Henry W Ballard

20 Sep 1864 - 11 Nov 1936

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Henry W Ballard

20 Sep 1864 - 11 Nov 1936
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HENRY WILLIAM BALLARD SR. Henry William Ballard, first son and second child of Henry and Margaret McNeil Ballard was born 'about sun down' on Tuesday 20 September 1864, in a log cabin on the Ballard lot in Logan, Cache County, Utah. Henry was born the day after his father returned from 'gathering th

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Henry W Ballard

Born:
Died:

Logan City Cemetery

Tenth East
Logan, Cache, Utah
United States
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rmballard

May 31, 2013
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rmballard

May 27, 2013

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Henry William Ballard - History 1

Contributor: rmballard Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

HENRY WILLIAM BALLARD SR. Henry William Ballard, first son and second child of Henry and Margaret McNeil Ballard was born "about sun down" on Tuesday 20 September 1864, in a log cabin on the Ballard lot in Logan, Cache County, Utah. Henry was born the day after his father returned from "gathering the poor saints from the Missouri River," a call issued by President Brigham Young. His birth brought great rejoicing to the Ballard household and all during his long life he was a source of strength and joy to his parents and to his brothers and sisters. When he was less than three months old he had a severe attack of measles, and was very sick for some time. , On Thursday, 5 January 1865 he was blessed and given his name by his father in the Fast Meeting of the Second Ward. He was named after father Henry, and his Grandfather William Ballard. The following February on the 6th he was taken very sick with convulsions and it looked as though his life would be destroyed. The convulsions lasted for four days and during this time his parents fasted and prayed for him and administered to him with his two grandfathers assisting, with all the faith that they could exercise. Finally on the 20th day they left him and his parents were very thankful that the Lord had heard and answered their prayers. When he was but four years old he had the whooping cough, along with his older sister Margaret Hannah, who was five years old, and his brother Thomas, two years old and the twins Janet and Charles who were six months old. What an ordeal for his parents! When Henry was five years old and the little twins died within two days of each other. His little heart was broken over their passing for he loved them so very much. On Thursday 3 Oct. 1872, at the age of eight years, he was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by his father and was confirmed the same day in the Fast Meeting in the Second Ward by Christian Larsen. When he was ten years old, sorrow came to the home again. In July 1874 the family was stricken with scarlet fever. His little four year old brother George Albert died of this disease and within six days his older sister Margaret Hannah, his companion and playmate died also. Thus again Henry knew loneliness and sorrow. Henry's boyhood days were spent in hard work and willing service upon his father's farm. When in his youth, when about ten years old, while helping his father haul peas from the fields he fall on a pitch form and it ran through his bowels. His father prayed over him and asked the Lord to spare his life until he could get him home to his mother. When he was brought into the house he looked like he was dead. His mother was inspired to make a herb plaster and put his whole body into it. His parents then offered up a mighty prayer for him and by a miracle, he was restored to health in a very short time. Both he and his parents acknowledged the power of God in saving his life. At that time no doctors were available. Henry received his first ordination in the Priesthood under the hands of his father, as he was ordained a Deacon, 30 June 1877 and this ordination was the first of its kind to be performed in Cache Valley for the Church had just given out their instructions unto ordination. On 16 September 1877, Henry was set apart as President of the Deacon's Quorum of the Second Ward in Cache Stake. When Henry was about eighteen years old he fell in love with a popular little girl from the Third Ward. She was his only sweetheart and remained so until his death. This little girl was Elvira Davidson, daughter of the Bishop of the Third Ward. Henry told of his courtship many times to amuse his grandchildren like this: "When your grandmother was sixteen years old, I started to keep company with her. She was a very popular girl there in the old Third Ward and was a special favorite with the boys. They didn't like me coming down there to court one of their prize Third Warders and they told me so. They warned me to stay away but I wasn't easily discouraged. I had taken a very serious liking to her and so kept seeing her. One night after I had visited with her for a while, I was on my way home when I was way laid by a group of these boys from the Third Ward and I was tossed into the canal and told again to stay away. I was determined that I had found the girl that I wanted to marry so I disregarded this warning and kept going back to see her until I won her." On 1 October 1884, Henry was advanced in the Priesthood and ordained an Elder under the hands of his father. On 2 October 1884, at the age of twenty years he was married to Elvira Davidson, eighteen year old daughter of Robert and Ada Hemenway Davidson. They were married in the Logan Temple and Marriner W. Merrill performed the ceremony. Elvira wrote in her diary, "When I was about fourteen years old I started to keep company with Henry Ballard. We went together for about four years and then were married. We had a double wedding with Lena Phister and Alonzo Lewis. My mother and Sister Ballard went together and gave us a wedding supper. We were both dressed alike. We had white Swiss dresses with a large pink ribbon tied with large sashes in the back, with pink rose buds in front. There were about fifty to our wedding." 