Henry Zenger

1 Oct 1882 - 25 Nov 1954

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Henry Zenger

1 Oct 1882 - 25 Nov 1954
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When my grandpa (Lynn Zenger) was little, he would go to his grandpa's (Heinrich Zenger) farm. While he was at his grandpa's farm he would watch him kill the pigs and the chickens so they could have food. To get the chickens they would use a long pole and on the end of the pole there was a hook so t

Life Information

Henry Zenger

Born:
Died:

Midway City Cemetery

447-599 W 500 S
Midway, Wasatch, Utah
United States
Transcriber

RWhisnant

January 6, 2012
Photographer

GraveScavenger

December 25, 2011

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Henry Zenger is buried in the Midway City Cemetery at the location displayed on the map below. This GPS information is ONLY available at BillionGraves. Our technology can help you find the gravesite and other family members buried nearby.

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Dinner with Grandpa Heinrich

Contributor: RWhisnant Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

When my grandpa (Lynn Zenger) was little, he would go to his grandpa's (Heinrich Zenger) farm. While he was at his grandpa's farm he would watch him kill the pigs and the chickens so they could have food. To get the chickens they would use a long pole and on the end of the pole there was a hook so they could grab the chicken. Heinrich had a big stump and he would put the chickens head on the stump and cut the head off. The chicken would run around for about 30 seconds and then it would die. Then my grandpa's grandma would take all the feathers off and cook it. When they killed the pig they would shoot it right behind the ear and it would die. After the pig had died they would tie its back legs to a pole that was hanging above the ground and let all the blood drain out. Then they would skin it and eat it. That is how my grandpa got dinner when he visited his grandpa's farm.

