James A. Loveless

Jul 1853 - 7 Feb 1924

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James A. Loveless

Jul 1853 - 7 Feb 1924
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Grave site information of James A. Loveless (Jul 1853 - 7 Feb 1924) at Provo City Cemetery in Provo, Utah, Utah, United States from BillionGraves
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Life Information

James A. Loveless

Born:
Died:

Provo City Cemetery

610 S State St
Provo, Utah, Utah
United States
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SharonLavashHawkins

May 29, 2011
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GraveScavenger

May 29, 2011

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James A Loveless a Short Biography

Contributor: SharonLavashHawkins Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

An Excerpt from, “Portrait, Genealogical and Biographical Record of the State of Utah, Containing Biographies of Many Well Known Citizens of the Past and Present.” National Historical Record Co., Chicago, 1902.JAMES A. LOVELESS, a native son of Provo and a life-long citizen of this place, born July 19, 1853. He is the son of Bishop James W. and Matilda (McClellan) Loveless. Bishop Loveless came from an old Ohio family, being born in that State December 23, 1828, and his father, John, a native of Fairfield County, where he was a well-to-do farmer. When the Bishop was but a year old his father moved to Fountain County, Indiana, locating on a farm on the Wabash River, and there he and his family later became converts to the teachings of the Mormon religion and were baptized by Solomon Hancock. John Loveless became a teacher in the branch Church organized in his community, and from that position was promoted to be a Priest. He was ordained an Elder March 28, 1832, and assisted in establishing another branch Church thirty miles from his home, presiding over the two branches for several months, when he was sent back to Ohio on a mission. In 1833 he was made President of the Ohio branch, and led the Saints into Jackson County, Missouri. After the Mormons had been driven out by the mob, Mr. Loveless went to Lafayette County, Missouri, where he remained until 1837, and then moved to Caldwell County, the same State, where the Saints were gathering. In the fall of 1838 they were again attacked by a mob and Mr. Loveless was compelled to sign over all his property to the mob. He went to Adams County, Illinois, where he followed farming for two years and from there to Hancock County. In the spring of 1844 he was sent on another mission to Ohio, starting home on hearing of the trouble brewing in Nauvoo, but did not reach there until after the death of the Prophet. In 1845, while he was again absent from home his place was destroyed by the mob, who set fire to the house and his family were compelled to flee to the woods for safety. He moved his family to Nauvoo and took part in all the trouble that followed in that place. When the Saints left Nauvoo he was one of the Quorum that went to the Temple to invoke the Divine blessing upon the people. April 27, 1846 he went to Council Bluffs, and there witnessed the forming of the famous Mormon Battalion. He later settled on a farm seven miles from Winter Quarters, and remained there until he crossed the plains to Utah in 1851, arriving in Salt Lake Valley September 15111 of that year. He first settled on the Jordan River, then at Provo, and from there went to Payson, where he died.Our subject's father, James W., remained with his father up to the time he arrived in Utah and was twenty-four years of age when he crossed the plains. He located in Provo and made his home in this place the rest of his life, living in the city and having