3 On this same date Lena Phister an orphaned girl who had been taken into the Ballard home and raised to young womanhood was also married by Brother Merrill. She married Alonzo Lewis, son of Bishop B. M. Lewis of the First Ward. Henry Ballard recorded in his journal: "After the marriage in the evening we had a very sociable gathering of friends and relatives at our own house. President Marriner W. Merrill of the temple was with us." After Henry Sr. and Elvira were married they made their first home in the little log house that was Henry Sr's. Grandfather and Grandmother William and Hannah Ballard's home (address now 203 West Center in Logan). In this home on 14 March 1886 their first child a daughter named Elvira Ada was born and three years later on 8 April 1889 she died of scarlet fever. Of her death Elvira wrote: "Ada was just three years when she died, it almost broke our hearts--she was such a sweet child and we loved her so much. Henry Jr. was just four months old at the time." On 8 December 1885 both Henry Sr. and Elvira received Patriarchal Blessings from Zebedee Coltrin. Great blessings were given to them which has always been a comfort to them. These years were trying years for Henry Sr's. parent, they were hunted and abused and persecuted because of polygamy and in order to escape imprisonment he took his father and Robert Davidson (his father-in-law) and William Watterson in his covered wagon went to Salt Lake City so they might start on their missions unmolested from Logan. They left Logan 31 October 1886 at 7:30 p.m. and traveled all night through a fierce storm of thunder, wind and hail. The elements seemed turned loose as if to thwart their progress of their journey but reality it proved a blessing to them for the roads had been dotted with deputies bent upon their arrests and had it not been for the storm the arrests would surely have been made. Because of the storm the deputies deserted their post and sought shelter and in the blackness of the night the wagon rolled on unmolested. Only the lightning flashes revealed at intervals the road ahead and the trusted team was given free rein to choose the course. After this long and trying journey of ninety miles the company arrived safely in Salt Lake City. On 3 November at 11 :00 a.m. Henry Sr. bid good-bye to his beloved father and father-in-law after he had taken them to the train going east and with his tired team he returned to his home in Logan. Henry, like his father was a farmer and he owned a small farm in Petersboro, in Cache Valley, but continued to live in Logan and in the winter months brought his horses and two cows to Logan. Even at an early date stock in the City was voted undesirable so Henry sold his home to Mr. Blanchard and bought a lot on second North between third and forth west street and about the middle of the block on the south side of the street. Upon this lot he built, in about 1889, a small home. When Henry Jr. was very young they moved to this new home but they were not permitted to enjoy it for long. When Henry was but twenty-seven years old he was called and set apart as Bishop of Benson Ward, a small settlement on the banks of Bear River, eight miles west of Logan. Henry was so young to be a Bishop and he worried over it. He offered to go on a five year mission if they would release him from being Bishop, but the authorities said No, so he was ordained Bishop of Benson, 9 March 1891. This ward was named Benson, 14 June 1877 in honor of Apostle Ezra Taft Benson by Moses Thatcher and William B. Preston of the Cache Stake Presidency. For fourteen years the ward had been presided over by Bishop Alma Harris until his release, 5 March 1891. III feelings existed in this community due to the difference of the Territorial Survey and the United States Survey which varied from a few rods to sixteen rods. Expensive law suits and bitter feelings resulted and it took years to obliterate the ill will thus engendered. At the time Henry was appointed to this calling Moses Thatcher told the people he had chosen one to preside over them that all would like and respect and if he had to he would take boxing gloves to maintain order and good will and that the Presidency of the Stake would give him ten years to make a good ward. This call came to Henry and his wife as a mission for at that time they had no interest in Benson or no friends for they did not know a single soul there. They had no property and had no intention of ever leaving their home in Logan. When they received this appointment Henry took his young wife in a racing cart drawn by their horse call Puss, and through the spring mud of March drove to this their new field of labor. When they arrived they tied the horse to a post in front of the log cabin meeting house which was but sixteen by thirty feet and surveyed their future homeland. His wife Elvira looked in dismay at the sparsely settled village and said, "Where is Benson Ward?" Henry was ordained a High Priest and set apart as Bishop of the Benson Ward, 9 March 1891 by Moses Thatcher, with Jonathan Ricks and Noah Williams as counselors. When Noah Williams moved from the ward in 1895 Phillip Purser was called to take his place; and when Jonathan Ricks left Benson, Paul Cardon was called to the 4 5 position thus made vacant and with these counselors Henry faithfully served his ward for more than twenty years. Soon after his appointment Henry located twenty five acres of property with a log cabin with one room on it and moved his wife and son Henry Jr. into it. He sold his farm in Petersboro and raised means to pay for his home. Elvira wrote this: "We sold our home in Logan and our farm and bought our home in Benson from Joel Ricks and our farm from Bishop Preston. We lived in this one room house one summer and one winter." The log house was a tumbled down shack with great holes between the logs but with the help of his wife he cut limbs from the near by trees to fill in the holes and chinked it up with plaster. Henry put up two by fours on the inside and then they nailed heavy factory cloth over it and painted the factory with calcimine and decorated a border at the top and thus converted it into a home of peace, contentment and love, which was always characterized their dwellings. While the cabin was greatly improved in appearance it was cold and drafty and when the wind blew the factory formed great billows on the walls. The first day the family went to their new home they took only the things they needed: a stove and table and chairs and a wash board and a few dishes and a bed. Everything was dumped in the middle of the floor and Elvira was left to make a home out of the hovel. As she worked clearing things up and cleaning the cabin she saw a woman coming through the