Jacob Fuhriman

16 Jan 1831 - 11 May 1914

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Jacob Fuhriman

16 Jan 1831 - 11 May 1914
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Jacob Fuhriman 16 Jan 1831-14 May 1914 My father, Jacob Fuhriman, was born in Orschenbeck, Canton Bern, Switzerland January 16, 1831--143 years ago. He passed his early life among the Alps. When he was 19 years old his father died, leaving his mother with, a small home on the mountain side with a mo

Life Information

Jacob Fuhriman

Born:
Died:

Providence City Cemetery

900 River Heights Blvd
River Heights, Cache, Utah
United States
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shirlbur

April 22, 2012
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hlubean

June 18, 2012
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Amador82

September 17, 2020
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MDSIMS

April 15, 2012

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Jacob Fuhriman

Contributor: Amador82 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 4 months ago

Jacob Fuhriman 16 Jan 1831-14 May 1914 My father, Jacob Fuhriman, was born in Orschenbeck, Canton Bern, Switzerland January 16, 1831--143 years ago. He passed his early life among the Alps. When he was 19 years old his father died, leaving his mother with, a small home on the mountain side with a mortgage on it and seven children. He learned the carpenter trade at the age of 22. He was hired out to a building contractor Andreas Loosli. A good deal of the work consisted of hewing out timber for buildings so father became a good hand with the broad ax. He become acquainted with Anna Barbara Loosli. They were married December 5, 1856. They both joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints February 14, 1858 (116 years ago). Two years later, March 16, 1860 they left Switzerland for America. At that time they had one small son, Godfrey. They left Liverpool, England in a sailing vessel, taking between six or seven weeks to get to New York. They then traveled by train to St. Joseph, Missouri. From there they took a flat boat up the Missouri River to Florence, Nebraska. They stayed in Florence long enough for Casper and Ulrich Loosli, brothers of his wife Anna Barbara, to buy oxen, wagons and food supplies. They came to Utah with the James T. Ross Company. This company consisted of 259 Swiss and English converts, 36 wagons, 142 oxen, and 52 milk cows. Only one person and 2 head of cattle died en route. Jacob Fuhriman, having nothing to buy an outfit with, drove two yoke of oxen and one wagon across the plains for Casper Loosli to pay for passage for his wife and small son. She walked and carried the baby all the way. The journey of 1020 miles took 79 days. They had a lot of hardships, but not so many as the pioneers who come earlier. They reached Salt Lake Valley on September 3, 1860. President Brigham Young and some other church authorities came to their camp to welcome them and give the instructions. This was father’s first meeting with President Young. After staying in Salt Lake for a few days, at the direction of Brigham Young, and being persuaded by John Theurer to go to Cache Valley. There they settled in Spring Creek, later called Providence. The first winter they lived in a tent. It was too late in the season to get lumber from the canyon, and to build a house. One night the wind blew their tent in on top of them. Father, being a carpenter, soon built a one room house, then a larger one. He also bought land which he farmed. Their first flour bin was 5 feet high and divided into two sections, one section for flour and the other for shorts. This bin also served as a safe hiding place for the children when the Indians raided the town. In those years the Mormon Church practiced polygamy. Father's first wife, Anna Barbara, urged her husband to send for her sister Mary from her parents' home in Switzerland. He met Mary in Salt Lake and married her in 1869. He also built her a house in Providence. In about 1898 he hauled supplies to Promontory Point on the Central Pacific Railroad to get away from the government men who were after those practicing polygamy, but he didn't like the work and being away from home, so when he got back he was arrested, fined $50 and ordered to serve in the Sugarhouse penitentiary. He was there for three months. He later said that those three months were some of the most rewarding of his life as he served with Apostles George Q. Cannon, Amasa Lyman and others, who taught him much about the Church. He said they were treated very well. Father always enjoyed going to General Conference each spring and fall so he could meet with the church leaders face to face. Father's first wife, Anna Barbara had 5 sons and 3 daughters. His second wife, Mary, had 4 sons. In the year of 1870 Father aided in building the First Ward rock meeting house, constructing and hewing all the supports of the roof 14 inches square and 40 feet long. (This is now the Rozella Manor.) In 1864 there were no school districts and no school taxes, each community provided its own school and each parent paid the teacher with a certain number of bushels of wheat for each child, generally 1 1/4 bushel per month. He was a share holder in the first co-op store in 1869 and also in a saw mill. In 1877 Father was set apart to preside over the German speaking meetings. In those years so many people from Switzerland and Germany settled in Providence that special meetings were held for them every Sunday afternoon. Father presided over these meetings for 31 years. Father was respected and loved by all who knew him. He was a peace-maker. The Bishop often called on him to go to a home where there was trouble to talk to them and help straighten out the problems. His second wife, Mary, died of pneumonia in 1892 leaving four sons. Then three years later his first wife, Anna Barbara died of cancer, leaving five sons and three daughters. Out of these 12 children, five were married at this time leaving Father seven not married. Two years later he met my mother, Carolina Bollscwiler in Salt Lake. They were married soon after in the Salt Lake Temple. This was a great responsibility and challenge for her, to marry a man with seven boys at home and her husband being much older than she. Father was 66 years old and Mother 33. So she started her busy happy life with Father and seven sons who ranged from the ages of 10 to 36. As these sons began to marry, she began to replace them with her own sons and daughters--two girls and three boys. Father kept many hives of bees. He never ate a piece of bread without butter and honey. I believe this is one of the reasons he had good health, he never had a sick day in his life. May 14, 1914 at the age of 83 he had a stroke. The sudden death of Father brought Mother heartache and worry. She was left a widow at age 50 with five little children to raise. My oldest brother was 12 years old and my baby brother 2 years old. He was born when Father was 81. In spite of hardships and worries Mother kept her family together and made a happy life for them. Her life was one of sacrifice and devotion. She lived 48 more years after Father's death. She passed away January 18, 1963 at the age of 98. I'm thankful for my parents, for the examples they set, for the choices they made throughout their lives, and for the wonderful heritage they gave us. Sources: 1. History of Jacob Fuhriman by Emilie F. Thatcher, written January 1973. Daughters of the Utah Pioneers Museum, Salt Lake City, Utah. 2. Article on Jacob Fuhriman, written by son Carl Fuhriman.