a farm in the Second Ward. He became a prominent man in public life, occupying a seat on the City Council for a number of years, and also filling various other offices. He was a member of the Territorial Militia, in which he held the rank of Major, and took an active part in the Walker and Black Hawk wars; was a member of the Black Hawk War Veterans Association. He was associated with the management of the Second Ward for more than thirty years, fifteen years of which he was Bishop. Mr. Loveless believed firmly in the doctrines and teachings of his Church, especially the doctrine of polygamy, and in accordance with that belief married three women and reared a family of thirty-six children, many of whom are well and favorably known in Utah County. He died in 1888, at the age of sixty years.James A., our subject, was the third child in a family of ten, of whom eight are now living— Mrs. Noel Knight, deceased; Mrs. S. S. Bailey, our subject, Sarah, now Mrs. Jenkins, living in Idaho ; Mrs. James Gray, of Provo ; Mrs. Conover, in Emery County; Mrs. Horace Beebe; Mrs. John W. Farrer, and Joseph W. Until he was twenty-three years of age Mr. Loveless remained at home in the Second Ward, receiving his education from such schools as were then in existence, and finished in what was then the Timpanogos College, now the Brigham Young, and leading much the same life as other farmer boys.In 1876 he settled on his present home on the Provo Bench, where he took up a farm of one hundred and sixty acres of raw land, which he has since improved to a high state of cultivation. He has followed a general farming life, but has paid especial attention to potatoes and strawberries, and his berries have found a very ready market, being of an extra fine flavor and color; he also has a fine orchard of about six hundred trees, and altogether has one of the finest farms in the vicinity of Provo. He has some stock, but has not made any effort to keep many at a time. While he has paid especial attention to his farm, our subject has found time to interest himself in the life of the community in which he has always lived, and is interested in a number of local enterprises, among which is the Provo Commercial and Savings Bank, of which he is a stockholder, and was also at one time interested in the Utah County Savings Bank. Like most of the farmers of Utah he is interested in the question of irrigation, and a member of a number of canal and ditch companies, holding offices in them for several years. He has also proved himself the friend of education and was prominent in securing the Provo Bench School District, being School Trustee for ten years, and doing much to improve the conditions of the free schools.Mr. Loveless was married in 1876 to Miss Julia E. Ekins, daughter of George and Ellen Ekins. Eight children have been born to them—Ellen M., wife of M. E. Krichner; James A., Jr., married; Violate, Annie, Hazel, George W., John W., and Ray.In the Church Mr. Loveless has held the offices of Deacon, Member of the Elders' Quorum, and in 1882 was ordained High Priest and set apart as First Counselor to Bishop Wentz of the Timpanogos Ward ; he also served for a number of years as President of the Young Men's Mutual Improvement Association. In 1901 he was called on a mission to the Eastern States, laboring in Maryland and the Virginias and returning home after an absence of twenty-five months. In the community where he grew up and has spent his entire life, Mr. Loveless is held in the very highest esteem for his many noble qualities of heart and mind. He has always been straight-forward and honorable in all his transactions, and has by his own industry and perseverance won his present enviable position as a farmer and business man.