fields and she thought, "Oh, dear, what will that woman think of such a home?" The woman was Liza Jane Ricks, the wife of Henry's counselor. She was friendly and made herself acquainted and helped clean up the house and arrange the bits of furniture and from this time a friendship was formed which has lasted for nearly half a century. Elvira recorded this in her sketch. "After we had been in Benson about a week they organized the Sunday School, Primary, Mutual and Relief Society. Brother Orson Smith was with us and asked me to be President of the Relief Society. As Henry was Bishop, I told him we would have too many worries to take that position and that Henry would need my help, so they put in Sister Sarah Reese as President and myself as First Counselor. I worked with all the presidents as first counselor for thirty five years and eight years as first counselor to Sister Frost in the Primary. When the Logan Tabernacle and the Temple were built Henry donated his time and means and worked in the construction of both of these houses. Both he and his wife spent many days in Temple work for their dead ancestors. On 28 December 1891, their next child was born. The weather was so cold and the cabin so drafty that it was thought best to have Elvira go to Logan and stay with her mother until the baby was a few weeks old. This child they named Margaret Elveretta and she was born in Logan. When she was six weeks old the mother and the two children went back to their home in Benson. The next spring, 1892 Henry built on to the cabin. He added two brick rooms, a bed room and a living room and converted the cabin into a kitchen. On 14 May 1892 Henry was appointed a delegate from Cache Valley to go to Salt Lake to a Democratic Convention to elect two Delegates and two Alternates to the Convention in Chicago. The convention was held on the 24th of June in Chicago. His father was also a delegate and they went to Salt Lake together. They arrived by train at 9:30 A.M. and paraded the streets in the parade headed by the Logan Brass Band. They marched from the station to Main Street with four hundred delegates. Henry's brother Melvin was the Drummer in the band. They left Ogden at 12:30 A.M. and arrived in Logan at 3:30 A.M. They all had a good time. Under Henry's direction with a committee appointed consisting of the Bishopric and W. W. Roundy, Charles Reese, Nephi Tarbet and Jacob Jorgensen, a new meeting house was planned and built and when it was finished the Relief Society sisters furnished the benches and chairs and made home made carpets for the aisles. It has been said: "Probably no people were ever more thankful for a suitable place to worship and for public gatherings that were the Benson people when they moved into their new headquarters. Elder George F. Richards of the Quorum of the Apostles dedicated the new house of worship. Later Henry bought twenty-five acres of land by the meeting house and then he bought land across Bear River from Bishop William B. Preston. A few years later he bought a quarter section of land joining his farm across the river, from Mr. Price. This land was all covered with sage brush as heavy as ones arm and as tall as an ordinary man. Henry worked hard, long hours to clear this land by hand and as he cleared a section he planted it in wheat. He was ridiculed for planting wheat for he was told the rabbits would eat it all. He planted and the wheat grew and he raised the first wheat over that section ever raised. He cleared, plowed and planted a little at a time until finally he converted the sage brush prairie into a beautiful farm of the best wheat grown. He also beautified his home surroundings; planted shade trees, apple trees, and small fruits and produced the first apples grown in Benson. Henry owned a big thoroughbred stallion which he sometimes 6 7 used for farm work. One day, 21 June 1892, after cutting lucerne, a short distance from his home, he was driving his harnessed team down the road to his home, walking behind them, another team behind his team became frightened and ran away. This frightened Henry Sr's team and they ran also. The stallion wheeled around and struck Henry Sr. in the face with the horns of the harness and knocked him to the ground. He clung to the reins and was dragged some distance. The other team crashed into Henry Sr's. team and they became a tangled mess of frightened demons and with vicious blows the stallion struck him and he was trampled upon by the four frightened beasts until his poor body was mangled and dragged and finally left in the rear as if dead with his terrified wife looking on. The morning of the accident his father and mother and sisters, Rebecca, Lettie and Myrtle went over to Cache Junction for a visit. His mother just got there when she received and impression to go home that something was wrong. She could not be persuaded to remain and prepared to go back at once. Rebecca insisted upon going back with her mother and so the two of them started out in a two wheeled cart and one horse. The road by the way of Benson was considered in a dangerous condition but when they reached the cross roads she turned the horse into the Benson road. Rebecca tried to persuade her mother to go the other way but she said, "No, I feel impressed to go by way of Benson. I don't know why but we'll see when we get there." As the cart in which they were riding turned in the bend of the road his mother saw her son under the feet of the tangled crazed horses and then she knew why she had been so impressed. She gave Rebecca the lines, put her foot on the wheel of the cart, jumped to the ground and ran as fast as she could run to the aid of her son. His poor wife was petrified with fear and grief and never was one so welcome as was his mother at this time. One of the neighbors came and assisted the grief stricken women and made a bed in his big white topped buggy and placed the mangled body of poor Henry Sr. in the bed. His wife sat by his side and Rebecca took charge of the baby Retta and little Henry Jr. and they started off to Logan to a doctor. His mother took the cart and hurried on ahead to Logan and prepared a room and bed for her dear son and by the time the "white top" arrived the doctor was waiting at the door for the patient. Henry Sr. was in a serious condition for many days with his ribs crushed and his cheek bone broken and his body torn and bruised but fortunately he had no internal injuries. For two weeks he and his family stayed at his