the needed hops and cornmeal for a long time. They came to Utah in the Ira Eldredge Company. As the group of travelers reached the Platte River a great sadness came to the Backhouse family for their baby girl, Sarah Jane, who had been just five weeks old when they left England, became very ill and died. She was buried in a piece of hollowed out log, with only a piece of board from the wagon box for a cover for her crude casket. After their arrival in Salt Lake City they first stayed in a dugout, then rented a one room cabin from George S. Clark, then soon purchased a place of their own and also bought some good farm land. A friend gave them some tomato seeds and these were planted the first year. They produced such a bounteous crop that they were forced to trade tomatoes for other foods. This was not easy to do, as tomatoes were a comparatively new food and not so well liked as they are today. James was very interested in Temple work and sent to England for books that contained genealogy of the Backhouse lines. It is believed that he did baptism for at least 500 names of people that he felt were relatives of his. (A check with Sister Alvira Olpin in Pleasant Grove, who kept Temple records for many years, showed that the baptisms done by James were not done in family groups and since his daughter, Eleanor's, death it is doubtful if his records can be found.) Jane became a fine midwife and helped to bring many children into the world while still caring for her own family. Many friends and neighbors praised her for her willingness to help them to treat her patients with loving kindness, share her goods with others and help, always in a quiet way. They had many hardships and many heartaches, but their faith never wavered, they worked untiringly for the good of their family and the Church, attending all church meetings regularly. Their farm prospered and their children grew and had families of their own. The lives of James and Jane blessed many. Contributed by many family members: Roy Miller, Harold Clark, Suzanna Mae Grua, Mary Alice Ward and others.

James Backhouse and Jane Williams from DUP

Contributor: danoble1 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

James Backhouse, son of William Backhouse and Hannah Parkinson, was born in Rockbridge, Lancastershire, England, Nov 27, 1819. As a young boy he became a spinner in the cotton mills of the district and was able to make a very good living. He came of a long line of thrifty English People who had for years and years been outstanding in the textile industry and in the Society of Friends, or Quakers. However, the Quaker faith did not long satisfy the young, James, for several years before he was married he joined the Latter-day Saints Church and was baptized at Preston, being one of the first persons in Preston to become a member of the new faith. He became a very close friend of John Taylor, who in later years became President of The Church. In 1847 he was married to Jane Williams and they took their residence in Blackburn, Lancaster, England. With the idea of emigrating to America they at once set about to same money for the long journey to Utah and to purchase land when they should finally reach the land of Zion. Jane Williams was the daughter of Samuel Williams and Mary Ann Moss. She was born in Stockport, Lancaster, England on September 30, 1824. Her father served in the Crimean War. In the spring of 1861 James and Jane left their home in Blackburn and taking their children and the best of their clothing and dishes and other household equipment that was practicable to take on so long a journey, sailed for America. They were four or five weeks on the water and landed at Castle Gardens, New York, with the Horace Eldredge Company in May 1861. They boarded a train at new York and traveled to Niagara Falls, which they were permitted to stop and see, and then on to Nauvoo, where they viewed the beautiful Nauvoo temple, which the saints had been forced to abandon. They traveled on both the Missouri and Mississippi rivers in order to reach Florence, Nebraska, where they waited for several weeks for wagons and equipment to begin their trek across the plains. The trip from England was eventful in many ways. Their ocean voyage was made on a sailing vessel the "Manchester", which was not a regular passenger boat and only carried 400 passengers on this trip. the vessel sailed from Liverpool and was the first vessel that started from England that year. This vessel caught fire just after reaching New York and was burned beyond further use. David John, later of Provo, was Captain of the company of Saints on the boat. When they were ready to begin the trip across the plains James purchased a large tent so that his family might be comfortably housed at night. He also had good oxen and wagon but in order for the children to ride it was necessary for him to walk all the long distance and for his wife to walk a greater part of the way. Mary, their eldest child also walked most of the way. She was only thirteen years old. When they reached the Platte River a great sadness overtook them when their baby girl, Sarah Jane, who had been only five weeks old when they left England, became very ill and died. She was buried in a piece of hollowed out log, with a piece of board from their wagon for the cover of the crude casket. When they began their trip with Ox team, Jane made up a large supply of yeast cakes from hops and corn meal. Thinking that there would be plenty of materials to make more when she reached the valley she shared her yeast until there was not enough to finish the journey. Much was her dismay when she found it impossible to obtain more hops and corn meal for a long time. Jane was an exceptional bread maker and even on shipboard she had done a good deal of baking. Just before they landed she baked a large amount and after they got off the ship at New York, she had her husband take a large sack full and go out on the street to see it. After their arrival in Salt Lake they were not long in moving out to Pleasant Grove. Here they stayed in a dugout for one night then moved to a small one room house owned by George S. Clark. They soon moved to a place of their own as they had already arranged for the purchase of some farming ground. Someone gave them some tomato seeds and the first year they raised a bountiful crop of tomatoes but not much else. They were forced to trade tomatoes for other foods. A rather hard thing to do since tomatoes were a new food and not so well liked as now They had may hardships and many heart aches, but their faith never wavered and they worked untiringly for the good of the church and attended all of their meetings regularly. Their farm prospered enough that they were able to bring up their children and also do a great deal of genealogy and temple work. Jane was an excellent mid-wife and her services were constantly in demand in this field, and she always went to her patients willingly. They were ever ready to share their goods with others and to help others at all times, but they did everything in a quiet and kindly way. They were loved by all who knew them. James and Jane were the parents of six children, all of whom were born in Blackburn, except Eleanor, the youngest who was born in Pleasant Grove. The children were Mary Alice, William Orson, James Williams, John Thomas, Sarah Jane, and Eleanor. Jane died at her home in Pleasant Grove July 22, 1898. James died May 16, 1909. They are both buried in Pleasant Grove.