Biography of James Anderson Loveless

Contributor: SharonLavashHawkins Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Biography of James Anderson Loveless As told by J A Loveless Jr. As we have such a short time for this sketch I think it will be best to make it as brief as possible and will include as the main subject the lives of my father and mother. James Anderson Loveless, the son of James Washington Loveless and Matilda E. Loveless. He was born in Provo, July 19, 1853. His father was the son of John and Mahala Anderson Loveless and was born Dec. 23, 1828 in Fairfield Ohio. He worked with his father on his farm in Ohio. They moved to Indiana; there later moved from there to Missouri where they were all closely with their farms and the church until he was about nineteen years of age. When at Council bluffs, Iowa, he married Matilda E. McClellan, while he was still living with his father on their farm in Missouri. Matilda E. McClellan’s parents were old time friends of the Lovelesses, belonging to the same church and farming the same section with the Lovelesses. This was where their first child was born. He was offered a good position in a lumber yard in Indiana and moved to Indiana where he remained between one and two years. While there another daughter was born. In the fall of 1851 he received word that the saints in Missouri had been driven out. James W. thought it best to go back to Missouri to see if he could find anything about his parents. Arriving there about August 1851 he found the mob had been persecuting the saints and had driven them out of the state and had left there May 21, 1851. The mob took everything the saints had and burned all that would burn. Their crops, planted in the spring, had matured and he harvested the crops and they lived on that the following winter. The following winter his brother-in-law WB Head and his wife got ready to cross the plains for Utah. They succeeded in getting 2 new wagons and with what they gathered up made up 2 more wagons, and left in the spring of 1852 with all their belongings. Each woman was driving a yoke of cows, four wagons in the party. Matilda was compelled to walk the entire distance, they were loaded so heavy. When they reached Salt Lake City they were counseled to go to Provo; as their parents were counseled to do the year before. When they reached Provo, James W. Loveless took up land and the family started farming as a means of livelihood. They built themselves a little home and for the first time had peace and happiness. The saints and settlers began to enjoy their freedom in this section. It was in this section that little James A was born. Then they began to have trouble with the Indians. It was almost continuous. They were forced to be on the lookout for Indians all the time to protect themselves. James W. Loveless took an active part in the Walker and Blackhawk wars. He was a member of the territorial Militia in which he held the rank of Major. He was also doing his part in public affairs. Although he was a successful farmer, he was prominent in public life. He was road supervisor a number of years. His assistants were Charles Miller and Abraham C. Conover. He occupied a seat on the City Council a number of years. Under W. Miller, as mayor, he was councilor from 1874 to 1881. When Abraham O. Smoot was mayor, his home was in the 2nd Ward. He was councilor to the Bishop in 1859. In 1874 he was ordained Bishop of that ward, which position he held until his death in 1888. James was his mother’s only boy and as boys are was somewhat spoiled. It was at this time he learned to drive the team and helped with everything and anything there was to carry on the work of the farm. When he was just a boy he took the team and went to the canyon for wood that they used for firewood during the winter. They grew a great number of potatoes and grain of course. The potatoes and grain were their main crops and when the harvesting began they had no combines or even binders and the grain was cut and bound by hand. Later was threshed by a thresher who drove their horses of six or eight teams to pull and thresh the grain, as soon as the grain was cut and threshed the potatoes were dug. He had a few days or even months to go to school but of course had to hurry home to cut wood for the fire to cook with and keep warm with. As he grew older he had more responsibilities to carry out. His father James W. Loveless was a great public worker and would whittle on sticks a great deal. He was a polygamist and when officers would get after him he would go to his son James A. Loveless Sr. He had 3 wives. 1st wife was Matilda McLellan who had 9 children. His second wife was Mary. She was an English lady who had 18 children. Third wife was Josephine Caldwell who had 9 children. Four living to adulthood. The day after James A. was married they moved to their homestead about 1879. The first year after homesteading the gound was planed in alfalfa and grain and fruit trees of all kinds. My grandmother (Julia Ekins) taught school until she was married, but never taught after she was married. James A Loveless was a member of the State Legislature for a number of years. He was first councilor to Bishop Peter Wents, who was the first Bishop of the Timpanogos ward. Amasa Mecham was 2nd councilor. James A. Loveless Sr., was a member of the school board for a number of years. My grandmother Julia Ekins was president of the Relief Society during which time they built a Relief Society Granary in back of their house. The Relief Society ladies would go out each fall and glean grain to put into it. This continued until the 1st world war when wheat was sold to the Government and they did no more gleaning. As the boys were married, they were given 10 acres of land and when the last one was married the Home place was sold to George where he raised a family of 13 children.

Biography taken from Portrait, genealogical and biographical record of the State of Utah

Contributor: SharonLavashHawkins Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