Mother's home and through great faith and tender care he was finally restored sufficiently to be moved to his own home. Here after a period of several weeks became entirely restored to health and strength. From the Logan Journal--a newspaper of Logan, we find: "I write to give my friends particulars of my son's accident. He had just finished cutting a piece of lucerne, a short distance from his house, and while he was walking and driving his team on the road home, a runaway horse came dashing up behind him. As the road was newly worked and soft he did not hear it approach until it was nearly on him. As he turned his head one of the horns of the harness struck him in the face, breaking his cheek bone. knocking him down and bruising him badly. One shoe was torn from his foot, as the line which the runaway was dragging wrapped around his leg with a half hitch and dragged him several rods. My son managed to get home but vomited blood several times on the way. He was brought to Logan and put under the care of Dr. Parkinson, who made him as comfortable as possible. We hope by the blessings of the Lord he will soon be out again." Signed Bishop Ballard. June 29, 1892 On 9 February 1895 their home was blessed by another son. This date was the birth date of Henry's brother Melvin J. Ballard, so this son was named Melvin Joseph Ballard. This son has followed in his father's footsteps and has held positions of honor and trust in the ward and the stake. On 27 September 1897 another son was born. They named him Robert LeRoy. The Robert was in honor of Elvira's father Robert Davidson. This son, like his brothers has served his church and community with honor and trust. Their last child, a daughter was born 3 September 1900 and named Leone. She was a girl of ability and was active in all the ward affairs. Henry and Elvira rejoiced in witnessing the marriages of all their children in the House of the Lord, and seeing them all take their places in the world with honor and trust and have watched them follow in their own foot steps in the service of the Gospel. Henry had asked for a release from his labors as Bishop many times but a release was not granted until after twenty one years of faithful devoted service. He finally resigned and insisted upon a release. He was released on 19 November 1911. He was succeeded by Howard Reese. After a period of ten years Henry's son Henry Jr. filled his fathers place as Bishop and so for eighty years from father to son a Henry Ballard has served as Bishop in the church. His father Henry Ballard served as bishop of the Second Ward in Logan for nearly forty years, Henry W. Ballard serves as Bishop of Benson Ward for twenty-one years and his son Henry W. Ballard Jr. served as Bishop of Benson Ward for twenty years. All have left a record untarnished. After his release Henry W. Ballard was called to the High Council of Cache Stake and was set apart by President Joseph E. Cardon on 5 June 1920. In this capacity he served faithfully for a number of years until his health failed. 8 In his young manhood Henry had as accordion which he learned to play by ear and to play an accompaniment to songs he sang to his children and grandchildren. One of those songs was a plantif tune with a sad story of a small boy which never failed to bring tears to ones eyes as he sang it. It was called "Poor Little Joe." One line I remember was "And cast out in the snow was Poor Little Joe-" Henry had a good singing voice and showed talent for music and had the opportunity come to him for training might have done well, but in his youth the struggles for bread and butter were so great that education and culture were left out. Henry had but very little schooling in the public schools of Logan but became a self educated man and leader. He was always a leader in the community and had visions far beyond the time in which he lived. He was appointed Road Supervisor and through his efforts roads were improved and travel made much safer and comfortable. He promoted education by helping to establish schools and served as trustee of the Benson Board of Education. He was always helpful and generous with those who tried to help themselves and gave aid and encouragement to those who had ambition. The President of our Utah University, Dr. George Thomas, who was a poor young man who had just finished his schooling at Logan and had ambition to go farther in the field of education, came to Henry for help. He asked him if he would sign a note at the bank for money enough to help him get through college in higher education. Henry was happy to do so and without security other than his good name the money was loaned from the bank and the boy went East to College where he graduated with honor and has since given much to Utah in the field of learning to thousands of young people of the state and other states. Henry said, "I didn't lose a cent of that money and I was paid a big interest in seeing that young man rise to distinction in the educational world." Henry took many boys into his home who worked for him, and treated them as his very own sons. He provided food, clothing and education for them, they ate with the family, they laughed with his family and prayed with them. Their joys and their sorrows were his and his worries were theirs. His home was a happy home, hospitality was unlimited and loved ones and friends found a peace and welcome seldom found elsewhere. His wife was truly a help mate to him under all conditions and at no time was he other than good to her and proud of her and her home. In his later years he once said. "Never in my life have I ever been afraid to take anyone to my home or ashamed of the condition of my home or my wife. She has always been neat and clean and kept a clean home for me." 9 10 King or slave were treated with equal courtesy and attention and at his table both distinguished guest and the poor wanderer have feasted. In addition to her home and family Elvira was active and efficient in all the affairs of the ward. She served for thirty- five years as a counselor in the Relief Society and worked in the Primary many years and was faithful and loyal to all of the organizations. Besides farming Henry owned and milked a large herd of cows and sold milk to the creamery. His wife helped with the milking, raised chickens and with the aid of the sale of eggs she beautified their home by enlarging it and improving it until it stood for many years as a monument to their thrift and industry and their