Pioneer Journey - Mary Alice Backhouse at 13

Contributor: danoble1 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Submitted by Linda Burns, 2nd Great Granddaughter Backhouse, James (41) Backhouse, James William (7) Backhouse, Jane Williams (36) Backhouse, John Thomas (3) Backhouse, Mary Alice (13) Backhouse Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847–1868 Born: 27 Nov 1819 Died: 16 May 1909 1861 Ira Eldredge Company Departure: 1 July 1861 Arrival in Salt Lake Valley: 13-15 September 1861 Company Information: 70 wagons were in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post at Florence, Nebraska (now Omaha). The journal of the Eldredge Company makes note of the following: Sarah Jane Backhouse; age 5 months, 8 days; Country: England; Date and Place of Death: 16 Aug. 1861, 70 miles West of Laramie; Nature of Disease: Diarrhea; Name of Father: James Backhouse; Maiden Name of Mother: Jane Williams The James Backhouse family home was in Pleasant Grove, Utah. He was a High Priest, cotton spinner, and farmer. He died May 16, 1909.

History of Eleanor Backhouse Slaugh written by herself and added upon by children.

Contributor: danoble1 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

History of ELEANOR BACKHOUSE SLAUGH Daughter of James and Jane Backhouse of Lancashire, England, Who arrived in America in May 1861~ Written by Leah B8cker And read in the Aberdeen Camp of the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers on May 23, 1941. Jane Williams Backhouse and James Backhouse, my parents, of Lancaster and Lancashire, England, sailed from Liverpool on April 6, 1861 with their four children, two sons-·James and John, and two daughters----Mary and Jane. Jane was' six weeks old when they left Liverpool. While living in Preston, Lancashire, Mormon missionaries had stayed with them. Wilford Woodruff was one of them. They were converted to the faith. Father's folks did not approve of his joining so they came to America; they were six weeks crossing the ocean. Just before reaching New York City, they passed the “Big Western", a ship that laid the Atlantic cable. Their boat seemed like a small tug-boat at the side of the big ship. From New York, they went by boat and train to Florence, which is now Omaha, Nebraska. Here they found it was necessary to wait until a wagon train was ready to leave. From Independence, Missouri, they crossed the plains by ox-team. John Holman was captain of the company. Father walked most of the way. He swam the Platte River when they came to it. The baby Jane died while crossing the plains. A log was hollowed out and her body put in it; and then it was buried and covered with rocks so that the coyotes couldn't get in. This place was called Rocky Point. They arrived in what is now Pleasant Grove, Utah, on September 19, 1861, and lived in a log house with a mud roof. Father worked on farms while mother was a mid-wife. Later, they did a great deal of Temple work in Manti and Salt Lake Temples. I was born on October 6, 1862. The first thing that I remember was mother sewing by the fireside and spinning yarn to make clothes. All our clothes were made of homespun material. We did all the cooking in a fireplace until 1871 when Father took a load of hay to Salt Lake City and brought back a stove. We were very proud of it and kept it shined all the time. Shortly after this, we built a new three-room log house. I helped Mother dip candles many times. Every scrap of grease and tallow was carefully saved for making candles. When we couldn't get candle-molds, we had to dip them by hand. I enjoyed doing it very much and thought it great fun. When I was six, Father bought eight acres of land one mile from town; and in 1869, we moved on to it. Just a quarter-mile south of our home was an Indian camp of the Ute tribe. They often came to beg for fruit, meat, vegetables, grain, or anything they saw and wanted. They were friendly to all of us because Father always gave them what they asked for. This wasn't true with the other settlers, though; for the Indians stole from some of them. At one time, they were on the warpath for days and days. I was terribly frightened and none of us slept much. They were going to war against the Blackfoot Indians whose camp was at a point on the Bear River near what is now Malad, Idaho. Little Chief, the leader of the Ute tribe, had married a Blackfoot princess; and they had a three-year-old son at the time of battle. His tribe did not approve of his marriage so the Utes came to Bear River to fight. Little Chief was wounded and died on the way back to Pleasant Grove. All through the night they pow-wowed. We stayed up all night because we were afraid there would be another fight here. Next morning, they took the body of Little Chief up on the mountains below what is known as Timpanogas, and he was buried. That day an old squaw told mother that he was her son and that one of the Indians had taken the little boy and broken his back over his knee. She was crying very hard, and mother tried to comfort her as best she could. A few nights later, the tribe left and returned to the Reservation. Only a few came back from time to time to beg. Then came the grasshoppers. They took everything in their path. Father and the boys hauled straw and spread it along the ditch banks. Mother and I then went through the grain with ropes and chased them on to the ditch banks. At night they set fire to the straw and burned the grasshoppers. That year we saved forty bushels of wheat, and were surely thankful. Potatoes were so scarce that we had to peel them very thick, and then save the peelings to plant. I went to school in a little one-room house in Stringtown, which is now Linden. There ware six other pupils beside myself. The teacher, Susannah Wooley, always let us out to watch the stage coach go by which took men to the Pioche mines in Nevada. They used to water their horses at the schoolhouse since there was not any more water for ten miles. We used to have really good times playing together at school. Our spelling matches used to be the most fun. One day the teacher asked who could spell stovepipe. Mamie Slaugh was the only one who raised her hand. She strutted up to the front as big as could be and spelled s-q-u-o-v-e~s-q-u-i-p-e. The schoolroom was in an uproar so school was dismissed. It was her father and brother who in fun had told her that was how it was spelled. I was very fond of reading and read every book that I could get. Life was very enjoyable. Both the young and the old shared in the fun. When I was about ten years old, I can remember going on a Sunday School Excursion on Brigham Young’s birthday, June the first. The railroad had been built as far south as Lehi. The Sunday Schools from Pleasant Grove and American Fork rode in wagons to Lehi. Then the three Sunday Schools took the train to the Tabernacle in Salt lake City. There was a program and at noon they gave us all a bun. The afternoon was spent in the theatre where we saw a stage play of "Aladdin and His Wonderful 1amp". We then returned to the train and were taken back home, tired but happy. October 7, 1879, at the age of seventeen, I was married to John Henry Slaugh also of Pleasant Grove. I am the mother of nine children: Jennie, Eleanor, Nettie Frank, William, Gertrude, and