Irving A Johnson

25 Aug 1897 - 9 May 1978

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Irving A Johnson

25 Aug 1897 - 9 May 1978
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Talk given by Rulon Johnson at Irving Johnson's Golden Wedding program in Cannonville, Utah. August 1973 Well, I'm glad to see such a lovely crowd here and, of course, Maiben is older than I and so he can tell bigger stories which is only natural. But I'd like to tell a little story. You know, it us

Life Information

Irving A Johnson

Born:
Died:

Georgetown Cemetery

about 3 miles south of Cannonville on Kodacrome Way (a few hundred yards to the west)
Cannonville, Garfield, Utah
United States

Epitaph

Father; Mother; Their children, He Saved Soles, In His Will Is Our Peace, Married Sep 14, 1935; sealed Sept 27, 1952, Wife of Seth Johnson Peace Perfect Peace A Loving Wife, A Mother Dear, A friend to all, Lies Buried Here, Sons of Geo. W & Henrietta G Johnson, married June 29, 1956; children Clara S, A. True, Marilyn K., Richard W., Joyce F, A Devoted Husband and a Loving Father a True Latter Day Saint, Beloved Father

Headstone Description

Father - Joseph Edward
Mother - Susan J
Children: Joseph E, Alfred D, Karma J, US ARMY WORLD WAR II, says and Baby, Children: Saundra, Ronald Lee, Sheila, Nila, Sue Ellen, Children: Billy, Sherman, Gwen, Deane, David, Dimion, Karen, Rebecca, Mother
Father, Sealed Sept 27, 1952
Children: Larry W - Ladona - Myrna L - Alma D - Ramona J - Joseph D, Son of Adelbert & Mary J Heaps, Children of Nephi & Zina Johnson, Children of Irving A & Daisie C Johnson, Utah
Cpl 12 Infantry
World War II BSM-PH, Married Irving A Johnson Sept 5, 1923, A loving wife & mother...
A friend to all..., Sons of Geo. W & Henrietta C. Johnson, Wife: Shana
Daughter: Kori Lee, Sealed June 28, 1939, US ARMY
WORLD WAR II, DEAN: US ARMY WORLD WAR II, UTAH CPL 1050 BASE UNIT AAF
WORLD WAR II, PFC US ARMY
WORLD WAR I, Children: Clara S - A True - Marilyn K - Richard W - Joyce F, Wife of Cyrus Mangum, Daugh of Marion..., Son of R. W. & Clara E Pinney, Magleby Mortuary, Husband of Sarah A Dutton, Daughter of Richard C & Susanah D. Pinney
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Rulon Johnson talk about Irving Johnson