SONS OF UTAH PIONEERS FITS OGDEN MAN PERFECTLY By Dennis Lythgoe, Deseret News Published: Thursday, Aug. 3 1995

Contributor: Amador82 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 4 months ago

SOME 68,000 Mormon pioneers crossed the plains to Utah from 1847 to 1869. Because the last true pioneer arrived over 125 years ago, almost all of the sons of the pioneers are grandsons or great grandsons. There is an exception to every rule, of course.In this case, it is Carl Fuhriman, now a vigorous 83, the son of Jacob Fuhriman, a Swiss emigrant who became an LDS convert in 1858 and then made the long journey to Utah. A life member of the Sons of the Utah Pioneers, Carl is probably the only genuine son of an LDS pioneer still living. Born in Cache Valley, he and his wife, Edna, raised three children and live in Ogden. "What do you think," asked Edna, "of this old man with that kind of a history?" "I'm impressed." I said. "How old was the pioneer father when his youngest son was born?" "Eighty-one," said Carl, "and my mother was 47." Then he showed me a picture of Joseph Fuhriman's 17 children, including 54-year-old Godfrey and baby Carl. Carl was born in 1912 to Joseph and his third wife, Caroline Bollschweiler. Carl said, "Father died when I was only 2, so I don't remember him at all, but I am proud of my heritage." He has a vivid memory of his mother, who married Joseph when he was 66 and she was 33. She lived to be 98 years old. For the first 15 years of their marriage, she lived with Carl and Edna. From his mother, Carl learned of the sacrifices of his pioneer ancestors. As a young girl, Caroline had a vivid dream about a man in a brown suit emerging from LDS Conference. He shook her hand and walked away, but she knew he was the man she was supposed to marry. When she met Joseph, she instantly recognized him as the man in her dream. Joseph and his first wife, Barbara, traveled from Switzerland to Liverpool, England, and set sail on a 30-day journey to New York on March 16, 1860. Then they traveled by train to St. Joseph, Mo., and crossed the river to Florence, Neb. There they obtained an ox team and wagon and left for Utah with the James T. Ross company, consisting of 359 Swiss and English converts. It took 79 days to make the 1,020-mile journey. To lighten the load for the oxen, Jacob and Barbara walked most of the way, Barbara carrying 9-month-old God-frey. They were met in Emigration Canyon by Brigham Young, who sent them to Cache Valley to settle in the town of Providence. Today there are some 3,000 Jacob Fuhriman descendants. In his early years, Carl farmed and worked as a plasterer and a carpenter. He and his family left Cache Valley during World War II to work at the Ogden arsenal, now part of Hill Air Force Base. After three years, he began a 29-year stint at the Union Pacific Railroad. Although retired for 20 years, he returned to the labor force in 1993 to become a crossing guard. "I feel age creeping up on me, but I still get out for an hour every morning and every afternoon to help the kids cross the street. I got a letter the other day telling me I got a cost of living raise from $4.50 an hour to $4.59." That's welcome news, because he was making only $4.40 a day at the old Ogden arsenal. "Now I make $4.50 minimum wage an hour. I make twice as much standing on the corner helping kids cross the street as I did then working all day." This esteemed crossing guard is now the patriarch of the Fuhriman family, revered as much as his father. Even the pioneer link in the Ogden home remains strong, through a plethora of treasured pioneer photos and Joseph's wooden chair prominently displayed in the living room. Scott Harris, 32, artfully rebuilt it as a symbol of love for his grandfather Carl. The pioneer legacy is unbroken.