Heinrich(Henry) and Lena Zenger - My Grandparents

Contributor: RWhisnant Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

REMEMBRANCES OF GRAMPA & GRANDMA ZENGER By Lynn A. Zenger, June 8, 2014 I remember as a child visiting my grandparents at their home in Midway, Utah. We lived in Salt Lake City, which was about a 45 minute drive to Midway. In the winter that could be somewhat of a scary drive as we had to go over Parley’s Summit and I recall more than once dad had to get out our his car and put on half chains to navigate the slick roads. Grandpa and Grandma had a small farm that had apparently been constructed many years before using the natural volcanic-looking(at least that is what I would call it) rock of the area for the foundation and fencing in front of the home. That whole area around Midway had a lot of geo-thermal activity, and this type of rock was very prevalent, and I assume free at the time, and so was used for building/fencing materials. I recall as a youth going to what was called the Hot Pots to swim. This was a natural hot spring-fed swimming pool. The water was naturally warm coming from under ground, and had a kind of sulfur smell. As kids, we thought that was great fun. Their home was right across the street from the town square where there was their church and other structures, including a town hall, as I recall. Uncle Dean’s house was right next door to the west and Uncle Glen’s house was a block further north. Grandpa had a barn, a chicken coop, and a corral where he kept some cattle and a pig. I seem to recall that there was also an old outhouse out by the chicken coop, which still could be used, even though the house had indoor plumbing. I recall that there were some old Sears catalog pages there that were used for toilet paper. Every time we would come into the house sitting there on a pedestal right in the entrance way, was a large piece of Iron Pyrite Ore, on display. It was probably 8-10” in diameter. I was always impressed by that rock specimen, and would admire all the facets and surfaces that were shiny gray-silver in color, and wished that I could have it for my own. I don’t remember the history of that sample, although I’m sure dad told me. I seem to recall that it came out of one of the mines in the area. I remember that grandma’s front bedroom was always cold, as it didn’t have central heat, I think. In fact, I don’t think the house had a furnace. I think it was heated with the kitchen stove. Grandma had her loom in that front bedroom, where she would make handmade rugs from old clothing scraps. I have several of those old rugs still in my home, which we use for throw rugs. Each was different depending on the type of material that grandma had available to use for batting. Grandma would occasionally made a desert called Seven-Mile Cakes(I think that was the name) which were like fried pieces of thin dough sprinkled with sugar, and she would put them in that cold bedroom to keep until we would have them for a desert. I also remember that grandma would always have a cookie sheet of bread crusts sitting by the coal stove to dry. They would provide the bread for the sacrament each Sunday at church, which I presume grandma would bake, and she would cut off all the crusts and then dry them by her stove for use in other cooking. I think Grandpa was the custodian for either the church or the school, I don’t remember which. I remember that dad and I would often go to Grandma’s on a Friday night, spend the night and then get up at 4:00am to go fishing up on Snake Creek. Those meadows and fields that we used to fish through are now all gone, as a result of the housing and development that has occurred in the area, has covered them all over. The Midway that I remember as a kid, no longer exists, as so much development has totally changed the face of the area. Just like Park City has also changed. My Aunt Eva and Uncle Charles lived in Park City and when we would go visit them, it was just a sleepy little mining town, with not much going on. Not so today, as it has become totally developed into a very poplar ski and recreation town. When we would go to Grandma’s for fishing, I would sleep on the couch and dad would wake me at that early hour to leave while it was still dark. We would come back again at around 9-10am, normally with a mess of fish (dad was very good at being able to catch fish out of the smallest holes, but me not so much). It wouldn’t take dad long to have his limit(10 fish, I think) which we would bring home and then cook for dinner, or take home to put in our freezer. We would normally catch Rainbow or Brook Trout. Sometimes we would go down to Deer Creek Reservoir and catch Perch, off the bank, which is a quite boney fish. But Grandma knew how to cook them and they were quite good. Dad was only a stream fisherman, and so we would never go out in a boat. After fishing, Grandma would fix us breakfast of bacon and eggs and then serve us Postum to drink. I always was suspicious that grandma was serving me something that I shouldn’t be drinking, as it looked so much like coffee, and had an unusual taste, but I drank it anyway. It wasn’t until I got married and found Postum in the store that I looked at the ingredients and discovered that it was just a natural grain drink, and that I shouldn’t have had cause for concern. Had I realized at that young age that my grandma and grandpa were totally dedicated to the gospel, I shouldn’t have had reason for concern. I remember on one summer day going to Grandma’s and noticing that Grandma had a big pot of water boiling on the stove. I followed Grandpa into the chicken coop where he caught several large chickens with a long staff with a hook on the end. He held them by their feet upside down and carried them outside into the yard where he had a large tree stump sitting. He took his axe and chopped off their heads and then just threw them on the ground and they ran all over the yard for 10 seconds for so, before they fell over dead. The headless chickens were then put in the big pot of water, which had been brought out to the backyard and mom, dad, and grandma proceeded to pluck all the feathers off the chickens. (Today, you just go to the store, and that is all done for you.)Grandma then proceeded to cook the chickens for dinner. Another time, in the winter, I remember going with Grandpa and dad, who had taken his 22 caliber rifle out of the closet and we went out to the pig pen. There he shot the big pig that he had been raising, right behind the ear and then Grandpa and dad tied the pig’s hind legs to a large tri-pod and hoisted the pig up in the air and then slit its throat and all the blood drained out. They then butchered the pig and prepared the meat for future use. Behind Grandpa’s chicken coop there was a little irrigation ditch which ran across the adjoining field. I suspect that this field belonged to Grandpa and was part of his farm. I think he raised alfalfa there for feed for the cattle. I recall going to that little stream in the summer, laying down on my stomach and watching the pond skaters glide across the water. I always wondered why they didn’t sink, but they didn’t. They always fascinated me. I remember that on the ditch banks of many of the irrigation ditches that ran through Midway, peppermint would grow. Often my folks would gather some of that peppermint to dry and make peppermint tea. I never really liked the tea, but I sure did like the pungent aroma of the growing green peppermint. I remember after Grandpa died that Grandma would come down to our house in Salt Lake City, and sit with mom (sometimes with my Grandma Allred as well) and darn socks and underwear. They would use yarn and create a patch to cover the hole and make it last that much longer. That was kind of the mantra of that era. Use it up – wear it out. No reason to discard something just because it had a hole in it. I think that was the Depression Era mentality. Sometimes they would do that while watching General Conference. After the last session of conference, we would get in the car and go down to Temple Square, where we would meet all the relatives by the Seagull Monument. In my pre-teen years I recall that one year mom, dad, Carol and I, and Grandmas Zenger and Allred, took a trip to Canada in dad’s 1948 Chevrolet. I think mom must have left Paul with another relative because there were just the 6 of us. Mom was born and raised in Raymond, Alberta, Canada, and we went back to visit some of her family and friends. I recall that we went to a Mennonite Colony where all the adults went in to have a chiropractic adjustment. Apparently the Chiropractor was known far and wide for his healing work. Carol and I stayed in the car. The Mennonites had on common dress, with long sleeve shirts/blouses. I remember they had a common eating hall, with a large triangle chime hanging on the outside to summon members for meals. While in Canada we also went to Cardston to the temple. All the adults went in and Carol and I just stayed outside and played while they participated in a temple session. When Grandma started to deteriorate in her later years, she was living in an Assisted Living Center in Heber, and one weekend, my family and I had driven to Salt Lake and I had to return to Denver for work, so I left the family in Salt Lake, and drove home by myself. I decided to go through Heber to see Grandma, which I did. Grandma had deteriorated to the point that she didn’t know who I was, which was rather discouraging, but it wasn’t long after that she passed away. She’s in a better place and with Grandpa, so that is good. In Uncle Dean’s garage, which sat right next to Grandpa’s front yard, he had some animals/birds which he had had stuffed. I assume he had a taxidermist mount them for him. He must have shot them himself. I became enthralled with an owl and a hawk. I asked Uncle Dean if I could borrow them and take them home. Mom and dad agreed to allow this, and so I had the owl and the hawk mounted on the wall in my bedroom for all of my teenage years. I named the owl, Ollie, and the hawk, Herkimer. I returned the birds to Uncle Dean when I started preparing to leave home for my mission. I remember in Grandma’s house she had an attic bedroom, and I recall going up there one day and looking at some of the old things stored there. Of particular interest was an old gramophone, with the vinyl cylindrical discs for records, and the sound horn that stuck out. I thought that was pretty cool. There were other things there that I don’t seem to remember. As I recall, Uncle Glen bought Grandpa and Grandma’s house and property before they died, and so all of the personal property belonged to him. I am told that he disposed of all the personal effects after Grandma’s death. My father, Ray H. Zenger, was born and raised in Midway, and there are many other interesting details of life in Midway which he has included in his personal history.