Contributor: Ron Haymore Created: 3 years ago Updated: 1 month ago

Talk given by Rulon Johnson at Irving Johnson's Golden Wedding program in Cannonville, Utah. August 1973 Well, I'm glad to see such a lovely crowd here and, of course, Maiben is older than I and so he can tell bigger stories which is only natural. But I'd like to tell a little story. You know, it used to be Father's policy to tell a story before he started to preach. So I guess I can tell this on Irv. I don't know if he's heard it or not, but I'm sure he'll remember it when I tell it. Well, a stranger came into town and he was out milking his cow; THis stranger--he didn't have a watch. So he happened by the corral where Irv was milking the cow, and he leaned over the fence and said, "Say Mister, could you tell me what time it is?" Irv, milking the cow, stopped milking, raised the cow's udder up, looked underneath and said, "ten minutes to seven'", The stranger was quite concerned and looked at him and said, "Say, Mister, would you tell me please, how you told the time by raising that cow's udder. Irv said, "That's easy." He said, "when I raise the cow's udder, I can see the church clock." Well, Maiben seemed to be telling about pigs and you know there are other things in this life besides hogs. We used to ride quite a bit. 0f course, I did too, and he thought he was pretty good and he was. We used to go out on the range every so often~ more especially in the summer. We would go out and we always carried a buck-strap with us. Of course, Irv was older and he kind of dared me, and he'd rope a wild cow or a steer or something, and he'd dare me to get on it. And he'd laugh at me if I wouldn't. So, of course, I had to do it to prove to him that I was as good as he was. Then, the next time I'd rope one and he'd have to get on. But anyway, one fall we went to the round-up on the East Fork. We'd go there,to get the cattle and bring them down to the field. I'm sure he'd remember this, but anyway, they had all of his cattle together and they'd gathered them in a bunch. And this morning, why we thought we'd put on a little rodeo or something--something so the younger bucks would ride a horse or maybe they'd catch a wild steer or something. Anyway, they decided to catch this four-year old steer. He was a big stout steer and he was husky. So Irv said he'd ride him if they would catch him. So they caught him and Irv got on. Some old gentleman, I think he was from up here at Tropic, I believe his name was Shakes- peare, said you'd better not let that man ride that steer. He'll kill him. He said, "He'll never get out of it alive." Well Irv, he just laughted at him. He went ahead and got on that steer. Well, he rode the steer until he decided he wanted to get off. When he got off--why, as he slid off the back, his spur rowel--the rowel on his spur got in the old steer's tail and he just bounced him down the rocks there for quite a ways. And finally, the spur came loose, and he was alright. I thought maybe he was hurt. But he just got up and said, "Well, it kind of hurts back here, but I feel fine otherwise. So he was lucky there. Then another time he came down. I was herding sheep with George Henderson. I was camped down on West Clark Bench. He came down there. The owners always had a good fat saddle horse--grain fed. There was a big white stallion running down there along the bench; so, of course, there was a whole herd of horses there. He told me, "I believe that I can catch that horse". He said, "I'm going to try". So he went out there and tried two or three days. Of course, that horse was just too much for him. He'd get out of the way, run away from him and then this horse would get up on a big knoll and look down at him. But anyhow, he was lucky enough that he caught a nice bay mare. Oh, she was a beauty. He came in and told me--he said, "You know, I sure caught a nice mare today". I said, "Where is she?" "Oh"; he said, "I tied her up over there to a dry tree." He just tied her up by the neck to a dry cedar tree. So, I said, "You sure she's alright':'. "Oh , yea, yea, yes," he said. "She's tied up and she has plenty of rope so she won't choke or anything like that. So we went over to check her out, and there she lay dead--choked to death. She had wound around the oak, tangled up, and struggled until she died. Then Irving was called on a mission. He Left a very good riding horse in my care. When he returned, he was anxious to get back on his horse. In the meantime I had been riding her. She was grain fed and in good shape. He crawled on her as big as you please, and she threw him! I know that before I'd seen him ride her, but he'd had two years away from it, and she just got the best of him. Then, I'm going to tell you another little story about --I'm trying to remember. The deer used to come into Dad's field up there and they'd come in there right in the grain patch all the time and, of course, this is kind of a joke on me as well as him so it can work both ways. But any how, we followed those two old bucks. One of them was dubbed toes. He was dubbed toed, and I'm sure that if anyone was hunting back in that time, they would remember old dubbed-toe, because every year his partner was killed and he'd take up with another one. Nobody ever saw old dubbed toe. Well, anyhow, we followed him out. We were going along and it was snowing and the snow was--oh, about an inch deep on the ground. So we were just a creeping along there as careful as we could. I could see Irv. He was over on old dubbed-toe's tracks. He wanted to get him. Of course, so did I. But anyhow, I spotted this partner of old dubbed-toe. Just his breast was sticking out. His horns were sticking up above the big buck brush that was over there. So I pulled down on him, and I shot him right in the breast. Well, he jumped way up there in the air and I thoughti-well, that's a pretty good shot--I got him. So he ran a little ways and fell. I ran down there to him. When I got down there, why he was just laying down there on his haunches. I just jumped up on his back--first leaned the gun up against the brush--jumped up on his back and stuck the knife in his throat. I was going to cut his throat. I just got the knife in his throat and in the meantime Irv was trying to get to me by coming from behind me and any how the buck jumped up with me on. Well, I had to get off and so I jumped off. The buck started to run and I started to chase him with my knife. Well, Irv came along and grabbed my gun. He was coming behind me with the gun, and I was chasing the buck and he ran about, oh maybe fifty yards and then he dropped. He was bleeding all the time. I'd get down there just get ready to cut his throat and he'd get up and take off again. So he did that for quite a ways and Irv was running and yelling, "Get out of the way so I can shoot him again!" I said, "I don't want him shot again. I'm going to get him." So, finally he went on and I chased him and chased him until he finally lay down and couldn't get up. He just naturally bled to death. So I cut his throat. Irv said, "Why didn't you get out of the way so I could shoot him." And I said, "I didn't want you to shoot him." And I said, "You know, that deer hasn't got a drop of meat spoiled. He hasn't got a hole in his hide. His hide is perfect and his meat has never been touched." And that was right. I just shot his breast off and when we ripped him down the breast for the hide--he never even had a hole in his hide so it was perfect. And I said "Now, that's why I didn't want you to shoot him again. I didn't want any holes in his hide. I wanted him whole." So, I don't know, I could go on here and tell you stories from now to midnight. But I don't want to take up all the time. I know there are a lot of other people here who would like to talk, but I wish Irv and Daisy all the happiness in the world and I'm sure glad that they have so many friends. I wish to thank each one of you. And I know that God lives and the gospel is true, and I say this in the name of Jesus Christ. Amen.