JAMES A. LOVELESS, a native son of Provo and a life-long citizen of this place, born July 19, 1853. He is the son of Bishop James W. and Matilda (McClellan) Loveless. Bishop Loveless came from an old Ohio family, being born in that State December 23, 1828, and his father, John, a native of Fairfield County, where he was a wellto-do farmer. When the Bishop was but a year old his father moved to Fountain County, Indiana, locating on a farm on the Wabash River, and there he and his family later became converts to the teachings of the Mormon religion and were baptized by Solomon Hancock. John Loveless became a teacher in the branch Church organized in his community, and from that position was promoted to be a Priest. He was ordained an Elder March 28, 1832, and assisted in establishing another branch Church thirty miles from his home, presiding over the two branches for several months, when he was sent back to Ohio on a mission. In 1833 he was made President of the Ohio branch, and led the Saints into Jackson County, Missouri. After the Mormons had been driven out by the mob, Mr. Loveless went to Lafayette County, Missouri, where he remained until 1837, and then moved to Caldwell County, the same State, where the Saints were gathering. In the fall of 1838 they were again attacked by a mob and Mr. Loveless was compelled to sign over all his property to the mob. He went to Adams County, Illinois, where he followed farming for two years and from there to Hancock County. In the spring of 1844 he was sent on another mission to Ohio, starting home on hearing of the trouble brewing in Nauvoo, but did not reach there until after the death of the Prophet. In 1845, while he was again absent from home his place was destroyed by the mob, who set fire to the house and his family were compelled to flee to the woods for safety. He moved his family to Nauvoo and took part in all the trouble that followed in that place. When the Saints left Nauvoo he was one of the Quorum that went to the Temple to invoke the Divine blessing upon the people. April 27, 1846 he went to Council Bluffs, and there witnessed the forming of the famous Mormon Battalion. He later settled on a farm seven miles from Winter Quarters, and remained there until he crossed the plains to Utah in 1851, arriving in Salt Lake Valley September 15th of that year. He first settled on the Jordan River, then at Provo, and from there went to Payson, where he died. Our subject's father, James W., remained with his father up to the time he arrived in Utah and was twenty-four years of age when he crossed the plains. He located in Provo and made his home in this place the rest of his life, living in the city and having a farm in the Second Ward. He became a prominent man in public life, occupying a seat on the City Council for a number of years, and also filling various other offices. He was a member of the Territorial Militia, in which he held the rank of Major, and took an active part in the Walker and Black Hawk wars; was a member of the Black Hawk War Veterans Association. He was associated with the management of the Second Ward for more than thirty years, fifteen years of which he was Bishop. Mr. Loveless believed firmly in the doctrines and teachings of his Church, especially the doctrine of polygamy, and in accordance with that belief married three women and reared a family of thirty-six children, many of whom are well and favorably known in Utah County. He died in 1888, at the age of sixty years. James A., our subject, was the third child in a family of ten, of whom eight are now living— Mrs. Noel Knight, deceased; Mrs. S. S. Bailey, our subject, Sarah, now Mrs. Jenkins, living in Idaho; Mrs. James Gray, of Provo; Mrs. Conover, in Emery County; Mrs. Horace Beebe; Mrs. John W. Farrer, and Joseph W. Until he was twenty-three years of age Mr. Loveless remained at home in the Second Ward, receiving his education from such schools as were then in existence, and finished in what was then the Timpanogos College, now the Brigham Young, and leading much the same life as other farmer boys. In 1876 he settled on his present home on the Provo Bench, where he took up a farm of one hundred and sixty acres of raw land, which he has since improved to a high state of cultivation. He has followed a general farming life, but has paid especial attention to potatoes and strawberries, and his berries have found a very ready market, being of an extra fine flavor and color; he also has a fine orchard of about six hundred trees, and altogether has one of the finest farms in the vicinity of Provo. He has some stock, but has not made any effort to keep many at a time. While he has paid especial attention to his farm, our subject has found time to interest himself in the life of the community in which he has always lived, and is interested in a number of local enterprises, among which is the Provo Commercial and Savings Bank, of which he is a stockholder, and was also at one time interested in the Utah County Savings Bank. Like most of the farmers of Utah he is interested in the question of irrigation, and a member of a number of canal and ditch companies, holding offices in them for several years. He has also proved himself the friend of education and was prominent in securing the Provo Bench School District, being School Trustee for ten years, and doing much to improve the conditions of the free schools. Mr. Loveless was married in 1876 to Miss Julia E. Ekins, daughter of George and Ellen Ekins. Eight children have been born to them—Ellen M., wife of M. E. Krichner: James A., Jr., married; Violate, Annie, Hazel, George W., John W., and Ray. In the Church Mr. Loveless has held the offices of Deacon, Member of the Elders' Quorum, and in 1882 was ordained High Priest and set apart as First Counselor to Bishop Wentz of the Timpanogos Ward; he also served for a number of years as President of the Young Men's Mutual Improvement Association. In 1901 he was called on a mission to the Eastern States, laboring in Maryland and the Virginias and returning home after an absence of twenty-five months. In the community where he grew up and has spent his entire life, Mr. Loveless is held in the very highest esteem for his many noble qualities of heart and mind. He has always been staightforward and honorable in all his transactions, and has by his own industry and perseverance won his present enviable position as a farmer and business man. from Portrait, genealogical and biographical record of the State of Utah ...