James Darling Ross Company (1860)

Contributor: Amador82 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 4 months ago

Jacob Fuhriman Traveled for 81 days with the James Darling Ross Company. As a brief summary of that company’s experience: James D. Ross had served two missions in England and been first counselor in the European Mission. Returning from his mission, he presided over 594 British and Swiss emigrants aboard the ship Underwriter. He was appointed captain of a company made up of 249 individuals—Americans, English, Swiss, and possibly Germans. A few men joined the company to avoid the Civil War draft. Those who had excess baggage had to leave it behind. The Swiss emigrants had eight or ten wagons out of a total of thirty-five or thirty-six in the company. There were 142 oxen and 54 cows. All of the emigrants, including Captain Ross, were inexperienced in frontier living and plains travel. Many had to learn to drive oxen. Some had to learn to milk a cow or grease a wagon. They left Florence, Nebraska Territory, in mid-June. On 2 July they were at Wood River Center. On 4th of July they heard cannons firing near Fort Kearny as the soldiers celebrated the nation’s birth. Like other travelers on the plains, they saw large herds of buffalo, thunderstorms, and ever-present begging Indians. They hunted rabbits, sage hens, and duck. They killed a deer and a bear. They passed numerous trading posts where they could buy a variety of goods at inflated prices. At times they traveled within a few miles of other Mormon companies including those led by Jesse Murphy and John Smith. They passed Fort Laramie on 27 July. On 5 August they camped on the Platte River opposite Deer Creek. They followed the road to Green River, passed Fort Bridger and reached camp in Emigration Canyon on Sunday, 2 September. The camp was visited by a number of Church leaders including Wilford Woodruff, George A. Smith, Lorenzo Snow, and Franklin D. Richards. They gave the company practical advice. They drove into the city the following day. Upon their arrival, Brigham Young and Daniel H. Wells greeted them and gave more counsel. A single death had occurred en route. The emigrants expressed great respect for Captain Ross.

Brief Sketch of Parents by Jacob R. Fuhriman

Contributor: Amador82 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 4 months ago

Jacob Fuhriman left Switzerland on March 16, 1860 with his wife and one son, Godfrey. He crossed the plains in Captain Ross’s Company. He was one of the first settlers in Providence, Utah. He was a carpenter by trade and helped build the first Providence meeting house. He was one of the carpenters in the building of the Logan Temple. He also built three houses of his own and several other buildings. He was successful. He was always active in the Church, working in the Temple he had helped build. He was a cheerful donator. He was President of the German organization for 20 years. He was also a trustee on the school board. Anna Barbara Loosli Fuhriman immigrated to America with her husband and infant son. She endured all the hardships of the pioneers, carrying her child all the way across the plains. She carded wool, spun yarn and knit the hose for her family. She was a good seamstress, making clothes for the dead, and preparing the bodies for burial. She was an active church worker, a teacher in Relief Society and taking care of the sick. She was also a hat maker, making them from straw. She was bedfast for many years before finally dying from cancer. **Written by Jacob R. Fuhriman

Jacob Fuhriman

Contributor: DavidR.BillionGraves@gmail.com Created: 4 months ago Updated: 4 months ago