Albert who lived to maturity and Pearle and James who died in infancy. Eight years after our marriage, we moved to Ashley Valley which was just being settled at that time. It was a wild country. The soldiers, cowboys, and Indians Were always having trouble. We lived at Naples for four years. John worked on the canal being built from the Ashley River to Naples. I was set apart as a teacher in the Sunday School soon after it was started. The climate here in the Valley wasn't right and the water it was terrible. As a result, there was a good deal of sickness in the family. My stay in Naples wasn't very pleasant, and I was glad to get back to Linden. John played the violin at all the dances and plays. We surely had some good times. For a while we had apple-cuttings, hayrides, corn shucking ,’s which ended in square dancing. We also had quilting’s with picnics afterward. Mother had a stroke, and I went to take care of her. She was still living on the old homestead. She passed away in July 1898. I was kept very busy taking care of my family, cooking, cutting and drying fruit, sewing, and washing. This didn't leave much time for pleasure. Father was an invalid forty-two years, and I had to care for him. He was almost ninety years old when he died on May 16, 1908. I was set apart as a teacher in the Relief Society in 1905 by Bishop Olpin; and I worked at that until October 1919. All the children except one were married by then and had families of their own. Some of the children came home for $Christmas in December 1918. The First World War had just ended, and the first flu epidemic broke out. It was so terribly bad, and we didn't have the medicine to treat it. There were nine out of every ten people who died with it. Six of my family were ill with it at once" I was all-alone, and no one would dare come in to help. John died on January 6, 1919 from this flu. I then came to Idaho to live with my two sons, William and Albert. We enjoyed many fishing trips together. I also made my first trip through Yellowstone Park while living with them. My eldest daughter Jennie Has married on March 27, 1900 to L. H. Phillips. They came to Idaho and raised a family of six Children. On May 15,1905, Eleanor became Mrs. J. H. Tomlinson. They reside in Pleasant Grove on the old Homestead. They had seven Children. In the fall of 1905, Nettie married Elias Phillips and they had six children. Elias died with the flu in 1919. In 1915, Frank married Rosins Richins of Pleasant Grove, and they made their home in Aberdeen until her death. They had two children and also adopted one. The eldest, a boy, died in April 1938. Frank was married on July 25, 1935, to Mrs. Pearl Clinger, a widow with five children. Three children have been born with two living. William and Lillian Millions of American Falls, Idaho, were married on September 4, 1926. They have one child. Gertrude became Mrs. Gus Becker on November 26, 1917, and they are parents of six children with one dead. Albert was married in November 1936 to Lillian Snow Jones who had three children by a previous marriage. They had two children. All of my children except Eleanor live in Aberdeen. I have thirty-eight grandchildren, thirty-five living; and fifty-two great grandchildren, forty-seven living. In August of 1932, Harvey and Jennie took me back to Ashley Valley to visit. Lots of the old friends are still there, and the valley hasn't changed much at all. Many of the buildings we helped to build are still in use. It was very dry and there was very little water. They had to haul water quite a long ways. John’s brother Ben is still living there, and most of his folks that are living are still there. His sister, Mame Slaugh Fage, is now living in Linden. She is eighty years old. After the death of my eldest daughter1s husband in 1939, I went to live with Jennie. I have enjoyed very good health until the last two years during which time I have been ailing& I have taken quite an interest in the Relief Society and Daughters of the Pioneers Organization. My history is the first one of the Aberdeen Camp of the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers to be sent in and registered. I am now seventy-eight years old and still have the old homestead at Pleasant Grove. I spend most of my time in Idaho enjoying my married children and their families. Signed by Eleanor Backhouse Slaugh (The following information has been added by the children and grandchildren of Eleanor Backhouse Slaugh.) Grandmother used to take care of women when they were confined after having a baby. She would stay ten days with the family taking complete care of them. She was usually paid in something other than money. Grandmother's life for the next few years was busy and happy. She and her daughter Jennie moved into the town of Aberdeen in a large white frame house on ________. Here they kept busy making rugs on a loom and piecing together lovely quilts by the hour. Grandmother and Aunt Jennie loved to put Jigsaw puzzles together. They would spend hours at it. They used to put the wash water on to heat, and would get so interested in the puzzle that the water would get cold so they would heat it again. Again it would get cold so they would finally put the washing off until the next day. Their homo was the center of the family meetings. Everyone had to go to town to shop and would find it most convenient to stop and visit awhile at their home. Should it be near mealtime there was always something handy to be prepared into a tasty lunch or dinner. You were always welcome. Grandmother was an avid reader of books and magazines and always took a newspaper from which she kept up on all local and world affairs. She was most interesting to talk with because she was so well read. She had a good memory and could tell of events and happenings in her life and that or her family for hours at a time. In the summer of 1945 she and Jennie went back to Pleasant Grove to visit her daughter Ella and family. It was strawberry time, and how they enjoyed the luscious fruit. They had a wonderful visit with relatives and old friends. In the fall of that year Jennie became very ill. Grandmother took over the complete running of the home and helped care for her daughter until she passed away in March of the following year. The next years of her life she spent living with first one of her children and then another. After spending some time with her son William, she went to live with Gertrude and it was here that she suffered a stroke from which she never fully recovered. The next few years her widowed daughter Nettie took care of her. Even though she could not get around any more her mind was still sharp and active, and she remained cheerful. She was always so happy to have you call for a visit. Her family wa all very good to call. Later she was taken back to Pleasant Grove to make her home with her daughter Ella, and her husband who had purchased the old Slaugh home place and had built a new home there. Here she suffered another stroke and passed away quietly on the 11th of May 1952. She was laid to rest in the Pleasant Grove Cemetery beside her husband. In her passing she gained a well earned rest after living a most active and fruitful life. She left behind a large posterity who loved and respected her memory..