BIOGRAPHY OF JAMES ANDERSON LOVELESS SR

Contributor: SharonLavashHawkins Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

            James Anderson Loveless was born 19 July 1853 in Provo, Utah, Utah Territory to James Washington and Matilda Elizabeth McClellan Loveless.  His father was born 23 December 1828 in Fairfield, Ohio and was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in August 1839 at the age of ten. His mother was born 15 December 1829 in Nashville, Davidson,Tennessee.  She was baptized into the Church in 1853 at the age of 24.  His parents were married on 9 March 1847 at Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie, Iowa               His father served a mission for the Church and returned two days after the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum had been martyred.  His family came to Deseret with the John G. Smith Company.  They began their journey from the outfitting post at Kanesville, Iowa (present day Council Bluffs) on 1 May 1851.  His father was 22, his mother was 21 and with them were Jane Caroline, age 2; Cynthia Angeline (Ann), age 2 months.  His two brothers, Joseph Jackson, age 19, and Nephi Anderson, age 18 were also with them. There were 137 in the company and they arrived in the valley between 15 through 23 September 1851.            His father’s sister, Rachel Priscilla wrote of their trip coming to Deseret.  She was ten years old when they came.  “Pop fitted our four wagons one with four yoke of cattle, and two with three yoke including the cows and one with one very large yoke of oxen for my mother. There were two mall children and although I was then ten years old I was not permitted to ride with mother except on rare occasions. One day I got in with mother and as I got out over the end of the tongue, I caught my dress and hung for a little way, then fell down and the team ran over me, but I was not hurt in the least although my mother was very scared.            Pop did not have money enough to leave. but he went down to a merchant by the name of Kinkaid in the capital and got a load of goods for freighting and they for hauling this load in provisions for the trip, which consisted of cornmeal, matches, ham[,] some wheat flour, so that we were left well provided for in foodstuff.            In about six days the others also came up and we were organized and ready for the journey. Pop was put in as captain over ten wagons. Our captain was named[Roswell] Stevens. The one man was captain over fifty wagons[.] the pilot of the company was named Cooley. He had been to Utah before. He rode a horse, the only horse I can remember in the company. He must have had lots of red cotton handkerchiefs as he always left one tied to a brush to guide us.            The next night we camped in a pretty place. We stopped two hours before sunset.One wagon pulled out a half mile from the others and the men came for my mother but she could not go. Two or three women went out to the wagon and the next morning I heard a baby cry in that wagon when it came back and I knew there was none the night before. I thought they had found one in the brush.”             They settled in the Provo, Utah, Utah Territory by 1853.  James had eight sisters and one brother.  They had trouble with the Indians there.  His father took an active part in the Walker and Blackhawk Wars.              His father entered into plural marriage in 1856 marrying Mary Britton.  She was from Birmingham, Warwickshire,England and they had eighteen children, thirteen girls and five boys.             He married Mary Josephine Caldwell in 1859 and they had nine children, five girls and four boys.             After they got to Provo, James Anderson was born 19 July 1853; Sarah Louisa was born 12 August 1855; Deseret Matilda was born 19 October 1858; Elizabeth Juliet (Liz) was the sixth child of James and Matilda, born 7 March 1861; Harriet Una was born 29 April 1865; Vilate Alice was born 2 June 1867; Joseph Wilburn was born 24 May 1870; and Hylette Maud was born 14 December 1874 and died 15 May 1882.               Shortly after the birth of James the family moved to West Jordan and built a home and kept farming.  They were there for two years and then moved to Payson, Utah, Utah Territory.  That was the last move they made.               James was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1861 at the age of eight.  He married Julia Ellen Ekins on 23 October 1876 in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake,Utah Territory at the age of 23.              Julia was born 21 August 1856 in Goshen, Utah, Utah Territory to George and Eleanor Sykes Ekins.  She was 20 years old when they married.  Julia had two sisters and three brothers.  Her parents came to Utah with an Unknown Company in 1852.  Her father was 30 and her mother was 28.  They were living in Goshen when Julia was born but later moved to Provo where she went to school.  She later taught school for several years after their marriage.              James and Julia homesteaded up on the Provo Bench which at that time was sagebrush, rocks and a lot of rattlesnakes.  The two worked together to clear the land.  They built a two room frame shack that was their home until they built one later.  They planted orchards and berries.              They had eight children, four girls and four boys.  They were all born in Provo,Utah, Utah Territory.  Ellen Matilda was born 20 January 1878; James Anderson Jr. was born 30 October 1880; Una Vilate was born 12 March 1883; Annie Elizabeth was born 15 July 1886; Hazel was born 19 August 1888; and George Washington was born 22 October 1890.  James served a mission to the Eastern States from 1900 to 1902.              After he returned two more children were born. John William was born 27 May 1893 and Ray Ekins was born 5 September 1897.              James served as first counselor to Bishop Peter M. Wentz for more than 23 years.  They built a ward chapel during that time.  He served on the school board for ten years and was also Superintendent and President of the Provo Bench Canal and Irrigation Company.              Julia was Relief Society President for 15 years. She was in charge of the Relief Society grain.  The relief society ladies were instructed to save and store grain for use in times of need. Many of the relief societies throughout the valley were involved in the storage program.  It was a very valuable commodity during times of need throughout the world.  A grainary was built in their yard and kept full until the Church took it over.              In 1918 they sold their home and acreage to their son George and moved back to Provo proper.  They ended up in the home was born and were able to remodel it before the moved back there.              James died on 7 February 1924 in Provo, Utah, Utah at the age of 70.  He was buried on 10 February 1924 in the Provo City Cemetery, Provo, Utah, Utah.              death of James she worked several years in the Salt Lake Temple and the Genealogical Society.  She spent her last few years visiting among her children.             Julia died on 9 January 1933 in Orem, Utah, Utah at the age of 76 and was buried on 13 January 1933 in Provo, Utah, Utah.    