Jacob Fuhriman 16 Jan 1831-14 May 1914 My father, Jacob Fuhriman, was born in Orschenbeck, Canton Bern, Switzerland January 16, 1831--143 years ago. He passed his early life among the Alps. When he was 19 years old his father died, leaving his mother with, a small home on the mountain side with a mortgage on it and seven children. He learned the carpenter trade at the age of 22. He was hired out to a building contractor Andreas Loosli. A good deal of the work consisted of hewing out timber for buildings so father became a good hand with the broad ax. He become acquainted with Anna Barbara Loosli. They were married December 5, 1856. They both joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints February 14, 1858 (116 years ago). Two years later, March 16, 1860 they left Switzerland for America. At that time they had one small son, Godfrey. They left Liverpool, England in a sailing vessel, taking between six or seven weeks to get to New York. They then traveled by train to St. Joseph, Missouri. From there they took a flat boat up the Missouri River to Florence, Nebraska. They stayed in Florence long enough for Casper and Ulrich Loosli, brothers of his wife Anna Barbara, to buy oxen, wagons and food supplies. They came to Utah with the James T. Ross Company. This company consisted of 259 Swiss and English converts, 36 wagons, 142 oxen, and 52 milk cows. Only one person and 2 head of cattle died en route. Jacob Fuhriman, having nothing to buy an outfit with, drove two yoke of oxen and one wagon across the plains for Casper Loosli to pay for passage for his wife and small son. She walked and carried the baby all the way. The journey of 1020 miles took 79 days. They had a lot of hardships, but not so many as the pioneers who come earlier. They reached Salt Lake Valley on September 3, 1860. President Brigham Young and some other church authorities came to their camp to welcome them and give the instructions. This was father’s first meeting with President Young. After staying in Salt Lake for a few days, at the direction of Brigham Young, and being persuaded by John Theurer to go to Cache Valley. There they settled in Spring Creek, later called Providence. The first winter they lived in a tent. It was too late in the season to get lumber from the canyon, and to build a house. One night the wind blew their tent in on top of them. Father, being a carpenter, soon built a one room house, then a larger one. He also bought land which he farmed. Their first flour bin was 5 feet high and divided into two sections, one section for flour and the other for shorts. This bin also served as a safe hiding place for the children when the Indians raided the town. In those years the Mormon Church practiced polygamy. Father's first wife, Anna Barbara, urged her husband to send for her sister Mary from her parents' home in Switzerland. He met Mary in Salt Lake and married her in 1869. He also built her a house in Providence. In about 1898 he hauled supplies to Promontory Point on the Central Pacific Railroad to get away from the government men who were after those practicing polygamy, but he didn't like the work and being away from home, so when he got back he was arrested, fined $50 and ordered to serve in the Sugarhouse penitentiary. He was there for three months. He later said that those three months were some of the most rewarding of his life as he served with Apostles George Q. Cannon, Amasa Lyman and others, who taught him much about the Church. He said they were treated very well. Father always enjoyed going to General Conference each spring and fall so he could meet with the church leaders face to face. Father's first wife, Anna Barbara had 5 sons and 3 daughters. His second wife, Mary, had 4 sons. In the year of 1870 Father aided in building the First Ward rock meeting house, constructing and hewing all the supports of the roof 14 inches square and 40 feet long. (This is now the Rozella Manor.) In 1864 there were no school districts and no school taxes, each community provided its own school and each parent paid the teacher with a certain number of bushels of wheat for each child, generally 1 1/4 bushel per month. He was a share holder in the first co-op store in 1869 and also in a saw mill. In 1877 Father was set apart to preside over the German speaking meetings. In those years so many people from Switzerland and Germany settled in Providence that special meetings were held for them every Sunday afternoon. Father presided over these meetings for 31 years. Father was respected and loved by all who knew him. He was a peace-maker. The Bishop often called on him to go to a home where there was trouble to talk to them and help straighten out the problems. His second wife, Mary, died of pneumonia in 1892 leaving four sons. Then three years later his first wife, Anna Barbara died of cancer, leaving five sons and three daughters. Out of these 12 children, five were married at this time leaving Father seven not married. Two years later he met my mother, Carolina Bollscwiler in Salt Lake. They were married soon after in the Salt Lake Temple. This was a great responsibility and challenge for her, to marry a man with seven boys at home and her husband being much older than she. Father was 66 years old and Mother 33. So she started her busy happy life with Father and seven sons who ranged from the ages of 10 to 36. As these sons began to marry, she began to replace them with her own sons and daughters--two girls and three boys. Father kept many hives of bees. He never ate a piece of bread without butter and honey. I believe this is one of the reasons he had good health, he never had a sick day in his life. May 14, 1914 at the age of 83 he had a stroke. The sudden death of Father brought Mother heartache and worry. She was left a widow at age 50 with five little children to raise. My oldest brother was 12 years old and my baby brother 2 years old. He was born when Father was 81. In spite of hardships and worries Mother kept her family together and made a happy life for them. Her life was one of sacrifice and devotion. She lived 48 more years after Father's death. She passed away January 18, 1963 at the age of 98. I'm thankful for my parents, for the examples they set, for the choices they made throughout their lives, and for the wonderful heritage they gave us. Sources: 1. History of Jacob Fuhriman by Emilie F. Thatcher, written January 1973. Daughters of the Utah Pioneers Museum, Salt Lake City, Utah. 2. Article on Jacob Fuhriman, written by son Carl Fuhriman.