Rulon Johnson talk about Irving Johnson

Contributor: Mary Hennig Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Talk given by Rulon Johnson at Irving Johnson's Golden Wedding program in Cannonville, Utah. August 1973 Well, I'm glad to see such a lovely crowd here and, of course, Maiben is older than I and so he can tell bigger stories which is only natural. But I'd like to tell a little story. You know, it used to be Father's policy to tell a story before he started to preach. So I guess I can tell this on Irv. I don't know if he's heard it or not, but I'm sure he'll remember it when I tell it. Well, a stranger came into town and he was out milking his cow; THis stranger--he didn't have a watch. So he happened by the corral where Irv was milking the cow, and he leaned over the fence and said, "Say Mister, could you tell me what time it is?" Irv, milking the cow, stopped milking, raised the cow's udder up, looked underneath and said, "ten minutes to seven'", The stranger was quite concerned and looked at him and said, "Say, Mister, would you tell me please, how you told the time by raising that cow's udder. Irv said, "That's easy." He said, "when I raise the cow's udder, I can see the church clock." Well, Maiben seemed to be telling about pigs and you know there are other things in this life besides hogs. We used to ride quite a bit. 0f course, I did too, and he thought he was pretty good and he was. We used to go out on the range every so often~ more especially in the summer. We would go out and we always carried a buck-strap with us. Of course, Irv was older and he kind of dared me, and he'd rope a wild cow or a steer or something, and he'd dare me to get on it. And he'd laugh at me if I wouldn't. So, of course, I had to do it to prove to him that I was as good as he was. Then, the next time I'd rope one and he'd have to get on. But anyway, one fall we went to the round-up on the East Fork. We'd go there,to get the cattle and bring them down to the field. I'm sure he'd remember this, but anyway, they had all of his cattle together and they'd gathered them in a bunch. And this morning, why we thought we'd put on a little rodeo or something--something so the younger bucks would ride a horse or maybe they'd catch a wild steer or something. Anyway, they decided to catch this four-year old steer. He was a big stout steer and he was husky. So Irv said he'd ride him if they would catch him. So they caught him and Irv got on. Some old gentleman, I think he was from up here at Tropic, I believe his name was Shakes- peare, said you'd better not let that man ride that steer. He'll kill him. He said, "He'll never get out of it alive." Well Irv, he just laughted at him. He went ahead and got on that steer. Well, he rode the steer until he decided he wanted to get off. When he got off--why, as he slid off the back, his spur rowel--the rowel on his spur got in the old steer's tail and he just bounced him down the rocks there for quite a ways. And finally, the spur came loose, and he was alright. I thought maybe he was hurt. But he just got up and said, "Well, it kind of hurts back here, but I feel fine otherwise. So he was lucky there. Then another time he came down. I was herding sheep with George Henderson. I was camped down on West Clark Bench. He came down there. The owners always had a good fat saddle horse--grain fed. There was a big white stallion running down there along the bench; so, of course, there was a whole herd of horses there. He told me, "I believe that I can catch that horse". He said, "I'm going to try". So he went out there and tried two or three days. Of course, that horse was just too much for him. He'd get out of the way, run away from him and then this horse would get up on a big knoll and look down at him. But anyhow, he was lucky enough that he caught a nice bay mare. Oh, she was a beauty. He came in and told me--he said, "You know, I sure caught a nice mare today". I said, "Where is she?" "Oh"; he said, "I tied her up over there to a dry tree." He just tied her up by the neck to a dry cedar tree. So, I said, "You sure she's alright':'. "Oh , yea, yea, yes," he said. "She's tied up and she has plenty of rope so she won't choke or anything like that. So we went over to check her out, and there she lay dead--choked to death. She had wound around the oak, tangled up, and struggled until she died. Then Irving was called on a mission. He Left a very good riding horse in my care. When he returned, he was anxious to get back on his horse. In the meantime I had been riding her. She was grain fed and in good shape. He crawled on her as big as you please, and she threw him! I know that before I'd seen him ride her, but he'd had two years away from it, and she just got the best of him. Then, I'm going to tell you another little story about --I'm trying to remember. The deer used to come into Dad's field up there and they'd come in there right in the grain patch all the time and, of course, this is kind of a joke on me as well as him so it can work both ways. But any how, we followed those two old bucks. One of them was dubbed toes. He was dubbed toed, and I'm sure that if anyone was hunting back in that time, they would remember old dubbed-toe, because every year his partner was killed and he'd take up with another one. Nobody ever saw old dubbed toe. Well, anyhow, we followed him out. We were going along and it was snowing and the snow was--oh, about an inch deep on the ground. So we were just a creeping along there as careful as we could. I could see Irv. He was over on old dubbed-toe's tracks. He wanted to get him. Of course, so did I. But anyhow, I spotted this partner of old dubbed-toe. Just his breast was sticking out. His horns were sticking up above the big buck brush that was over there. So I pulled down on him, and I shot him right in the breast. Well, he jumped way up there in the air and I thoughti-well, that's a pretty good shot--I got him. So he ran a little ways and fell. I ran down there to him. When I got down there, why he was just laying down there on his haunches. I just jumped up on his back--first leaned the gun up against the brush--jumped up on his back and stuck the knife in his throat. I was going to cut his throat. I just got the knife in his throat and in the meantime Irv was trying to get to me by coming from behind me and any how the buck jumped up with me on. Well, I had to get off and so I jumped off. The buck started to run and I started to chase him with my knife. Well, Irv came along and grabbed my gun. He was coming behind me with the gun, and I was chasing the buck and he ran about, oh maybe fifty yards and then he dropped. He was bleeding all the time. I'd get down there just get ready to cut his throat and he'd get up and take off again. So he did that for quite a ways and Irv was running and yelling, "Get out of the way so I can shoot him again!" I said, "I don't want him shot again. I'm going to get him." So, finally he went on and I chased him and chased him until he finally lay down and couldn't get up. He just naturally bled to death. So I cut his throat. Irv said, "Why didn't you get out of the way so I could shoot him." And I said, "I didn't want you to shoot him." And I said, "You know, that deer hasn't got a drop of meat spoiled. He hasn't got a hole in his hide. His hide is perfect and his meat has never been touched." And that was right. I just shot his breast off and when we ripped him down the breast for the hide--he never even had a hole in his hide so it was perfect. And I said "Now, that's why I didn't want you to shoot him again. I didn't want any holes in his hide. I wanted him whole." So, I don't know, I could go on here and tell you stories from now to midnight. But I don't want to take up all the time. I know there are a lot of other people here who would like to talk, but I wish Irv and Daisy all the happiness in the world and I'm sure glad that they have so many friends. I wish to thank each one of you. And I know that God lives and the gospel is true, and I say this in the name of Jesus Christ. Amen.

