Jacob Foutz

1801 - 11 Feb 1848

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Jacob Foutz

1801 - 11 Feb 1848
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Jacob was born in 1800 in Washington, Pennsylvania to John and Elizabeth Hinckle Foutz. He married Margaret Maun in 1822 in Green Castle, Pennsylvania. This area had been settled by the Germans. The children learned to speak German before they learned English. He apprenticed to become a bricklayer.

Life Information

Jacob Foutz

Born:
Died:

Old Deseret Cemetery

Bonneville Shoreline Trail
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah
United States

Headstone Description

This information comes from:
http://heritage.uen.org/resources/Wcd7132cdf9bbb.htm
all of the graves are unmarked

The following is text from the article:
FIRST CEMETERY IN THE SALT LAKE VALLEY, 1847-48
(Also the Kimball-Whitney and Brigham Young private cemeteries)

Early in the spring of 1846, a group of Mormon pioneers known in history as the Mississippi saints, left their homes in Mississippi, expecting each day to meet the pioneers under the direction of President Brigham Young and go with them to the Rocky Mountains. They had not received word that the body of the saints had decided to winter in Council Bluffs, so on they journeyed. When they reached Fort Laramie they learned from trappers and scouts that Brigham Young and his group had not been seen along the route. A mountain man, Henri Richard, offered to guide them to Pueblo, where he was going for supplies. They accepted the offer and established winter quarters there. These people established what is sometimes known as the first Anglo-Saxon settlement in Colorado.

Early in the summer of 1847 they learned that the first group of pioneers was on its way to the Valley of the Great Salt Lake. An advance company of seventeen persons, 5 wagons, 1 cart, 24 oxen, 22 cows, 3 bulls, and 7 calves, caught up with Brigham's company, June 4, at Ft. Laramie. This small group, headed by Robert Crow, consisted of ten persons with the last name of Crow and four (a son-in-law's family) with the name Therlkill. Milton Howard Therlkill was only 3 years of age at the time. Trouble plagued the Crow family all the way to Salt Lake, but this group arrived in the Valley with the main vanguard company, July 22, 1847.

Less than a month later, Milton drowned in City Creek and was buried, 12 Aug 1847, at this location. (One note indicated it was on his grandfather's [Robert Crow] lot. It was probably where his grandfather had his wagons set up while the fort was being built. The Crow and Therlkill families were not given property in Platt A. They went to Brown's Settlement [Ogden] the following year.) Milton was the first white person to die and be buried in Salt Lake City. He was buried on the east side of block 49, one block due east of the old Pioneer Fort (nearly opposite the adobe yards - there were adobe bricks made west of the fort and one reference is made of the fort as the adobe yard). This site was on the bank of a dry channel of City Creek, west of two springs, and next to a Fremont Indian mound. Excavations in 1986 located 32 bodies in 31 graves in the southeast quadrant of Block 49 (Section 8, see map).

More persons died in the Valley the first year than were located during 1986. Some journals indicate burials at the mound on the Shurtleff property, which occupied the northeast quadrant of Block 49 (Sections 6 and 7). Of the 32 pioneer bodies found, 9 were adults, the others were adolescents, children, and babies. They include: Milton Howard Therlkill (age 3), 12 Aug 1847, drowned previous day, Aug 11. Caroline Van Dyke Grant (age 29), wife of J.M. Grant, died of Cholera on Bear River, 26 Sep, bur. 30 Sep 1847 Nancy O'Neal Rich (age 65), pneumonia, buried next to C.V. Grant, 6 Oct 1847, 1st woman to die in Valley. Mary Evangeline Stewart (age 13), first person to sicken and die in the Valley. Arrived: 25 Sep Franklin K. Shed, poisoned by eating roots; buried in same grave as Snow child. John Edward Brewer Oakey (age 5), killed instantly by a log, rolling from saw pit. Arrived: 2 Oct. Elizabeth Covington (age 27), died of the cold. Arrived: 1 Oct Adam McDonald (age 57), who died of dysentery one hour before arriving in the Valley. Jacob Foutz (age 47), 11 Feb 1848, bishop and captain, had healed broken bones, shot in thigh. Arrived: 1 Oct.

Caroline Grant had her 2nd child, Margaret, in Winter Quarters, leaving her in a weakened condition when she came west. Cholera struck the camp on the Sweetwater River and claimed the baby, Margaret, on Sept. 2. She was buried along the trail four days before her mother died. Carolyn succumbed to the disease, Sept. 26th, at the Bear River crossing, 75 miles from Salt Lake City. Jedediah drove night and day to get to Salt Lake, where she was buried 4 days later. He and his friend Joseph Bates Noble went back to recover the body of Margaret and found that wolves had ravaged the grave and body. Before they reached the grave, Grant confided to his friend, "Bates, God has made it plain. The joy of Paradise where my wife and baby are together, seems to be upon me tonight. For some wise purpose they have been released from the earth struggles into which you and I are plunged. They are many, many times happier than we can possibly be here."

His other daughter survived. Jedediah became Salt Lake City's first mayor in 1852. When Willard Richards died, he became a counselor to Brigham Young. He was tall and angular and had a little of the Abraham Lincoln look. He gave fiery speeches, especially during the Reformation of 1856. He called the people to repentance, helped re-baptize them as a token of their recommitment. Insurance papers listed the cause of death (he was in his early 50's) as "typhoid-pneumonia." Given the idea that he had spent long hours deep in the cold and unsanitary waters of baptism during October and November, his falling victim of either or both of these afflictions was at least likely. His home was where the west entrance to Z.C.M.I. is now.

Just before he died, he had a remarkable visit to the spirit world, which he related to Heber C. Kimball, who told of it at his funeral. He saw many persons that he knew but only had conversation with his wife Caroline. She was the first person that came to him. She looked beautiful and had their little child, that died on the plains, in her arms, and said, "Mr. Grant, here is little Margaret; you know that the wolves ate her up, but it did not hurt her. Here she is all right."

Nancy O'Neal Rich, wife of Joseph and mother of Charles C. Rich, arrived Oct. 2 and was buried 4 days later, next to Caroline Grant. Clara Decker Young, Brigham's wife on the vanguard company, wrote, "I followed (Caroline) to the grave next morning, which made me very lonesome." Feb. 11, a granddaughter, Eliza N. Rich (age, 3 months) was buried next to her. North of the west end of Grand Avenue, Salt lake Cemetery, is a memorial monument to her, the first woman to die in the Valley, and her son, Ben E. Rich.
Transcriber

bwdraper

June 8, 2013
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bwdraper

June 7, 2013

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Jacob Foutz

Contributor: aerounds Created: 1 week ago Updated: 1 week ago

Jacob was born in 1800 in Washington, Pennsylvania to John and Elizabeth Hinckle Foutz. He married Margaret Maun in 1822 in Green Castle, Pennsylvania. This area had been settled by the Germans. The children learned to speak German before they learned English. He apprenticed to become a bricklayer. They moved to the frontier (Richland County, Ohio) and it was there they joined the church in 1834. When they first heard the missionaries Jacob exclaimed, "This is just what I have been looking for!" He was baptized the next day in spite of his wife's ridicule. She changed her mind and was baptized a month later. A branch was established there and Jacob became the branch president. They moved to a branch on the Crooked River in Missouri presided over by David Evans, who had first preached the gospel to them. He was wounded in the Haun's Mill Massacre. On the day of the attack Margaret was on her way to the stream to get a bucket of water. Bullets whizzed past her as she ran and fell behind a fallen tree trunk. Jacob and several other men barricaded themselves in the log blacksmith shop which proved to be a trap rather than a refuge. The mob fire poured through the chinks in the logs, killing or wounding everyone in the structure. Jacob was wounded in the hip. Before the mobsters came into the shop to finish off anyone who might be left alive, he pulled the bodies of dead companions over himself in the hope of escaping notice. The next morning Margaret came in and found him. With the help of some of the brethren who had escaped injury, she loaded him into a wagon and took him home. He recovered in time, to move with the rest of the Church to Illinois, but was never again the robust man he had been. After settling in Nauvoo he became bishop in the Nauvoo 5th Ward in 1942. He went on a mission, leaving his wife with 6 children and a baby coming. He went to Pennsylvania and labored among his friends and relatives, many of whom he brought into the church. He was a member of the Nauvoo Legion. He was a captain of the second 50 of the Abraham Smoot Company going to Utah and arriving there in September of 1847. He was bishop over part of the fort that was constructed that year, one of 5 original wards organized in the Salt Lake Valley. This ward was in the west part of town near where Pioneer Park was later developed. He died in 1848 at the age of 47, probably of a stroke or heart attack, while hauling gravel. The youngest of their 9 children was only a month old. It was among the first deaths to occur in the valley. It is not known where he was buried since the city cemetery had not yet been laid out.

Jacob Foutz by Adam Goodman

Contributor: aerounds Created: 1 week ago Updated: 1 week ago

Jacob Foutz was born November 20, 1800 in Franklin County, Pennsylvania, the son of John Foutz and Elizabeth Hinkle, who were both natives of the same area. On July 22, 1822, as a 21-year-old man, young Jacob married Margaret Mann. Margaret was born December 11, 1801 in Thomastown, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, to David Mann and Mary Rock. While still a baby, Margaret was deprived of both parents and was left an orphan; Margaret was raised by strangers. In 1834, while living in Richland County, Ohio, the Foutz family received a visitor from Elder David Evans of the four-year-old Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Elder Evans taught Jacob and Margaret’s family the restored gospel of Jesus Christ. Convinced of the Church’s truthfulness, the Foutz family was baptized a practice becoming increasingly unpopular with the northern Ohio neighbors. Jacob gained prominence in the area and became known as "the old preacher". The Foutzes purchased some land on the Crooked River in Missouri. Here an organized branch of the Church had settled in a spot known as Haun’s Mill, named for the mill owned by Brother Jacob Haun. The branch was presided over by the man who had taught the Foutz family the Gospel, Elder David Evans. The Foutzes were anxious to finally establish a permanent home here among their new friends of the faith. The Foutz family was living at Haun's Mill during the time of the Haun's Mill Massacre. Miracously, all of the family survived the massacre. What follows are excerpts from Jacob's wife, Margarets account of the massacre that occurred on October 30, 1838. I was at home with my little family of five children and could hear the firing of guns. In a moment I knew the mob was upon us. Soon a runner came telling the women and children to hasten into the timber and secret ourselves, which we did without taking anything to keep us warm. And had we been fleeing from the scalping knife of the Indian we would not have made greater haste, and as we went we finally numbered about forty or fifty women and children. We ran about three miles into the woods and there huddled together, spreading what few blankets and shawls chance only had thrown in our path, upon the ground for the children and here we remained until two o’clock the next morning before we heard anything of the result of the firing at the mill... It was about seven o’clock in the morning when we arrived at the mill. The first house I came to there were three dead men ... I hurried on to find my husband. (Jacob Foutz) I found him in an old house covered with rubbish. The mob had taken the bedding and clothing from the houses that were near the mill. My husband was shot in the thigh. I rendered him all the aid that I could but it was evening before I could get him home. In the evening Brother Evans got a team and wagon and conveyed my husband to his house, carried him in and placed him on the bed. I then had to attend him alone, without any doctor or anyone to tell me what to do for him. Six days after, I and my husband together, extracted the bullet, it being buried deep in the thick part of the thigh and flattened like a knife. During the first ten days the mob came every day with blackened faces, more like demons from the infernal pit than like human beings, cursing and swearing that they would kill that **** old Mormon preacher. (Jacob Foutz) And, at times like these when human nature would quail, I have felt the power of God upon me to that degree that I have stood before them fearless and although a woman and alone, these demons in human shape had to succumb, for there was a power they knew not of. During these days of danger I would sometimes have to hide my husband out in the woods and cover him with leaves. And, then again in the house. Thus during my husband’s illness was I harassed by mobocratic violence.” The Foutz family moved frequently with the Saints over the next years. In each place where Jacob lived, he served the Lord. On October 27, 1840, Jacob Foutz was made second councilor to Bishop Matthew Leach in the Freedom Stake of the Church, near Payson, Adams County, Illinois. The Prophet Joseph Smith records that on February 28, 1841, a branch of the Church or stake of Zion was organized in Brown County, western Illinois with Levi Gifford as president, Lodarick as first councilor, and Jacob Foutz as second councilor. Between 1841 and 1842, he served a mission for the Church On October 12, 1842, Jacob Foutz was appointed bishop of the Nauvoo Fifth Ward. In 1847, Jacob Foutz led a company of pioneers as a captain of 50 to Utah. The company departed June 17, 1847 from the outfitting post on the Elkhorn River about 27 miles west of Winter Quarters, Nebraska. Included in the company was Jacob Foutz (46), Margaret Mann Foutz (45), Nancy Ann Foutz (21), Elizabeth Foutz Hess (20), Catherine Foutz (15), Joseph Lehi Foutz (10), Margaret Foutz (7), and Jacob Foutz, Jr. (3). Shortly after arriving in SLC, on November 7, 1847, Bishop Foutz was called as the bishop of the east half of the New Fort Ward, which was one of the five wards in the Great Salt Lake Valley. Poor of health, Bishop Foutz spent much of his time in bed. The injuries he suffered at Haun's Mill had never completely healed, and a fever sickness he contracted in Nauvoo lingered as well. Just a month after the birth of his last child, Bishop Foutz passed away at the age of 47. Jacob died on February 14, 1848 while he was away from home excavating in gravel. His fellow workers said that he had a stroke and died suddenly. Jacob Foutz's final resting place is somewhere in Salt Lake City, but unfortunately, the exact spot is unknown.