SONS OF UTAH PIONEERS FITS OGDEN MAN PERFECTLY By Dennis Lythgoe, Deseret News Published: Thursday, Aug. 3 1995

Contributor: DavidR.BillionGraves@gmail.com Created: 4 months ago Updated: 4 months ago

SOME 68,000 Mormon pioneers crossed the plains to Utah from 1847 to 1869. Because the last true pioneer arrived over 125 years ago, almost all of the sons of the pioneers are grandsons or great grandsons. There is an exception to every rule, of course.In this case, it is Carl Fuhriman, now a vigorous 83, the son of Jacob Fuhriman, a Swiss emigrant who became an LDS convert in 1858 and then made the long journey to Utah. A life member of the Sons of the Utah Pioneers, Carl is probably the only genuine son of an LDS pioneer still living. Born in Cache Valley, he and his wife, Edna, raised three children and live in Ogden. "What do you think," asked Edna, "of this old man with that kind of a history?" "I'm impressed." I said. "How old was the pioneer father when his youngest son was born?" "Eighty-one," said Carl, "and my mother was 47." Then he showed me a picture of Joseph Fuhriman's 17 children, including 54-year-old Godfrey and baby Carl. Carl was born in 1912 to Joseph and his third wife, Caroline Bollschweiler. Carl said, "Father died when I was only 2, so I don't remember him at all, but I am proud of my heritage." He has a vivid memory of his mother, who married Joseph when he was 66 and she was 33. She lived to be 98 years old. For the first 15 years of their marriage, she lived with Carl and Edna. From his mother, Carl learned of the sacrifices of his pioneer ancestors. As a young girl, Caroline had a vivid dream about a man in a brown suit emerging from LDS Conference. He shook her hand and walked away, but she knew he was the man she was supposed to marry. When she met Joseph, she instantly recognized him as the man in her dream. Joseph and his first wife, Barbara, traveled from Switzerland to Liverpool, England, and set sail on a 30-day journey to New York on March 16, 1860. Then they traveled by train to St. Joseph, Mo., and crossed the river to Florence, Neb. There they obtained an ox team and wagon and left for Utah with the James T. Ross company, consisting of 359 Swiss and English converts. It took 79 days to make the 1,020-mile journey. To lighten the load for the oxen, Jacob and Barbara walked most of the way, Barbara carrying 9-month-old God-frey. They were met in Emigration Canyon by Brigham Young, who sent them to Cache Valley to settle in the town of Providence. Today there are some 3,000 Jacob Fuhriman descendants. In his early years, Carl farmed and worked as a plasterer and a carpenter. He and his family left Cache Valley during World War II to work at the Ogden arsenal, now part of Hill Air Force Base. After three years, he began a 29-year stint at the Union Pacific Railroad. Although retired for 20 years, he returned to the labor force in 1993 to become a crossing guard. "I feel age creeping up on me, but I still get out for an hour every morning and every afternoon to help the kids cross the street. I got a letter the other day telling me I got a cost of living raise from $4.50 an hour to $4.59." That's welcome news, because he was making only $4.40 a day at the old Ogden arsenal. "Now I make $4.50 minimum wage an hour. I make twice as much standing on the corner helping kids cross the street as I did then working all day." This esteemed crossing guard is now the patriarch of the Fuhriman family, revered as much as his father. Even the pioneer link in the Ogden home remains strong, through a plethora of treasured pioneer photos and Joseph's wooden chair prominently displayed in the living room. Scott Harris, 32, artfully rebuilt it as a symbol of love for his grandfather Carl. The pioneer legacy is unbroken.