Rulon Johnson talk about Irving Johnson

Contributor: Davidsdig Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 month ago

Talk given by Rulon Johnson at Irving Johnson's Golden Wedding program in Cannonville, Utah. August 1973 Well, I'm glad to see such a lovely crowd here and, of course, Maiben is older than I and so he can tell bigger stories which is only natural. But I'd like to tell a little story. You know, it used to be Father's policy to tell a story before he started to preach. So I guess I can tell this on Irv. I don't know if he's heard it or not, but I'm sure he'll remember it when I tell it. Well, a stranger came into town and he was out milking his cow; THis stranger--he didn't have a watch. So he happened by the corral where Irv was milking the cow, and he leaned over the fence and said, "Say Mister, could you tell me what time it is?" Irv, milking the cow, stopped milking, raised the cow's udder up, looked underneath and said, "ten minutes to seven'", The stranger was quite concerned and looked at him and said, "Say, Mister, would you tell me please, how you told the time by raising that cow's udder. Irv said, "That's easy." He said, "when I raise the cow's udder, I can see the church clock." Well, Maiben seemed to be telling about pigs and you know there are other things in this life besides hogs. We used to ride quite a bit. 0f course, I did too, and he thought he was pretty good and he was. We used to go out on the range every so often~ more especially in the summer. We would go out and we always carried a buck-strap with us. Of course, Irv was older and he kind of dared me, and he'd rope a wild cow or a steer or something, and he'd dare me to get on it. And he'd laugh at me if I wouldn't. So, of course, I had to do it to prove to him that I was as good as he was. Then, the next time I'd rope one and he'd have to get on. But anyway, one fall we went to the round-up on the East Fork. We'd go there,to get the cattle and bring them down to the field. I'm sure he'd remember this, but anyway, they had all of his cattle together and they'd gathered them in a bunch. And this morning, why we thought we'd put on a little rodeo or something--something so the younger bucks would ride a horse or maybe they'd catch a wild steer or something. Anyway, they decided to catch this four-year old steer. He was a big stout steer and he was husky. So Irv said he'd ride him if they would catch him. So they caught him and Irv got on. Some old gentleman, I think he was from up here at Tropic, I believe his name was Shakes- peare, said you'd better not let that man ride that steer. He'll kill him. He said, "He'll never get out of it alive." Well Irv, he just laughted at him. He went ahead and got on that steer. Well, he rode the steer until he decided he wanted to get off. When he got off--why, as he slid off the back, his spur rowel--the rowel on his spur got in the old steer's tail and he just bounced him down the rocks there for quite a ways. And finally, the spur came loose, and he was alright. I thought maybe he was hurt. But he just got up and said, "Well, it kind of hurts back here, but I feel fine otherwise. So he was lucky there. Then another time he came down. I was herding sheep with George Henderson. I was camped down on West Clark Bench. He came down there. The owners always had a good fat saddle horse--grain fed. There was a big white stallion running down there along the bench; so, of course, there was a whole herd of horses there. He told me, "I believe that I can catch that horse". He said, "I'm going to try". So he went out there and tried two or three days. Of course, that horse was just too much for him. He'd get out of the way, run away from him and then this horse would get up on a big knoll and look down at him. But anyhow, he was lucky enough that he caught a nice bay mare. Oh, she was a beauty. He came in and told me--he said, "You know, I sure caught a nice mare today". I said, "Where is she?" "Oh"; he said, "I tied her up over there to a dry tree." He just tied her up