Life Timeline of James A. Loveless

1853
James A. Loveless was born on Jul 1853
James A. Loveless was 9 years old when U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring the freedom of all slaves in Confederate territory by January 1, 1863. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
1862
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James A. Loveless was 26 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
1879
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James A. Loveless was 36 years old when The Eiffel Tower is officially opened. The Eiffel Tower is a wrought iron lattice tower on the Champ de Mars in Paris, France. It is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower.
1889
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James A. Loveless was 45 years old when Spanish–American War: The Treaty of Paris is signed, officially ending the conflict. The Spanish–American War was fought between the United States and Spain in 1898. Hostilities began in the aftermath of the internal explosion of the USS Maine in Havana Harbor in Cuba, leading to US intervention in the Cuban War of Independence. American acquisition of Spain's Pacific possessions led to its involvement in the Philippine Revolution and ultimately in the Philippine–American War.
1898
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James A. Loveless was 50 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
1903
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James A. Loveless was 64 years old when Tsar Nicholas II of Russia was forced to abdicate in the February Revolution, ending three centuries of Romanov rule. Nicholas II or Nikolai II, known as Saint Nicholas in the Russian Orthodox Church, was the last Emperor of Russia, ruling from 1 November 1894 until his forced abdication on 15 March 1917. His reign saw the fall of the Russian Empire from one of the foremost great powers of the world to economic and military collapse. He was given the nickname Nicholas the Bloody or Vile Nicholas by his political adversaries due to the Khodynka Tragedy, anti-Semitic pogroms, Bloody Sunday, the violent suppression of the 1905 Russian Revolution, the executions of political opponents, and his perceived responsibility for the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905). Soviet historians portray Nicholas as a weak and incompetent leader whose decisions led to military defeats and the deaths of millions of his subjects.
1917
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James A. Loveless died on 7 Feb 1924 at the age of 71
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for James A. Loveless (Jul 1853 - 7 Feb 1924), BillionGraves Record 3719 Provo, Utah, Utah, United States

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