James Darling Ross Company (1860)

Contributor: DavidR.BillionGraves@gmail.com Created: 4 months ago Updated: 4 months ago

Jacob Fuhriman Traveled for 81 days with the James Darling Ross Company. As a brief summary of that company’s experience: James D. Ross had served two missions in England and been first counselor in the European Mission. Returning from his mission, he presided over 594 British and Swiss emigrants aboard the ship Underwriter. He was appointed captain of a company made up of 249 individuals—Americans, English, Swiss, and possibly Germans. A few men joined the company to avoid the Civil War draft. Those who had excess baggage had to leave it behind. The Swiss emigrants had eight or ten wagons out of a total of thirty-five or thirty-six in the company. There were 142 oxen and 54 cows. All of the emigrants, including Captain Ross, were inexperienced in frontier living and plains travel. Many had to learn to drive oxen. Some had to learn to milk a cow or grease a wagon. They left Florence, Nebraska Territory, in mid-June. On 2 July they were at Wood River Center. On 4th of July they heard cannons firing near Fort Kearny as the soldiers celebrated the nation’s birth. Like other travelers on the plains, they saw large herds of buffalo, thunderstorms, and ever-present begging Indians. They hunted rabbits, sage hens, and duck. They killed a deer and a bear. They passed numerous trading posts where they could buy a variety of goods at inflated prices. At times they traveled within a few miles of other Mormon companies including those led by Jesse Murphy and John Smith. They passed Fort Laramie on 27 July. On 5 August they camped on the Platte River opposite Deer Creek. They followed the road to Green River, passed Fort Bridger and reached camp in Emigration Canyon on Sunday, 2 September. The camp was visited by a number of Church leaders including Wilford Woodruff, George A. Smith, Lorenzo Snow, and Franklin D. Richards. They gave the company practical advice. They drove into the city the following day. Upon their arrival, Brigham Young and Daniel H. Wells greeted them and gave more counsel. A single death had occurred en route. The emigrants expressed great respect for Captain Ross.

Brief Sketch of Parents by Jacob R. Fuhriman

Contributor: DavidR.BillionGraves@gmail.com Created: 4 months ago Updated: 4 months ago

Jacob Fuhriman left Switzerland on March 16, 1860 with his wife and one son, Godfrey. He crossed the plains in Captain Ross’s Company. He was one of the first settlers in Providence, Utah. He was a carpenter by trade and helped build the first Providence meeting house. He was one of the carpenters in the building of the Logan Temple. He also built three houses of his own and several other buildings. He was successful. He was always active in the Church, working in the Temple he had helped build. He was a cheerful donator. He was President of the German organization for 20 years. He was also a trustee on the school board. Anna Barbara Loosli Fuhriman immigrated to America with her husband and infant son. She endured all the hardships of the pioneers, carrying her child all the way across the plains. She carded wool, spun yarn and knit the hose for her family. She was a good seamstress, making clothes for the dead, and preparing the bodies for burial. She was an active church worker, a teacher in Relief Society and taking care of the sick. She was also a hat maker, making them from straw. She was bedfast for many years before finally dying from cancer. **Written by Jacob R. Fuhriman

Life timeline of Jacob Fuhriman

Jacob Fuhriman was born on 16 Jan 1831
Jacob Fuhriman was 9 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
Jacob Fuhriman was 29 years old when Charles Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
Jacob Fuhriman was 32 years old when U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring the freedom of all slaves in Confederate territory by January 1, 1863. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
Jacob Fuhriman was 49 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Jacob Fuhriman was 50 years old when The world's first international telephone call is made between St. Stephen, New Brunswick, Canada, and Calais, Maine, United States. A telephone call is a connection over a telephone network between the called party and the calling party.
Jacob Fuhriman was 65 years old when George VI of the United Kingdom (d. 1952) George VI was King of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Commonwealth from 11 December 1936 until his death in 1952. He was the last Emperor of India and the first Head of the Commonwealth.
Jacob Fuhriman was 73 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
Jacob Fuhriman died on 11 May 1914 at the age of 83
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Jacob Fuhriman (16 Jan 1831 - 11 May 1914), BillionGraves Record 1485598 River Heights, Cache, Utah, United States

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