by the neck to a dry cedar tree. So, I said, "You sure she's alright':'. "Oh , yea, yea, yes," he said. "She's tied up and she has plenty of rope so she won't choke or anything like that. So we went over to check her out, and there she lay dead--choked to death. She had wound around the oak, tangled up, and struggled until she died. Then Irving was called on a mission. He Left a very good riding horse in my care. When he returned, he was anxious to get back on his horse. In the meantime I had been riding her. She was grain fed and in good shape. He crawled on her as big as you please, and she threw him! I know that before I'd seen him ride her, but he'd had two years away from it, and she just got the best of him. Then, I'm going to tell you another little story about --I'm trying to remember. The deer used to come into Dad's field up there and they'd come in there right in the grain patch all the time and, of course, this is kind of a joke on me as well as him so it can work both ways. But any how, we followed those two old bucks. One of them was dubbed toes. He was dubbed toed, and I'm sure that if anyone was hunting back in that time, they would remember old dubbed-toe, because every year his partner was killed and he'd take up with another one. Nobody ever saw old dubbed toe. Well, anyhow, we followed him out. We were going along and it was snowing and the snow was--oh, about an inch deep on the ground. So we were just a creeping along there as careful as we could. I could see Irv. He was over on old dubbed-toe's tracks. He wanted to get him. Of course, so did I. But anyhow, I spotted this partner of old dubbed-toe. Just his breast was sticking out. His horns were sticking up above the big buck brush that was over there. So I pulled down on him, and I shot him right in the breast. Well, he jumped way up there in the air and I thoughti-well, that's a pretty good shot--I got him. So he ran a little ways and fell. I ran down there to him. When I got down there, why he was just laying down there on his haunches. I just jumped up on his back--first leaned the gun up against the brush--jumped up on his back and stuck the knife in his throat. I was going to cut his throat. I just got the knife in his throat and in the meantime Irv was trying to get to me by coming from behind me and any how the buck jumped up with me on. Well, I had to get off and so I jumped off. The buck started to run and I started to chase him with my knife. Well, Irv came along and grabbed my gun. He was coming behind me with the gun, and I was chasing the buck and he ran about, oh maybe fifty yards and then he dropped. He was bleeding all the time. I'd get down there just get ready to cut his throat and he'd get up and take off again. So he did that for quite a ways and Irv was running and yelling, "Get out of the way so I can shoot him again!" I said, "I don't want him shot again. I'm going to get him." So, finally he went on and I chased him and chased him until he finally lay down and couldn't get up. He just naturally bled to death. So I cut his throat. Irv said, "Why didn't you get out of the way so I could shoot him." And I said, "I didn't want you to shoot him." And I said, "You know, that deer hasn't got a drop of meat spoiled. He hasn't got a hole in his hide. His hide is perfect and his meat has never been touched." And that was right. I just shot his breast off and when we ripped him down the breast for the hide--he never even had a hole in his hide so it was perfect. And I said "Now, that's why I didn't want you to shoot him again. I didn't want any holes in his hide. I wanted him whole." So, I don't know, I could go on here and tell you stories from now to midnight. But I don't want to take up all the time. I know there are a lot of other people here who would like to talk, but I wish Irv and Daisy all the happiness in the world and I'm sure glad that they have so many friends. I wish to thank each one of you. And I know that God lives and the gospel is true, and I say this in the name of Jesus Christ. Amen.