Bishop Jacob Foutz Sr: A Legacy of Faith

Contributor: aerounds Created: 1 week ago Updated: 1 week ago

BISHOP JACOB FOUTZ, SR.: A LEGACY OF FAITH FROM HAUN’S MILL TO SALT LAKE A Life History Prepared for Descendants of Jacob and Margaret Foutz By Steven Russell Jensen August 12, 1997 Introduction As a fourth great-grandson of Jacob Foutz, I have produced this edited version of the History of Bishop Jacob Foutz Sr. and Family, Including a Story of the Haun’s Mill Massacre, written by Grace Foutz Boulter and Mary Foutz Corrigan in 1944. First, I wish to thank these two women who wrote Jacob Foutz’s history over 50 years ago. Surely they spent many hours of research to produce this detailed account. They are the reason I have been able to do what I have done. My entire text is a revised version of Boulter and Corrigan’s work, a 32-page unpublished document, which can be found in Special Collections of the Harold B. Lee Library (call number: M270.1; F829b) at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. In my account, I use six other sources besides Boulter and Corrigan’s work; these sources are footnoted. My purpose in preparing this edited history is two-fold: (1) To celebrate the fascinating lives of these once-prominent but now little-known Mormon pioneersCJacob and Margaret FoutzCduring this Sesquicentennial of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints’ arrival in the Salt Lake Valley. (2) To provide the descendants of Jacob and Margaret Foutz (their son, Joseph Lehi, is the great-grandfather of my living grandmother, Margaret Elaine Russell Hoopes) with a written and electronically stored Jacob Foutz history (see Appendix for pedigree charts of both Margaret Elaine Russell and Jacob Foutz). Whether the reader is a direct descendent of Jacob and Margaret Foutz, my hope is that by pondering the gripping lives of this nineteen-century couple, the reader will resolve to follow the Foutz family’s example of living always by the Sesquicentennial theme of AFaith In Every Footstep. Early Life Jacob Foutz was born November 20, 1800 in Franklin County, Pennsylvania, the son of John Foutz and Elizabeth Hinkle, who were both natives of the same area. Jacob’s grandfather, Conrad Foutz, was born in 1734 in Sweibruchen, Germany, and sailed across the Atlantic with his parents, who died during the trip and were buried at sea. Conrad continued the journey to America, where he and his wife, Elizabeth were the first of three generations of Foutzes in south central Pennsylvania. Information is scare about the early life of Jacob Foutz. In his youth he probably farmed with his father and also learned the vocation of a brick mason.[1] One source says he was an Aenergetic brick layer. On July 22, 1822, as a 21-year-old man, young Jacob married Margaret Mann. Margaret was born December 11, 1801 in Thomastown, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, to David Mann and Mary Rock. While still a baby, Margaret was deprived of both parents and was left an orphan; Margaret was raised by strangers. The lives of these two young peopleCJacob and MargaretCwere destined to be adventuresome and notable. They lived in one of the most progressive periods the world has ever known and in a country rapidly expanding westward. As they began to raise their family among the rolling hills of south central Pennsylvania, Jacob and Margaret had no idea that an event-filled life awaited them out WestCa life full of ups and downs as changing as the lush-green knolls around them. From Pennsylvania to Ohio Of Jacob and Margaret’s 12 children, four were born in Pennsylvania (Susan, Polly, Nancy Ann, and Elizabeth); the remaining seven were born in four states: Ohio (Sarah, Catherine, and Alma); Missouri (Joseph Lehi); Illinois (Margaret, Hyrum, and Jacob, Jr.); and the soon-to-be Utah (Maranda).[2] Only eight of the 12, however, lived old enough to be married. Franklin County, Pennsylvania, where the Jacob Foutz family first lived, was settled mainly by German people. Consequently, Jacob and Margaret’s children actually learned the German language before they learned English. This caused the Foutz children embarrassment when they left Pennsylvania in 1827 and moved west to Ohio among the English-speaking people. In 1834, while living in Richland County, Ohio, the Foutz family received a visitorCElder David Evans of the four-year-old Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Elder Evans taught Jacob and Margaret’s family the restored gospel of Jesus Christ. Convinced of the Church’s truthfulness, the Foutz family was baptizedCa practice becoming increasingly unpopular with the northern Ohio neighbors. Shortly after the Foutz family joined the Church, they probably felt what the local Church leaders were calling Athe spirit of gathering.Groups of Saints were fleeing Ohio persecution and congregating in Missouri. Consequently, Jacob and Margaret left Ohio and moved their family further west to be with the Latter-day Saints. Haun’s Mill, Missouri The Foutzes purchased some land on the Crooked River in Missouri. Here an organized branch of the Church had settled in a spot known as AHaun’s Mill,named for the mill owned by Brother Jacob Haun. The branch was presided over by the man who had taught the Foutz family the Gospel, Elder David Evans. The Foutzes were anxious to finally establish a permanent home here among their new friends of the faith. On March 16, 1837, Margaret gave birth to Joseph Lehi, who would be the oldest Foutz son to live to maturity. Though by now Margaret had given birth eight times, three children had died; in an entry in her diary dated October 1838 she writes of her Alittle family of five children. Speaking of the Foutz’s new home in Missouri, Margaret Foutz recalls, AWe enjoyed ourselves exceedingly well and everything seemed to prosper, but the spirit of persecution began to manifest itself. Falsehoods were circulated about the Mormon population that was settling about the region and soon there began to be signs of trouble. Along with the other members at Haun’s Mill, the Foutz family were not permitted to enjoy their new home for long. Missouri mobs were driving out the Saints in county after county. The small settlement of Saints on the Crooked River in Caldwell County was no exception. In the fall of 1838, mobs threatened to destroy the mill owned by Brother Haun. The brethren tried many times to settle matters peacefully with the mob, but to no avail. Consequently, the Saints took precautions. On October 28, they organized themselves and stationed 28 armed watchmen to guard the settlement. Two days later, however, the Haun’s Mill Saints felt somewhat safe from any immediate attack by the mob. But that feeling of safety was short lived. To the Foutz family and to all others present on that dreadful Tuesday, October 30, 1838, the event would be forever known as AThe Haun’s Mill Massacre. Margaret Foutz writes that on October 30, the Saints thought all was adjusted from the meeting the brethren had with the Amobbersthe day before. Brother Evans went to inform the menC Margaret’s husband among themCthat all was well. At about the middle of the afternoon, according to Joseph Young, Athe banks of Shoal Creek, on either side, teemed with children sporting and playing, while their mothers were engaged in domestic employment. Then suddenly, says Margaret, without any warning, 60 or 70 men with blackened faces came riding on their horses at full speed toward the settlement. The brethren ran for protection into an old log blacksmith’s shop. But without arms, the men were helpless. The mob rode to the shop, and with no explanation or apparent cause they began a full-scale butchery by firing round after round through the cracks in the log wall of the shop. The following passage is Margaret’s eye-witness description of one of the blackest moments in LDS Church history. Included are Margaret’s feelings about this faith-testing experience that forever changed the lives of the Foutz family. AI was at home with my little family of five children and could hear the firing of guns. In a moment I knew that the mob was upon us. Soon a runner came telling the women and children to hasten into the woods and secret ourselves. This we did in all haste without taking anything to keep us warm; and had we been fleeing from the scalping knife of the Indian, we would not have made greater haste. As we ran from house to house, gathering as we went, we finally numbered about forty or fifty women and children. AWe ran about three miles into the woods and there huddled together, spreading what few blankets and shawls we chanced to have upon the ground for the children. There we remained until two o’clock the next morning before we heard anything of the result of the firing at the mill. Who can imagine our feeling during this dreadful suspense? When the news did come, Oh but what terrible news! Fathers, brothers, husbands inhuna. We took up the line of march for home, but alas what a home! Who would we find there? ANow with our minds full of the most fearful forebodings, we retraced those three long dreary miles. As we were returning I saw Brother Myers, who had been shot through the body. In that dreadful state he had crawled on his hands and knees about two miles to his home. AAfter I arrived at my house with my children, I hastily made a fire to warm them and then started for the mill, about two miles distant. My children would not remain at home as they said >if father and mother are going to be killed we want to be with them.’ AOn the way to the mill, in the first house I came to there were three dead men. One a Brother McBride, was a terrible sight to hehold, having been cut and chopped and mangled with a corn cutter. I was told that [h]e was a survivor of the Revolutionary War. AI hurried on looking for my husband and finally found him in an old house covered with some rubbish. He had been shot in the thigh. I there rendered him all the aid that I could but it was evening before I could get him home. AI saw thirteen more dead bodies at the shop and witnessed the beginning of the burial which consisted in throwing the men that the mob would return and kill the few that were left, they threw the bodies in head first or feet first as the case might be. When they had thrown in three my heart sickened and I could not stand it more. I turned away to keep from fainting. AMy husband and another Brother had drawn dead bodies over themselves and pretended to be dead [according to another witness, AJacob Fouts and Wm. Champlin feined their selves dead and lay still untill their pockets were robed[3]]. By so doing they saved their own lives and heard what some of the mob said. After the firing was over two little boys that were in the shop begged for their lives, but no one of the mob said >they will make Mormons’ and he put the muzzle of his gun to the boys heads and blew their brains out. AOh what a change one short day had brought! Here were our friends dead and dying, one in particular asked to take a hammer and give him relief by knocking his brains out, so great was his agony. And in all this we knew not what moment our enemies would be upon us again. All this suffering, not because we had broken any law - on the contrary it was part of our religion to keep the laws of the land - but because the evil spirit was at work among the children of men. AIn the evening Brother Evans got a team and wagon and conveyed my husband to our home. He carried him in and placed him on the bed. I then had to attend him alone, without a doctor or anyone to tell me what to do for him. Six days later my husband himself, helped me to extract the bullet which was buried deep in the thick part of his thigh and was flattened like a knife. We did this with a kitchen knife. ADuring the first ten days the mob came every day with blackened faces (more like demons from the internal pit than like human beings) cursing and swearing that they would kill the old Mormon preacher, who was my husband. At times like these when human nature would quail, I have felt the power of God upon me to that degree that I have stood before the fearless and although a woman and alone, those demons in human shape had to succumb to the power which they know not of. During these days of danger I sometimes hid my husband out into the woods behind our home and covered him with leaves. When he was able to sit up he was dressed as a woman and put at the spinning wheel. In this way his life was protected. Thus during my husbands illness was I harassed by mobocratic violence. On one occasion (as the story is told), when the mob came to Margaret’s house looking for her husband, she felt the power of God upon her to such an extent that she was totally unafraid. She commanded the mobbers, who had murdered and injured the men of the community, to kill and dress a pig for her family to eat. The men trembled before Margaret and did as she instructed. Sister Foutz often told how she surprised herself on such occasions. However, she always gave the credit and thanks to God. The mobs had taken food, clothing, and bedding from the Saints and had even burned some of their homes. As a result, besides the pain and sorrow they had to bear, many Saints were without even the bare necessities of life. The mob finally said they would leave the Saints alone if the Saints would leave Missouri in the spring. The Saints agreed and headed for Illinois. On record in LDS Church files is the following document that appears to be a registered complaint. Signed by Jacob Foutz, the document is sworn to against members of the mob that molested the Saints in Missouri: Quincy, Illinois, March 17, A.D. 1840 This is to certify that I was citizen retime of Caldwell County, Missouri, at the time Governor Bogg’s exterminating order was issued and that I was quartered on by the mob militia without my leave or consent, at different times, and at one time by William Mann, Hiram Cumstock and brother, who professed to be the captain, also Robert While; And that I was wounded and driven from the State to my inconvenience and deprived of my freedom as well as to my loss of at least four hundred dollars. Signed - - - Jacob Foutz Sworn to before C.M. Woods, Clerk Circuit. Many such complaints, sworn to by different men, are on file in Illinois. The Saints took their case to Washington, D.C., but a helping hand was not to be found even in the nation’s capitol. The Saints received no financial aid or redress for the sufferings and material losses caused by the citizens and governor of Missouri. The Illinois Era About the middle of February 1839, the Foutz family joined the Haun’s Mill survivors and hundreds of other Missouri Saints in a great exodus to Illinois; the Foutz’s settled in Quincy. At first the residents of Quincy were hospitable. They understood the unjust treatment the Saints had received in Missouri. It seemed as though the Latter-day Saints finally had found sympathetic neighbors. But as the Saints continued to cross the Illinois border into Quincy, the locals became alarmed. They feared the new citizens would take away their jobs. This fear probably upset the local politicians enough that they repeated what so many other townspeople in New York, Ohio, and Missouri had done: they urged the Mormons to move elsewhere. The Foutz family left Quincy sometime in 1840. On October 27, 1840, Jacob Foutz was made second councilor to Bishop Matthew Leach in the Freedom Stake of the Church, near Payson, Adams County, Illinois (Payson is about 10 miles east of Quincy). While living in Adams County, Margaret Foutz gave birth to her ninth child, Margaret, Jr. Sometime between October 1840 and February 1841 the Foutz family moved into Brown County, for the Prophet Joseph Smith records that on February 28, 1841, a branch of the Church or stake of Zion was organized in Brown County, western Illinois with Levi Gifford as president, Lodarick as first councilor, and Jacob Foutz as second councilor. As with their previous two homes in Illinois, the Foutz family did not stay long in Brown County; soon they were in Nauvoo, Illinois. On October 12, 1842, the high council of the Church in Nauvoo Aresolved that the City of Nauvoo be divided into ten wards according to the division made by the Temple Committee, and that there be a Bishop appointed over such districts immediately out of the City and adjoining there to as shall be considered necessary.This resolution continues by naming those chosen to preside over these districts. Jacob Foutz was appointed bishop of the Nauvoo Fifth Ward. Between the time Jacob lived in Brown County in 1841 and in Nauvoo in 1842, he served a mission for the Church.[4] A little diary kept by Jacob adds some insight during this time of his life. The humble book, handmade of white paper and sewed to a black cover, records the following: ALeft Nauvoo 12th. Of September and left Quincy 3rd. of October.This is believed to be Jacob’s notation of the dates he left to serve a mission for the ChurchCback to his homeland of Pennsylvania. The year is believed to be 1841. The exact circumstances under which Jacob Foutz left Nauvoo for the mission field are not known. Serving a mission was undoubtedly a great sacrifice for both Jacob and the Foutz family. The Foutz’s had barely settled in their home in Nauvoo when Jacob received the call. He left his six living children and Margaret, who was expecting another baby soon. At this time in LDS Church history, many men were sent as missionaries to far-off lands although the men were needed badly at home for many tasks. In Nauvoo, the tasks included a swamp to drain, homes to build, and a temple to construct. Under these conditions, Jacob Foutz left for Pennsylvania to preach the gospel. He achieved success laboring among his friends and relatives, many of whom he helped to convert and to be baptized into the Church. Jacob records in his diary that he left APitsburgto go out and search faithfully and to preach in nearby neighborhoods. Jacob labored in the Pennsylvania counties of Indiana, Camberg, Bedford and Franklin. Usually he preached at meetings held in schoolhouses, but occasionally he preached at meetings in private homes. According to Jacob’s record, the investigators at these meetings numbered from 11 to 18; at one meeting he notes 28 were present. On November 16, 1842, Jacob records he baptized Levi Thornton and his wife, Elizabeth. The following expense account in Jacob’s diary, which Jacob kept together with his other records, sheds light into the purchases of a nineteenth-century Latter-day Saint missionary (the list is unedited): 10 libs. fish .40 Calico 1.60 Sugar .10 Cofy .12 Butter 2 lbs. 120 How long Brother Foutz remained on his mission is not known. Margaret gave birth to a baby boyCHyrum, in December 1842Cin Jacob’s absence. No record of the baby was ever written after this time, so Hyrum probably died in infancy. Nauvoo, in those days, was an extremely unhealthful place to live. Sickness was rampant throughout the settlement, and the old and young died of fever continually. Little Hyrum probably died of such an illness. But illness and even death did not hinder the faith of Margaret and Jacob. The following (unedited) miraculous experience was written (years after the fact) in Margaret’s autobiography: AMy jusband was a man of great faith, and many times has sickness yielded and even broken bones been united in oure family, through prayer and the administration of the laying on of hands. I bear testimony that this work commonly called AMormonismis true and I leave this as a testimony to my children and to my children’s children, and to all who may read my autobiography, that this work is the work of the Lord. AI will now chronicle one miracle that took place in my home. My jusband took very sick, also a young man that lived at out house was very sick and my eldes child had been very sick for about ten days; in fact he was so bad that he had become speechless. I sent for an Elder, Brother J. Carto. He and another Elder came with him, and they administered to each of the sick and then called upon them, in name of the Lord to arise from their beds and be made whole. They did so and I got them somthing to eat, of which they partook and they were instantaneously healed by the power of GodCHis servants officiating in Priesthood which they had received. After returning from his mission, Jacob stayed very active in the Church. He was made a member of the Nauvoo LegionCan 85-man group placed aboard the AMaid of Iowasteamboat to protect the Prophet Joseph Smith. As a result of threats by mobs to take the Prophet and others out of Nauvoo, the Maid of Iowa was launched from Nauvoo to patrol the Mississippi River; it prevented anyone from taking the Prophet to Missouri by water for trial. Jacob Foutz was among a group that loaded the boat June 25, 1842, and sailed that night. After being gone for about one week, the crew left Quincy on July 1, 1843 at 8 a.m. to return to Nauvoo. On the morning of Sunday, October 1, 1843, Joseph Smith attended a meeting in Nauvoo that was eventually adjourned due to the cold and rain. The afternoon weather, however, was more pleasant, and the people assembled to resume their meeting. They were addressed by Elder William Marks, president of the Nauvoo Stake; by Charles C. Rich; and by Bishop Jacob Foutz. Along with the other Saints in Nauvoo, the Foutz family busied themselves at home while living in constant fear of the mobs, which threatened the Saints continually. In June 1844, the Prophet Joseph, his brother, Hyrum, and others gave themselves to the mob to prevent further trouble and bloodshed. Taken to the jail in Carthage, Illinois, Joseph and Hyrum never returned alive. Following the death of their beloved Prophet and leader, the Saints lived in even greater fear and anxiety. The mob continually threatened to burn Nauvoo and to drive the Mormons from the state. During these troublesome times, Margaret Foutz gave birth to another son, Jacob, Jr., on August 25, 1844. During this era, several Church leaders broke away from the main body of Saints and took with them many followers. Jacob Foutz and his family, however, remained faithful to the proper authority. When Brigham Young, president of the Quorum of the Twelve, was chosen to lead the Church, the Foutz family rallied around their new prophet and gave him their support. At General Conference on October 7, 1844, the membership of the Church sustained Jacob Foutz in his calling as a bishop by a unanimous vote.[5] During the next day’s session, President Young selected men from the high priest quorum to go abroad Ain all the congressional district of the United States to preside over the branches of the Church.Jacob Foutz was among those chosen to go. However, no record states that Brother Foutz answered this call. He had recently served a mission to Pennsylvania, and his health was still suffering from being wounded at Haun’s Mill. Despite persecution and a common feeling that again they would have to abandon their homes, the Nauvoo Saints continued to build the temple. All participated who could donate their time and services. At the commencement of 1845, the Saints put forth special effort to rush the temple to completion. In a record published January 31, 1845, Bishops Newel K. Whitney and George Miller (the new trustees-in-trust for the Church)[6] said Jacob Foutz was one of the brethren appointed as agents by the proper authorities of the Church to Acollect donations and tithings for the Temple and for other purposes, in the City of Nauvoo. Three months later at the General Conference of the Church on April 7, 1845, William Clayton recorded that among the principal officers of the Church sustained by the membership, Jacob Foutz was sustained as bishop of the Eighth Ward of Nauvoo. The winters were long and cold for those who were so poorly housed and underfed. Sickness was prevalent and the elders of the Church kept busy administering to the sick and caring for the own families. On Monday, February 9, 1846, the Nauvoo Temple was set on fire. Men and women frantically carried water and eventually succeeded in putting out the flames. With sorrow the Saints viewed the damage done to the Lord’s houseCthe structure for which many had gone hungry to help build. With the arrival of spring, life returned to normal, and the Foutz family made preparations for the wedding of their 18-year-old daughter, Elizabeth. On April 10, 1846, Elizabeth was married to Henson Walker in the Nauvoo Temple. Elizabeth and Henson began their wedded life in troublesome times. Members of the Church were crossing the river to leave Nauvoo as rapidly as possible. Many Saints had moved during the middle of winter; those still in Nauvoo were urged to speed their departure. President Young and many of the Twelve Apostles as far west as Council Bluffs in search of refuge for the Saints. Crossing the Plains Exactly when Bishop Jacob Foutz and his family left Nauvoo is not known, but it must have been soon after the April 10 marriage of Elizabeth and Henson. Trouble with the mob was worsening each day. Surely without fanfare the Foutz family boarded their covered wagon and left their ACity Beautifuland the eastern United States, never to return. Once again the family was homeless. And the uncertainty of this journey, more than any other, required bolstered faith and devotion. Upon leaving Nauvoo, the Foutz family first traveled to Garden Grove, Iowa. Here they stayed long enough to harvest a crop in the summer and fall of 1846. The next stop was Winter Quarters, where the Saints had built homes and were preparing to spend the winter. Many travelers, arriving late in the season, were forced to live in their wagons through the long, cold winter. On June 21, 1847, roughly a year after the left Nauvoo, Jacob and Margaret Foutz and their family left Winter Quarters for the three-month summer journey that would take them to a permanent home in the Rocky Mountains. The Foutz family did not leave without an organized means of traveling. The departing Saints, in order to know what course to travel and to have a leader for counsel and assistance, were organized into companies with captains over each group of 100, 50, and 10 people. Bishop Jacob Foutz and Joseph Horne were captains of the second fifty of the Abraham O. Smoot Company.[7] As they began walking in June 1847, the Foutz family most likely consisted of Jacob, age 46; Margaret, 45; Nancy Ann, 21; Elizabeth, 19 (now married to Henson Walker); Catherine, 16; Joseph Lehi, 10; Margaret, 7; and Jacob, 2. The Foutzes probably had two wagons to store all their household goods and belongings; Catherine and Lehi often told how they drove one of the teams of oxen on their journey. Even though they were better off than many families by having two wagons, the members of the Foutz family still had to walk most of the way. Jacob and Margaret did not keep a daily record of their journey across the plains. However, in Andrew Jenson’s Pioneer History Journal, the location of the Foutz family is cited in the fall of 1847: ASept. 7, 1847. It snowed part of the day and the weather was cold. By night the snow had cleared away. They crossed the Dry Sandy Creek at two o’ clock P.M. and the Little Sandy at ten o’clock in the evening where they stopped to camp. The road was good and the cattle traveled very much faster especially after sundown. They made twenty-eight miles that day. AThe second fifty of Smoot’s hundred with Jacob Foutz and Joseph Horne as Captains spent part of the day with other pioneers from another company at the upper crossing of the Sweetwater. ASat. Sept. 18, 1847; Smoot’s hundred arrived and camped on Bear River. Their journey continued until the whole Smoot Company arrived in the Salt Lake Valley on September 25, 1847. The Smoot Company was fortunate to arrive before the heavy snowfalls of early autumn. Some companies who were caught in these storms suffered terribly. When cattle no longer could pull the loads in the heavy snow, companies sent a call for help to the Saints in the Valley. Jacob Foutz was one of those sent to the rescue. According to Jenson’s Pioneer History Journal, AThe second fifty of Smoot’s company responded liberally to the call of sending teams [from] the valley to help the rear company over the mountains. Jacob Foutz sent one yoke of oxen back. A New Home in the West The Foutzes had finally finished their journey west, but there was little time to rest. The approaching winter required the family to stay very busy that fall establishing their new home. Along with the other Saints who arrived in 1847, Jacob and Margaret assisted in the original building of Salt Lake City. Jacob and Margaret also received callings in the first Church organizations to be established in the new area. On November 7, 1847, Bishop Foutz was again placed at the head of a ward. This time he became bishop of the East half of the New Fort Ward, which was one of the five wards in the Great Salt Lake Valley. On January 7, 1848, while living in her new home, Margaret gave birth to her twelfth and final child, daughter Maranda. Poor of health, Bishop Foutz spent much of his time in bed. The injuries he suffered at Haun’s Mill had never completely healed, and the fever sickness he contracted in Nauvoo lingered as well. Just over a month after the arrival of his baby daughter, Bishop Foutz passed away at the age of 47. Jacob’s death on February 147, 1848 was a freak happening: while he was away from home excavating in gravel, his fellow workers said he Atook a fitor a stroke and died suddenly. Jacob Foutz’s final resting place is in Salt Lake City; the exact spot is uncertain. However, one thing is certainCthat Jacob went to the reward for which he had labored all his life. He lived an eventful and exciting life, mingled with joys and sorrows. He was a faithful member and leader of the Church for many years, having moved his family with the Saints from Ohio to Missouri to Illinois to UtahCall in an effort to help build the kingdom of God on earth. Church members joined the Foutz family in February 1848 to mourn the passing of this righteous man. Life without father Jacob continued for the Foutz family, who eventually settled in Pleasant Grove, Utah. In later years, Margaret often said her husband left her with eight children, seven bushels of wheat, two cows, a city lot, and five acres of brush land. When Jacob died, Catherine, 16, was the oldest child at home. Joseph Lehi, the oldest son, was then 10 years old. Even at this young age, Joseph assumed much of the financial responsibility for the Foutz family. Margaret Foutz lived for almost 50 more years. She died August 5, 1896. But the legacy of faith established by Jacob and Margaret Foutz has never died. The Foutz posterity continues to bring hundreds of descendants into this world to reap the blessings as members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Jacob Foutz, Sr. and Family by Grace Foutz Boulter and Mary Foutz Corrigan