James Backhouse

Contributor: sandyhamilton Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

As a young boy he became a spinner in one of the cotton mills of the district and was able to earn a very good living as he grew older. He came from a long line of thrifty English people who, for many and years had been outstanding in the textile industry and who were active in the Society of Friends, or Quakers. James was a cotton spinner and a bachelor living at Nova Scotia, Blackburn, Lancaster at the time of his first marriage to Mary Aspinall. The wedding certificate listed his father as William Backhouse, a shoemaker. Mary also lived in Nova Scotia, Blackburn. She was a weaver, a minor and a spinster, whose father, Thomas Aspinall was a bookkeeper. They were married by Jonathan Glide an Independent Minister. James was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints on October 6 1843 by James Araitistant and was a member of the Blackburn Branch Preston Conference. He was ordained an Elder by Thomas Williams on September 16 1983. He was among the first group of Preston Saints to become members of the new faith. He became a very close friend of John Taylor, who in later years became President of the Church, and they worked, ate, and slept together for some time. James and Mary were living at Hopwood Square, Blackburn in 1845 at the birth of their first child, Hannah. Mary died just a few weeks later at age 19. James, as informant to both these events to the registrar, signed his name with an X mark. James married Jane Williams on July 26, 1846. She was received on May 12 1845 into the Blackburn Branch by letter from Burnley where she had been baptized into the Church February 13 1844 by Robert Jackson. Because of English law James and Jane were married in the Parish Church by W. F. Pierson. The marriage certificate listed his father as William Backhouse a cordwainer (same as shoemaker). Jane's father, Samuel Williams, is listed as a cordwainer. The family was assisted by The Perpetual Emigrating Fund Company, so that they might go to Zion to live with the Saints. The family sailed on April 16 1861 on the ship "Manchester" for America. Ages listed: James 42, Jane 38, Mary Alice 12, James 6, John T. 3 and Sarah Jane infant. They took their very best clothes, dishes, and household equipment. They were on the ocean for four or five weeks and finally landed at Castle Gardens, New York in May. The trip from England had been quite an eventful one for the ship they traveled on was a sailing vessel and was not equipped to carry many passengers, but was carrying over 400 on this particular trip. They sailed from Liverpool, being the first ship to travel the Atlantic Ocean from England that year. When the ship reached New York and the passengers were all unloaded, the ship caught fire and burned so that it could never be used again. Mr. Trask was the captain of the ship and David John was the leader of the Latter Day Saint emigrants. Jane was an exceptional bread baker and even on shipboard she had done a good deal of baking. Just before they reached port she baked a large amount of good bread and after they got off the ship she and her husband took a large sack full of this bread and sold it on the street in New York City. When leaving New York they traveled by way of Niagara Falls and were thrilled at the beauty of the Falls. Then on to Nauvoo. Then on to travel on the Mississippi River and then the Missouri River to Florence, Nebraska. There they waited several weeks before they could purchase wagons and oxen to make the long trip to Salt Lake City. When the Backhouse family was ready to begin the trip across the plains, James bought a large tent so that his family might be more comfortably taken care of during the nights. They were well equipped and had good oxen and a very strong wagon in which the smaller children were permitted to ride. Just before the trip with ox teams began, Jane made up a large supply of yeast cakes from hops and cornmeal. Thinking there would be plenty of the same ingredients available when they reached the Salt Lake Valley, she shared the yeast with other emigrants, until there was not enough left for them to finish the journey. Great was her dismay when she found that it was quite impossible to obtain the needed hops and cornmeal for a long time. They came to Utah in the Ira Eldredge Company. As the group of travelers reached the Platte River a great sadness came to the Backhouse family for their baby girl, Sarah Jane, who had been just five weeks old when they left England, became very ill and died. She was buried in a piece of hollowed out log, with only a piece of board from the wagon box for a cover for her crude casket. After their arrival in Salt Lake City they first stayed in a dugout, then rented a one room cabin from George S. Clark, then soon purchased a place of their own and also bought some good farm land. A friend gave them some tomato seeds and these were planted the first year. They produced such a bounteous crop that they were forced to trade tomatoes for other foods. This was not easy to do, as tomatoes were a comparatively new food and not so well liked as they are today. James was very interested in Temple work and sent to England for books that contained genealogy of the Backhouse lines. It is believed that he did baptism for at least 500 names of people that he felt were relatives of his. (A check with Sister Alvira Olpin in Pleasant Grove, who kept Temple records for many years, showed that the baptisms done by James were not done in family groups and since his daughter, Eleanor's, death it is doubtful if his records can be found.) Jane became a fine midwife and helped to bring many children into the world while still caring for her own family. Many friends and neighbors praised her for her willingness to help them to treat her patients with loving kindness, share her goods with others and help, always in a quiet way. They had many hardships and many heartaches, but their faith never wavered, they worked untiringly for the good of their family and the Church, attending all church meetings regularly. Their farm prospered and their children grew and had families of their own. The lives of James and Jane blessed many. Contributed by many family members: Roy Miller, Harold Clark, Suzanna Mae Grua, Mary Alice Ward and others.