Rulon Johnson talk about Irving Johnson

Contributor: Davidsdig Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 month ago

Talk given by Rulon Johnson at Irving Johnson's Golden Wedding program in Cannonville, Utah. August 1973 Well, I'm glad to see such a lovely crowd here and, of course, Maiben is older than I and so he can tell bigger stories which is only natural. But I'd like to tell a little story. You know, it used to be Father's policy to tell a story before he started to preach. So I guess I can tell this on Irv. I don't know if he's heard it or not, but I'm sure he'll remember it when I tell it. Well, a stranger came into town and he was out milking his cow; THis stranger--he didn't have a watch. So he happened by the corral where Irv was milking the cow, and he leaned over the fence and said, "Say Mister, could you tell me what time it is?" Irv, milking the cow, stopped milking, raised the cow's udder up, looked underneath and said, "ten minutes to seven'", The stranger was quite concerned and looked at him and said, "Say, Mister, would you tell me please, how you told the time by raising that cow's udder. Irv said, "That's easy." He said, "when I raise the cow's udder, I can see the church clock." Well, Maiben seemed to be telling about pigs and you know there are other things in this life besides hogs. We used to ride quite a bit. 0f course, I did too, and he thought he was pretty good and he was. We used to go out on the range every so often~ more especially in the summer. We would go out and we always carried a buck-strap with us. Of course, Irv was older and he kind of dared me, and he'd rope a wild cow or a steer or something, and he'd dare me to get on it. And he'd laugh at me if I wouldn't. So, of course, I had to do it to prove to him that I was as good as he was. Then, the next time I'd rope one and he'd have to get on. But anyway, one fall we went to the round-up on the East Fork. We'd go there,to get the cattle and bring them down to the field. I'm sure he'd remember this, but anyway, they had all of his cattle together and they'd gathered them in a bunch. And this morning, why we thought we'd put on a little rodeo or something--something so the younger bucks would ride a horse or maybe they'd catch a wild steer or something. Anyway, they decided to catch this four-year old steer. He was a big stout steer and he was husky. So Irv said he'd ride him if they would catch him. So they caught him and Irv got on. Some old gentleman, I think he was from up here at Tropic, I believe his name was Shakes- peare, said you'd better not let that man ride that steer. He'll kill him. He said, "He'll never get out of it alive." Well Irv, he just laughted at him. He went ahead and got on that steer. Well, he rode the steer until he decided he wanted to get off. When he got off--why, as he slid off the back, his spur rowel--the rowel on his spur got in the old steer's tail and he just bounced him down the rocks there for quite a ways. And finally, the spur came loose, and he was alright. I thought maybe he was hurt. But he just got up and said, "Well, it kind of hurts back here, but I feel fine otherwise. So he was lucky there. Then another time he came down. I was herding sheep with George Henderson. I was camped down on West Clark Bench. He came down there. The owners always had a good fat saddle horse--grain fed. There was a big white stallion running down there along the bench; so, of course, there was a whole herd of horses there. He told me, "I believe that I can catch that horse". He said, "I'm going to try". So he went out there and tried two or three days. Of course, that horse was just too much for him. He'd get out of the way, run away from him and then this horse would get up on a big knoll and look down at him. But anyhow, he was lucky enough that he caught a nice bay mare. Oh, she was a beauty. He came in and told me--he said, "You know, I sure caught a nice mare today". I said, "Where is she?" "Oh"; he said, "I tied her up over there to a dry tree." He just tied her up by the neck to a dry cedar tree. So, I said, "You sure she's alright':'. "Oh , yea, yea, yes," he said. "She's tied up and she has plenty of rope so she won't choke or anything like that. So we went over to check her out, and there she lay dead--choked to death. She had wound around the oak, tangled up, and struggled until she died. Then Irving was called on a mission. He Left a very good riding horse in my care. When he returned, he was anxious to get back on his horse. In the meantime I had been riding her. She was grain fed and in good shape. He crawled on her as big as you please, and she threw him! I know that before I'd seen him ride her, but he'd had two years away from it, and she just got the best of him. Then, I'm going to tell you another little story about --I'm trying to remember. The deer used to come into Dad's field up there and they'd come in there right in the grain patch all the time and, of course, this is kind of a joke on me as well as him so it can work both ways. But any how, we followed those two old bucks. One of them was dubbed toes. He was dubbed toed, and I'm sure that if anyone was hunting back in that time, they would remember old dubbed-toe, because every year his partner was killed and he'd take up with another one. Nobody ever saw old dubbed toe. Well, anyhow, we followed him out. We were going along and it was snowing and the snow was--oh, about an inch deep on the ground. So we were just a creeping along there as careful as we could. I could see Irv. He was over on old dubbed-toe's tracks. He wanted to get him. Of course, so did I. But anyhow, I spotted this partner of old dubbed-toe. Just his breast was sticking out. His horns were sticking up above the big buck brush that was over there. So I pulled down on him, and I shot him right in the breast. Well, he jumped way up there in the air and I thoughti-well, that's a pretty good shot--I got him. So he ran a little ways and fell. I ran down there to him. When I got down there, why he was just laying down there on his haunches. I just jumped up on his back--first leaned the gun up against the brush--jumped up on his back and stuck the knife in his throat. I was going to cut his throat. I just got the knife in his throat and in the meantime Irv was trying to get to me by coming from behind me and any how the buck jumped up with me on. Well, I had to get off and so I jumped off. The buck started to run and I started to chase him with my knife. Well, Irv came along and grabbed my gun. He was coming behind me with the gun, and I was chasing the buck and he ran about, oh maybe fifty yards and then he dropped. He was bleeding all the time. I'd get down there just get ready to cut his throat and he'd get up and take off again. So he did that for quite a ways and Irv was running and yelling, "Get out of the way so I can shoot him again!" I said, "I don't want him shot again. I'm going to get him." So, finally he went on and I chased him and chased him until he finally lay down and couldn't get up. He just naturally bled to death. So I cut his throat. Irv said, "Why didn't you get out of the way so I could shoot him." And I said, "I didn't want you to shoot him." And I said, "You know, that deer hasn't got a drop of meat spoiled. He hasn't got a hole in his hide. His hide is perfect and his meat has never been touched." And that was right. I just shot his breast off and when we ripped him down the breast for the hide--he never even had a hole in his hide so it was perfect. And I said "Now, that's why I didn't want you to shoot him again. I didn't want any holes in his hide. I wanted him whole." So, I don't know, I could go on here and tell you stories from now to midnight. But I don't want to take up all the time. I know there are a lot of other people here who would like to talk, but I wish Irv and Daisy all the happiness in the world and I'm sure glad that they have so many friends. I wish to thank each one of you. And I know that God lives and the gospel is true, and I say this in the name of Jesus Christ. Amen.