Contributor: aerounds Created: 1 week ago Updated: 1 week ago

Jacob Foutz, Sr. and Family 1800 - 1848 Jacob Foutz, Sr. was a native of Pennsylvania. He was born in Franklin County, November 20, 1800, the son of John Foutz and Elizabeth Hinkle, who were also natives of this same county and state. The information available regarding the earlier ancestry of this family is meager. It is known, however, that the father of the above mentioned John Foutz was Conrad Foutz, born in Sweibruchen, Germany in 1734, died in Donegal, Pennsylvania, November 20, 1790. Conrad´s wife, Elizabeth, was born in 1739, place unknown. She died September 26, 1827, at Lewisburg, Pennsylvania. According to the records of Mr. A. B. Foutz, who lived in Pennsylvania, and who died about 1937, the above mentioned Conrad Foutz came to this country from Germany. His father and mother died during the trip over and were buried at sea. Conrad came to America alone, but no record is available as to the year he came. It is believed that Jacob Foutz, Sr. had several brothers and sisters. The only authentic record we have as yet is a mention made in the diary of Jacob Foutz, Sr. where he writes of having a brother, Micial, and a sister, Elizabeth. The record of his sister, Elizabeth, shows she was born June 22, 1797, Franklin County, Pennsylvania. She married Jacob Hess, 1816. Elizabeth Foutz Hess joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and came to Utah with the Pioneers in 1847. She was the mother of twelve children. She made her home in Farmington, Utah. Her posterity is numerous throughout northern Utah. More will be said of this good woman later in the history. Very little information is to be had regarding the early life of Jacob Foutz, Sr. We do know, however, that he was an energetic brick layer. When he was twenty-one years old (July 22, 1822), he married Margaret Mann. She was the daughter of David Mann and Mary Rock, born December 11, 1801, in Thomastown, Franklin County, Pennsylvania. When Margaret was a mere baby she was left an orphan, deprived of both parents. But He who is a "Father to the fatherless" had a mission for her to perform and so she was spared and brought up by strangers to heed the voice of God and glorify His name. The lives of these two young people, Jacob and Margaret, were destined to be adventuresome and notable. They lived in one of the most progressive periods the world has ever known and in one of the countries which was making its own early history at this time. They came from a section of this country that furnished many pioneers, and early in their married life, they too went to live on the frontier. While they lived in Franklin County, Pennsylvania, four girls were born to them, two of which died in infancy. Susan was born February 14, 1823, and Polly was born October 10, 1824. Polly lived to be about seven years old, as it is believed she died sometime in 1831. The third daughter, Nancy Ann, was born in Jemper City, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, on the 21st day of May, 1826. The fourth child, Elizabeth,was born September 13, 1827. Franklin County, where the Foutz family lived, was settled mainly by German people, and the Foutz children were taught to speak the German language before they learned to speak English. This caused them much embarrassment when they left this section of the country and went west among the English speaking people. In the latter part of the year 1827, the family moved west to Richland County, Ohio. At this time Ohio and the country westward was only sparsely settled. The small settlements were chiefly along the rivers which were the main means of travel. There was much good land to be had for the taking and many families were leaving their homes in the east to take up farming on the western frontiers. It was in this new home in Richland County, Ohio, where the fifth child in the Foutz family was born. This daughter they named Sarah. Here also death visited this humble abode as Polly, their second daughter, died sometime in 1831. In December of this same year 1831 their sixth daughter was born to them on Christmas Day. While this little family lived in Richland County, Ohio, Elder David Evans of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints came to their home and taught them the Gospel. They were convinced of its truth and were baptized into the Church, which was a very unpopular thing to do at that time, as most people were very bitter toward the Elders. The same year they became members of the Church, their first son was born. He was Alma, the seventh child in the family, born December 4, 1824. This child, however, like his sister Polly, was not permitted to live long upon the earth, as he died in childhood sometime before October, 1838. Shortly after the Foutz family joined the Church, they probably felt the "spirit of gathering" which was then being taught by the Elders of the Church, for they left Ohio and moved farther west. This time they purchased some land on the Crooked River in Missouri. Here was an organized branch of the Church, and here they hoped to have a permanent home. This branch of the Church was presided over by their friend, Elder David Evans, who had first preached the Gospel to them. Speaking of this new home in Missouri, Margaret Foutz says, "We enjoyed ourselves exceedingly well and everything seemed to prosper, but the spirit of persecution began to manifest itself. Falsehoods were circulated about the Mormon population that was settling about the region and soon there began to be signs of trouble." Here, on the Crooked River in Caldwell County, Missouri, another son was born to the Foutz family on March 16, 1837. This son they named Joseph Lehi. He was the eldest son to live and was destined to play an important role in the settling of the west. Margaret Foutz, in October 1838, speaks of her "little family of five children" so we take for granted that the eldest child, Susan, must also have passed on into another sphere before this time, as well as Polly and Alma. The Foutz family, with the other members of the little settlement, were not permitted to enjoy their new home for long. The mobs were driving the Saints out of one county after another in Missouri, and as Margaret Foutz said, "Even in the little settlement of Haun´s Mill in Caldwell County, trouble was being felt." The mob had threatened to destroy the mill owned by Brother Haun and so as a precautionary measure the Saints had organized themselves together and planned to keep a few watchmen at the mill continually. The Saints had met with a great deal of opposition from the people in Missouri, as they had in different sections of the east. It seems the evil spirit was always at work stirring up individuals and groups of individuals to persecute the Saints. Many times the brethren had tried to settle matters peaceably, but to no avail, and so in October 1838, the Foutz family had a most trying experience. It is known in Church History as "The Haun´s Mill Massacre". "We ran about three miles into the woods and there huddled together, spreading what few blankets and shawls we chanced to have upon the ground for the children. There we remained until two o´clock the next morning before we heard anything of the result of the firing at the mill. Who can imagine our feelings during this dreadful suspense? When the news did come, lo! What terrible news! Fathers, brothers, husbands killed! "We now took up the line of march for home, but alas what a home! Who would we find there? Now with our minds full of the most fearful forebodings, we retraced those three long, dreary miles. As we were returning I saw Brother Myers who had been shot through the body. In that dreadful state he had crawled on his hands and knees about two miles to his home. "After I arrived at my house with my children, I hastily made a fire to warm them and then started for the mill, about two miles distant. My children would not remain at home as they said, `If father and mother are going to be killed, we want to be with them.' "On the way to the mill, in the first house I came to, there were three dead men. One, a Brother McBride, was a terrible sight to behold, having been cut and chopped and mangled with a corn cutter. I was told that he was a survivor of the Revolutionary War. "I hurried on, looking for my husband and finally found him in an old house covered with some rubbish.He had been shot in the thigh. I there rendered him all the aid that I could, but it was evening before I could get him home. "I saw thirteen more dead bodies at the shop and witnessed the beginning of the burial which consisted in throwing the men that the mob had killed into a vault that formerly was intended for a well. They threw the bodies in head first or feet first as the case might be. When they had thrown in three, my heart sickened and I could not stand it more. I turned away to keep from fainting. "My husband and another brother had drawn dead bodies over themselves and pretended to be dead. By so doing they saved their own lives and heard what some of the mob said. After the firing was over two little boys that were in the shop begged for their lives, but no - one of the mob said, `They will make Mormons´ and he put the muzzle of his gun to the boys´ heads and blew their brains out. "Oh, what a change one short day had brought! Here were our friends dead and dying, one in particular asked me to take a hammer and give him relief by knocking his brains out so great was his agony. And in all this we knew not what moment our enemies would be upon us again. "All this suffering, not because we had broken any law - on the contrary, it was part of our religion to keep the laws of the land - but because the evil spirit was at work among the children of men. "In the evening Brother Evans got a team and wagon and conveyed my husband to our home. He carried him in and placed him on the bed. I then had to attend him along, without a doctor or anyone to tell me what to do for him. Six days later my husband, himself, helped me to extract the bullet which was buried deep in the thick part of his thigh and was flattened like a knife. We did this with a kitchen knife. "During the first ten days the mob came every day with blackened faces (more like demons from the infernal pit than like human beings) cursing and swearing that they would kill the old Mormon preacher, who was my husband. At times like these when human nature would quail, I have felt the power of God upon me to that degree that I have stood before the mob fearless and although a woman and alone, these demons in human shape had to succumb to the power which they knew not of. During these days of danger I sometimes hid my husband out in the woods behind our home and covered him with leaves. When he was able to sit up he was dressed as a woman and put at the spinning wheel. In this way his life was protected. Thus, during my husband´s illness was I harassed by mobocratic violence." The story is told that on one occasion when the mob came to Sister Foutz´s looking for her husband, she felt the power of God upon her to such an extent that she was totally unafraid. She commanded the mobbers, inasmuch as they had killed and injured the men of the community, to kill and dress a pig for her and her little ones to eat. These men trembled before this little woman and did as she had told them to do. Sister Foutz often told how she surprised herself on such occasions, but she was humble and gave credit and thanks to her God for this extra courage and strength. The mobs had taken food, clothing and bedding from the Saints and had even burned some of their homes. So now besides the pain and sorrow they had to bear, many of them were without even the bare necessities of life. The day came, at length, when the mob finally left the Saints alone with the understanding that they were to leave Missouri in the spring. This the Saints agreed to do, even though it meant giving up another of their homes and the improved land that went with them. Always their enemies profited from their labor and suffering. About the middle of February 1839 the Foutz family, along with other inhabitants of the little settlement of Haun´s Mill, and hundreds of other Saints from other parts of Missouri began their exodus. They went from Missouri to Quincy, Illinois. At Quincy the people were hospitable. They understood the unjust treatment the Saints had been given in Missouri and for awhile they seemed to sympathize with them. As more Saints continued to come into Illinois the local citizens of Quincy became alarmed. They feared that the new citizens would take all the work to be had and probably upset political authority, and so they too began to suggest that the "Mormons" move elsewhere. In the files of the Latter-Day Saints, there is on record what seems to be a registered complaint signed by Jacob Foutz, sworn to against individuals of the mob which had molested the Saints in Missouri. This complaint reads as follows: Quincy, Illinois, March 17, 1840 This is to certify that I was citizen retime of Caldwell County, Missouri, at the time Governor Bogg´s exterminating order was issued and that I was quartered on by the mob militia without my leave or consent, at different times, and one time by William Mann, Hiram Cumstock and brother, who professed to be the captain, also Robert White; And that I was wounded and driven from the State to my inconvenience and deprived of my freedom as well as to my loss of at least four hundred dollars. Signed ----------- Jacob Foutz Sworn to before C. M. Woods, Clerk Circuit. Many such complaints were sworn to by different men and they are on file in Illinois, but although the matter was even taken to the Federal Government at Washington D.C., the Saints were unable to get help or redress for the sufferings and material losses which the citizens and Governor of Missouri had caused them. It must have been sometime in 1840 when the Foutz family left Quincy, Illinois, for in that year (October 27, 1840) we find Jacob Foutz was made second counselor to Bishop Matthew Leach in the Freedom Stake of the Church, near Payson, Adams County, Illinois. While the Foutz family lived in Adams County, Illinois, probably in the city of Quincy, or near Payson, their daughter Margaret was born. This was on the 16th day of October 1839. Sometime between October 1840 and February 1841 the Foutz family moved into Brown County, for it is recorded in the writing of Joseph Smith that on February 28, 1841, a branch of the Church, or Stake of Zion, was organized in Brown County, Western Illinois, with Levi Gifford as president, Lodarick as first counselor and Jacob Foutz as second counselor. Jacob Foutz must not have lived in this locality long, for shortly after this he was living in Nauvoo, Illinois. On the 20th of October 1842 the High Council in session (at Nauvoo) "Resolved that the City of Nauvoo be divided into ten wards according to the division made by the Temple Committee, and that there be a Bishop appointed over such districts immediately out of the city and adjoining thereto as shall be considered necessary." This resolution goes on further to give the names of those chosen to preside over these districts. Jacob Foutz was appointed Bishop of the Fifth Ward. In a little diary kept by Jacob Foutz, we are given a little insight into his life. This book is a meager affair, handmade of white paper, sewn to a black cover. In this diary he says, "Left Nauvoo 12th of September and left Quincy 3rd of October." This we believe to be the notation made at the time he left for the mission field. The year is believed to be 1841. The Church Presidency thought it advisable to keep in touch with the eastern branches even if the Saints were hard pressed in their new location. Missionaries were sent out as usual in spite of the fact that they were badly needed at home to drain the swamp that was to be their home, build their homes and help with the ******** of the Temple. Under just what circumstances Jacob Foutz left to go on his mission, we do not know, but surely it must have been a great sacrifice for him and his family to make. They were barely settled in their home in Nauvoo when he was sent away, leaving his six children and wife who was expecting another baby soon. His mission took him again to his old home state of Pennsylvania where he labored among his friends and relatives, many of whom he was successful in converting and baptizing into the church. Jacob Foutz tells (in his diary) of leaving "Pitsburg" and going out and searching faithfully and preaching in nearby neighborhoods. He labored in Indiana, Camberg, Bedford and Franklin Counties. Most of the time he preached at meetings held in the school houses, but occasionally meetings were held in the homes of individuals. According to his record, the investigators of these meetings numbered from eleven to eighteen and at one meeting he notes twenty-eight were present. On November 16, 1842, Jacob Foutz records that he baptized Levi Thornton and wife, Elizabeth. An expense account in the diary of Jacob Foutz, which he kept right along with his other records, is interesting when we compare the price and variety of goods which this missionary bought with those purchases today. Evidently these good brethren bought for their families as well as themselves while out in the mission field, as such items as "calico" appear often in the lists, one of which is as follows: 10 lbs. fish.40Calico1.60 Sugar.10Cofy.12 Butter 2lbs..20 Just how long Brother Foutz remained on his mission is not known. The next account of him we have is in June 1842, at which time he was again in Nauvoo. His wife had given birth to a baby boy in his absence. This child, Hyrum, was born in December 1842 at Nauvoo, Illinois. No record after this time is to be had concerning this baby, so it is believed it died in infancy. Nauvoo at that time was a most unhealthy place to live. There was much sickness throughout the settlement and old and young died of fever continually. It is possible that little Hyrum may have been a victim of such disease. Our sympathy goes out to the mother of this family, for she had more than her share of work and worry to make a home in this new country under such trying circumstances. In Margaret Foutz´s autobiography (written years later) she had this to say: "My husband was a man of great faith, and many times had sickness yielded and even broken bones been united in our family, through prayer and the administration of the laying on of hands. I bear testimony that this work commonly called "Mormonism" is true and I leave this as a testimony to my children and to my children´s children, and to all who may read my autobiography, that this work is the work of the Lord. "I will now chronicle one miracle that took place in my home. My husband took very sick, also a young man that lived at our house was very sick and my eldest child had been very sick for about ten days; in fact he was so bad that he had become speechless. I sent for an Elder, Brother J. Carto. He and another Elder came with him, and they administered to each of the sick and then called upon them, in the name of the Lord, to arise from their beds and be made whole. They did so and I got them something to eat, of which they partook and they were instantaneously healed by the power of God - His servants officiating in Priesthood which they had received." After returning from his mission, Jacob Foutz was very active in the Church and he was also made a member of the Nauvoo Legion. Inasmuch as threats were being made by mobs to take the Prophet and others out of Nauvoo, men were called especially to protect Brother Joseph. Jacob Foutz was among a group of about eighty-five men aboard the "Maid of Iowa", a steamboat which was sent out from Nauvoo to patrol the Mississippi River in an effort to prevent anyone from taking the Prophet to Missouri by water for trial. This boat was loaded June 25, 1842 and sailed that night. They were out about one week,; as it is recorded, they left Quincy, Illinois, on July 1, 1843 at 8:00 a.m. to return to Nauvoo. On Sunday, October 1, 1843 Joseph Smith attended a meeting in Nauvoo in the morning which was adjourned in consequence of cold and rain. The weather in the afternoon was more pleasant and the people assembled to resume their meeting. They were addressed on this occasion by Elder William Marks, local president of the Nauvoo stake, Charles C. Rich and Bishop Jacob Foutz. The Foutz family, like all of the other Saints, were busy making their home in Nauvoo while, at the same time, they lived in constant fear of the mobs which were threatening them continually. In June 1844 the Prophet Joseph, his brother Hyrum and others following the advice of some of the Saints, gave themselves up to the mob in an effort to save trouble and bloodshed. These men were taken to the jail in Carthage, Illinois, from which the Prophet and his brother Hyrum never returned alive. After this dreadful event which took place at Carthage in which the two brothers Joseph and Hyrum lost their lives, the Saints lived in even greater fear and anxiety. Threats were made continually by the mob to burn Nauvoo and drive the people from the state. In these troublesome and uncertain times, Margaret Foutz gave birth to another son Jacob on August 25, 1844. The Saints, now left without a President, were greatly bewildered. Sidney Rigdon, who had been a counselor to Joseph Smith in the First Presidency of the Church, sought to set himself up as their leader. This he did before the Twelve Apostles, the rightful governing power of the Church could gather themselves in from their various mission fields. Sidney Rigdon was prevented from carrying out his plan and was later disfellowshipped from the church. Many were led away who were in sympathy with his views. Several other church leaders broke away from the Church at this time and took with them many followers. Jacob Foutz and his family remained faithful to the proper authority, and when Brigham Young, President of the Twelve Apostles, was chosen to lead the Church, they rallied around their new President and gave him their support. In the fall, the general conference of the Church was held. At this conference on October 7, 1844, Jacob Foutz and other leaders and Bishops were sustained in their various offices by a unanimous vote. On October 8, 1844 at another session of this general conference, President Young proceeded to select men from the High Priest Quorum to go abroad "in all the congressional districts of the United Stated to preside over the branches of the Church". Jacob Foutz was among those chosen on this occasion. It seems that there was much unrest and many evil practices had crept into the eastern branches of the Church and President Young thought it advisable to send faithful men, whom he knew to have the Spirit of God with them, to preside over these branches and straighten out matters. Many men left Nauvoo shortly after they received their call to fill this mission. There is no record, however, that Brother Foutz answered this call. He had recently been on a mission to Pennsylvania and it is possible that he was not sent out again, his health being poor since his encounter with the mob at Haun´s Mill. Although persecution was great and it was felt generally that the Saints would again have to abandon their homes, they were commanded of God to go ahead with the building of a temple. All who could, gave of their time and means for this purpose. At the beginning of the new year, special efforts were put forth to rush the temple completion. In a record published by Bishops Whitney and Miller, trustees in trust for the Church, dated January 31, 1845, it is shown that Jacob Foutz was one of the brethren appointed as agents by the proper authorities of the Church to "collect donations and tithings for the Temple and for other purposes, in the City of Nauvoo". Three months later, at the General Conference of the Church, on April 7, 1845, William Clayton recorded the principal officers of the Church who were sustained by the Church membership. On this occasion Jacob Foutz was sanctioned as Bishop of the Eighth Ward of Nauvoo. The winters were long and cold for those who were so poorly housed and underfed. Sickness was prevalent and the Elders of the Church were kept busy administering to the sick and caring for their own families. On Monday, February 9, 1846, the Temple was seen to be on fire. Men and women, carrying water frantically, succeeded in putting out the flames. It was with sorrow they viewed the damage that had been done to the Lord´s House. The structure which many had gone hungry to build. When spring finally came again, life became more normal and the Foutz family made preparations for the wedding of their next eldest daughter, Elizabeth. On April 19, 1846 Elizabeth was married to Henson Walker in the Nauvoo Temple. This young couple began their wedded life in troublesome times. The members of the Church were moving across the river and leaving Nauvoo as rapidly as possible. Many had moved during the dead of winter and those still in the city were urged to speed their departure. President Young and many of the Twelve Apostles were already as far west as Council Bluffs in search of a place of refuge for the Saints. So Elizabeth and Henson Walker, eager to make a home for themselves, had no idea where this home might one day be. Among those first to leave Nauvoo, crossing the Mississippi River on ice, was Elizabeth Foutz Hess, sister of Bishop Jacob Foutz. Elizabeth´s husband, Jacob Hess, was at that time paralyzed. They suffered greatly from cold and exposure. The first night after leaving Nauvoo they camped on the Iowa side of the river in a cold rain. From here they went on to Mt. Pisgah in the state of Iowa. They encountered hardships and trouble throughout the journey and upon their arrival at Mt. Pisgah Elizabeth´s husband was far spent. Her son, John W. Hess, had assumed the responsibility of his father´s family as well as his own. He had made his father as comfortable as possible in one of the two wagons and in the other was carried all the household supplies and provisions the oxen team could draw. All able to walk were forced to do so. At Mt. Pisgah they prepared to stay for a while. Here the earlier pioneers had planted crops for the benefit of those who would follow, and it was thought this would be a good place to rest. They were not there long until Jacob Hess died, June, 1846. While the Hess family was trying to adjust itself and make new arrangements, the call came to the Mormons for five hundred men to form a battalion and march to Santa Fe. In July, John W. Hess, the son, was called to enlist in the army, which he did. He took his wife with him on this long march, leaving his mother, Elizabeth Foutz Hess, and her family of fatherless children at Mt. Pisgah. Mt. Pisgah was a beautiful spot for a camp. The prairie was rolling and rich, skirted with beautiful groves of timber on the main fork of the Grand River. Under more favorable conditions Elizabeth and her family might well have been very happy in this temporary home. We will leave this little family now while we look once more upon the city of Nauvoo and the Saints that are there. It is not known definitely just when Bishop Jacob Foutz and his family left Nauvoo, but it must have been soon after their daughter, Elizabeth´s marriage to Henson Walker on April 10, 1846, for trouble with the mob became worse each day. It is recorded that few Saints were left in Nauvoo after August, 1846, for on the twelfth of this month the mob, about twelve hundred in number, came upon the Saints, armed with cannon and guns, and had a terrible battle. After fighting one hour and twenty-five minutes, the mob offered terms of compromise. All Mormons were to leave the city within five days, leaving only twelve families to finish the unsettled business and dispose of property, etc. The brethren, having little or no choice, consented to these terms and they hurried preparations to leave. It is said that on Thursday, five days later, when the mob came to Nauvoo some fifteen hundred in number, such was the distress and suffering of the Saints as actually to draw tears from the mob. Thus it was the "City Beautiful" was left behind and the Saints again were made homeless. On leaving Nauvoo, the Foutz family went first to Garden Grove, Iowa. Here they stayed long enough to harvest a crop (summer and fall of 1846), then they moved on to Winter Quarters. Here the Saints had built some homes and were preparing to spend the winter. Many, arriving later, were forced to live in their wagons throughout the long, cold winter. All during the fall and winter, reports came at different times and from various sources that the mob in Missouri was organizing to come against the Saints in their new location. It seemed that as yet they had not found the place which was destined to be their peaceful home. Often the Saints sang together the Hymn, "All is Well", written by Brother William Clayton. This helped to keep up their courage and strengthen their faith that eventually they would "find the place which God for them prepared, far away in the West". In the spring of 1847, President Young and the twelve Apostles organized a company of pioneers to blaze a trail westward and search out a suitable place for the saints to settle. On the 14th of April this little band set forth. There were one hundred forty-three men and boys on the list of this company, three women and two children. They had seventy-three wagons with horses, oxen and cattle. Among this group was Henson Walker, the young husband of Elizabeth Foutz. When Henson was called to take this journey, his wife was very ill. He would have declined to go had not Elizabeth urged him on. She wanted him to respond to all calls made upon him by the Presidency and would not now consent to his staying with her. So Henson Walker left with the promise that if his wife lived she would follow him later. Elizabeth was determined to keep this promise, so preparations were made for her to make the trip with one of the first companies to leave after the original company was well on its way. She planned to travel with her husband´s people. When her own folks learned that she was going, they prepared to follow that they might look after her burial. They had no hope that she would live to see the valleys of the Rocky Mountains. However, as they moved on westward, out of the damp lowlands, Elizabeth´s health began to improve. Her life, which for a time seemed to be close to the end, had in reality only begun. On June 21, 1847 the Foutz family left Winter Quarters on the journey that was eventually to take them to a permanent home in the mountains. These pioneers were organized into companies with a captain over each hundred, one over each fifty and one over each ten. This was done that each family might know where it was to travel and to whom to look for counsel and help. Bishop Jacob Foutz and Joseph Horne were captains of the second fifty of the Abraham O. Smoot company. As near as we are now able to figure, there were in the Foutz family at this time Bishop Jacob Foutz, who was forty-six years old, and another son, Jacob, who was four years old before they reached their destination. The family very likely had two wagons in which to store all their household goods and provisions, as Catherine and Lehi often told how they drove one of the teams of oxen on their journey westward. Even though they were better off in this respect than many families, the individuals in the family had to walk most of the way. This journey offered a variety of experiences. Before they reached their destination there was happiness, romance and adventure in store for them, as well as fatigue, hunger and sorrow. They were to find out what it meant to toil on in intense heat, extreme cold and rain. In the end lay the reward, worth all it cost. When they made preparations for the journey, they had thought to supply themselves with all that was necessary for their comfort on the journey, but they soon learned that the wagon would not hold a great deal. Often, by planning and careful packing, they were able to get in a few luxuries as well as the bare necessities, only to find out that it was too much of a load for the oxen to pull. When most families were on the road, they had only the essential food, clothing and bedding, and these were not enough when misfortune came their way. Sometimes the rain came through the wagon cover and soaked the flour which mildewed and was not fit to be eaten. Thereafter the family lived almost entirely on buffalo meat. At times a wagon would be overturned while fording a stream and then the entire contents of the wagon would be lost or badly spoiled. Feed for the cattle became a problem. In many places the grass had either been eaten off by the animals of earlier companies or destroyed when some traveler had left his campfire and caused the prairie to burn. Each day they tried to travel from one watering place to another, but this was not always possible as the streams dried up late in the summer and so occasionally they were without water. The hot, dry plains brought health to some who had fallen sick in the low, damp city of Nauvoo, but others became ill from the changes in climate, water and food. The mothers with small children suffered greatly with anxiety, never knowing what would be their lot from day to day. Often they left a lonely grave along the wayside, one that was not likely to ever be visited again. The Indians too were ever a source of worry. They were not hostile and so the pioneers did not fear them, but they were cattle thieves of the worst kind. Each night guards had to be set about the camp to keep track of the animals that wandered away in search of food. Many companies did not have enough oxen and horses to draw their wagons and so could ill afford to lose any to the Indians. However, in the face of all the trouble they had to overcome, there was ever some fun. Each day brought a change of scenery, new hope and greater dreams. Often in the evening they gathered around the campfire and listened to talks from hunters and explorers who sometimes spent the night with them. Or they sang songs and danced when they were not too tired. The young folks, upon whom responsibility did not weigh too heavily, rejoiced in the friendships they made and the adventures they encountered. Brigham Young and the first company of pioneers had at last arrived in the Salt Lake Valley, July 24, 1847. They found it to be a good place and most of them were well satisfied with the prospects of the country. They were thankful and rejoiced in the blessings they had on their journey. Not a man, woman or child had died on the trip and not even any cattle died, but a few were stolen by the Indians. This group of Pioneers immediately got to work exploring the country thereabouts and laying out the city that was to be their future home. Everything was to center around the Temple Square, and the city was so laid out. The once barren desert at once became a very busy place. Some were sent into the mountains for logs with which to build homes, some set to work making adobes. Some fenced off corrals for the cattle and others plowed the ground and planted crops. Everyone did his part to get the valley ready for those who were soon to arrive. On July 29, the Pueblo company of the Mormon Battalion arrived in the Salt Lake Valley. Everyone rejoiced in seeing the brethren who had answered the nation´s call and taken such a hard journey into the wilderness. These