James Backhouse and Jane Williams from DUP

Contributor: sandyhamilton Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

James Backhouse, son of William Backhouse and Hannah Parkinson, was born in Rockbridge, Lancastershire, England, Nov 27, 1819. As a young boy he became a spinner in the cotton mills of the district and was able to make a very good living. He came of a long line of thrifty English People who had for years and years been outstanding in the textile industry and in the Society of Friends, or Quakers. However, the Quaker faith did not long satisfy the young, James, for several years before he was married he joined the Latter-day Saints Church and was baptized at Preston, being one of the first persons in Preston to become a member of the new faith. He became a very close friend of John Taylor, who in later years became President of The Church. In 1847 he was married to Jane Williams and they took their residence in Blackburn, Lancaster, England. With the idea of emigrating to America they at once set about to same money for the long journey to Utah and to purchase land when they should finally reach the land of Zion. Jane Williams was the daughter of Samuel Williams and Mary Ann Moss. She was born in Stockport, Lancaster, England on September 30, 1824. Her father served in the Crimean War. In the spring of 1861 James and Jane left their home in Blackburn and taking their children and the best of their clothing and dishes and other household equipment that was practicable to take on so long a journey, sailed for America. They were four or five weeks on the water and landed at Castle Gardens, New York, with the Horace Eldredge Company in May 1861. They boarded a train at new York and traveled to Niagara Falls, which they were permitted to stop and see, and then on to Nauvoo, where they viewed the beautiful Nauvoo temple, which the saints had been forced to abandon. They traveled on both the Missouri and Mississippi rivers in order to reach Florence, Nebraska, where they waited for several weeks for wagons and equipment to begin their trek across the plains. The trip from England was eventful in many ways. Their ocean voyage was made on a sailing vessel the "Manchester", which was not a regular passenger boat and only carried 400 passengers on this trip. the vessel sailed from Liverpool and was the first vessel that started from England that year. This vessel caught fire just after reaching New York and was burned beyond further use. David John, later of Provo, was Captain of the company of Saints on the boat. When they were ready to begin the trip across the plains James purchased a large tent so that his family might be comfortably housed at night. He also had good oxen and wagon but in order for the children to ride it was necessary for him to walk all the long distance and for his wife to walk a greater part of the way. Mary, their eldest child also walked most of the way. She was only thirteen years old. When they reached the Platte River a great sadness overtook them when their baby girl, Sarah Jane, who had been only five weeks old when they left England, became very ill and died. She was buried in a piece of hollowed out log, with a piece of board from their wagon for the cover of the crude casket. When they began their trip with Ox team, Jane made up a large supply of yeast cakes from hops and corn meal. Thinking that there would be plenty of materials to make more when she reached the valley she shared her yeast until there was not enough to finish the journey. Much was her dismay when she found it impossible to obtain more hops and corn meal for a long time. Jane was an exceptional bread maker and even on shipboard she had done a good deal of baking. Just before they landed she baked a large amount and after they got off the ship at New York, she had her husband take a large sack full and go out on the street to see it. After their arrival in Salt Lake they were not long in moving out to Pleasant Grove. Here they stayed in a dugout for one night then moved to a small one room house owned by George S. Clark. They soon moved to a place of their own as they had already arranged for the purchase of some farming ground. Someone gave them some tomato seeds and the first year they raised a bountiful crop of tomatoes but not much else. They were forced to trade tomatoes for other foods. A rather hard thing to do since tomatoes were a new food and not so well liked as now They had may hardships and many heart aches, but their faith never wavered and they worked untiringly for the good of the church and attended all of their meetings regularly. Their farm prospered enough that they were able to bring up their children and also do a great deal of genealogy and temple work. Jane was an excellent mid-wife and her services were constantly in demand in this field, and she always went to her patients willingly. They were ever ready to share their goods with others and to help others at all times, but they did everything in a quiet and kindly way. They were loved by all who knew them. James and Jane were the parents of six children, all of whom were born in Blackburn, except Eleanor, the youngest who was born in Pleasant Grove. The children were Mary Alice, William Orson, James Williams, John Thomas, Sarah Jane, and Eleanor. Jane died at her home in Pleasant Grove July 22, 1898. James died May 16, 1909. They are both buried in Pleasant Grove.