love for the beautiful. Henry was a large strong man, well developed and blessed with a wonderful body. His hair was black, his eyes blue, penetrating and unflinching. He possessed a generous disposition, was kindly but was uncompromising with wrong doing. No matter what others thought. Henry had carried the burden of debt for many years but lived to pay every dollar he owed in the world. His last donation to his ward was just prior to his death; he traded a tract of his own land across the river to a member of the ward who owned the present site of the Ward Chapel. The land he gave in exchange was three times the size of the chapel property but he gave it freely as a gift for the present site for his ward to erect a new meeting house upon it for the saints of the ward. Under the leadership of his son a very creditable chapel was erected, paid for and dedicated by President Heber J. Grant. For several years before his death Henry had been failing in health. He had undergone a serious operation and was a sufferer of high blood pressure and a weakened heart. However, he kept up with his work until he could work no longer. At the last he suffered for several days very seriously and one morning he said he wanted to get out of bed for he felt better. His wife was alone with him and got him up in a chair and went to the kitchen to fix his breakfast. When she returned to the room where he was sitting up he gave a little sigh and his spirit was gone. He died 11 November 1936 at the age of seventy-two years, one month and twenty one days. His funeral was held in the amusement hall of the new school building for the new chapel was not yet finished. It was held on 15 November 1936, and he was buried in the Logan City cemetery by the side of his dear little daughter, Ada. While Henry left but little property and small savings he died a wealthy man. He left riches that will never perish. He was rich in experience, he left rich memories, a priceless family and a lovable honored wife. Elvira wrote: "My husband Henry William Ballard Sr died, 11 November 1936, it has left me all alone to live on memories." She lived on in her dearly beloved home alone, save for the memories of a happy life and a devoted husband, for fifteen years waiting for her call to come so she might join her Henry Sr. Those fifteen years were spent in service to her family and church as long as she was able to serve. She suffered their joys and sorrows and loved each one, children, grandchildren and great grandchildren with great devotion. On 10 January 1949, her grandson William, (Bill) died of cancer of the brain and the following year, on 11 January 1950, her son Henry Jr. died suddenly of a heart attack. She sorrowed over their passing and was very lonely but felt sure of a reunion and a welcome for her when her time would come to join them. From a letter she wrote to me on 1 February 1950 we find: "We miss dear Henry Jr. so--it is three weeks today since he died and it seems like three years. My, I will sure miss him. He was so kind and thoughtful of me. He would call me up every night over the phone and say--Mother are you all right? I couldn't go to bed till I heard from you. They would come over so often and spend the evening. He came over three different times this fall to get me to go over and stay with them. When the snow came he came over and drained the water pipes. I went over and stayed with them four weeks. I was with him when he took so sick. We can't understand why he had to go unless the Lord wanted him for some work over there. The whole ward misses him, everyone that speaks say how we miss Brother Henry Ballard Jr. for we all loved him. Our homes won't be the same now he has gone for all loved him so." Elvira loved her home dearly and refused to be moved from it. She was ill the last few years of her life. Death finally took her from her home on 2 September 1951. She was eighty-five years of age. Her funeral services were held on, 5 September 1951, in the Benson Ward meeting house and she was buried by her dearly beloved Henry Sr. in the Logan City Cemetery. Henry Sr. and Elvira were the parents of six children, five lived to maturity. They knew the joy of sending two of their sons into the world to preach the gospel. Henry Jr. filled a mission to the Northwestern States Mission. He left, 25 July 1911 and returned, 28 June 1913. In March 1921 he was set apart as Bishop of Benson Ward by Apostle Melvin J. Ballard and served until Oct 1941. In 1941 he became second counselor to the President of Cache Stake 12 which position he held until February 1947 when the stake• was divided. At that time he was asked to serve as Stake President but upon the advice of his doctor he declined to take the position. Robert LeRoy, their youngest son filled a mission to the North Western States Mission also. He left 12 January 1921 and since that time has served as a home missionary for the church. Melvin Joseph has served many positions and at present is on the High Council of his stake. Retta's husband served a mission to the North Western States Mission and Retta has served as Ward Relief Society President for many years as well as in the Mutual and Primary Work. Leone made her home in Salt Lake City. In all her wards she has been active in the organizations and served on the Stake Board of Primary. All their children have married and have children and grandchildren and today Henry Sr and Elvira have a large posterity who hold in reverence their Grandparents. After Elvira's death the old homestead was sold and in 1956 the old home was torn down--and another chapter is closed. No parents were blessed with better sons and daughters. The boys in their youth worked with their father on the farm clearing the sage brush, plowing, planting and harvesting, counting the dollars to help "pay father's debts." Their conduct in life is without blemish. Children of Henry William Sr and Elvira Davidson Ballard: Elvira Ada b. 14 Mar 1886 d. 8 Apr 1889 Henry William Jr b. 1 Dec 1888 m. Almeda Jane Roundy d. 11 Jan 1950 Margaret Elvaretta b. 28 Dec 1891 m. Edwin Shadrack Roundy d 22 May 1968 Melvin Joseph b. 9 Feb 1895 m. Audria Una Munk d. 18 Dec 1974 Robert LeRoy b. 27 Sep 1897 m. Agatha Almira Toombs d. 10 Aug 1966 Leone b. 3 Sep 1900 m. Oliver Wendell Wilkes d. 14 Feb 1988 Information for this sketch was taken from the journal of Henry Ballard. From the memory of Elvira Ballard and from her written sketch. Written by Myrtle Ballard Shurtliff