soldiers were in good spirits, but many were seriously ill and travel worn. Those able to work assisted the pioneers in the work being done in the valley, but they were all anxious to start east and look after their families. As soon as it was possible, preparations were made for those who were going back to Winter Quarters to do so, as they hoped to reach their old homes before snow fell. Accordingly, on August 16, 1847, many of these hardy pioneers and soldiers set out again over the rough roads they had made. Some were happy at the prospects of seeing their families, while others, like Henson Walker, were fearful lest their loved ones had departed this life. On August 30, these brethren met the Spencer Company on the Sweet Water (east of Ft. Bridger). William Walker was in this group and it is believed that Elizabeth Foutz Walker was there also. There must have been great rejoicing when this young couple were again united. Walkers went on to the Salt Lake Valley, arriving there in September 1847. Quotations taken from the Pioneer History Journal, compiled by Andrew Jenson, give a little insight into the whereabouts of the Foutz family in the fall of 1847. "Sept. 7, 1847. It snowed part of the day and the weather was cold. By night the snow had cleared away. They crossed the Dry Sandy Creek at two o´clock P. M. and the Little Sandy at ten o´clock in the evening where they stopped to camp. The road was good and the cattle traveled very much faster, especially after sundown. They made twenty-eight miles that day. "The second fifty of Smoot´s hundred, with Jacob Foutz and Joseph Horne as Captains, spent part of the day with other pioneers from another company at the upper crossing of the Sweetwater. "Sat., Sept. 18, 1847. Smoot´s hundred arrived and camped on Bear River. And so their journey continued until the whole company arrived in the Salt Lake Valley on September 25, 1847. This company was fortunate in getting there before the heavy snows fell. Some companies caught in these storms suffered terribly. The cattle could no longer pull the loads in the heavy snow and a call for help came to the Saints in the valley. Quoting from the Pioneer History Journal, we find: "The second fifty of Smoot´s company responded liberally to the call of sending teams from the valley to help the rear company over the mountains. Jacob Foutz sent one yoke of oxen back." With winter ready to set in, the entire Foutz family became very busy establishing their new home. With the other Saints, they assisted in making the first improvements in Salt Lake City along with working in the first organizations of the church that were set up in this new location. On November 7, 1847, Bishop Jacob Foutz was again placed at the head of one of the wards of the Church. This time he became Bishop of the east half of the New Fort Ward which was one of the five wards into which the pioneers of Great Salt Lake Valley were divided. This ward was located in the west side of town near where the Pioneer Park was later developed. It was in this general location where the Foutz family located. In this new home, on January 7, 1848, a baby daughter was born, whom they named Maranda. Bishop Foutz had poor health and was in bed much of his time. His ill health was contributed to the injuries he received at Haun´s Mill and to the fever sickness which he suffered while in Nauvoo. Of this sickness his wife tells us more in her later years. Just a little over a month after the arrival of the baby girl, which was their twelfth child, Bishop Jacob Foutz passed away. His death occurred while he was away from home excavating in gravel, on the 14th day of February, 1848. His fellow workers said he took what they called a stroke and died suddenly. (More like a heart attack.) It is not known where Bishop Jacob Foutz was buried. There is no record to indicate that the City Cemetery had been laid out then, as his death was among the first to occur in the valley. He was very likely buried on the family property, as there are records to indicate that such was the practice in that early day. Traditions of the family differ as to the place of his burial. Some say he was buried on a hillside by other graves and that some years later, a land slide covered all the graves there. Another tradition, for which we can furnish no proof, is that he was buried on the northeast corner of Second South Street and Main where the Walker Bank now stands. The place of his burial is still unknown. Although we do not know where his final resting place was, we do know that he went to the reward for which he had labored all his life. His life had been an eventful one, mingled with joys and sorrows. He had been a faithful member of the Church for many years and a diligent worker in it. The Church leaders, as well as the membership, joined with the family in mourning the passing of this humble servant of God. Now that the family was left without a father, new plans had to be made for their livelihood. The mother, Margaret, told often in later years that her husband left her with eight children, seven bushels of wheat, two cows, a city lot and five acres of brush land. This was little security for a widow living in a country where there was little hope of finding employment for herself or her children. Joseph Lehi, the eldest son, was then ten years old. Even at that age he heroically assumed much of the financial responsibility of the family. He, like other boys of the time, had had little if any schooling, and so he had to resort to the kind of work an unschooled lad could get in a pioneer country. He was a born trader and a lover of animals, especially horses. By driving teams for others and by his trading he was able to help his mother greatly. Catherine, then sixteen years of age, found employment in the home of Lewis and Clarissa Robinson. These people were very good to her and it was while she was working for them that she met her future husband, Samuel White. On the 5th day of December, 1848, Nancy Ann Foutz (twenty-two years old) married Ephraim John Pearson. The young couple made their home in Salt Lake City. The following year, September 27, 1849, Catherine was married to Samuel White. He was a native of Vernon. Having been left an orphan, he had lived most of his life with the Lyman family. While the Saints lived at Mt. Pisgah, and the call came for volunteers to join the U. S. Army, Brother Lyman advised Samuel not to join if they could get enough men with him. This evidently was not the case, however, for Samuel became a member of the Mormon Battalion. He made the long hard trip with his company and was released after reaching California. Samuel was working at Sacramento, California at the time gold was discovered there. He gathered about $500.00 in gold, then, in accordance with instruction received from the Church Presidency, he bought a horse and went on to Utah, but many of his companions and friends remained in California, attracted by the gold and the mild climate. When Samuel White reached Salt Lake City he again made his home with the Lymans until he married Catherine. Then they lived out at Cottonwood where their first child, Charles Samuel, was born on September 27, 1850. In the spring of 1850, the widow, Margaret Foutz, and her four children Joseph Lehi, Margaret, Jacob Jr., and Maranda moved south into Utah County. They located at Battle Creek (now Pleasant Grove). This was destined to be their home for many years and the home of the mother for the rest of her life. Upon their arrival in Pleasant Grove, they first lived on the land where the J. P. Hayes home now stands (1937). Later they moved into a log cabin on the lot where the old Foutz home stood for many years. This was on the northwest corner of the First West and Center Streets. At that time there was a rock wall around the city, forming a fort. This wall bordered the north side of the Foutz property. In Pleasant Grove, the family made their living by farming and by use of the spinning wheel which Mrs. Foutz was fortunate enough to own. On February 20, 1852 the first Bishop of Pleasant Grove (George S. Clark), wrote to the Deseret News: "We have only five spinning wheels at present in operation, but hope soon to have many more so that we can have some of the best music in our domestic circles." Margaret Foutz, it seems had one of these five wheels and together she and her daughter Margaret used to spin wool for their neighbors, receiving wool for pay, which they made into homespun material and socks which they were able to sell for a good price. In spite of the long hours spent in earning a living, their life in this pioneer country was not all toil. Many evenings were spent in merrymaking at the Church socials and in homes of neighbors. They often gathered for quilting "bees", wool carding "bees" and so forth. On these occasions the men folks would join them later in the evenings when the chores were done and they all enjoyed parched corn and apples or some simple refreshment which the hostess was able to furnish. Margaret Mann Foutz was well liked by her neighbors and she and her family enjoyed the friendship and association of all in the little community. Being a good neighbor and a good manager, Margaret found time to do for others as well as her own. She was always ready to help and accommodate whenever she could, but there was a limit to her ability to do some things. Her son Joseph Lehi liked to tell how Margaret broke one of her neighbors of the habit of borrowing. This neighbor, it seemed, was always running out of tea, so Mrs. Foutz put a whole package of tea into a container and labeled it her neighbor´s tea. Whenever this good woman came to borrow tea, Mrs. Foutz loaned liberally from the container and when the borrowed tea was returned it was faithfully put back in this same can. By and by the container was empty. When the neighbor again came to borrow, Mrs. Foutz told her what she had done and explained that she had borrowed herself out of tea, and she could not loan her any more. Tea seemed to figure prominently in the diet of the early Mormon pioneers. Another tale that young Joseph Lehi liked to tell was how he obtained a nice five pound package of tea for his mother. People seemed to know that young "Joe" was a trader and they came to him whenever they had anything to dispose of. One day an immigrant approached him, wanting to know where he might get a cat. Joe knew his mother would never willingly part with hers, but he also knew that she was out of tea, so he proceeded to make a deal. He traded his mother´s fine specimen of the cat family for the package of tea. Mrs. Foutz did not know for years what became of her cat. In the summer of 1855, Joseph Lehi, who was then eighteen years old, accompanied Bill Hickman to Sacramento, California, with the first herd of cattle the Mormon Church ever marketed on the Coast. California seemed to be the best place to sell their surplus cattle in those days, as it was a fast growing country. Ever since the days of the gold rush, people had poured into this section and food was generally scarce. So, while Sacramento was a good marketing place, it was still a long way off (about 700 miles) and the trip was a hard one. In this first herd there were 800 head of cattle. The Indians at this time were very hostile and this added to the danger of the long journey. Once when the Indians gave them cause for worry and made trouble for them, as a subterfuge one of the men pretended to be crazy, permitting himself to be chained to the wagon. He was such a good actor that the Indians became frightened and fled. They had no more trouble with this particular tribe. Joseph Lehi worked with Bill Hickman for a long time and the two became staunch friends. The older man influenced the younger as a father does a son. Ten years had now passed since the Saints arrived in the Rocky Mountains. In all the cities and counties of the territory there were celebrations being planned in honor of the occasion. July 24, 1857 was a memorable one, a day not to be forgotten for years to come. The sun rising on the peaceful little settlement of Pleasant Grove found flags flying and decorations everywhere ready for the celebration. The following paragraph, taken from Jensen´s Pioneer History Journal, gives an account of the parade held on this occasion in Pleasant Grove, Utah: "July 24, 1847, was an important event to the Pioneers as it was the celebration of the first ten years in Utah. John W. Lusk was Marshall of the day. The parade consisted of horses, battalion of infantry, Pioneers of 1847, Mormon Battalion carrying U.S. Flags and leading a ram. Twenty-four young men in uniform with banners and twenty-four young ladies dressed in white with blue silk scarfs. Twenty-four girls with flags containing the motto `Our Children Our Glory´ and twenty-four boys with flags bearing the motto `Defense of the Constitution´." While such celebrations were in progress throughout the territory, Porter Rockwell and others arrived in Salt Lake City from Fort Bridger, bearing news which was to change the peace of mind and the very lives of these people. The messengers went immediately to Brighton in the Big Cottonwood Canyon where Brigham Young and the Salt Lake City Saints were holding their 24th of July celebration. Here the President of the Church was notified that an army of the United States soldiers under the command of General Johnson, was advancing upon the Saints. Such news must have put an end to the festivities and brought fear and apprehension to everyone. For ten years they had toiled early and late to conquer this desert and now that it was just beginning to blossom and show the fruits of their labor, their security was again threatened. Was there never to be a time or place where they could live in peace and happiness? Like the news, armies in those days traveled slowly so there was no immediate danger, but plans must be made at once to fortify the city. By September President Brigham Young had placed Salt Lake City under martial law. Many of the Saints had left their homes and gone south to Provo and other places. The Temple, church building and some of the better homes were fixed in readiness, with orders to set them on fire should the army enter the city. This time, if their oppressors took over their property, it was to be in a worthless condition. The Saints had decided that no longer were they going to suffer their enemies to dwell in their homes. A band of scouts were sent to the mouth of Echo Canyon to prevent the U.S. Army from entering the valley. Joseph Lehi Foutz was one of this group. While on this trip Joseph rode an especially fine race mare whose owner, Bill Hickman would not have entrusted to the care of anyone else. At this time Joseph was an excellent horseman and was later to become an expert in military tactics. He rose to Captain in the Utah Militia and when the trouble with Johnson´s Army was over, Joseph Lehi trained the men in Utah County in military tactics as long as he resided there. Later, when he moved to Richfield, he had charge of the military training in Sanpete and Sevier counties. To return to the time at hand, Johnson´s Army at length did enter the valley, but under somewhat peaceful circumstances. Tears welled in the eyes of members of the Mormon Battalion when they saw their former leader General Doniphan riding through the streets of Salt Lake City with his head uncovered. General Doniphan had not forgotten the brave members of the army he had once commanded and out of respect to them he rode humbly through the streets of their beloved city. In the winter of 1857 young Margaret Foutz was married to her brother-in-law, Henson Walker, and she went to live with her sister, Elizabeth in the old Walker home on the State Highway in Pleasant Grove. Henson´s other wife, Mary Green moved into another home, leaving the two sisters to themselves. Probably the greatest event in Margaret´s life was when her only son, Ezra Foutz Walker was born. This was January 25, 1859. Margaret was a wonderful mother, caring for her child dexterously. She was independent and self-reliant. She was an orderly housekeeper and skilled in the art of needlecraft. With infinite art she made Ezra´s clothes, embroidered his little blouses and sewed also for Elizabeth´s children. Because she was so adept with her needle, all her life she gave of her time and talent to the public in preparing burial clothes. Along with other things, she made a little money for herself by knitting stockings for sale and by making homespun suits from homemade yarn. Sometimes she sold gloves she had made herself from tanned deer skin. The Walker home was a happy one. It was always open to friends and strangers alike. The Church authorities made this their stopping place as they journeyed to and from the southern towns. The dusky red man often ate at the Walker table and the neighbors and townspeople gathered there for fun and advice. Elizabeth F. Walker was called to be President of the first Relief Society organization in Pleasant Grove, and in the fulfillment of this calling she had many and varied experiences. Organizing a group of women for relief purposes was not easy inasmuch as all the pioneer women of that day were over burdened with their own work. It was about this time that one of Elizabeth´s sons was accidentally killed. The shock and sorrow of this accident undermined her health and almost cost her life. Her own experiences taught her to be sympathetic and understanding. She suffered with those in distress and rejoiced with others when good fortune came their way. In Mother Foutz´s family the younger children were now grown. The year 1866 saw both Jacob Foutz, Jr. and Maranda married. Jacob had lived at home with his mother for twenty-one years and had helped her earn her living. Now he was grown, and he chose himself a wife, and on January 7, 1866, he married Sarah Ann Thorne. Their marriage took place on a Sunday afternoon, the ceremony being performed by their brother-in-law Bishop Henson Walker. Later that spring, on March 18, 1866 Maranda, the youngest daughter in the family was married to Thomas J. Bacon. Jacob Jr. and Sarah made their home with the widowed mother who was now about sixty-five years old. As usual, the first years of their married life was a hard one. There was little work to be had for pay in this new land and now, in the winter, there was no income from the farm. Sarah was a capable, industrious girl and a comfort to her mother-in-law. Together they shared their food or fasted, whichever was their lot. Sarah often told how they ate bread and molasses day after day, until they were more than tired of it. That fall Sarah was expecting a baby, and her young husband went away in American Fork Canyon working at the saw mill. Some neighbors of the Foutz family were busy dressing a beef which they had killed. Sarah sat up late at night spinning ceaselessly to earn a little extra with which she hoped to buy some meat. When at last she had twenty-five cents, she looked at it a long time, wondering if she should spent that much on herself. Finally she decided to do so and went to the neighbors and asked to buy some meat. When they told her they had none to sell, she was so disappointed it upset her terribly. For a time after that she was unable to eat her poor fare and soon after this her baby arrived on October 11, 1866. This son they called Jacob Fredrick. He was so thin he hardly looked human, but he brought joy into their humble home and gave them a new hope for the future. Soon after this their financial outlook became better and this young pioneer family, like all the others, became prosperous and happy. When the Church began to practice again the "United Order", Jacob joined whole-heartedly and was called to take charge of the saw mill in American Fork Canyon where he had previously worked. The following autumn, as Christmas drew nearer, Sarah again started to save her small earnings, this time it was to buy some surprise for her husband, which she thought he could enjoy while away from home. She could not decide just what to give him. On Christmas morning, however, she was so proud of her choice. She gave him his gift, which was something just for him, and then she waited anxiously to see how happy it would make her husband. When he opened it, Jacob looked both surprised and ashamed, then walked out of the room without saying a word. She had given him a plug of tobacco! As the individual families took root and became better able to serve in the Church, new auxiliary organizations were added to the ward and in each of these organizations were found members of Margaret Mann Foutz´s family. Elizabeth Foutz Walker was president of the Relief Society and on December 6, 1873, when the Pleasant Grove Retrenchment Association was reorganized, Margaret Foutz Walker was made president, with seven counselors who were Pauline Eliza Brown, Louisa Pearson, Florence Halliday, Elizabeth Holman, Christena Larsen, Mary A. Frampton, Annie White; Hulda Winters (Grant), Secretary; and Martha Wooley, treasurer. This organization was the forerunner of the Young Ladies Mutual Improvement Association, which was later organized on December 20, 1878, with the same president as its head. Jacob Foutz, Jr. was a ward teacher for many years and was first counselor in the Elders´ Quorum under Alexander Bullock for eighteen years. Later Jacob was put in as president of the quorum. Brother Bullock says that in all their years together he and Jacob never had a disagreement. Catherine Foutz White, now the mother of ten children (nine of which were still living) was a Relief Society teacher for twenty-seven years. Maranda Foutz Bacon too was a well-loved Relief Society teacher, helping out in many ways that only a person with her qualities of character could do. Sarah Ann Foutz, wife of Jacob, Jr., was counselor in the Pleasant Grove Ward Relief Society, working with Patience Archer, who was the president. Henson Walker, husband of the two of the Foutz girls, was Bishop of Pleasant Grove Ward for many years. This family was not only active in the Church, but also in civic affairs as well. Jacob Jr. was a policeman for six years and later became City Marshal. Down in southern Utah, Joseph Lehi was busy with others in adjusting Indian affairs and in training men in the militia. In 1875 Joseph Lehi accompanied Jacob Hamblin into the Navajo Reservation and Hopi Indian villages. These two men became fast friends. Jacob said of Joseph that he was the best scout he had ever been out with. They had many experiences together. Joseph was an excellent marksman, was fond of target practice, and often indulged in this pastime with the Indians, who admired his skill. While in Sevier County, Joseph Lehi entered the United Order and was put in charge of the saw mill in Clear Creek Canyon. He was also given charge of the "Order´s" horses that were kept in the West Mountains. In the fall of 1877, Joseph Lehi and his family moved to Arizona. They were five weeks on the way. Enroute they crossed the Big Colorado River on ice - something that no one was ever known to do before. They journeyed long and they encountered many hardships. To keep themselves warm they put their homemade carpets over the wagon bows under the wagon cover. They also carried hot coals in the ovens of the stoves they were taking with them. Joseph had charge of Lee´s Ferry on the Big Colorado River the first season. Their first home was Moancopi, ninety miles south of the ferry. The next year they bought the home of John D. Lee, which the Indians called Monava. Here the Foutz family lived for years. Isolated as they were, all the education several of the children ever obtained was given them by the first wife, whom everyone called "Aunt Amanda". So efficient and diligent was she as a teacher that these same children later in life were able to hold important positions and take their places in their communities among people who had been more fortunately situated. Much honor is due this novel teacher and her worthy pupils. Monava was just an oasis in the desert, far from civilization. The Foutz families (there were three of them) were often lonely and homesick for their old home in Utah. Travelers were made more than welcome as the lonely settlers were as anxious to keep them as the weary travelers were pleased to stay and rest. Often such people with their teams were fed for long periods of time when the Foutz family could ill afford it. In this far away settlement, supplies were generally scarce. The family sometimes lived for months on Indian corn that cost dearly and was so worm-eaten it had to be picked over, washed and dried before it could be ground in a coffee mill to make their bread. During the years when the polygamists were being persecuted, Joseph Lehi was able to evade the officers as a fugitive. He spent one year in Old Mexico. When he returned from there he brought with him Susan Judd, who was his third wife. He jokingly remarked that he would just as "lief" be hung for a sheep as a lamb. When the government later bought out this section and added it to the Indian Reservation, Joseph Lehi, his second and third wives, and their children moved into New Mexico. The first wife, "Aunt Amanda", and her children had earlier moved to Utah. As a polygamist, Joseph Lehi was the best. He was a good manager and a good father. He was fond of little children, but as they grew up he requested strict obedience and profound respect from his children. Sorry indeed were they if they ever disobeyed him. He was a staunch believer in the adage "spare the road and spoil the child". He had a genial disposition, fond of company, quick to see the point, minded his own business, and liked to see others do the same. In 1876, when Margaret Mann Foutz was living alone in her log home in Pleasant Grove, one of her neighbors Annie Swenson, who later became the wife of Ezra Walker, wrote the story of her life as Margaret dictated it to her. The following paragraph is taken from this story. "I am now in my seventy-sixth year, the mother of twelve children, fifty-two grandchildren and twelve great grandchildren. I have witnessed the growth of our American government under that inspired document, the Constitution of the United States, and have rejoined under the wise administration of pure and good laws. And I have witnessed law set at defiance, and mobocratic violence run rampant, yea, verily, when the wicked rule the people mourn." The children of this venerable mother were also reaching their declining years and one by one, death took them, beginning with Margaret Foutz Walker, who died January 18, 1890. She had been released from her office as president of the Y.W. M.I.A. in the fall of 1881 because of failing health, and from this she never recovered. She had spent most of her time in the service of others and now it was fitting that such a useful, industrious and active person as she had always been be permitted to spend the last nine years of her life in the peace of quiet of her own home. The pioneer mother, Margaret Mann Foutz, was next to close her book of life on this earth. For some years this mother had lived with her daughter, Catherine. Her daughter, Maranda, did her washing and ironing and often fixed dainty food for her, but the mother was independent and to the last, chose to do for herself all that she could do. Old as she was, she was good natured and always looked upon the bright side of everything. Her granddaughter, Mary Abigail White West, said of her: "She could live in a hovel And make of it a house of prayer With peace for all who entered there." On the morning of August 5, 1896, Margaret arose as usual for breakfast. She tidied up her room and seemingly was in good health, but before noon she had passed away. Only her daughter, Catherine, was with her at the time. Her grandchildren, who had loved so much to visit her, were busy that morning picking black English currents. This mother of twelve children, at the time of her death, at ninety-five years, had seventy grandchildren, one hundred twenty-six great grandchildren, and nine great, great grandchildren. Her funeral was held in the Pleasant Grove Ward Meeting House on Friday at 2:00 o´clock in the afternoon, August 7, 1896. The next day a sketch of her life, together with the following paragraph, appeared in the Deseret Evening Newspaper: "There was laid to rest yesterday, in the quiet little cemetery at Pleasant Grove, Utah County, the remains of a most estimable and beloved woman whose life has covered a remarkable period of the world´s history, and whose individual experiences have been in many instances of a most thrilling character. Further especial interest on the part of the people of Utah centers in her career from the fact that she has been associated with them from the beginning of settlement here, and for many years previously been an active participant in the trials and hardships they were compelled to endure in the darkest periods of their history. She was herself a pioneer of 1847 in Utah and in all the scenes she passed through, this humble, unassuming, intelligent, devoted woman had declared her knowledge of the Divine Power in what is called Mormonism - that is the Gospel of Christ. The venerable mother in Israel, whose body was followed in the grave yesterday, was Sister Margaret M. Foutz, aged ninety five years." About two years later, February 6, 1898, Nancy Ann Foutz Pearson followed her mother in death. Nancy Ann had moved to Pleasant Grove from Salt Lake City after the birth of her second child in 1851. Her husband, Ephraim John Pearson, took up a farm and they established their home there. Two other children were born to them in Pleasant Grove, Hyrum and Louisa. The two older children, Ephraim and Ann Sophia, died young. It was hard to make a living in these early days in this pioneer country, so the father of this little family sought employment away from home in the winter when he could not labor on the farm. This separation proved fatal, however, as it later tended to separate them permanently. Nancy Ann lived apart from her husband for many years before her death. Mail traveled slowly in those days and misunderstandings were bound to arise, some of which were never straightened out. Nancy Ann, like her mother, lived a very useful and serviceable life, never complaining about her lot. She cared for her children and found time to help others. She was a pioneer and a daughter of pioneers. She went through many hardships, but did it willingly for her children and her Church. On the 19th day of March, 1907, another of this family, Joseph Lehi, closed his eventful career. There are many pages in this good man´s history which will never be written, but his posterity may well be proud of their paternity, and it is fitting that there is hardly a branch in his large family tree which does not have a "Joseph" in it. Elizabeth Foutz Walker died in Pleasant Grove, January 30, 1910, at the age of eighty-three. She was the mother of seven children. In her home town of Pleasant Grove she was affectionately known as "Aunt Elizabeth", but to her own family she was the wonderful mother and grandmother, and inspiration to all of them. Elizabeth, who was a pioneer and had been through many hardships, lived longer than three of her own children. Her husband and his other wives preceded her in death also. The next of this pioneer family to be taken was Jacob Foutz Jr., who died December 9, 1917, at the home of his eldest son Jacob Fredrick Foutz in Pleasant Grove, Utah. Jacob´s wife, Sarah Ann, had passed on three years before, and Jacob was never reconciled to her going. Life held no interest for him when his wife was gone. She had been strictly a home woman, a devoted mother and faithful wife, and together they were a companionable couple. Neither was given to much talk, but each seemed happy in the companionship of the other. They were both honest, upright and charitable people who were destined not to be separated for long. Jacob´s health began to fail him shortly after his wife´s death and he seemed to be only waiting until he could again be with her. He passed away at the age of seventy-three after being confined to his bed for some time. As his home occupied a central spot in the little city of Pleasant Grove, so the memory of this good man holds a central place in the hearts of his fellow townspeople. The next spring, on April 19, 1918 Catherine Foutz White died, and Pleasant Grove lost another of its first pioneers. With her passing went a noble soul who had often entertained the Primary children with tales of her experiences and stories of the Prophet Joseph Smith, whom she remembered well. Catherine was the mother of ten children. At the time of her death (age 86) she had twenty-nine grandchildren and forty-three great grand-children. Funeral services were held in the Pleasant Grove First Ward on a Monday afternoon. She was buried in the cemetery of the city which had been her home for sixty-seven years. Miranda Foutz Bacon, youngest of the family of Bishop Jacob Foutz, Sr., was the last to be called in death. She had a hard life. When she was only six weeks old her father had died, leaving her mother with a family of children in a veritable wilderness. Maranda grew up with the desire to do her share of life´s work and she was a great help and comfort to her widowed mother. When Maranda was fourteen years old she and her mother spun wool and knitted socks to make a living. They also made the flour sacks used in the first flour mill in Pleasant Grove. All summer Maranda cut and dried fruit as well as helped others in their homes. All through her life she was so kind and patient that the sick and needy sought her out. She labored always and enjoyed her work both in the Church and the community. The last few years of her life she was an invalid, having broken both legs. She was still the same sweet lady she had always been, never complaining of the pain she had to bear. To the end she remained cheerful and smiling always. The good work and kind deeds she had done for others made her last days happy, as never a day passed without a neighbor, friend or relative called at her bedside to encourage her and bring her gifts. Maranda died March 21, 1928. Her death marked the passing of the last of the children of Bishop Jacob and Margaret Mann Foutz. This pioneer family was once more united. The Desert Evening News, on August 8, 1896 printed the following paragraph in connection with the death of Margaret Mann Foutz. It is a fitting tribute to this whole family of pioneers: "Those who were associated with the deep trials and heroic faithfulness attending the establishment of the Church, and of the settlement of these mountain vales, are dropping from the ranks of the people, weary in body from the long and gallant struggle. But the sublime unwavering heroism they displayed in the cause they had espoused and in which they triumphed, remains in history, a shining example to the youth of Zion. The courage and devotion of women, no less than that of men, stands forth in brightness in the records of the Saints, to lead succeeding generations to like fidelity in a glorious cause. The true and tried veterans are passing to the other side to receive the reward of their faithfulness even to death; may the generations that succeed them and now are active in life´s battle have a record as bright and unsullied at the close of their mortal day as do their fathers and mothers." - compiled from various sources by Grace Foutz Boulter and Mary Foutz Corrigan  Joseph Lehi Foutz, son