Life timeline of Henry Zenger

1882
Henry Zenger was born on 1 Oct 1882
Henry Zenger was 10 years old when Electrical engineer Nikola Tesla gives the first public demonstration of radio in St. Louis, Missouri. Nikola Tesla was a Serbian American inventor, electrical engineer, mechanical engineer, physicist, and futurist who is best known for his contributions to the design of the modern alternating current (AC) electricity supply system.
Henry Zenger was 21 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
Henry Zenger was 30 years old when The British passenger liner RMS Titanic sinks in the North Atlantic at 2:20 a.m., two hours and forty minutes after hitting an iceberg. Only 710 of 2,227 passengers and crew on board survive. RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early hours of 15 April 1912, after colliding with an iceberg during its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City. There were an estimated 2,224 passengers and crew aboard, and more than 1,500 died, making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history. RMS Titanic was the largest ship afloat at the time it entered service and was the second of three Olympic-class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line. It was built by the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast. Thomas Andrews, her architect, died in the disaster.
Henry Zenger was 47 years old when Babe Ruth becomes the first baseball player to hit 500 home runs in his career with a home run at League Park in Cleveland, Ohio. George Herman "Babe" Ruth Jr. was an American professional baseball player whose career in Major League Baseball (MLB) spanned 22 seasons, from 1914 through 1935. Nicknamed "The Bambino" and "The Sultan of Swat", he began his MLB career as a stellar left-handed pitcher for the Boston Red Sox, but achieved his greatest fame as a slugging outfielder for the New York Yankees. Ruth established many MLB batting records, including career home runs (714), runs batted in (RBIs) (2,213), bases on balls (2,062), slugging percentage (.690), and on-base plus slugging (OPS) (1.164); the latter two still stand as of 2018. Ruth is regarded as one of the greatest sports heroes in American culture and is considered by many to be the greatest baseball player of all time. In 1936, Ruth was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame as one of its "first five" inaugural members.
Henry Zenger was 57 years old when World War II: Nazi Germany and Slovakia invade Poland, beginning the European phase of World War II. World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most global war in history; it directly involved more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. In a state of total war, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.
Henry Zenger was 63 years old when World War II: Hiroshima, Japan is devastated when the atomic bomb "Little Boy" is dropped by the United States B-29 Enola Gay. Around 70,000 people are killed instantly, and some tens of thousands die in subsequent years from burns and radiation poisoning. World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most global war in history; it directly involved more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. In a state of total war, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.
Henry Zenger died on 25 Nov 1954 at the age of 72
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Grave record for Henry Zenger (1 Oct 1882 - 25 Nov 1954), BillionGraves Record 567633 Midway, Wasatch, Utah, United States

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