Pioneer Journey - Mary Alice Backhouse at 13

Contributor: sandyhamilton Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

Submitted by Linda Burns, 2nd Great Granddaughter Backhouse, James (41) Backhouse, James William (7) Backhouse, Jane Williams (36) Backhouse, John Thomas (3) Backhouse, Mary Alice (13) Backhouse Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847–1868 Born: 27 Nov 1819 Died: 16 May 1909 1861 Ira Eldredge Company Departure: 1 July 1861 Arrival in Salt Lake Valley: 13-15 September 1861 Company Information: 70 wagons were in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post at Florence, Nebraska (now Omaha). The journal of the Eldredge Company makes note of the following: Sarah Jane Backhouse; age 5 months, 8 days; Country: England; Date and Place of Death: 16 Aug. 1861, 70 miles West of Laramie; Nature of Disease: Diarrhea; Name of Father: James Backhouse; Maiden Name of Mother: Jane Williams The James Backhouse family home was in Pleasant Grove, Utah. He was a High Priest, cotton spinner, and farmer. He died May 16, 1909.

History of Eleanor Backhouse Slaugh written by herself and added upon by children.

Contributor: sandyhamilton Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

History of ELEANOR BACKHOUSE SLAUGH Daughter of James and Jane Backhouse of Lancashire, England, Who arrived in America in May 1861~ Written by Leah B8cker And read in the Aberdeen Camp of the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers on May 23, 1941. Jane Williams Backhouse and James Backhouse, my parents, of Lancaster and Lancashire, England, sailed from Liverpool on April 6, 1861 with their four children, two sons-·James and John, and two daughters----Mary and Jane. Jane was' six weeks old when they left Liverpool. While living in Preston, Lancashire, Mormon missionaries had stayed with them. Wilford Woodruff was one of them. They were converted to the faith. Father's folks did not approve of his joining so they came to America; they were six weeks crossing the ocean. Just before reaching New York City, they passed the “Big Western", a ship that laid the Atlantic cable. Their boat seemed like a small tug-boat at the side of the big ship. From New York, they went by boat and train to Florence, which is now Omaha, Nebraska. Here they found it was necessary to wait until a wagon train was ready to leave. From Independence, Missouri, they crossed the plains by ox-team. John Holman was captain of the company. Father walked most of the way. He swam the Platte River when they came to it. The baby Jane died while crossing the plains. A log was hollowed out and her body put in it; and then it was buried and covered with rocks so that the coyotes couldn't get in. This place was called Rocky Point. They arrived in what is now Pleasant Grove, Utah, on September 19, 1861, and lived in a log house with a mud roof. Father worked on farms while mother was a mid-wife. Later, they did a great deal of Temple work in Manti and Salt Lake Temples. I was born on October 6, 1862. The first thing that I remember was mother sewing by the fireside and spinning yarn to make clothes. All our clothes were made of homespun material. We did all the cooking in a fireplace until 1871 when Father took a load of hay to Salt Lake City and brought back a stove. We were very proud of it and kept it shined all the time. Shortly after this, we built a new three-room log house. I helped Mother dip candles many times. Every scrap of grease and tallow was carefully saved for making candles. When we couldn't get candle-molds, we had to dip them by hand. I enjoyed doing it very much and thought it great fun. When I was six, Father bought eight acres of land one mile from town; and in 1869, we moved on to it. Just a quarter-mile south of our home was an Indian camp of the Ute tribe. They often came to beg for fruit, meat, vegetables, grain, or anything they saw and wanted. They were friendly to all of us because Father always gave them what they asked for. This wasn't true with the other settlers, though; for the Indians stole from some of them. At one time, they were on the warpath for days and days. I was terribly frightened and none of us slept much. They were going to war against the Blackfoot Indians whose camp was at a point on the Bear River near what is now Malad, Idaho. Little Chief, the leader of the Ute tribe, had married a Blackfoot princess; and they had a three-year-old son at the time of battle. His tribe did not approve of his marriage so the Utes came to Bear River to fight. Little Chief was wounded and died on the way back to Pleasant Grove. All through the night they pow-wowed. We stayed up all night because we were afraid there would be another fight here. Next morning, they took the body of Little Chief up on the mountains below what is known as Timpanogas, and he was buried. That day an old squaw told mother that he was her son and that one of the Indians had taken the little boy and broken his back over his knee. She was crying very hard, and mother tried to comfort her as best she could. A few nights later, the tribe left and returned to the Reservation. Only a few came back from time to time to beg. Then came the grasshoppers. They took everything in their path. Father and the boys hauled straw and spread it along the ditch banks. Mother and I then went through the grain with ropes and chased them on to the ditch banks. At night they set fire to the straw and burned the grasshoppers. That year we saved forty bushels of wheat, and were surely thankful. Potatoes were so scarce that we had to peel them very thick, and then save the peelings to plant. I went to school in a little one-room house in Stringtown, which is now Linden. There ware six other pupils beside myself. The teacher, Susannah Wooley, always let us out to watch the stage coach go by which took men to the Pioche mines in Nevada. They used to water their horses at the schoolhouse since there was not any more water for ten miles. We used to have really good times playing together at school. Our spelling matches used to be the most fun. One day the teacher asked who could spell stovepipe. Mamie Slaugh was the only one who raised her hand. She strutted up to the front as big as could be and spelled s-q-u-o-v-e~s-q-u-i-p-e. The schoolroom was in an uproar so school was dismissed. It was her father and brother who in fun had told her that was how it was spelled. I was very fond of reading and read every book that I could get. Life was very enjoyable. Both the young and the old shared in the fun. When I was about ten years old, I can remember going on a Sunday School Excursion on Brigham Young’s birthday, June the first. The railroad had been built as far south as Lehi. The Sunday Schools from Pleasant Grove and American Fork rode in wagons to Lehi. Then the three Sunday Schools took the train to the Tabernacle in Salt lake City. There was a program and at noon they gave us all a bun. The afternoon was spent in the theatre where we saw a stage play of "Aladdin and His Wonderful 1amp". We then returned to the train and were taken back home, tired but happy. October 7, 1879, at the age of seventeen, I was married to John Henry Slaugh also of Pleasant Grove. I am the mother of nine children: Jennie, Eleanor, Nettie