Haun´s Mill Massacre by Clarissa Robison Willey

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Margaret Mann 1801 - 1896 Haun´s Mill Massacre A story of my great grandmother Foutz as told to me by my mother Elizabeth Robison. Written by Clarissa Robison Willey. Great Grandfather was wounded at the Haun´s Mill Massacre. He pulled dead bodies over him so the mob would think he was dead. They stole a pair of new boots off his feet. When the mob found he was still alive, they went to his home a number of times, but was unable to find him. His wife and children hid him in the corn field and disguised him in a number of ways. At one time when they saw the angry mob coming, Great Grandmother armed her children with butcher knives, clubs, or whatever they could find at hand. She, herself, had an ax and stood in the doorway and defied the mob to come in, telling them she would split their heads wide open if they dared come in. They looked at each other and said, "She is a gritty little piece." They went away and left them unmolested. I remember seeing my great grandmother. She was a very small person.  

Letter to Brigham Young from the Edward Hunter and Jacob Foutz Company

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Edward Hunter and Jacob Foutz Company - 1847 March 11, 1847 --"Friday. Brigham Young today organized the Camp of Israel into traveling companies, groups of ten pioneers, each with a captain, and a specific marching order. The plan accommodated the 143 men and boys, three women and two children comprising this Mormon vanguard. They assembled at the rear of Young's wagon this morning and counted off. He appointed Stephen Markham and Albert Perry Rockwood as captains of hundreds; Tarlton Lewis, James Page, John Pack and Shadrach Roundy as captains of fifties." James Davenport is assigned to the 11th Ten, with John S. Higbee, captain along with John Wheeler, Solomon Chamberlain, Conrad Kleinman, Joseph Rooker, Perry Fitzgerald, John H. Tippetts, Henson Walker, and Benjamin W. Rolfe. --(Schindler--**************************************************************************) Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847–1868 Journal History, 21 June 1847, p. 23 (Also known as the John Taylor Co. 197 individuals and 72 wagons were in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post on the Elkhorn River about 27 miles west of Winter Quarters, Nebraska.) (**********************************************************************************) "The Second Hundred departed June 17, 1847 with Edward Hunter as Captain. Included in this company, Jacob Foutz was the Captain of the Second Fifty. They arrived October 1, 1847: Jacob Foutz -46; Margaret Mann Foutz -45; Nancy Ann Foutz -21; Elizabeth Foutz Hess-20; Catherine Foutz -15; Joseph Lehi Foutz -10 ; Margaret Foutz -7; Jacob Foutz, Jr. -3 " --Heart Throbs of the West, Vol. 8. Page 428. (Full Text) In camp on creek, near Red Hills, west 63 miles from Ft. Laramie Aug. 17, 1847 To Bro. B. Young, The camp is enjoying good health, no cases of sickness at this date, and no deaths have occurred. Two births. We number 155 souls. The names of men capable of bearing arms and of performing other camp duties are as follows: Edward Hunter, Alva Keller, Henry Heath, Wm. W. Potter, Berry A. Covington, Nathaniel M. Dodge, Henry Tuttle, Jacob Foutz, Jacob F. Secrist, Henry I. Doremus, Samuel Merrill, Isaac Leany, William Leany [Laney], William Sceare [Scearce], Leonard Stump, John A. Wolf [Woolf], Abraham Boswell, Vinson [Vincent] Shirtliff [Shurtleff], Hobert [ Hubbard] Tuttle, Lemon Brunson [Leman Bronson], Albert G. Fellows, Wilmer Brunson [Bronson], Wm. Fellows, Fredrick Bainbridge, John McBride, William K. Rice, Newton J. Hale [Hall], Mc Bride, D. M. Thomas, Henry Thomas, A. W. Collins, Robert D. Covington, Thomas Warrick, James Matthews [or Mathis], John Thomas, Philemon Thomas, John Robertson, John Lowery, Justus Seelye [Seeley], Wm. S. Seelye [Seeley], Jastus W. Seelye, Henry Wilcox, David Seelye [Seeley] James Young, John Young, Ithamer Sprague. The sisters who had husbands and/relatives in the army were Catharine Ann Owens, Mary Ann Hunter, Louize [Louisa]Calkins, Sarah Dodge. There are also in this company; 50 guns, 7 pistols, 246 1/2 lbs. powder, 138 lbs. shot, 394 lbs. lead, 59 wagons, 247 oxen, 12 horses, 3 mules, 95 cows, 38 sheep, and 3 hogs. As to our teams, they are not so good a plight as we could wish. The loss of cattle in Grants company has made it necessary to take from our teams to supply that loss. A few of our cattle (oxen) are failing in their feet and have died, owing to the want of competent teamsters. Small accidents occur almost daily, and we think that none of our teams or perhaps very few of them will be in a condition to return to Winter Quarters. In the present condition our cattle, we think, if we reach the place of our destination with them, it will be as much as we shall expect. Our cows, with a very few exceptions, are put in the teams. We say, in conclusion that if a few additional teams could be furnished us, they would assist us very much on our journey. Edward Hunter, Capt. of Hundred, Jacob Foutz, Capt. of Fifty (Source: Hunter, Edward and Jacob Foutz, Letter, in Journal History of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 17 Aug. 1847, 5-6.)

Elizabeth Foutz Walker

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According to history, the first of Pfautz family was John Michael Pfautz, who was born and lived in Switzerland (or Germany). In the beginning the name was spelled P-F-A-U-T-Z as we have it spelled here. Later as the family spread out over the world, those in America left off the “P” and changed the “a” to “o”, but as the author of history says, “No matter what the spelling or the pronunciation, the family is still the same.” Many people left Europe because of religious persecution; among them was John Michael Pfautz who left Amsterdam, Holland early in 1770 on the ship “William,” whose captain was William Hill. He landed in Germantown, near Philadelphia, where he lived, died and was buried. His descendants have spread over the entire United States and have become English speaking people, hence the English spelling and pronunciation of the surname “Foutz.” There was a daughter, Elizabeth and two some, Jacob and Micial, in this family and from which have come many of present Foutz families. Our Foutz family began with Jacob (Sr.) who was born Nov. 20, 1800, in Franklin County, Pennsylvania. He was the son of John and the grandson of Conrad. Jacob, Sr. grew up with his father’s family, still speaking the German language. He was a member of the Methodist Church and was of a religious turn of mind. During these years he met Margaret Mann, daughter of David Mann (Munn) and Mary Rock, whom he married July 22, 1822, at Green Castle, Pennsylvania. They remained there, making a home and providing for themselves until 1828. By this time there were four little daughters: Susan, born Feb. 14, 1823; Pollyanne, born Oct 10, 1824; Nancy Ann, born May 21, 1826; and Elizabeth, born Sep. 13, 1827. It is of Elizabeth that we now continue. She grew up with her sisters, a normal healthy child. In 1828 the urge came to her family as it had to many others to move west, so they went to Richland County, Ohio. Here they remained for a few years, building a home and trying to make themselves secure and comfortable. Two more baby sisters came to bless their home, Sarah born Sep. 10, 1829 and Catherine born Dec. 25, 1831. Here too they lost one of their older girls, Polly, who died in Richland in 1830 or 1831. The children had never spoken anything but the German language. Now they must associate with English speaking children in the schools; it was a great trial for the little girls. In 1834 a Mormon Missionary by the name of David Evans called at the Foutz home. The father was away to a Methodist revival, some distance from home and as travel was done by team and wagon, he would not return until the next evening. The mother heard the message and was told that the missionaries would hold a meeting in the neighborhood that evening. During the day she thought of the man and of the message several times. She told herself that she wasn't interested in either, but when evening came she decided to go, just out of curiosity, she told herself. At the meeting she heard some things she had never heard before and they rang in her mind. The Elders would hold another meeting again the next evening, but she told herself she wasn't interested and would not be there. When her husband came home the next day, she told him what had happened but thought that they were not in sympathy with the doctrines the missionaries taught. He replied, “We will go to the meeting.” She tried to discourage him but he was determined to know what the men taught. Accordingly they went. The blood of Israel flowed in his veins and he knew the “Voice of the good Shepherd.” When the meeting was over he talked to the Elders, telling them he knew that their message was true, it was what he had been looking for and asked for baptism. The next day he was to meet the Elders and be baptized, his wife tried every way possible to persuade him not to join this new religion. It was new, unpopular, and she even said it was a silly thing to do. This did not change his mind and on the February day in 1834 he was baptized. His wife was sure he had made a mistake and she would not be found doing the same thing but in six weeks the Spirit of God bore testimony so strongly to her spirit that she too knew the Gospel was true and David Evans baptized her. They decided to join the body of the church as soon as arrangements could be made. No sooner had they cast their lot with the Saints, than they began to realize what persecution meant. They were driven with the Saints into Caldwell County, Missouri. Here they bought land to make another home. They planted crops thinking this would be permanent. October 1838 found them driven with others to Haun’s Mill. It was here that one of the darkest tragedies on record was to be enacted. Elizabeth had just passed her eleventh birthday but she was old enough to know that there was trouble afoot. This is known in Church History as the Haun’s Mill Massacre. It greatly affected the lives of the Foutz family. Imagine if you can what this family went through at this time. The oldest child, a girl fifteen years old, Elizabeth eleven and five other ranging in age down to a baby who was a year and a half old. Winter was coming on and their husband and father was badly crippled from gunshot wounds in the thigh. They were never certain whether or not the mobs might descend upon them at any time. Under these conditions, terror must have filled their hearts constantly. Surely they must have had help from a kind Heavenly Father to survive such conditions. About the middle of February 1839 they were able to leave their homes in Missouri, even though it was in the midst of winter. They took refuge in Quincy, Illinois. There they stayed for a while and then moved on to Nauvoo. Here peace and prosperity existed for a while and there was work for everybody. By this time Jacob Foutz Sr. had improved in health and was made Bishop of his ward in Nauvoo. While the men built the beautiful city of Nauvoo on the bend of the Mississippi River, the women and girls helped in every way they could. Elizabeth’s mother was made president of the Relief Society in their ward soon after its organization. Here Elizabeth learned first hand of the aims and objects of this women’ organization so recently organized by the Prophet Joseph Smith. (The family was well acquainted with the Prophet and his family.) During the succeeding years Elizabeth met a young man by the name of Henson Walker Jr. Henson was born in Manchester, Ontario, New York on March 13, 1820. He had joined the church in 1840 and married Martha Ann Bouck. With her family they had moved to Nauvoo. Henson and Martha had one son, John, when Martha died in August 1843. Elizabeth and Henson’s acquaintance became friendship and later ripened into love and on April 10, 1846 Apostle Orson Hyde married them in the Nauvoo Temple. Henson took Elizabeth to live with the Bouck family, with whom he had lived most of the time since he had joined the church. Henson was like one of their own and he was glad to be adopted by such fine people. Soon after the marriage of Henson and Elizabeth, the little son was accidentally drowned. This was a great sorrow to all and naturally Elizabeth blamed herself but who can say that the child’s work had not been completed and his own mother was patiently waiting for him in a better world. The Saints were soon driven out of Nauvoo across the Mississippi into Iowa. Henson was called by President Brigham Young to go with the Saints to help build up Council Bluffs and Winter Quarters. Then a mob came upon Nauvoo and threatened to massacre the Saints there. He was sent back to help quell the trouble. Then he returned to the new city of Winter Quarters again. During the winter of 1846-1847, everything was astir. One thousand log homes were built and 150 dugouts were hastily made. The sound of anvils could be heard everywhere as men made and repaired wagons in preparation for the long journey they knew was ahead of them. As soon as possible the Bouck family was moved across the river and the Foutz family soon followed. Health conditions were poor and many of the Saints suffered from fever. The exposure to which they were subjected added to the trouble. Elizabeth took the fever and became very ill. Her husband had already been called by President Young to go with the advanced guard or scouting party with the first company to make the trek west. It was just one year after their marriage and much had been crowded into that year. Elizabeth now was so ill that her life was despaired of many times. This was a trying ordeal for both of them but duty called and Henson must go, no excuses or backing down. History says he left her at death’s door. She was left in the care of the Boucks who watched over her as tenderly as if she were their own. The advanced division moved forward as fast as preparations could be made and details attended to. On the 16th of April the original band was on its way. Elizabeth felt sure if she could follow her husband in the next company she would be better. They knew little of what was ahead of them. Only one thing they knew and that was that they were going to find a new home away from mobs and persecution. They knew little of the strange rough country through which they must pass or the obstacles they must meet. Early in June the second Company was ready to start. Elizabeth was still confined to her bed in the wagon-box but still she pleaded that she would be better off, if she could only be on the ways, away from this fever infested country. Accordingly, arrangements were made for the Boucks to come in the next company and Elizabeth was to come with them. When it was learned that Elizabeth was going with the next company the Foutz family made plans to go, too. As her father said, “We can help to give her as decent a burial as possible,” for he had little hope she would live to go far. As the warm spring days came and with the anticipation and fascination of the journey into the unknown, Elizabeth began to mend. When the company left Winter Quarters she was able to sit up only a little while at a time. But she was hopeful and her trust was in the Lord, His protecting care and His great healing powers. Imagine if you can, starting the journey in a bed made in the wagon-box. This bed was made of whatever they could gather together when the mob got through with them. Think of her riding, jostling along over all kinds of trails, fording streams or being ferried or carried across rivers, never knowing what would happen next. Her faith in her Heavenly Father’s care, in her own people, in her husband, and her love for all of them made her equal to the ordeals and trials through which she must pass and she was willing to make any sacrifice necessary. Early June found the second company on its way. Spring rains were passed, vegetations was green and beautiful. The warm spring days were with them and Elizabeth was full of hope for the future. There would be many obstacles ahead of them but with a song in her heart and courage to try, things must be better. The company journeyed on day after day. Her determination to continue on, coupled with the faith and prayers of her family and friends added new strength and soon she was able to sit up in her bed a little longer each day. As time went on, she was able to be up and outside of the wagon a little each day. She watched for signs of the previous company that showed that they had passed along in their travels. No matter how small the sign, it brought a thrill to the hearts of the watching loved ones. Finally the day came. Word was received that the first company of Pioneers had reached the valley of the Great Salt Lake. Explorations had been made in many directions and decisions had been made that “This Is The Place.” The Saints should settle there as their permanent home! This was a happy day for many of the travelers. The thought of loved ones after this long, hazardous journey, having completed the first lap in safety and being permitted to return to their people, filled every heart with the keenest anticipation and rejoicing. This was especially true of Elizabeth and her people. After all the trials through which they had passed, they were made to rejoice more than ever to see her health improved daily. Her heart was full of rejoicing and thanksgiving for the blessings she felt were so abundantly showered upon her. She thanked her Heavenly Father for those blessings and pleaded for a continuation of them. The happiness of these thoughts seemed to bring added strength and vigor to her. As it happened the coming of the second company of pioneers had timed the return of the first company very well. They had made camp at the Sweetwater in Wyoming and planned to celebrate the next day. They couldn't tell the exact hour but they knew that they were not far apart. It was to be a gala affair. The band played and everybody rejoiced as the company came in sight of camp. With those who were returning it was another story, their hearts and minds were filled with wonder and suspense. Some of the friends of Henson have told of this meeting. He hurried from one wagon to another in search of his wife and her people. Had anyone seen her or did they know of her whereabouts? Finally they were located! What a time of rejoicing it was! Henson found what he was looking for and together they finished their journey with their families. They reached the Salt Lake Valley in September 1847. As soon as they arrived they began making plans for a home. Kind old Father Bouck divided his scanty store with them and they began their housekeeping and homemaking. It was a struggle for everyone. There was little they had been able to bring with them and less to be found in this new desert country. Their food consisted of a small ration of flour and the fish and game the young husband could provide (he was good at it) and the roots they could dig from the ground. They toiled and struggled, grateful each day to be in a land of peace among relatives, kind neighbors and friends and thankful for a chance to help those who had so willingly helped them. The fall and winter wore past and spring came again. The people tried to make the best of whatever conditions came to them. They were always busy trying to improve their conditions. They tried to live their religion and obey the counsel given them by those in authority. The happiness of their little home was increased on June 13, 1848 by the birth of a son whom they named Henson III. Probably from lack of nourishing food he was long and lean, for the young mother could not make him plump and husky. He had black eyes and black hair and was the joy and pride of his parents. They took up land about where Fort Douglas now stands, farmed with whatever implements and seeds they had. In the early, 1849, Indian war troubles began. Henson was called to go south to Utah County with others to help suppress this unrest. The families of these men were left to get along as best they could while their husbands were gone on these dangerous journeys. In the summer of 1850, Henson was called by President Young to go with others to the Platte River to help with the building of a ferry for the Church. These men were gone most of the summer and again the young wife and baby were left to get along the best way they could. This trip was quite successful, providing means with which to start their future home. It was December 13, 1850 that their second child was born, a baby girl whom they named Victoreen Elizabeth. She was more plump and rosy, with brown hair and blue eyes. Throughout her life she had a patient, sunny disposition. These had been trying times, but the young family was always looking forward for better days. Now they were planning to make a new and they hoped, a more permanent home for themselves. As the husband had traveled south into Utah County during the trouble with the Indians, he watched the land and the water and studied ways and means to make his life fit into the scheme of things in this new country. In 1851 he began to make his plans materialize and the spring of 1852, Elizabeth and her two small children were located in Battle Creek, later called “Pleasant Grove.” She was fortunate in having her mother, Margaret Mann Foutz, come with them when they moved from Salt Lake to their new home. Mother Foutz was equally blessed in being able to come as she had been left a widow with several children. Land was staked off and homes were started. It was a busy time for everyone. Elizabeth was a good housewife and a splendid manager, making everything do its full duty in every way possible. Grandmother Foutz was equally resourceful. She tried to help her children earn their way as they went along. The women gathered wild fruit and berries for food; gleaned in the fields for grain, raised gardens, made soap, water softener and dye. They gathered the bits of wool that clung to the brush as the sheep grazed in the neighborhood. This was cleaned, washed, carded and spun into yarn and knitted into warm stocking or woven into cloth from which their clothes were made. This was all done by hand. They made candles to provide light as they worked in the long winter evenings, sewing the cloth into clothing and knitting stockings. It must be remembered that under these conditions new suits, coats and dressed did not come often but often enough to be appreciated and enjoyed by all. On the 7th of June 1852, with Elizabeth’s consent, Henson married Sophronia Philinda Clark in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. Early in the summer of 1852 President Young called Henson to go with him to St. George to take care of church duties, thus leaving the young wives and family to care for themselves. In July 1852 President Young and others of the General Authorities came again to visit in Utah County. They dined and rested at the Walker home and then resumed their journey. Three days later they returned and appointed Henson Presiding Elder of the Pleasant Grove Branch. On March 22, 1853 a third child came to bless their home. This time, another boy whose physical characteristics were much like those of his older brother’s. He had piercing black eyes and dark brown hair. He had a genial disposition and a strong will. He was given the name of Lewis Heber. Lewis for his father’s youngest brother of whom he was very fond and Heber in honor of Heber C. Kimball who was an early apostle of the Church and a very close friend of the Walker Family. In those early days, Pleasant Grove tried a plan that was sometimes used in early day practice when it became a branch of its own. This was a double organization, that is, leadership arrangement in it church affairs. George S. Clark, one of the first men to settle in this area, had previously been called as first Bishop over the northern part of Utah County, which included the villages of Evansville (Lehi), McArthursville (American Fork) and Battle Creek (Pleasant Grove). It seems that George S. Clark now continued as Bishop . . .."had charge of the temporal affairs, doubtless directing the Aaronic Priesthood activities, collecting the tithes and offerings and ministering to the more practical needs of the people. At the same time, after July 1852, Henson Walker officiated as President of the Branch . . .. presiding over the Sunday services, directing the work of the quorums of the Melchizedek Priesthood in their ministry of spiritual affairs.” (History of the Church Vol. 4, p. 331) In 1853 the General Authorities organized the Pleasant Grove Branch into a Ward. Brother Walker was ordained a High Priest and set apart to serve as Bishop of the new ward, having charge of both its temporal and spiritual affairs. All of these things had its effect on Elizabeth. Many new responsibilities in many directions came to her. Many times was she called upon to entertain the General Authorities in their home. In those days there were no hotels or eating-places. Elizabeth and her people had grown up with the prominent people of the Church. They had known them as long as she could remember and had associated with them during the trying days of Nauvoo and from then on, the trials of the Church had tended to cement their friendship and loyalty together. She was glad to do whatever service possible for their comfort and blessing. Furthermore, the old scripture that the “Poor ye have with ye always” was variably true. Immigrants were coming to the settlements constantly and many of them had exhausted all their resources in getting to their destination. Under the direction of the Bishopric, the immediate needs of these people were cared for. Elizabeth’s fourth son was born November 4, 1855. He was another blue-eyed baby with brown hair and a sweet, patient disposition. He was given the name of Appollos Benjamin, in honor of two fine brothers of the Driggs family who worked much with the father and who were loved and respected as much as if they were children of this family. Shortly after the birth of A.B., another plural wife was taken into the family, Mary Green. Mary was an English convert, born 19 February 1838 in Shropshire England. She and Henson were married on the 3 July 1838 in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. Mary was a patient faithful mother of seven children, five of whom lived to maturity. A little over a year later, 9 November 1857, Henson married Elizabeth’s younger sister, Margaret Foutz. Margaret was born 16 October 1839 in Adams County, Illinois. Unlike other wives she lived in the home with her sister, together they worked and planned to build the home for their families. Margaret had only one child, a son, whom she named Ezra Foutz Walker. Early in 1856 Bishop Henson Walker and his counselors officially organized the Female Relief Society. Elizabeth Walker was President; Laura Liston was first counselor, and Susan Neff the second counselor with Mary Ann Street the Secretary and Treasurer. Visiting Teachers were appointed to visit the sisters and gather whatever could be donated for the care of the poor. They took their baskets with them and gathered groceries, foodstuffs or clothing, as the people were able to give. The Society distributed these commodities, made clothing and quilts for he poor and assisted bye Bishop in caring for the immigrants as they came in from time to time each year. They tried to correct the morals and strengthen the virtues of the people in general, supporting and upholding the Priesthood. They nursed the sick, watched at the bedside of the dying, made the clothes and prepared the bodies of the dead for burial. They were truly sisters of mercy. Another baby boy came to bless the home of Elizabeth and Henson on 27 April 1858. He had dark eye and hair and a carefree disposition and as he grew older he was much fonder of play than of work and responsibility. He was named John Young. The mother’s cares and worries increased with the addition of each new member of the family. Besides the care of her family, Church duties increased. It was at this time the President Buchanan sent out an army of 2500 soldiers to crush a rebellion in the valley. It came about in this way. Two disappointed applicants for Government mail contracts had sent stories to Washington D. C. that the Mormons were in rebellion against the United States. The stories were absurd, yet on this fabric of falsehood the President had ordered the soldiers to put down the “Mormon Rebellions.” The news came on July 24, 1857 as the saints were celebrating the tenth anniversary of their arrival in the valley. Many of the people were celebrating in the near by canyons. When a dust-laden weary horseman rode up to Brigham Young’s tent and delivered this ominous message. The news spread like wildfire and in a short time the entire Salt Lake Valley was in a frenzy of excitement. Men were dispatched to do what they could to delay the army and play for time in the hope that something might be done to turn the President from this madness. Prairies were burned, the armies’ cattle were stampeded, the bridges built by the Mormons were destroyed and fords were dredged. Because of this carefully executed plan the army was forced to remain in their winter quarter in what is now western Wyoming. Colonel Thomas L. Kane, who had become acquainted with the Mormons when they moved across Iowa, gave the Saints much help. He had seen the injustices they had suffered. It was largely through his efforts that the President was persuaded to send to Utah a peace commission in the spring of 1858. President Young agreed that the army might pass through the city but could not stop there. Lest there be any violations of this agreement, he put into effect the plan originally decided upon. When the army entered the Valley the following summer, it found the city desolated and deserted except for a few watchful men who were armed with flint and steel and sharp axes. The houses and barns were filled with straw, ready to be set afire and the axes were ready to chop down the orchards in case of any violations. The people had moved to the south, leaving their homes to be burned if necessary. Some of the army officers and men were deeply affected as they marched through the silent streets, realizing what their coming had meant. One prominent officer, who had led the Mormon Battalion on its long march and knew of the wrongs previously inflected on these people, bared his head in reverent respect. The army marched through the city without trouble and camped nearly forty miles to the southwest in Cedar Valley. The Saints returned to their homes. This event has gone down in history as Buchanan’s Blunder. All these experiences had their effects on the people of the valley. The worry and excitement for Elizabeth through these long months was great as she cared for her family. Besides her own there were always others whom she must look after. December 29, 1860, Elizabeth’s sixth child was born. A baby girl with blue eyes and brown hair was a real joy to the entire family and especially so to the mother since it was another girl to go with four boys. She had disposition that loved everybody and whom everybody loved. Things went on in the usual way for these times. Everybody must learn to work and play, to be kind and helpful to each other. Children must be kept in school as much as possible and they must learn to do what was necessary both inside and outside of the home. In 1863 Henson was called to fill a mission in Europe. He labored in England and was also called to preside over the Scottish Mission. He was released from his labors as Bishop and Mayor to give his time to the missionary work. While he was away, Elizabeth gave birth to her last child on 16 January 1864 whom she named Sanford Foutz. He was an even-tempered child and a great comfort to his family. With the release of her husband as Bishop, came the release for Elizabeth as president of the Relief Society. This was a great relief to Elizabeth to be relieved of this responsibility. Her husband was gone on his mission for about two years. Relieved of some of the responsibilities that had crowded their busy lives, they began to think of some peace and quiet and less of struggle and strain; but this was not to last for long. Lewis Heber, their second son now fifteen years old, was accidentally killed on April 13, 1868. He had gone to the pasture to drive the cow’s home. On the way, the horse had a bad disposition at times and became unmanageable. Going down a little hill, the horse fell on its rider, crushing him to death. Neighbors saw the accident and hurried to render assistance. They carried him home but he was so badly hurt, he lived only a short time. He had talked to them as he went away with the horse, now in a few brief minutes he was dead. Elizabeth was grief stricken and the shock was terrible. She could not be comforted. She blamed herself for the accident and placed all the responsibility for it on herself. If only she had done otherwise, it would not have happened. The fact is, during the day a neighbor had come to borrow the bridle. She loaned it to him with the promise that he would have it back by a certain time. They all knew that the animal was hard to manage and the son had had a special bridle made by which he could better control the horse. The neighbor failed in his promise and was no there with the bridle at the appointed time. The son, knowing the vicious nature of the horse at the time, naturally was a little perturbed when he found the bridle gone and remarked to his mother that the horse would kill him yet. He went away and in a few minutes he was carried back in an almost lifeless condition. There was nothing that could be done. He was gone and she felt that she was to blame. The shock and grief caused a nervous breakdown. She could not control herself. She couldn't sleep or eat and as the summer came on her reasoning was feared for. She walked about alone in the night or day to try to use up the tension that seemed to tear her apart. Doctors were few and medical help was even more scarce. It was just a guess if this or that might help. The family tried everything possible. At last it was decided to take her out for a ride early in the morning while the dew sparkled on the grass when everything was cool and quiet and the air was fresh and invigorating. No one knew whether or not this would help. It could only be tried but it was worth a try. She was awake anyway. So the experiment began. The horses were hitched to the farm wagon and Elizabeth was helped to the spring seat. That’s all they had. She insisted that it wouldn't make any difference where or how she went or what she saw if only she could get relief. Kind neighbors were willing to help in every way possible. Nancy Holman came to offer her assistance. Most of the men were tied to their farm labors, but Nancy could take her team of mules and do the job as she lived across the street from Elizabeth. She had a genial disposition and tried in many ways to help. She felt that her efforts were being rewarded in a small way and this gave her courage. She was up as soon as it was light enough to see to get the mules ready. A clean quilt was put on the seat that consisted of a board with springs fastened to the ends of the board and hooks that held it fast to the wagon box. There was no back, no sides, only the fluffy homemade quilt that covered the rough board. As soon as it was light, Nancy drove into the yard and helped Elizabeth out of the house and onto the wagon seat. They decided to drive to the north field this morning. The families both had property in those parts. The mules jogged along gently and Nancy talked of everything pleasant of which she could think. They talked of the size of the sagebrush by the side of the road, the jack rabbits and cotton tails darting about, the hum of the insects, the song of birds, the flapping of the wings of the crow as he rose from his meal and of some dead animal. It was a varied sound and scene. They drove through growing fields toward the mouth of the canyon, near the beautiful mountains and west into more growing fields. Finally, they came to a very familiar road that took them down a hill, across abridge over a stream of water. The stream was full of watercress, fresh and crisp. Past the bridge was a steeper incline than before. As the team went down the first incline a bolt came out, letting the double-trees slide against the heels of the mules. This startled them and they quickened their pace. Nancy wasn't prepared for this and before she knew it they had gone off the bridge and two wheels were in the water. The water was deep. The two women were tossed out of the wagon into the clear, cold, spring water in a bed of watercress. They looked at each other, the sight was an amusing one and as the two astonished women looked at themselves in the bed of watercress surrounded by the water, their predicament took on a humorous angle and both of them began to laugh. Nancy often told of it later. It was the first time even a smile had been seen on Elizabeth’s face. Something had happened, it was as if a spell had been broken, Elizabeth laughed a hearty laugh. As they looked at each other in such a plight, sitting in the water far above their waists, the more humorous it appeared to them, the harder they laughed. Finally they began to realize what had really happened and they began to try to get out on the bridge. They were a bedraggled dripping sight. Meanwhile the mules had moved on until the incline in the road caused the double-trees to slip back in place and they stopped. The women climbed into the wagon and rode home. The experience had its good and bad effects. Elizabeth could smile and laugh again. The cold bath in the watercress put an end to some physical function for Elizabeth, which never appeared again. At first this didn't seem so bad but later she developed a severe headache from which she never fully recovered. Sometimes the pain in her head was so intense that she was forced to go to bed. At other times it was less severe and she could be about attending to her duties at home. She wore a white band of cloth around her head fastened tight which helped to relieve some of the pain. This band was put over wintergreen ointment which she massaged on her head. For more than forty-two years she suffered but was sweet and patient through it all. It took a long time to overcome the shock and grief of this trouble but when she began to mend her health gradually improved thou she never regained her full vigor and strength. She was always very sympathetic and understanding with others. The joys of the community were hers and their sorrows were hers as well. During most of her life she had been active and busy. Now her health condition caused her to slow down and she spent more time at home with her family and friends. There were the four polygamous families and if anyone had trouble they looked to Elizabeth for help. Some of the wives lost children and this was a great sorrow to her as well as to them. By this time the children were growing up and getting married and they stayed as close to their old home as possible. This had its advantages and disadvantages. At one time her oldest son, Henson III, and family lived in the house with them. An epidemic of diphtheria spread through the town. The disease was a bad type and no one knew what to do for it. Three of these children took the disease and died in as many weeks this was very hard on the grandmother. Later, trouble for polygamous families was stirred up. Men were arrested and thrown in jail unless they could keep out of the way of the Federal Officers. Elizabeth’s husband made several trips out of the state on several short-term missions to the Northern States. He, with others, spent time doing missionary work for the Church instead of lying in jail. All this increased the work and responsibility of the wives who were left at home to care for the families. Most of these men were loyal to their families and to their Church. At last the time came when the men were instructed to denounce their plural wives and disown them. Henson’s wives had their own homes, all except one. Margaret, Elizabeth’s younger sister, had lived in the same house with her and Henson for nearly thirty-five years. They must obey the law of the land and Margaret was moved into a home of her own across the street from Elizabeth. This was a great trial for all concerned. Margaret’s health failed her in her loneliness and she passed away in a few years. In June 1885 Elizabeth’s youngest daughter, Evaline, was married and moved with her husband to Vernal, Utah, where the oldest daughter lived. A year later, she was brought home in a much worse condition than before. She passed away in March 1887-8, before an operation could be performed. This was another heart breaking experience for Elizabeth, one she could hardly overcome. Still she struggled on. Then on 13th of March 1893, the oldest daughter, Victoreen, passed away, leaving a family of fourteen children, the youngest a baby only ten days old. When news came of this tragedy, the shock and sorrow ere almost more than Elizabeth could bear. She passed out and lay for days in a semi-conscious condition. Her third son, A. B., was doing missionary work in the Northern States at the time. In her delirious condition she seemed to connect the trouble with him. At last he was released and brought home in the hope that this might save her life. It had the desired effect. She began to mend. She was then about sixty-five years old. She had had some harrowing experiences and much poor health but she finally rallied, learned what had really taken place and was sill able to carry on to a degree. On July 24, 1897 the Utah Pioneers celebrated the 50th anniversary of their arrival in Utah. It was a gala affair. There were only a few of that valiant band left. Each one was presented with a gold badge commemorating this event. Elizabeth had traveled with her husband through these many milestones together. She had been patient, kind and gentle. She had suffered long but had often said that she wanted to suffer all the Lord had for her to suffer while she was in this life. She didn't want to take any extra pain to have to endure in another world. She and her husband lived on a few more years, enjoying their lives together seemingly reconciled to whatever awaited them. They enjoyed their family greatly. Often they saw them and knew them well. The daughters were gone but four sons with their families were near them and visited them often. On January 24,1904 her husband, Henson, passed away after a brief illness. Still she carried on, willing to take whatever her Heavenly Father had in store for her. After the death of her husband, she remained for the most part in the old home that had been home for so many years. Their youngest son, Sanford, and his family were with her in the house. From the beginning she had been here in this location for more than fifty-two years in Pleasant Grove. Elizabeth seemed to be just waiting for whatever should come to her. She was sure at the death of her husband that it would not be long until she too would be called. As the years passed by she often “wondered why ‘Pa’ didn't come” for her. He knew she never went anywhere without him. In January of 1910 Elizabeth began to fail rapidly. Always she was asking for her son, Bennie, to be near her. He tried to gratify her every desire. The weather was cold, the snow deep, and Bennie must drive three miles with horse and buggy to come to her, always spending the night with her. He sat at her bedside until his heart gave out. Then they were both down, each wondering about the other. When Elizabeth was told that A.B. was too sick to come to her, she seemed perfectly satisfied and remarked, “He will soon be better.” She passed away January 30, 1819. Bennie died February 3, 1910. Funereal services were held in the Pleasant Grove Tabernacle February 3, 1910. Thus closed the life of Elizabeth Foutz Walker, a life spread over eighty-three years; years crowded with experiences of every kind. She was a noble lady, patient and kind to everyone, always anxious to help wherever she could. Her numerous posterity now numbered into the sixth and seventh generation, many of whom have brought honor to her name. (From the files of Mary Jean Caldwell.)