Henry William Ballard - History 1

Contributor: rmballard Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

HENRY WILLIAM BALLARD SR. Henry William Ballard, first son and second child of Henry and Margaret McNeil Ballard was born "about sun down" on Tuesday 20 September 1864, in a log cabin on the Ballard lot in Logan, Cache County, Utah. Henry was born the day after his father returned from "gathering the poor saints from the Missouri River," a call issued by President Brigham Young. His birth brought great rejoicing to the Ballard household and all during his long life he was a source of strength and joy to his parents and to his brothers and sisters. When he was less than three months old he had a severe attack of measles, and was very sick for some time. , On Thursday, 5 January 1865 he was blessed and given his name by his father in the Fast Meeting of the Second Ward. He was named after father Henry, and his Grandfather William Ballard. The following February on the 6th he was taken very sick with convulsions and it looked as though his life would be destroyed. The convulsions lasted for four days and during this time his parents fasted and prayed for him and administered to him with his two grandfathers assisting, with all the faith that they could exercise. Finally on the 20th day they left him and his parents were very thankful that the Lord had heard and answered their prayers. When he was but four years old he had the whooping cough, along with his older sister Margaret Hannah, who was five years old, and his brother Thomas, two years old and the twins Janet and Charles who were six months old. What an ordeal for his parents! When Henry was five years old and the little twins died within two days of each other. His little heart was broken over their passing for he loved them so very much. On Thursday 3 Oct. 1872, at the age of eight years, he was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by his father and was confirmed the same day in the Fast Meeting in the Second Ward by Christian Larsen. When he was ten years old, sorrow came to the home again. In July 1874 the family was stricken with scarlet fever. His little four year old brother George Albert died of this disease and within six days his older sister Margaret Hannah, his companion and playmate died also. Thus again Henry knew loneliness and sorrow. Henry's boyhood days were spent in hard work and willing service upon his father's farm. When in his youth, when about ten years old, while helping his father haul peas from the fields he fall on a pitch form and it ran through his bowels. His father prayed over him and asked the Lord to spare his life until he could get him home to his mother. When he was brought into the house he looked like he was dead. His mother was inspired to make a herb plaster and put his whole body into it. His parents then offered up a mighty prayer for him and by a miracle, he was restored to health in a very short time. Both he and his parents acknowledged the power of God in saving his life. At that time no doctors were available. Henry received his first ordination in the Priesthood under the hands of his father, as he was ordained a Deacon, 30 June 1877 and this ordination was the first of its kind to be performed in Cache Valley for the Church had just given out their instructions unto ordination. On 16 September 1877, Henry was set apart as President of the Deacon's Quorum of the Second Ward in Cache Stake. When Henry was about eighteen years old he fell in love with a popular little girl from the Third Ward. She was his only sweetheart and remained so until his death. This little girl was Elvira Davidson, daughter of the Bishop of the Third Ward. Henry told of his courtship many times to amuse his grandchildren like this: "When your grandmother was sixteen years old, I started to keep company with her. She was a very popular girl there in the old Third Ward and was a special favorite with the boys. They didn't like me coming down there to court one of their prize Third Warders and they told me so. They warned me to stay away but I wasn't easily discouraged. I had taken a very serious liking to her and so kept seeing her. One night after I had visited with her for a while, I was on my way home when I was way laid by a group of these boys from the Third Ward and I was tossed into the canal and told again to stay away. I was determined that I had found the girl that I wanted to marry so I disregarded this warning and kept going back to see her until I won her." On 1 October 1884, Henry was advanced in the Priesthood and ordained an Elder under the hands of his father. On 2 October 1884, at the age of twenty years he was married to Elvira Davidson, eighteen year old daughter of Robert and Ada Hemenway Davidson. They were married in the Logan Temple and Marriner W. Merrill performed the ceremony. Elvira wrote in her diary, "When I was about fourteen years old I started to keep company with Henry Ballard. We went together for about four years and then were married. We had a double wedding with Lena Phister and Alonzo Lewis. My mother and Sister Ballard went together and gave us a wedding supper. We were both dressed alike. We had white Swiss dresses with a large pink ribbon tied with large sashes in the back, with pink rose buds in front. There were about fifty to our wedding." 