Rulon Johnson talk about Irving Johnson

Contributor: vcorn49 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 month ago

Talk given by Rulon Johnson at Irving Johnson's Golden Wedding program in Cannonville, Utah. August 1973 Well, I'm glad to see such a lovely crowd here and, of course, Maiben is older than I and so he can tell bigger stories which is only natural. But I'd like to tell a little story. You know, it used to be Father's policy to tell a story before he started to preach. So I guess I can tell this on Irv. I don't know if he's heard it or not, but I'm sure he'll remember it when I tell it. Well, a stranger came into town and he was out milking his cow; THis stranger--he didn't have a watch. So he happened by the corral where Irv was milking the cow, and he leaned over the fence and said, "Say Mister, could you tell me what time it is?" Irv, milking the cow, stopped milking, raised the cow's udder up, looked underneath and said, "ten minutes to seven'", The stranger was quite concerned and looked at him and said, "Say, Mister, would you tell me please, how you told the time by raising that cow's udder. Irv said, "That's easy." He said, "when I raise the cow's udder, I can see the church clock." Well, Maiben seemed to be telling about pigs and you know there are other things in this life besides hogs. We used to ride quite a bit. 0f course, I did too, and he thought he was pretty good and he was. We used to go out on the range every so often~ more especially in the summer. We would go out and we always carried a buck-strap with us. Of course, Irv was older and he kind of dared me, and he'd rope a wild cow or a steer or something, and he'd dare me to get on it. And he'd laugh at me if I wouldn't. So, of course, I had to do it to prove to him that I was as good as he was. Then, the next time I'd rope one and he'd have to get on. But anyway, one fall we went to the round-up on the East Fork. We'd go there,to get the cattle and bring them down to the field. I'm sure he'd remember this, but anyway, they had all of his cattle together and they'd gathered them in a bunch. And this morning, why we thought we'd put on a little rodeo or something--something so the younger bucks would ride a horse or maybe they'd catch a wild steer or something. Anyway, they decided to catch this four-year old steer. He was a big stout steer and he was husky. So Irv said he'd ride him if they would catch him. So they caught him and Irv got on. Some old gentleman, I think he was from up here at Tropic, I believe his name was Shakes- peare, said you'd better not let that man ride that steer. He'll kill him. He said, "He'll never get out of it alive." Well Irv, he just laughted at him. He went ahead and got on that steer. Well, he rode the steer until he decided he wanted to get off. When he got off--why, as he slid off the back, his spur rowel--the rowel on his spur got in the old steer's tail and he just bounced him down the rocks there for quite a ways. And finally, the spur came loose, and he was alright. I thought maybe he was hurt. But he just got up and said, "Well, it kind of hurts back here, but I feel fine otherwise. So he was lucky there. Then another time he came down. I was herding sheep with George Henderson. I was camped down on West Clark Bench. He came down there. The owners always had a good fat saddle horse--grain fed. There was a big white stallion running down there along the bench; so, of course, there was a whole herd of horses there. He told me, "I believe that I can catch that horse". He said, "I'm going to try". So he went out there and tried two or three days. Of course, that horse was just too much for him. He'd get out of the way, run away from him and then this horse would get up on a big knoll and look down at him. But anyhow, he was lucky enough that he caught a nice bay mare. Oh, she was a beauty. He came in and told me--he said, "You know, I sure caught a nice mare today". I said, "Where is she?" "Oh"; he said, "I tied her up over there to a dry tree." He just tied her up by the neck to a dry cedar tree. So, I said, "You sure she's alright':'. "Oh , yea, yea, yes," he said. "She's tied up and she has plenty of rope so she won't choke or anything like that. So we went over to check her out, and there she lay dead--choked to death. She had wound around the oak, tangled up, and struggled until she died. Then Irving was called on a mission. He Left a very good riding horse in my care. When he returned, he was anxious to get back on his horse. In the meantime I had been riding her. She was grain fed and in good shape. He crawled on her as big as you please, and she threw him! I know that before I'd seen him ride her, but he'd had two years away from it, and she just got the best of him. Then, I'm going to tell you another little story about --I'm trying to remember. The deer used to come into Dad's field up there and they'd come in there right in the grain patch all the time and, of course, this is kind of a joke on me as well as him so it can work both ways. But any how, we followed those two old bucks. One of them was dubbed toes. He was dubbed toed, and I'm sure that if anyone was hunting back in that time, they would remember old dubbed-toe, because every year his partner was killed and he'd take up with another one. Nobody ever saw old dubbed toe. Well, anyhow, we followed him out. We were going along and it was snowing and the snow was--oh, about an inch deep on the ground. So we were just a creeping along there as careful as we could. I could see Irv. He was over on old dubbed-toe's tracks. He wanted to get him. Of course, so did I. But anyhow, I spotted this partner of old dubbed-toe. Just his breast was sticking out. His horns were sticking up above the big buck brush that was over there. So I pulled down on him, and I shot him right in the breast. Well, he jumped way up there in the air and I thoughti-well, that's a pretty good shot--I got him. So he ran a little ways and fell. I ran down there to him. When I got down there, why he was just laying down there on his haunches. I just jumped up on his back--first leaned the gun up against the brush--jumped up on his back and stuck the knife in his throat. I was going to cut his throat. I just got the knife in his throat and in the meantime Irv was trying to get to me by coming from behind me and any how the buck jumped up with me on. Well, I had to get off and so I jumped off. The buck started to run and I started to chase him with my knife. Well, Irv came along and grabbed my gun. He was coming behind me with the gun, and I was chasing the buck and he ran about, oh maybe fifty yards and then he dropped. He was bleeding all the time. I'd get down there just get ready to cut his throat and he'd get up and take off again. So he did that for quite a ways and Irv was running and yelling, "Get out of the way so I can shoot him again!" I said, "I don't want him shot again. I'm going to get him." So, finally he went on and I chased him and chased him until he finally lay down and couldn't get up. He just naturally bled to death. So I cut his throat. Irv said, "Why didn't you get out of the way so I could shoot him." And I said, "I didn't want you to shoot him." And I said, "You know, that deer hasn't got a drop of meat spoiled. He hasn't got a hole in his hide. His hide is perfect and his meat has never been touched." And that was right. I just shot his breast off and when we ripped him down the breast for the hide--he never even had a hole in his hide so it was perfect. And I said "Now, that's why I didn't want you to shoot him again. I didn't want any holes in his hide. I wanted him whole." So, I don't know, I could go on here and tell you stories from now to midnight. But I don't want to take up all the time. I know there are a lot of other people here who would like to talk, but I wish Irv and Daisy all the happiness in the world and I'm sure glad that they have so many friends. I wish to thank each one of you. And I know that God lives and the gospel is true, and I say this in the name of Jesus Christ. Amen.