Autobiography of Margaret Foutz, Pleasant Grove, Dec. 28, 1876

Contributor: aerounds Created: 1 week ago Updated: 1 week ago

Autobiography of Margaret Foutz Daughter of David and Mary Munn, born Dec. 11, 1801, Franklin County, Pennsylvania PLEASANT GROVE CITY DEC. 28, 1876 I was married to Jacob Foutz July 22, 1822. In the year 1827 we emigrated to Richland Co., Ohio. After living here a few years and Elder by the name of David Evans came into the neighborhood preaching the Gospel of Jesus Christ, commonly called Mormonism. We united ourselves with the Church being baptized by Brother Evans in the year 1834. Subsequently we took our departure for Missouri together with the saints. We purchased some land to make a permanent home on Crooked River, where a small branch of the Church was organized, David Evans being the President. We enjoyed ourselves exceedingly well and everything seemed to prosper but the spirit of persecution began to make itself manifest. Falsehoods were circulated about the Mormon population that were settling about that region, and there soon began to be signs of troubles. The brethren, in order to protect their families, organized themselves together. Threats being made by the mob to destroy a mill belonging to Brother Haun, it was considered best to have a few men continually at the mill to protect it. One day Brother Evans went and had an interview with a Mr. Comstock, said to be the head man of the job, all things were amicably adjusted. Bro. Evans then went to inform the brethren (my husband being among them) that all was well (this was about the middle of the afternoon, when Bro. Evans started from Mr. Comstock), when on a sudden without any warning whatever, sixty or seventy men with blackened faces came riding their horses at full speed. The brethren ran for protection into an old log blacksmith shop. Being without arms, the mob rode up to the shop and without any explanation or apparent cause, began a wholesale butchery by firing round after round thru the crack that was made between the logs of the shop. I was at home with my little family of five children, and could hear the firing of guns. In a moment I knew the mob was upon us. Soon a runner came telling the women and children to hasten into the timber and secrete themselves, which we did without taking anything to keep us warm. And had we been fleeing from the scalping knife of the Indian we would not have made greater haste, and as we went we finally numbered about forty or fifty women and children. We ran about three miles into the woods and there huddled together spreading what few blankets or shawls, chance only had thrown in our path, on the ground for the children, and here we remained until two o’clock next morning before we heard anything of the result of the firing at the mill. Who can imagine our feelings during this dreadful suspense. And, when the news did come, Oh what terrible news; Fathers, Husbands, Brothers, and Sons, inhumanly butchered. We now took up the line of march for home. Alas, what a home. Who would we find there, and now with our minds full of the most fearful forebodings we retraced those dreary long miles. As we were returning I saw a Brother Myers, who had been shot through his body. In that dreadful state he crawled on his hands and knees about two miles to his house. After I arrived at my house with my children I then made a fire and we warmed ourselves. We then started for the mill, which was over one mile from our house. My children said, “If Father and Mother are going to be killed we want to be with them.” The first house I came to there were three dead men, one a Brother McBride. I was told he was one of the survivors of the Revolution. He was a horrible sight to see, having been cut and chopped and terribly mangled with a corn cutter. I hurried on to find my husband. I found him in an old house covered with rubbish. The mob had taken the bedding and clothing from all the houses that were near the mill. My husband was shot in the thigh. I rendered him all the aid that I could, but it was evening before I could get him home. I saw thirteen more dead bodies at the shop, and witnessed the beginning of the burial, which consisted in throwing the bodies into an old dry well. So great was the fear of the men that the mob would return and kill what few men that were left that they threw the bodies in head first or feet first as the case might be. When they threw in three my heart sickened and I could not stand it more. I turned away to keep from fainting. My husband and another brother drew dead bodies on themselves and pretended to be dead and by so doing saved their lives and heard what the mob said. After the firing was over, two little boys that were in the shop begged for their lives, but no they said D-m them, they will make Mormons and put the muzzle of their guns to their heads and blew their brains out. What a change one short day had brought! Here were my friends dead and dying. One in particular asked me to give him relief by taking a hammer and knock his brains, so great was his agony from his wounds, and we knew not what moment our enemies would be upon us, and all this not because we had broken any of the laws, on the contrary, it was a part of our religion to keep the laws of the land. In the evening Brother Evans got a team and conveyed my husband to his house, carried him in and placed him on the bed. I then attended to my husband alone without any doctor or anyone to tell me what to do for him. Six days after I and my husband, together, extracted the bullet, it being furied deep in the thick part of the thigh and flattened like a knife. During the first ten days, the mob came every day with blackened faces, more like demons from the infernal pit, than like human beings, cursing and swearing that they would kill the d-m old Mormon preacher. And, at times like these, when human nature would quail I have felt the power of God upon me to that degree that I have stood before them fearless, and although a woman and alone, these Demons in human shape, had to succumb for there was a power they knew not of. During these days of danger I would sometimes hide my husband, out in the woods, and cover him with leaves. And, then again in the house, and thus during my husband’s illness was a harassed by mobocratic violence. The mob finally left us with an understanding that we should leave in the spring. About the middle of February we started for Quincy, Ill., arriving there we tarried for a short time, thence moved to Nauvoo, passed through all the vicissitudes that we as a people endured, felling deeply the loss of our Prophet and Patriarch, who were slain in Carthage Jail, and finally having to leave our beautiful city and seek a home in the basin of the Rocky Mountains. In the spring of 1847 we journeyed on, after the pioneers, arriving in the fall of the year, assisting too in making the first improvements in what is now known as Salt Lake City. On the 14th of February my companion departed this life, an event which seemed to cut my very heart strings, in this sterile land, with a family of nine on my hands and him on whom I had leaned, to be taken away, made me feel indeed lonely, but the good spirit came upon me in my affliction to bind up the broken heart. My husband was a man of great faith, and many times sickness has yielded even the knitting of broken bones in our family through prayer and administration of hands. I bear testimony that this work commonly called Mormonism is true, and I heave this as my testimony to my children and to my children’s children, and to all that may read my autobiography, that this is the work of the Lord. I will chronicle one miracle that took place in my home. My husband took very sick, also a young man that lived at our house, and my oldest child had been sick about ten days, in fact, it was so bad that he had become speechless. I sent for an Elder, Bro. J. Carts, and another Elder came with him, and they administered to each of them, and then called upon them in the name of the Lord to arise from their beds and be made whole; they did so and I got them something to eat, of which they partook and they were instantaneously healed by the power of God, his servants officiating in the Priesthood which they had received. I am now in my seventy-sixth year; the mother of twelve children, fifty-two grandchildren, and twelve great-grandchildren; have witnessed the growth of our American Government under that inspired document the Constitution of the United States, and have rejoiced under the wise administration of pure and good laws and also have I witnessed law set at defiance, and mobocratic violence run rampant; Yea. verily, when the wicked rule the people mourn. How near the hour glass of my time is run, I cannot say. But one thing I can say, I have ever been true to the laws of my country, true to my Lord and His holy cause, true to my companion, and expect ere long to meet him in the glorious resurrection of the just, when nothing shall hurt or mar in all the holy mountains, where we can build and inhabit and enjoy the society or our children and our children’s children unmolested, where pain and death shall have no reign, and sorrow is done away; which is the earnest desire of my heart in the name of Jesus Christ, Amen.

THE BIOGRAPHY OF JACOB FOUTZ, SR.