3 On this same date Lena Phister an orphaned girl who had been taken into the Ballard home and raised to young womanhood was also married by Brother Merrill. She married Alonzo Lewis, son of Bishop B. M. Lewis of the First Ward. Henry Ballard recorded in his journal: "After the marriage in the evening we had a very sociable gathering of friends and relatives at our own house. President Marriner W. Merrill of the temple was with us." After Henry Sr. and Elvira were married they made their first home in the little log house that was Henry Sr's. Grandfather and Grandmother William and Hannah Ballard's home (address now 203 West Center in Logan). In this home on 14 March 1886 their first child a daughter named Elvira Ada was born and three years later on 8 April 1889 she died of scarlet fever. Of her death Elvira wrote: "Ada was just three years when she died, it almost broke our hearts--she was such a sweet child and we loved her so much. Henry Jr. was just four months old at the time." On 8 December 1885 both Henry Sr. and Elvira received Patriarchal Blessings from Zebedee Coltrin. Great blessings were given to them which has always been a comfort to them. These years were trying years for Henry Sr's. parent, they were hunted and abused and persecuted because of polygamy and in order to escape imprisonment he took his father and Robert Davidson (his father-in-law) and William Watterson in his covered wagon went to Salt Lake City so they might start on their missions unmolested from Logan. They left Logan 31 October 1886 at 7:30 p.m. and traveled all night through a fierce storm of thunder, wind and hail. The elements seemed turned loose as if to thwart their progress of their journey but reality it proved a blessing to them for the roads had been dotted with deputies bent upon their arrests and had it not been for the storm the arrests would surely have been made. Because of the storm the deputies deserted their post and sought shelter and in the blackness of the night the wagon rolled on unmolested. Only the lightning flashes revealed at intervals the road ahead and the trusted team was given free rein to choose the course. After this long and trying journey of ninety miles the company arrived safely in Salt Lake City. On 3 November at 11 :00 a.m. Henry Sr. bid good-bye to his beloved father and father-in-law after he had taken them to the train going east and with his tired team he returned to his home in Logan. Henry, like his father was a farmer and he owned a small farm in Petersboro, in Cache Valley, but continued to live in Logan and in the winter months brought his horses and two cows to Logan. Even at an early date stock in the City was voted undesirable so Henry sold his home to Mr. Blanchard and bought a lot on second North between third and forth west street and about the middle of the block on the south side of the street. Upon this lot he built, in about 1889, a small home. When Henry Jr. was very young they moved to this new home but they were not permitted to enjoy it for long. When Henry was but twenty-seven years old he was called and set apart as Bishop of Benson Ward, a small settlement on the banks of Bear River, eight miles west of Logan. Henry was so young to be a Bishop and he worried over it. He offered to go on a five year mission if they would release him from being Bishop, but the authorities said No, so he was ordained Bishop of Benson, 9 March 1891. This ward was named Benson, 14 June 1877 in honor of Apostle Ezra Taft Benson by Moses Thatcher and William B. Preston of the Cache Stake Presidency. For fourteen years the ward had been presided over by Bishop Alma Harris until his release, 5 March 1891. III feelings existed in this community due to the difference of the Territorial Survey and the United States Survey which varied from a few rods to sixteen rods. Expensive law suits and bitter feelings resulted and it took years to obliterate the ill will thus engendered. At the time Henry was appointed to this calling Moses Thatcher told the people he had chosen one to preside over them that all would like and respect and if he had to he would take boxing gloves to maintain order and good will and that the Presidency of the Stake would give him ten years to make a good ward. This call came to Henry and his wife as a mission for at that time they had no interest in Benson or no friends for they did not know a single soul there. They had no property and had no intention of ever leaving their home in Logan. When they received this appointment Henry took his young wife in a racing cart drawn by their horse call Puss, and through the spring mud of March drove to this their new field of labor. When they arrived they tied the horse to a post in front of the log cabin meeting house which was but sixteen by thirty feet and surveyed their future homeland. His wife Elvira looked in dismay at the sparsely settled village and said, "Where is Benson Ward?" Henry was ordained a High Priest and set apart as Bishop of the Benson Ward, 9 March 1891 by Moses Thatcher, with Jonathan Ricks and Noah Williams as counselors. When Noah Williams moved from the ward in 1895 Phillip Purser was called to take his place; and when Jonathan Ricks left Benson, Paul Cardon was called to the 4 5 position thus made vacant and with these counselors Henry faithfully served his ward for more than twenty years. Soon after his appointment Henry located twenty five acres of property with a log cabin with one room on it and moved his wife and son Henry Jr. into it. He sold his farm in Petersboro and raised means to pay for his home. Elvira wrote this: "We sold our home in Logan and our farm and bought our home in Benson from Joel Ricks and our farm from Bishop Preston. We lived in this one room house one summer and one winter." The log house was a tumbled down shack with great holes between the logs but with the help of his wife he cut limbs from the near by trees to fill in the holes and chinked it up with plaster. Henry put up two by fours on the inside and then they nailed heavy factory cloth over it and painted the factory with calcimine and decorated a border at the top and thus converted it into a home of peace, contentment and love, which was always characterized their dwellings. While the cabin was greatly improved in appearance it was cold and drafty and when the wind blew the factory formed great billows on the walls. The first day the family went to their new home they took only the things they needed: a stove and table and chairs and a wash board and a few dishes and a bed. Everything was dumped in the middle of the floor and Elvira was left to make a home out of the hovel. As she worked clearing things up and cleaning the cabin she saw a woman coming through the fields and she thought, "Oh, dear, what