Frank, William, Gertrude, and Albert who lived to maturity and Pearle and James who died in infancy. Eight years after our marriage, we moved to Ashley Valley which was just being settled at that time. It was a wild country. The soldiers, cowboys, and Indians Were always having trouble. We lived at Naples for four years. John worked on the canal being built from the Ashley River to Naples. I was set apart as a teacher in the Sunday School soon after it was started. The climate here in the Valley wasn't right and the water it was terrible. As a result, there was a good deal of sickness in the family. My stay in Naples wasn't very pleasant, and I was glad to get back to Linden. John played the violin at all the dances and plays. We surely had some good times. For a while we had apple-cuttings, hayrides, corn shucking ,’s which ended in square dancing. We also had quilting’s with picnics afterward. Mother had a stroke, and I went to take care of her. She was still living on the old homestead. She passed away in July 1898. I was kept very busy taking care of my family, cooking, cutting and drying fruit, sewing, and washing. This didn't leave much time for pleasure. Father was an invalid forty-two years, and I had to care for him. He was almost ninety years old when he died on May 16, 1908. I was set apart as a teacher in the Relief Society in 1905 by Bishop Olpin; and I worked at that until October 1919. All the children except one were married by then and had families of their own. Some of the children came home for $Christmas in December 1918. The First World War had just ended, and the first flu epidemic broke out. It was so terribly bad, and we didn't have the medicine to treat it. There were nine out of every ten people who died with it. Six of my family were ill with it at once" I was all-alone, and no one would dare come in to help. John died on January 6, 1919 from this flu. I then came to Idaho to live with my two sons, William and Albert. We enjoyed many fishing trips together. I also made my first trip through Yellowstone Park while living with them. My eldest daughter Jennie Has married on March 27, 1900 to L. H. Phillips. They came to Idaho and raised a family of six Children. On May 15,1905, Eleanor became Mrs. J. H. Tomlinson. They reside in Pleasant Grove on the old Homestead. They had seven Children. In the fall of 1905, Nettie married Elias Phillips and they had six children. Elias died with the flu in 1919. In 1915, Frank married Rosins Richins of Pleasant Grove, and they made their home in Aberdeen until her death. They had two children and also adopted one. The eldest, a boy, died in April 1938. Frank was married on July 25, 1935, to Mrs. Pearl Clinger, a widow with five children. Three children have been born with two living. William and Lillian Millions of American Falls, Idaho, were married on September 4, 1926. They have one child. Gertrude became Mrs. Gus Becker on November 26, 1917, and they are parents of six children with one dead. Albert was married in November 1936 to Lillian Snow Jones who had three children by a previous marriage. They had two children. All of my children except Eleanor live in Aberdeen. I have thirty-eight grandchildren, thirty-five living; and fifty-two great grandchildren, forty-seven living. In August of 1932, Harvey and Jennie took me back to Ashley Valley to visit. Lots of the old friends are still there, and the valley hasn't changed much at all. Many of the buildings we helped to build are still in use. It was very dry and there was very little water. They had to haul water quite a long ways. John’s brother Ben is still living there, and most of his folks that are living are still there. His sister, Mame Slaugh Fage, is now living in Linden. She is eighty years old. After the death of my eldest daughter1s husband in 1939, I went to live with Jennie. I have enjoyed very good health until the last two years during which time I have been ailing& I have taken quite an interest in the Relief Society and Daughters of the Pioneers Organization. My history is the first one of the Aberdeen Camp of the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers to be sent in and registered. I am now seventy-eight years old and still have the old homestead at Pleasant Grove. I spend most of my time in Idaho enjoying my married children and their families. Signed by Eleanor Backhouse Slaugh (The following information has been added by the children and grandchildren of Eleanor Backhouse Slaugh.) Grandmother used to take care of women when they were confined after having a baby. She would stay ten days with the family taking complete care of them. She was usually paid in something other than money. Grandmother's life for the next few years was busy and happy. She and her daughter Jennie moved into the town of Aberdeen in a large white frame house on ________. Here they kept busy making rugs on a loom and piecing together lovely quilts by the hour. Grandmother and Aunt Jennie loved to put Jigsaw puzzles together. They would spend hours at it. They used to put the wash water on to heat, and would get so interested in the puzzle that the water would get cold so they would heat it again. Again it would get cold so they would finally put the washing off until the next day. Their homo was the center of the family meetings. Everyone had to go to town to shop and would find it most convenient to stop and visit awhile at their home. Should it be near mealtime there was always something handy to be prepared into a tasty lunch or dinner. You were always welcome. Grandmother was an avid reader of books and magazines and always took a newspaper from which she kept up on all local and world affairs. She was most interesting to talk with because she was so well read. She had a good memory and could tell of events and happenings in her life and that or her family for hours at a time. In the summer of 1945 she and Jennie went back to Pleasant Grove to visit her daughter Ella and family. It was strawberry time, and how they enjoyed the luscious fruit. They had a wonderful visit with relatives and old friends. In the fall of that year Jennie became very ill. Grandmother took over the complete running of the home and helped care for her daughter until she passed away in March of the following year. The next years of her life she spent living with first one of her children and then another. After spending some time with her son William, she went to live with Gertrude and it was here that she suffered a stroke from which she never fully recovered. The next few years her widowed daughter Nettie took care of her. Even though she could not get around any more her mind was still sharp and active, and she remained cheerful. She was always so happy to have you call for a visit. Her family wa all very good to call. Later she was taken back to Pleasant Grove to make her home with her daughter Ella, and her husband who had purchased the old Slaugh home place and had built a new home there. Here she suffered another stroke and passed away quietly on the 11th of May 1952. She was laid to rest in the Pleasant Grove Cemetery beside her husband. In her passing she gained a well earned rest after living a most active and fruitful life. She left behind a large posterity who loved and respected her memory..