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THE BIOGRAPHY OF JACOB FOUTZ, SR. Jacob Foutz, Sr. was a native of Pennsylvania. He was born in Franklin County on Nov 20, 1800, the son of John Foutz and Elizabeth Catherine Hinkle, who were also natives of the same county and state. The information available regarding the earlier ancestry of this family is meager. It is know, however, that the father of the above mentioned John Foutz was Conrad Foutz born in Sweibruchen, Germany in 1734 and died in Donegal, Pennsylvania Nov. 20, 1790. Conrad’s wife, Elizabeth, was born in 1739, place unknown. She died Sept. 26, 1827 at Lewisburg, Pennsylvania. According to the records of Mr. A. B. Boutz, who lived in Pennsylvania, and who died about 1937, the above-mentioned Conrad Foutz came to this country from Germany. His father and mother died during the trip over and were buried at sea. Conrad came to America alone, but no record is available as to the year he came. (Recent research has showed that Conrad was on the ship Edinburg and landed Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on 14 September 1753, James Russel was the ship Captain.) It is believed that Jacob Foutz, Sr. had several brothers and sisters. The only authentic record we have as yet is a mention made in the diary of Jacob Foutz, Sr. where he writes of having a brother, Micael and a sister, Elizabeth. (Later research shows a family of seven; Mary, John, un-named daughter, Elizabeth, Jacob, Micael, Solomon and Nettie.) The record of his sister, Elizabeth, shows that she was born 22 June 1797 in Franklin County, Pennsylvania. She married Jacob Hess in 1816. Elizabeth Foutz Hess joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and came to Utah with the pioneers in 1847. She was the mother of twelve children. She made her home in Farmington, Utah. Her posterity is numerous throughout northern Utah. Very little information is to be had regarding the early life of Jacob Foutz, Sr. we do know, however, that he was an energetic brick layer. When he twenty-one years old (July 22, 1822) he married Margaret Mann (Munn). She was the daughter of David Mann and Mary Rock. born 11 December 1801 in Thomastown, Franklin County, Pennsylvania. When Margaret was a mere baby she was left an orphan, deprived of both parents. The lives of these two young people, Jacob and Margaret, were destined to be adventuresome and notable. They lived in one of the most progressive periods the world ha ever known and in one of the countries which was making its own early history at this time. They came from a section of this country that furnished many pioneers and early in their married life they too went to live on the frontier. While they lived in Franklin County, Pennsylvania four girls were born to them, two of which died in infancy. Susan was born 14 Feb. 1823 (married James Brown), and Polly was born 10 Oct 1824. Polly lived to be about seven years old, as it is believed she died sometime in 1831. The third daughter, Nancy Ann, was born in Jemper City, Franklin, Pennsylvania on the 21st day of May 1826 (married Ephraim John Pearson). The fourth child Elizabeth was born September 13, 1827 (married Henson Walker). Mainly German people settled Franklin County where the Foutz family lived and the Foutz children were taught to speak the German language before they learned to speak English. This caused them much embarrassment when they left this section of the country and went west among the English-speaking people. In the latter part of the year 1827, the family moved west to Richland County, Ohio. At this time Ohio and the country westward was only sparsely settled. The small settlements were chiefly along the rivers which were the main means of travel. There was much good land to be had for the taking and many families were leaving their homes in the east to take up farming on the western frontiers. It was in this new home in Richland County, Ohio where the fifth child in the Foutz family was born. This daughter they named Sarah. Here also death visited this humble abode as Polly, their second daughter, died sometime in 1831. In December of the same year their sixth daughter, Catherine, was born to them on Christmas Day. While this little family lived in Richland County, Ohio, Elder David Evans of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints came to visit their home and taught then the Gospel. They were convinced of its truth and were baptized, which was a very unpopular thing to do at this time, as most people were very bitter toward the Elders. The same year they became members of the Church, their first son was born. He was Alma, the seventh child in the family, born 4 December 1824. This child, however, was not permitted to live long upon the earth, as he died in childhood sometime before October 1838. Shortly after the Foutz family joined the Church, they probably felt the “spirit of gathering” which was then being taught by the Elders of the church, for they left Ohio and moved farther west. This time they purchased some land on the Crooked River in Missouri. Here was an organized branch of the church and here they hoped to have a permanent home. This branch of the church was presided over by their friend, Elder David Evans, the elder who first preached the gospel to them. Speaking of this new home in Missouri, Margaret Foutz says, “We enjoyed ourselves exceedingly well and everything seemed to prosper, but the spirit ;of persecution began to manifest itself. Falsehoods were circulated about the Mormon population that was settling about the region and soon there began to be signs of trouble.” Here on the Crooked River in Caldwell County, Missouri, another son was born to the Foutz family on 16 March 1837. This son they named Joseph Lehi. He was the eldest son to live and was destined to play an important role in the settling of the west. The Foutz family, with the other members of the little settlement, was not permitted to enjoy their new home for long. The mobs were driving the Saints out of one county after another in Missouri and as Margaret Foutz said, “Even in the little settlement of Haun’s Mill in the Caldwell County, trouble was being felt.” The mobs had threatened to destroy the mill owned by Brother Haun and so as a precautionary measure the Saints had organized themselves together and planned to keep a few watchmen at the mill continually. Many times the brethren had tried to settle matters peaceably, but to no avail and so in October 1838 the Foutz family had a most trying experience. It is know in Church History as ‘The Haun’s Mill Massacre.” The following paragraphs are taken from the account of Joseph Young, an eyewitness of the massacre. “On Sunday, October 28, we arrived at Haun’s Mill where we found a number of our friends collected, who were holding a council and deliberating upon the best course for them to pursue to defend themselves against the mob who were collecting in the neighborhood under the command of Colonel Jennings, of Livingston (county) and threatening them with house burning and killing. “The decision of the council was that the neighborhood should put itself in a state of defense. Accordingly about twenty-eight of our men armed themselves and were in constant readiness for an attack if any small body of mobbers might come upon them. The same evening, for some reason best know to themselves, the mob sent one of their number to enter into a treaty with our friends, which was accepted on condition that each party, as far as their influence extended, should exert themselves to prevent any further hostilities. At this time, however, there was another mob collecting on the Grand River at William Mann’s which was threatening us; consequently, we remained under arms on Monday the 29th, which passed away without molestation from any quarter. “On Tuesday, the 30th, that bloody tragedy was enacted, the scenes of which I shall never forget. More the three-fourths of the day had passed in tranquility as smiling as the preceding one. I think there was no individual of our company that was apprised of the sudden and awful fate which hung over our heads like an overwhelming torrent, and which was to change the prospects, the feeling and sympathies of about thirty families. “The banks of Shoal Creek, on either side, teemed with children sporting and playing, while their mothers were engaged in domestic employments. Father or husbands were either on guard about the mills or other property, or employed in gathering crops for winter consumption. The weather was very pleasant, the sun shore clearly, all was tranquil, and no one expressed any apprehension of the awful crisis that was near us, even at our doors. “It was abut four o’clock, p.m., while sitting in my cabin with my babe in my arms and my wife standing by my side, the door being open, I cast my eyes on the opposite bank of Shoal Cree, and saw a large body of armed men on horses directing their course toward the mills with all possible speed. As they advanced through the scattering trees that bordered the prairie they seemed to form themselves into a three square position, forming a vanguard in front. At this moment, David Evans, seeing the superiority of their numbers (there being two hundred and forty of them according to their own count) gave a signal and cried for peace. This not being heeded they continued to advance and their leader, a man named Comstock, fired a gun, which was followed by a solemn pause of about ten or twelve seconds; when all at once they discharged about one hundred rifles, aiming at a blacksmith’s shop, into which our friends fled for safety. They then charged up to the shop, the crevices of which, between the logs, were sufficiently large to enable them to aim directly at the bodies of those who had fled there for refuge from the fire of their murderers. There were several families tented in the rear of the shop whose lives were exposed and amid the showers of bullets they fled to the weeds in different directions. “After standing and gazing at this bloody scene for a number of minutes and finding myself in the uttermost danger, the bullets having reached the house where I was living, I committed my family to the protection of Heaven and leaving the house on the opposite side, I took a path which led up the hill following in the trail of three of my brethren that had fled from the shop. “While ascending the hill we were discovered by the mob, who immediately fired at us and continued so to do ‘till we reached the summit. In descending the hill, I secreted myself in a thicket of bushes, where I lay till eight o’clock in the evening. At this time I heard a voice calling my name in an undertone. I immediately left the thicket and went to the house of Benjamin Lewis where I found my family, who had fled there in safety, and two of my friends mortally wounded; one of whom died before morning. Here we passed the painful night in deep and awful reflections on the scenes of the preceding evening. After day-light appeared some four or five men with myself, who had escaped with our lives from this horrid massacre, repaired as soon as possible to the mills to learn the condition of our friends whose fate we had but too truly anticipated. “When we arrived at the house of Mr. Haun, we found Mr. Merrick’s body lying in the rear of the house, Mr. McBride’s in front, literally mangled from head to foot. We were informed by Miss Rebecca Judd, who was an eye witness, that he was shot with his own gun after he given it up and then cut to pieces with a corn cutter by a man named Rogers of Davis County, who keeps a ferry on the Grand River and who has since repeatedly boasted of this act of savage barbarity. Mr. York’s body we found in the house. After viewing these corpses we immediately went to the blacksmith’s shop, where we found nine of our friends, eight of who were already dead and the other, Mr. Cox of Indiana, in agonies of death, which soon expired. “We immediately prepared and carried them to the place of interment. This last office of kindness due to the remains of departed friends was not attended with the customary ceremonies nor decency; for we were in jeopardy, every moment expecting to be fired on by the mob, who we supposed were lying in ambush, waiting the first opportunity to dispatch the remaining few who were providentially preserved from the slaughter of the preceding day. However, we accomplished without molestation this painful task. The place of burial was a vault in the ground, formerly intended for a well, into which we threw the bodies of our friends promiscuously.” Sister Foutz said the Saints had thought all was amicably adjusted after the meeting they had had with the mobbers the day before and Brother Evans had gone to inform the brethren, her husband among them, that all was well. It was about the middle of the afternoon of that day when all of a sudden without any warning whatever that sixty or seventy men with blackened faces came riding up, their horses at full speed. The brethren ran for protection into an old log blacksmith’s shop. Being without arms they were helpless when the mob rode up to the shop and without any explanation or apparent cause, began a wholesale butchery by firing round after round through the cracks in the log wall of the shop. Margaret found her husband in an old house covered with some rubbish. He had been shot in the thigh. She rendered him what aid she could but it was evening before she could get him home with the help of Brother Evans and his wagon and team. Brother Evans carried Jacob into their house and laid him on the bed. Then she was left alone to attend to his injuries. Six days later he helped her to extract the bullet that was buried deep in thick part of his thigh and was flattened like a knife. This was done with a kitchen knife. During the first ten days the mob came every day with blackened faces cursing and swearing that they would kill the old Mormon preacher but Margaret would hide him out in the woods behind their home and covered him with leaves or would sit him up, dressed as a woman, and put him at the spinning wheel. The mobs had taken food, clothing and bedding from the Saints and had even burned some of their homes. So now besides the pain and sorrow they had to bear, many of them were without even the bare necessities of life. The day came, at length, when the mob finally left the Saints alone with the understanding that they were to leave Missouri in the spring. The Saints agreed to do this, even though it meant giving up another of their homes and the improved land that went with them. Always the enemies profited from their labor and suffering. About the middle of February 1839 the Foutz family, along with other inhabitants of the little settlement of Haun’s Mill and hundreds of other Saints from other parts of Missouri, began their exodus. They went from Missouri to Quincy, Illinois. At Quincy the people were hospitable; they understood the unjust treatment the Saints had been given in Missouri and for a while they seemed to sympathize with them. As more Saints continued to come into Illinois the local citizens became alarmed. They feared that the new citizens would take all the work to be had and probably upset political authority and so they too began to suggest that the “Mormons” move elsewhere. In the files of the Latter Day Saints, there is on record what seems to be a registered complaint signed by Jacob Foutz, sworn to against individuals of the mob that had molested the Saints in Missouri. This complaint reads as follows: “Quincy, Illinois, March 17, A D. 1840 This is to certify that I was citizen retime of Caldwell County, Missouri, at the time Governor Bogg’s exterminating order was issued and that I was quartered on by the mob militia without my leave or consent, at different times, and one time by William Mann, Hiram Cumstock and brother, who professed to be the captain, also Robert White; and that I was wounded and driven from the State to my inconvenience and deprived of my freedom as well as to my loss of at least four hundred dollars. Signed——————Jacob Foutz Sworn to before C. M. Woods, Clerk Circuit.” Many such complaints were sworn to by different men and they are on file in Illinois, but, although the matter was even taken to the Federal Government at Washington, D. D., the Saints were unable to get help or redress for the sufferings and material losses which the citizens and Governor of Missouri had caused them. It must have been sometime in 1840 when the Foutz family left Quincy, Ill. for in that year (Oct 1840) we find Jacob Foutz was made second counselor to Bishop Matthew Leach in the Freedom Stake of the Church, near Payson, Adams County, Illinois. While the Foutz family lived in Adams County, Illinois, probably in the City of Quincy or near Payson, their daughter, Margaret, was born. This was on the 16th day of October 1839. Sometime between October 1840 and February 1841 the Foutz family moved into Brown County, for it is recoded in the writings of Joseph Smith that February 28, 1841 a branch of the church, of Stake of Zion, was organized in Brown County, western Illinois with Levi Gifford as president, Lodarick as first counselor and Jacob Foutz as second counselor. Jacob Foutz must not have lived in this locality long, for shortly after this he was living in Nauvoo, Illinois. On the 20th October 1842, the High Council in session (at Nauvoo), “Resolved that the City of Nauvoo be divided into ten wards according to the division made by the Temple Committee and that there be a Bishop appointed over such districts immediately out of the city and adjoining thereto as shall be considered necessary.” This resolution goes on further to give the names of those chosen to preside over these districts. Jacob Foutz was appointed Bishop of the Fifth Ward. In a little diary kept by Jacob Foutz we are given a little insight into his life. This book is a meager affair, hand made of white paper, sewed to a black cover. In this diary he says, “Left Nauvoo 112th of September and left Quincy 3rd of October.” This we believe to be the notation made at the time he left for the mission field. The year is believed to be 1841. The Church Presidency thought it advisable to keep in touch with the eastern branches even if the Saints were hard pressed in their new location. Missionaries were sent out as usual in spite of the fact that they were badly needed at home to drain the swamp that was to be their home, build their homes and help with the erection of the temple. Under just what circumstances Jacob Foutz tells, in his diary, of leaving “Pitsburg” and going out and searching faithfully and preaching in nearby neighborhoods. He labored in Indiana, Camberg, Bedford, and Franklin counties. Most of the time he preached at meetings held in the schoolhouses but occasionally meetings were held in the homes of individuals. According to his record, the investigators of these meetings numbered from eleven to eighteen and at one meeting he notes twenty-eight were present. November 16, 1842, Jacob Foutz records that he baptized Levi Thornton and wife, Elizabeth. An expense account in the diary which he kept right along with his other records, is interesting when we compare the prices and variety of goods which this missionary bought with those purchased today. Evidently these good brethren bought for their families as well as themselves while out in the mission field, as such items as “calico” appear often in the lists, one of which is as follows: 10 lbs. fish .40, sugar .10, calico 1.60, cofy .12, and butter 2 lbs. 20. Just how long Brother Foutz remained on his mission is not known. The next account of him we have is in June 1842, at which time he was again in Nauvoo. His wife had given birth to a baby boy in his absence. This child was born in December 1842 at Nauvoo, Illinois. No record after this time is to be had concerning this baby, so it is believed it died in infancy. Nauvoo at that time was a most unhealthful place to live. There was much sickness throughout the settlement and old and young died of fever continually. In Margaret Foutz’s autobiography, written years later, she had this to say: “My husband was a man of great faith and many times had sickness yielded and even broken bones been united in our family, through prayer and administration of the laying on of hands. I bear testimony that this work commonly called “Mormonism” is true and I leave this as a testimony to my children and to my children’s children and to all who may read my autobiography, that this work is the work of the Lord. “I will now chronicle one miracle that took place in my home. My husband took very sick, also a young man that lived at our house was very sick and my eldest child had been very sick for about ten days; in fact he was so bad that he had become speechless. I sent for an Elder, Bro. J. Carto. He and another Elder came that came with him, and they administered to each of the sick and then called upon them, in the name of the Lord, to arise from their beds and be made whole. They did so and I got them something to eat, of which they partook and they were instantaneously healed by the power of God—His servants officiating in Priesthood which they had received.” After returning from his mission, Jacob Foutz was very active the Church and he was also made a member of the Nauvoo Legion. Inasmuch as threats were being made by mobs to take the Prophet and others out of Nauvoo, men were called especially to protect Bro. Joseph. Jacob was among a group of about eighty0five men aboard the “Maid of Iowa”, a steamboat, which was sent out from Nauvoo to patrol the Mississippi River in an effort to prevent anyone from taking the Prophet to Missouri by water for trial. This boat was loaded June 25, 1842 and sailed that night. They were out about one week, as it is recorded they left Quincy July 1, 1843 at 8 o’clock to return to Nauvoo. On Sunday, October 1, 1843 Joseph Smith attended a meeting in Nauvoo in the morning that was adjourned in consequence of cold and rain. The weather in the afternoon was more pleasant and the people assembled to resume their meeting. They were addressed on this occasion by Elder William Marks, local president of the Nauvoo Stake, Charles C. Rich and Bishop Jacob Foutz. The Foutz family, like all of the other Saints, were busy making their home in Nauvoo while, at the same time, they lived in fear of the mobs that were threatening them continually. In June 1844, the Prophet Joseph, his brother, Hyrum, and others following the advice of some of the Saints, gave themselves up to the mob in an effort to save trouble and bloodshed. These men were taken to the jail in Carthage, Illinois from which the Prophet and his brother, Hyrum, never returned alive. After this dreadful event, which took place at Carthage, in which the two brothers, Joseph and Hyrum, lost their lives, the Saints lived in even greater fear and anxiety. Threats were made continually by the mob to burn Nauvoo and drive the people from the state. In these troublesome and uncertain times, Margaret Foutz gave birth to another son, Jacob, on the 25th of August 1844. In the fall the general conference of the Church was held. At this conference, October 7, 1844, Jacob Foutz and other leaders and Bishops were sustained in their various offices by a unanimous vote. On October 8, 1844, at another session of this general conference, Pres. Young proceeded to select men from the High Priest Quorum to go abroad “in all the congressional districts of the U. S. to preside over the branches of the Church.” Jacob Foutz was among those chosen on this occasion. It seems that there was much unrest and many evil practices that had crept into the eastern branches of the church and Pres. Young thought it advisable to send faithful men, whom he knew to have the spirit of God with them, to preside over these branches and straighten out matters. Although persecution was great and it was felt generally that the Saints would again have to abandon their homes, they were commanded of God to go ahead with the building of a Temple. All who could gave of their time and means for this purpose. At the beginning of the New Year special efforts were put forth to rush the Temple to completion. In a record published by Bishop Whitney and Miller, trustees in trust for the Church, dated Jan. 31, 1845, it is shown that Jacob Foutz was one of the brethren appointed as agents by the proper authorities of the Church to “collect donations and things for the Temple and for other purposes in the City of Nauvoo.” Three months later at the General Conference of the Church, on Apr. 7, 1845, William Clayton recorded the principal officers of the Church who were sustained by the Church membership. On this occasion Jacob Foutz was sanctioned as Bishop of the Eighth Ward of Nauvoo. (On Jan. 3, 1846 Jacob Foutz and Lucinda Loss were sealed in Nauvoo.) On Monday, 9 February 1846 the temple was seen to be on fire. Men and women, carrying water frantically, succeeded in putting out the flames. It was with sorrow they viewed the damage that had been done to the Lord’s House, the structure that many had gone hungry to build. When spring finally came again, life became more normal and the Foutz family made preparations for the wedding of their daughter, Elizabeth. On April 10, 1846, Elizabeth was married to Henson Walker, Jr. in the Nauvoo Temple. This young couple began their wedded life in troublesome times. The members of the church were moving across the river and leaving Nauvoo as rapidly as possible. Many had moved during the dead of winter and those still in the city were urged to speed their departure. Pre. Young and many of the Twelve Apostles were already as far west as Council Bluff in search of a place of refuge for the Saints. So Elizabeth and Henson Walker, eager to make a home for themselves, had no idea where this home might one day be. Among those first to leave Nauvoo, crossing the Mississippi River on the ice, was Elizabeth Foutz Hess, a sister of Bishop Jacob Foutz. Elizabeth’s husband, Jacob Hess, was at that time paralyzed. They suffered greatly from cold and exposure. The first night after leaving Nauvoo they camped on the Iowa side of the river in a cold rain. From here they went on to Mt. Pisgah in the state of Iowa. They encountered hardships and trouble throughout the journey and upon their arrival at Mt. Pisgah; Elizabeth’s husband was far spent. Her son, John W. Hess, had assumed the responsibility of his father’s family as well as his own. He made his father as comfortable as possible in one of the two wagons and in the other was carried all the household supplies and provisions the oxen team could draw. All able to walk were forced to do so. At Mt. Pisgah they prepared to stay for a while. Here the earlier pioneers had planted crops for the benefit of those who would follow and it thought this would be a good place to rest. They were not there long until Jacob Hess died, June 1846. It is not known definitely just when Bishop Foutz and his family left Nauvoo, but it must have been soon after their daughter’s, Elizabeth, marriage to Henson Walker, for trouble with the mob came worse each day. It is recorded that few Saints were left in Nauvoo after Aug. 1846, for on the 12th of that month the mob about twelve hundred in number, came upon the Saints, armed with cannon and guns, and had a terrible battle. After fighting for a little more than one hour the mob offered terms of compromise. All Mormons were to leave the city with five days, leaving only twelve families to finish the unsettled business and dispose of property, etc. The brethren, having no choice, consented to these terms and they hurried preparations to leave. It is said that on Thursday, five days later, when the mob came to Nauvoo some fifteen hundred in number, such was the distress and suffering of the Saints as actually to draw tears from the mob. On leaving Nauvoo, the Foutz family went first to Garden Grove, Iowa. Here they stayed long enough to harvest a crop (summer and fall of 1846) then they moved on to Winter Quarters. Here the Saints had built some homes and were preparing to spend the winter. Many, arriving late, were forced to live in their wagons throughout the long, cold winter. In the spring of 1847, Pres. Young and the Twelve Apostles organized a company of pioneers to blaze a trail westward and search out a suitable place for the Saints to settle. On the 14th of April this little band set forth. There were one hundred forty-three men and boys on the list of this company, three women and two children. They had seventy-three wagons with horses, oxen and cattle. Among this group was Henson Walker, Jr. the young husband of Elizabeth Foutz. When Henson was called to take this journey his wife was very ill. He would have declined to go had not Elizabeth urged him on. She wanted him to respond to all calls made upon him by the Presidency and would not now consent to his staying with her. So Henson left with the promise that if his wife lived, she would follow him later. Elizabeth was determined to keep this promise, so preparations were made for her to make the trip with one of the first companies to leave after the original company was well on its way. She planned to travel with her husband’s people, the John Adam Bouch family. When her own folks learned that she was going, they prepared to follow that they might look after her burial. They had no hope that she would live to see the valley of the Rocky Mountains. However, as they moved on westward, out of the damp lowlands, Elizabeth’s health began to improve. He life, which for a time seemed to be close to the end, had in reality only begun. It was on the 21st of June 1847 that the Foutz Family left Winter Quarters on the journey that was eventually to take them to a permanent home in the mountains. These pioneers were organized into companies with a captain over each hundred, one over each fifty and one over each ten. This was done that each family might know where it was to travel and to whom to look for counsel and help. Bishop Jacob Foutz and Joseph Horne were captains of the second fifty of the Abraham O. Smoot Co. As near as we are able to figure, there in the Foutz family at this time Bishop Jacob Foutz, who was forty-six years old, his wife, Margaret, forty-five years old, Nancy Ann, twenty-one years old, Catherine, fifteen years old, Joseph Lehi, ten years old, Margaret, seven years old, Jacob, Jr. who was four years old (three years old) and maybe Elizabeth, who was nineteen years old. (The church archives also list two small boys by the name of Brown, presumably their daughters children with them as their father was in the Mormon Battalion.) The family very likely had two wagons in which to store all their household good and provisions, as Catherine and Lehi often told how they drove one of the teams of oxen on their journey westward. Even though they were better off in this respect than many families, the individuals in the family had to walk most of the way. On August 30th the brethren from the advance company returned and met the Spencer Company on the Sweetwater, east of Fort Bridger. Henson had been fearful lest his wife had departed this life and found her well and traveling with his folks and her folks. The Foutz’s and Walker’s continued on their journey to Salt Lake Valley arriving there in September 1847. Taken from the Pioneer History Journal, compiled by Andrew Jenson, the following is the end of their journey: “Sept. 7, 1847. It snowed part of the day and the weather was cold. By night the snow had cleared away. They crossed the Dry Sandy Creek at 2 p.m. and the Little Sandy at 10 o’clock in the evening where they stopped to camp. The road was good and the cattle traveled very much faster, especially after sundown. They made 28 miles that day. The second fifty of Smoot’s hundred, with Jacob Foutz and Joseph Horne as captains, spent part of the day with other pioneers from another company at the upper crossing of the Sweetwater. “ Sat., Sept. 18 1847. Smoot’s hundred arrived and camped on Bear River.” And so the journey continued until the whole company arrived in the Salt Lake Valley Sept. 25, 1847. This company was fortunate in getting there before the heavy snows fell. Some companies caught in these storms suffered terribly. Again in Pioneer History Journal, we find: “The second fifty of Smoot’s company responded liberally to the call of sending teams from the valley to help the rear company over the mountains. Jacob Foutz sent back one yoke of oxen.” When winter set in, the entire Foutz family became very busy establishing their new home. With the other Saints they assisted in making the first improvements in Salt Lake City, along with working in the first organizations of the Church that were set up in this new location. On November 7, 1847, Bishop Jacob Foutz was again placed at the head of one of the wards of the Church. This time he became Bishop of the east half of the New Fort Ward, which was one of the five wards into which the Pioneers of Great Salt Lake Valley were divided. This ward was located in the west side of town near where the Pioneer Park was later developed. It was in this general location where the Foutz family located. In this new home, Jan. 7, 1848 a baby daughter was born, whom the named Maranda. Bishop Foutz had poor health and was in bed much of his time. His ill health was contributed to by the injuries he received at Haun’s Mill and to the fever sickness, which he suffered while in Nauvoo. Of this sickness his wife tells us more in her later years. Just a little over a month after the arrival of the baby girl, which was their twelfth child, Bishop Jacob Foutz passed away. His death occurred while he was away from home excavating in gravel, Feb. 14, 1848. His fellow workers said he took what they called a stroke and died suddenly. It is not known where Bishop Jacob Foutz was buried as his death was one of the first to occur in the valley. (He has since been interred from his grave to make room for a freeway and moved to the city cemetery in Salt Lake City.) His life had been an eventful one, mingled with joys and sorrows. He had been a faithful member of the Church for many years and a diligent worker in it. The Church Leader, as well as the membership, joined with the family in mourning the passing of this humble servant of God. (Mattie Secrest was sealed to Bishop Jacob Foutz on 24 Oct 1888. There doesn’t seem to be any record of her earlier for the family.)