Life timeline of Irving A Johnson

Irving A Johnson was born on 25 Aug 1897
Irving A Johnson was 11 years old when Ford puts the Model T car on the market at a price of US$825. Ford Motor Company is an American multinational automaker headquartered in Dearborn, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit. It was founded by Henry Ford and incorporated on June 16, 1903. The company sells automobiles and commercial vehicles under the Ford brand and most luxury cars under the Lincoln brand. Ford also owns Brazilian SUV manufacturer Troller, an 8% stake in Aston Martin of the United Kingdom, and a 49% stake in Jiangling Motors of China. It also has joint-ventures in China, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, and Russia. The company is listed on the New York Stock Exchange and is controlled by the Ford family; they have minority ownership but the majority of the voting power.
Irving A Johnson was 15 years old when The British passenger liner RMS Titanic sinks in the North Atlantic at 2:20 a.m., two hours and forty minutes after hitting an iceberg. Only 710 of 2,227 passengers and crew on board survive. RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early hours of 15 April 1912, after colliding with an iceberg during its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City. There were an estimated 2,224 passengers and crew aboard, and more than 1,500 died, making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history. RMS Titanic was the largest ship afloat at the time it entered service and was the second of three Olympic-class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line. It was built by the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast. Thomas Andrews, her architect, died in the disaster.
Irving A Johnson was 31 years old when Walt Disney character Mickey Mouse premieres in his first cartoon, "Plane Crazy". Walter Elias Disney was an American entrepreneur, animator, voice actor and film producer. A pioneer of the American animation industry, he introduced several developments in the production of cartoons. As a film producer, Disney holds the record for most Academy Awards earned by an individual, having won 22 Oscars from 59 nominations. He was presented with two Golden Globe Special Achievement Awards and an Emmy Award, among other honors. Several of his films are included in the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress.
Irving A Johnson was 33 years old when Great Depression: In a State of the Union message, U.S. President Herbert Hoover proposes a $150 million (equivalent to $2,197,000,000 in 2017) public works program to help generate jobs and stimulate the economy. The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s. It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century. In the 21st century, the Great Depression is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline.
Irving A Johnson was 48 years old when World War II: Nagasaki is devastated when an atomic bomb, Fat Man, is dropped by the United States B-29 Bockscar. Thirty-five thousand people are killed outright, including 23,200-28,200 Japanese war workers, 2,000 Korean forced workers, and 150 Japanese soldiers. Nagasaki is the capital and the largest city of Nagasaki Prefecture on the island of Kyushu in Japan. The city's name, 長崎, means "long cape" in Japanese. Nagasaki became a centre of colonial Portuguese and Dutch influence in the 16th through 19th centuries, and the Hidden Christian Sites in the Nagasaki Region have been recognized and included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. Part of Nagasaki was home to a major Imperial Japanese Navy base during the First Sino-Japanese War and Russo-Japanese War.
Irving A Johnson was 56 years old when Jonas Salk announced the successful test of his polio vaccine on a small group of adults and children (vaccination pictured). Jonas Edward Salk was an American medical researcher and virologist. He discovered and developed one of the first successful polio vaccines. Born in New York City, he attended New York University School of Medicine, later choosing to do medical research instead of becoming a practicing physician. In 1939, after earning his medical degree, Salk began an internship as a physician scientist at Mount Sinai Hospital. Two years later he was granted a fellowship at the University of Michigan, where he would study flu viruses with his mentor Thomas Francis, Jr.
Irving A Johnson was 67 years old when Martin Luther King Jr. received the Nobel Peace Prize for combating racial inequality through nonviolence. Martin Luther King Jr. was an American Baptist minister and activist who became the most visible spokesperson and leader in the civil rights movement from 1954 until his death in 1968. Born in Atlanta, King is best known for advancing civil rights through nonviolence and civil disobedience, tactics his Christian beliefs and the nonviolent activism of Mahatma Gandhi helped inspire.
Irving A Johnson died on 9 May 1978 at the age of 80
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Irving A Johnson (25 Aug 1897 - 9 May 1978), BillionGraves Record 30791180 Cannonville, Garfield, Utah, United States

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