Life timeline of James Backhouse

1819
James Backhouse was born in 1819
James Backhouse was 6 years old when The Erie Canal opens: Passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie. The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System. Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.
James Backhouse was 12 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
James Backhouse was 21 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
James Backhouse was 40 years old when Charles Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
James Backhouse was 42 years old when American Civil War: Fort Sumter surrenders to Confederate forces. The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865. As a result of the long-standing controversy over slavery, war broke out in April 1861, when Confederate forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina, shortly after U.S. President Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated. The nationalists of the Union proclaimed loyalty to the U.S. Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States, who advocated for states' rights to expand slavery.
James Backhouse was 58 years old when Thomas Edison announces his invention of the phonograph, a machine that can record and play sound. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
James Backhouse was 64 years old when Krakatoa begins to erupt; the volcano explodes three months later, killing more than 36,000 people. Krakatoa, or Krakatau, is a volcanic island situated in the Sunda Strait between the islands of Java and Sumatra in the Indonesian province of Lampung. The name is also used for the surrounding island group comprising the remnants of a much larger island of three volcanic peaks which was obliterated in a cataclysmic 1883 eruption.
James Backhouse was 72 years old when Thomas Edison patents the motion picture camera. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
James Backhouse died in 1909 at the age of 90
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for James Backhouse (1819 - 1909), BillionGraves Record 410226 Pleasant Grove, Utah, Utah, United States

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