Experiences of William Carter Staines on his mission to the Poncas, 1846-1847

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[Excerpts from the story: “Among the Poncas” by William C. Staines, pp. 31-67, originally from FAITH-PROMOTING STORIES, vol. 2, 1880.] [Note: William Carter Staines, at the time of his mission with the Poncas, was described by John R. Young, a contemporary: “President [Brigham] Young, ever ready to grasp an inspiration and to act promptly, quietly sent a few discreet men to labor as missionaries among the Indian tribes. One of these men, Wm. C. Staines, is worthy of note. He was a young English boy, [age 28] a late convert to the faith, small in body, and so deformed as to be almost a cripple; yet he had a soul and an ambition as grand and lofty as the immortal Wolfe’s. He penetrated the Indian tribes as far as the Sioux, by his sacrifices and force of character won their friendship and made impressions that opened the way for our people to pass through their lands in peace.” (“Memoirs of John R. Young, Utah Pioneer, 1847,” pp. 21-22. In an article written by William Carter Staines, he says that he fell upon ice while playing, at age 13, and injured his spine, which caused his deformity, “and from which I suffered more or less pain for twenty years.”] “A few days after the organization of the Mormon Battalion (1846) and when it had left for Fort Leavenworth, it was decided, in the council of the Authorities of the Church, that Brother George Miller should raise a company and endeavor to cross the Rocky Mountains that fall. At this time I was traveling and living with the family of Bishop Miller. I had been suffering with fever and ague for two months previous, but a few days before we arrived at Council Bluffs the fever left me . . . I had brought some shoemaker’s tools along, so that I could mend my shoes when they needed it. I had them in use every time we stopped, mending shoes for the camp. I soon learned to be a pretty good cobbler, especially in patching up the sisters’ shoes. Some four of Bishop Miller’s teamsters left to join the Battalion. Brother Henry G. Boyle was the one who drove the team I traveled in, but now I had to be teamster. We left with sufficient breadstuff to last a year, consisting of flour, corn meal, etc., but no meat, as we hoped to find plenty of game on our journey. In this we were disappointed, as we were without meat for several weeks, with the exception of fish, when we could catch them. When about twenty miles east of the Pawnee village and mission, we met several white men, who had been in charge of the mission, under the superintendence of an Indian agent appointed by the government. These men had been employed at building houses, fencing in land, sowing grain, etc., and endeavoring to teach the Indians to do likewise; but the Indians for some cause had become exasperated and had killed two of the white men, one of whom was a blacksmith. As soon as this party learned of our numbers and intentions they wished to return to the mission and cache some government property, such as iron, steel, blacksmith tools, farming implements, etc., which they had abandoned when fleeing from the Indians. On arriving at the mission and village, we found that all the Indians had left, fearing, I presume, that they would be punished if they were caught by the government troops. The brethren helped these men to cache all the property, which they did by digging a large hole in the ground, in a dry place, putting the goods into it, covering them with the soil taken out of the hole, and building a large fire over the place, that the ashes might cover up all the trace of the digging. One of the men of this party joined the Church, and emigrated to the valley with us. We found several fields of grain ready for harvesting, with potatoes, turnips and sweet corn, as well as a large quantity of wheat, barley, and oats already threshed and housed. This was all handed over to our camp. We remained here a couple of days, when we received a letter from President Brigham Young’s camp, advising us to winter on Grand Island, which was well timbered, and where there was a good feed also. This island was a few miles west of us, on the Platte River. The letter also stated that a company had left President Young’s camp, who would winter with us and give us sufficient strength to guard against an attack from Indians." First Meeting with the Poncas "The following day, eight Ponca chiefs came to our camp, stating that they had come from their nation to make peace with the Pawnees, and appeared much disappointed when they learned they had left, in consequence of their trouble with the men who had charge of the mission. These Ponca Indians were large, fine-looking men. Bishop Miller asked them to stay with us a few days, which they did, and appeared much pleased. They soon learned where we expected to winter, and were very anxious to have us all go to their village and stay. They represented that they had a good country, well timbered, and plenty of good pasture and shelter for our cattle. The next day, the company sent to join us, consisting of thirty men with their families, arrived. As soon as they had rested, a meeting was called, to know what should be done–winter on Grand Island, without the consent of the Pawnee Indians, who owned the land and timber there, or go with the Ponca chiefs where we would be welcomed by the whole nation. Camp with the Poncas The council decided to go with the Poncas, and the next day we fitted up our wagons for the journey. The next thing was to load up as much grain and potatoes as we could get into our wagons for these were the first we had been able to obtain since leaving Nauvoo in the spring. After we got ever corner of our wagons filled with eatables we left a great many bushels of grain and vegetables upon the land to waste, literally fulfilling a prophecy uttered by Bishop Miller, a few days before we started. When speaking to the camp, he said he hoped all who were going in that company were true Latter-day Saints, full of faith and good works, and added: “‘All of you who have been with us have seen the power of God manifested in behalf of the traveling camps of Israel, in protecting our leaders from our enemies, and providing food for the Saints, who number thousands. Some may say, ‘We were then traveling through a country where we found an occasional farm, from the owner of which we could purchase what we required; but today we have left all these, and have nothing but a wilderness before us, without farms, houses, or grain.’” “‘Let me say, as I have before said, you shall be blessed in the future as you have been in the past. ‘What, with food? Yes; I tell you, yes; I promise you all this day, in the name of the Lord, that you shall see the time while upon this journey, that you shall have more grain than you can load in your wagons, and leave many bushels behind you to waste upon the ground.’” This, my readers, was fulfilling prophecy to the very letter. How often have I seen the sayings of our leaders fulfilled in like manner since I started upon the journey. Brother James Emmett, one of our party, understood a little of the Sioux language, and one of the Ponca chiefs could converse in this language. Brother Emmett was asked to find out how far the Poncas lived from the camp. The chief told him three sleeps, or as he understood it, three days’ travel for our cattle; but we afterwards learned that the chief meant three days’ and nights’ travel with horses, one hundred and fifty miles. The country over which we traveled the first three days was very rough for our wagons. The name of the chief of the Poncas was Ta-nugar-number, which means, two buffalo bulls. He was thus named because he once killed two bulls, while they were running through the village. On the fourth day this chief came to us, saying he and his party had killed three buffaloes. Brother Miller ordered the camp to stop near a small stream close by, and send for the dead animals, that we might have buffalo meat for dinner. This was the first time we had had meat for ten weeks. A team was sent, and the meat soon arrived, and was distributed through the camp.” “We remained her until two o’clock, the next afternoon, when but little remained of the buffaloes, except the bones. Several more were killed before we reached the village. The meat of some was dried, but all the prime pieces were eaten. Visit by the Ponca Tribe On the eleventh day we camped within to miles of their village, and three miles from where we located for the winter. No sooner had we unyoked our cattle than we were visited by nearly all then nation, old and young. All wanted to see us. Many of them had never seen an ox before, and but few had seen many white men. A council of the chiefs and braves or warriors, was called, to meet with our brethren. The chief told his people that he had invited us to stay on their land during the winter, that we wanted timber for building houses and for fuel, and pasture for our cattle. He said they had plenty of both–more than they or we needed–and he wanted his braves to say that we could have it. In return, he told them we would build them houses, plow and plant some land for their squaws, and give them some flour. He then asked for an expression of their feelings. Several of the old men spoke, and all said we were welcome to come and go as we wished. The Poncas numbered about two thousand souls. After the meeting dismissed some thirty of the braves, or soldiers, favored us with a war dance. The musical instrument used for this was used at all the dances I ever saw while with them. It was like a tambourine, and about the same size. This is beaten as you would beat a drum. The braves formed in a circle, and at every beat of the instrument (and there were perhaps seventy strokes to the minute) they would jump up, at the same time bending forward in a half stooping position, and passing around as they jumped, yelling and hallooing in a most frightful manner. All they lacked at this dance to make it a perfect war dance, were the scalps of some whom they had killed in battle. This drumming, yelling and jumping continued for about fifteen minutes, when all the Indians left the camp for their own village. We were about one mile from the Missouri River, and near the mouth of Swift or Running Water River, and where the Indians raised a little corn. The next day the whole village turned out to visit us. They wanted us to trade with them by giving them flour, sugar, coffee, etc., for moccasins, buckskins, etc. A great many exchanges were made, to the satisfaction of both parties. The Indians, however, had by far the best of the bargains, as we found out the next morning, for many of us were minus an ax, a kettle, pan, cup, knife, or something that was used daily about our camp, and all these things we learned had been taken by our Indian visitors. As soon as this was known to the chiefs, they ordered all who had these articles to return them to our camp. A few tin cups, saucepans, milk pans, and such things were brought back, but not a tithe of what were taken. After this but few were allowed to visit us. The chief appointed two Indians to be at our camp every day, to keep them away, or keep them from stealing. In about three weeks a number of houses were ready for the Saints to occupy, and about two-thirds of our people were housed for the winter. William Carter Staines gets called on a Mission to the Poncas While this was being done I had been kept busy, shoe-mending; and very often I would be called upon to mend an Indian’s bridle or his bullet pouch, which I did cheerfully, and to their satisfaction. About the first of October the Ponca chief came to Brother Miller, and informed him that they were about to start for their winter hunting ground, to hunt buffalo, elk and deer, to get robes and meat, and wished to have a few of our young men accompany them. He mentioned me, stating that I was good and kind to his people, mending bullet pouches, etc., for them. That same evening, after several of our young men had proposed to go with the Indians on their hunt, Bishop Miller said, calling me by name, ‘I would like you to go with them. The chiefs and some braves have taken quite a liking to you, and I feel, Brother Staines, as though you would do much good by going among them on this journey.’ A peculiar feeling came over me while he was speaking, and I was led to say, ‘Brother Miller, if you say I can accomplish good by going with those Indians, I will go . . . If anything should occur, that I should never return, I have no relatives in camp to mourn my loss. This weak body of mine, can be better spared that those who are able bodied, all of whom are needed for the protection of the camp.’ He there and then appointed me to go, and blessed me in the name of the Lord. He said that I should do much good, and have exceeding faith in the God of Israel, who would guide and direct me in a marvelous manner. The next day we started. Our company consisted of Brother John Kay, who was going to do a little trading with and gunsmithing for the Indians; Frederick Boinbridge, his teamster, four young brethren and myself, with the Ponca nation, which numbered two thousand souls, with all their lodges, camp kettles, etc. Two hours before the Indians left for their winter hunting ground a few of the chiefs came to Bishop Miller to smoke the pipe of peace with him and our camp. This pipe of peace had been smoked with us many times before; and, as it may be a question how this is done, I will explain it to my young readers. When there is a sufficient number to form a circle, they always do so. The chief who invites the party fills his large pipe with tobacco (more than one pipe is used when the company is large). As soon as it is filled, the chief holds the bowl of the pipe upwards, and says a few words appopropriate to the occasion, calling always upon the Great Spirit, whom they call ‘Wurconda.’ These speeches were always made at feasts of importance, or councils, and at every ‘big smoke,’ or when they send off a war party, and when a party goes to make peace with another nation.” “During this ceremony no one spoke but those in council. It was as quiet as any religious meeting I ever attended. Each speech was like a prayer, and was delivered in a very solemn manner. After this peaceable smoke the Indians shook hands with their white friends and jumped into their saddles and left. It was a novel scene to us, and I am sure it would be to my young readers, to see this Indian nation on the move. In advance could be seen the chiefs and some of their braves on horseback. Next came the squaws, leading horses, packed with their lodges and camp equipage. Next came the old men and old women, with their lodges packed and drawn by dogs with poles strapped on their backs. With these were young men and maidens, all on foot. Those who had babies trapped them upon a board, and carried them as the Utah Indians do. All the young men and boys had bows and arrows; and when traveling they had a good time, testing their skill by shooting rabbits and small birds. When in camp a great deal of their time was spent in shooting at a mark. The first day we traveled about eight miles." [Note: William Staines continued to live with the Ponca Indians for several months, beginning in October, and leaving in March. He became well-acquainted with their culture and language, which he described in detail in his account, but which I will not include in its’ entirety, because of its’ length.] Observations of Ponca Life A few of the items William Staines mentioned in his account, were that the Poncas ate nearly nothing but meat, including buffalo, deer, elk, and, occasionally, antelope, beaver, otter, dog, wolf, skunk, turkey, duck, crow, and pigeon. When preparing to travel, the Poncas preferred to start early in the morning, and to not eat until two or three o’clock in the afternoon. William said that the Poncas were “very kind” to him, and “all were anxious” that he “should learn their language.” The Poncas called the Americans ‘morie-tongar.’ ‘Morie’ means knife, ‘tongar’ is a large knife. The first Americans they ever saw all had swords, which they thought looked like ‘large knives.’ The name that the Poncas gave to William was, “sargey morie-tongar” meaning “hardy American” and, at times, he would be called, “whadee shipper,” which was the name of the Poncas’ fire steel (one they used with a flint to strike fire with). William wore out the shoes he had been wearing after two weeks, and so, the Poncas gave him a pair of moccasins. After these were worn through, a Ponca removed his own moccasins, and traded with William. William observed the technique of the Poncas’ when buffalo hunting. He said that they would hunt from “five to forty buffaloes in one day.” One of the Ponca buffalo hunts, which engaged “about 400 buffaloes” he exclaimed, “was the best and most exciting hunt” he had ever seen. At that time, “50 buffaloes” were killed. William said, by that time, he “had learned considerable of their language,” and he was “able to converse tolerably well with them; and when sitting in the evening with some of the chiefs, they would ask me to talk to them about our people, wishing to know where we were going, and why we were going so far from our white brethren, and so on.” William gave the Poncas, “a brief history of the Church, the principles taught by the Prophet Joseph, his and his brother Hyrum’s death, and also of the Book of Mormon” and showed them a copy of the book, which he had brought with him. He said, “I also told them where their forefathers came from, where they first landed, and how they, like us, had been scattered and driven from the rising almost to the setting sun.” “These conversations were many and always very interesting to them. I may here mention that, when I left the nation, the chief with whom I stayed asked me for the Book of Mormon and told me he would keep it as long as he lived, and his son would keep it after him; for he wanted to have the book that could give the history of their fathers always with them. I handed it to him, and he thanked me, kissing the book, and saying it would be good medicine for his people, for he should feel as though his fathers were with them when he had the book.” Health Difficulties from eating meat exclusively Because of his diet with the Poncas, of “so much fresh meat without any vegetables or bread, and having but little exercise,” William began to develop “a kind of scurvy,” and all he could do, “was to apply buffalo fat to the parts affected.” His leg became swollen. He prayed that the swelling would go down, which it did, and he “was able to walk nine miles.” William developed sores on his face, down to his ankle. His knee would swell, increasing after each day’s journey, so that he “could scarcely walk” but then, “would go down” when the Poncas traveled. William said that this continued to happen for several weeks. William also developed boils all over, and “suffered a great deal of pain.” He said, “Notwithstanding this affliction I felt blessed of the Lord, and was not discouraged.” He found a spot near the Ponca village in “a large patch of plum” bushes, which he chose for his prayer room. He said that he “went there three times a day for prayer, and I felt many times, when praying, that the Lord was there.” William described the preparing of buffalo robes, and drying meat. The Poncas used the buffalo skins to sell to traders, for “cloth, ammunition, coffee, sugar, salt, etc.” The Ponca lodges were all made from buffalo skins. Five to eighteen skins would be needed to make one lodge. During the winter, the Poncas ran out of food. After three days, William “felt very faint” and so, decided to try cottonwood tree bark, which the Poncas fed to their horses in times of scarcity. He scraped off some bark, chopped it finely, and blessed it. He chewed a mouthful, and “swallowed the juice.” He was about to swallow the bark, but was given the impression not to, because “it would clog” his system. He thanked his Heavenly Father for the suggestion. Around this time, “a young chief and his wife” invited William to eat at their lodge. They gave hime “a piece of deer” about the size “one one’s hand.” William realized that this couple had gone without food at least as long as he had. He cut off a small piece, and returned the rest to this couple. The couple insisted that “Indian eat once in three days–good; but white man, or Morie-Tongar, needs to eat three times a day.” William said, “We had the best of order in our village. Four Indians were appointed every day to act as police. These had their faces blackened when on duty. Fresh ones were appointed daily to guard, and see that everything was orderly in the village.” William reported, “I had been informed while in the States that all Indians were very licentious and degraded in their character and habits. It may possibly be the case with some tribes, but from the first day I traveled with the Poncas up to the last, which was six months, I never saw anything that would cause a lady to blush, either in the actions of a male or female.” William then described the Ponca marriage ritual. He told of times when the Poncas had their horses stolen “by marauding parties from other nations” and how they would get back their horses. He said, “the war parties of the different tribes are constantly active; and each tribe has to be on the watch, to prevent its horses being stolen while in herds near its villages.” “All foreign war parties” were considered as “enemies.” Whenever the Indians see them, “they shoot them and bring their scalps to camp, for the young folks to dance around at their evening entertainments. Sending out these war parties was often the cause of the different nations going to war, and it is the same to this day.” Each tribe could be identified by the shape of its’ moccasins, each tribe’s shape differing slightly, and by the color of its’ arrows. William said that these differences were as well-known to the Indians as were the flags flown by the nations of Europe. William reported that the Poncas considered skunk meat “very fine food,” which he had occasion to try, and said, sometimes, “one can taste it the next day after eating it.” William admitted, before his mission, that he had “looked upon these Indians of the desert as the enemies of the white men, and believed they would rob and kill them whenever found.” Now, however, he said, “how different” his feelings were. “No nation or people” he said, “could have treated me with more kindness. I lived in the best house, or lodge, in the village. I had the best seat (a good pillow) at their councils. I had the best food the nation afforded to eat, and was treated by chiefs, soldiers, braves, and people, both old and young, as though I was their king. I always found they wished to be friendly with the white men if they would treat them right; but the Indians had been deceived by them in trade and treaty, and for this they had rebelled at times.” “The old chiefs always taught their young men to be good, and be at peace if others wished peace, and only fight when others were determined to fight with them.” At Christmastime, William’s “knee and right side were badly swollen.” He felt that he might not live another day. He prayed for relief, telling the Lord of his fear of dying amongst the Poncas, where he knew that their dead were buried in shallow graves, because the ground was frozen, and he did not want his dead body to be torn up by wolves. He “was anxious to see the Saints again; but if not,” “Oh, Lord, Thy will be done!” He prayed that his body might be protected, and that his “brethren” “might know” of his death, and the “location of this poor feeble body.” He then returned to the lodge where he had been staying, and wrote in his journal. He felt inspired to write a message to himself, from the Lord. He was told that his prayers had been accepted, that he would live, and that he would return to the Saints, travel much, and see his sister again “in the flesh.” William stated of this incident, “Had I not been with those Indians as I was, alone and sorely afflicted, I might never have had this testimony.” William did survive. He said, soon after Christmas, the Poncas were visited by a “party of Brules” a neighboring tribe. “The chief of this nation was a fine-looking man, about sixty years of age,” named, “Wah-bah-hooter,” or, “long-mane” (long hair). “Their hunting ground adjoins that of the Poncas on the south, and continues as far as old Laramie Fort.” At this time, William was invited to his first dog feast, “this being the last great feast of the season,” with the “visiting chiefs” as well as “the ruling chiefs of the Poncas, twenty-two in number.” William described the Indian method of fishing and cooking fish, wrapped in grass, and cooked in hot ashes. Springtime with the Poncas At this time, the Poncas had arrived at their winter hunting ground, near the trading post of Frenchman, Mr. Sarpee, “the only licensed trader for the Indians in the country west of the Missouri River.” The Poncas were scheduled to meet the traders at Mr. Sarpee’s trading post “about the 1st of March.” At this point, William departed from the Indians, then walked alone, thirty miles, to return to the Mormon pioneer camp. This took about three days of walking, and sleeping along the trail. The second night, William was approached by a large pack of wolves. He quickly prayed for protection. He was inspired to yell with all his might at them. The wolves immediately stopped, took “a good look” at him, then “divided” and passed by him. William “thanked” his “Heavenly Father for his goodness” in “preserving” his life. He said that was “the largest pack of wolves” he had ever seen “or heard of.” On William’s third day of walking, “a little before sunset” when he was looking for a spot of ground to spend the night, he was “greatly surprised” to see “a yoke of cattle grazing on the hill near by.” He was so surprised, he cried for joy. He climbed a hill, and saw a wagon and campfire a short distance away. To his great delight, William was reunited with a group of LDS pioneers, including “Mathews and Foutze” who “were somewhat startled as seeing me, and after the first exclamation of surprise, Brother Mathews said, ‘Why, Brother Staines, is it you? You are like one raised from the dead; for we were informed by the Indians that you were killed before last Christmas.’ William Staines related, “Thus ended my Indian mission, which (although at times I suffered much) was to me a very interesting part of my life. Through my experiences upon that mission, I became better acquainted with the dealings of the Lord with His servants when alone. I know assuredly that He will hear and answer our prayers, at all times, and under all circumstances, if we do and ask right. Before I close, let me say to those who have read this reminiscence, never allow your faith to fail you, but trust in the Lord and continue to pray to Him, and He will answer you. If He should not at first, pray again and again, and exercise faith, and I do know you will be answered and blessed of the Lord.”

Hunter, Edward and Jacob Foutz, Letter, in Journal History

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Hunter, Edward and Jacob Foutz, Letter, in Journal History of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 17 Aug. 1847, 5-6. Source Locations Church History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah In camp on creek, near Red Hills, west 63 miles from Ft. Laramie, Aug. 17, 1847. To Bro. B. Young, The camp is enjoying good health, no cases of sickness at this date, and no deaths have occurred. Two births. We number 155 souls. The names of men capable of bearing arms and of performing other camp duties are as follows: Edward Hunter, Alva Keller, Henry Heath, Wm. W. Potter, Berry [Burrill] A. Covington, Nathaniel M. Dodge, Henry Tuttle, Jacob Foutz, Jacob F. Secrist, Henry I. Doremus, Samuel Merrill, Isaac Leany, William Leany, William Sceare [Scearce], Leonard Stump, John A. Wolf [Woolf], Abraham Boswell, Vinson [Vincent] Shirtliff [Shurtleff], Hobert [ Hubbard] Tuttle, Lemon Brunson [Leman Bronson], Albert G. Fellows, Wilmer Brunson [Bronson], Wm. Fellows, Fredrick Bainbridge, John McBride, William K. Rice, Newton J. Hale [Hall], Mc Bride, D. M. Thomas, Henry Thomas, A. W. Collins, Robert D. Covington, Thomas Warrick, James Matthews [or Mathis], John Thomas, Philemon Thomas, John Robertson, John Lowery, Justus Seelye [Seeley], Wm. S. Seelye [Seeley], Jastus [Justus] W. Seelye, [John] Henry Wilcox, David Seelye [Seeley] James Young, John Young, Ithamer Sprague. The sisters who had husbands and/relatives in the army were Catharine Ann Owens, Mary Ann Hunter, Louize [Louisa] Calkins, Sarah Dodge. There are also in this company; 50 guns, 7 pistols, 246 1/2 lbs. powder, 138 lbs. shot, 394 lbs. lead, 59 wagons, 247 oxen, 12 horses, 3 mules, 95 cows, 38 sheep, and 3 hogs. As to our teams, they are not so good a plight as we could wish. The loss of cattle in Grant's company has made it necessary to take from our teams to supply that loss. A few of our cattle (oxen) are failing in their feet and have died, owing to the want of competent teamsters. Small accidents occur almost daily, and we think that none of our teams or perhaps very few of them will be in a condition to return to Winter Quarters In In the present condition our cattle, we think, if we reach the place of our destination with them, it will be as much as we shall expect. Our cows, with a very few exceptions, are put in the teams. We say, in conclusion that if a few additional teams could be furnished us, they would/assist us very much on our journey. Edward Hunter, Capt. of Hundred, Jacob Foutz, Capt. of Fifty.

Life timeline of Jacob Foutz

Jacob Foutz was born in 1801
Jacob Foutz was 12 years old when Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice is first published in the United Kingdom. Jane Austen was an English novelist known primarily for her six major novels, which interpret, critique and comment upon the British landed gentry at the end of the 18th century. Austen's plots often explore the dependence of women on marriage in the pursuit of favourable social standing and economic security. Her works critique the novels of sensibility of the second half of the 18th century and are part of the transition to 19th-century literary realism. Her use of biting irony, along with her realism and social commentary, have earned her acclaim among critics and scholars.
Jacob Foutz was 24 years old when The Erie Canal opens: Passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie. The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System. Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.
Jacob Foutz was 30 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
Jacob Foutz died on 11 Feb 1848 at the age of 47
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Jacob Foutz (1801 - 11 Feb 1848), BillionGraves Record 4107243 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States

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