will that woman think of such a home?" The woman was Liza Jane Ricks, the wife of Henry's counselor. She was friendly and made herself acquainted and helped clean up the house and arrange the bits of furniture and from this time a friendship was formed which has lasted for nearly half a century. Elvira recorded this in her sketch. "After we had been in Benson about a week they organized the Sunday School, Primary, Mutual and Relief Society. Brother Orson Smith was with us and asked me to be President of the Relief Society. As Henry was Bishop, I told him we would have too many worries to take that position and that Henry would need my help, so they put in Sister Sarah Reese as President and myself as First Counselor. I worked with all the presidents as first counselor for thirty five years and eight years as first counselor to Sister Frost in the Primary. When the Logan Tabernacle and the Temple were built Henry donated his time and means and worked in the construction of both of these houses. Both he and his wife spent many days in Temple work for their dead ancestors. On 28 December 1891, their next child was born. The weather was so cold and the cabin so drafty that it was thought best to have Elvira go to Logan and stay with her mother until the baby was a few weeks old. This child they named Margaret Elveretta and she was born in Logan. When she was six weeks old the mother and the two children went back to their home in Benson. The next spring, 1892 Henry built on to the cabin. He added two brick rooms, a bed room and a living room and converted the cabin into a kitchen. On 14 May 1892 Henry was appointed a delegate from Cache Valley to go to Salt Lake to a Democratic Convention to elect two Delegates and two Alternates to the Convention in Chicago. The convention was held on the 24th of June in Chicago. His father was also a delegate and they went to Salt Lake together. They arrived by train at 9:30 A.M. and paraded the streets in the parade headed by the Logan Brass Band. They marched from the station to Main Street with four hundred delegates. Henry's brother Melvin was the Drummer in the band. They left Ogden at 12:30 A.M. and arrived in Logan at 3:30 A.M. They all had a good time. Under Henry's direction with a committee appointed consisting of the Bishopric and W. W. Roundy, Charles Reese, Nephi Tarbet and Jacob Jorgensen, a new meeting house was planned and built and when it was finished the Relief Society sisters furnished the benches and chairs and made home made carpets for the aisles. It has been said: "Probably no people were ever more thankful for a suitable place to worship and for public gatherings that were the Benson people when they moved into their new headquarters. Elder George F. Richards of the Quorum of the Apostles dedicated the new house of worship. Later Henry bought twenty-five acres of land by the meeting house and then he bought land across Bear River from Bishop William B. Preston. A few years later he bought a quarter section of land joining his farm across the river, from Mr. Price. This land was all covered with sage brush as heavy as ones arm and as tall as an ordinary man. Henry worked hard, long hours to clear this land by hand and as he cleared a section he planted it in wheat. He was ridiculed for planting wheat for he was told the rabbits would eat it all. He planted and the wheat grew and he raised the first wheat over that section ever raised. He cleared, plowed and planted a little at a time until finally he converted the sage brush prairie into a beautiful farm of the best wheat grown. He also beautified his home surroundings; planted shade trees, apple trees, and small fruits and produced the first apples grown in Benson. Henry owned a big thoroughbred stallion which he sometimes 6 7 used for farm work. One day, 21 June 1892, after cutting lucerne, a short distance from his home, he was driving his harnessed team down the road to his home, walking behind them, another team behind his team became frightened and ran away. This frightened Henry Sr's team and they ran also. The stallion wheeled around and struck Henry Sr. in the face with the horns of the harness and knocked him to the ground. He clung to the reins and was dragged some distance. The other team crashed into Henry Sr's. team and they became a tangled mess of frightened demons and with vicious blows the stallion struck him and he was trampled upon by the four frightened beasts until his poor body was mangled and dragged and finally left in the rear as if dead with his terrified wife looking on. The morning of the accident his father and mother and sisters, Rebecca, Lettie and Myrtle went over to Cache Junction for a visit. His mother just got there when she received and impression to go home that something was wrong. She could not be persuaded to remain and prepared to go back at once. Rebecca insisted upon going back with her mother and so the two of them started out in a two wheeled cart and one horse. The road by the way of Benson was considered in a dangerous condition but when they reached the cross roads she turned the horse into the Benson road. Rebecca tried to persuade her mother to go the other way but she said, "No, I feel impressed to go by way of Benson. I don't know why but we'll see when we get there." As the cart in which they were riding turned in the bend of the road his mother saw her son under the feet of the tangled crazed horses and then she knew why she had been so impressed. She gave Rebecca the lines, put her foot on the wheel of the cart, jumped to the ground and ran as fast as she could run to the aid of her son. His poor wife was petrified with fear and grief and never was one so welcome as was his mother at this time. One of the neighbors came and assisted the grief stricken women and made a bed in his big white topped buggy and placed the mangled body of poor Henry Sr. in the bed. His wife sat by his side and Rebecca took charge of the baby Retta and little Henry Jr. and they started off to Logan to a doctor. His mother took the cart and hurried on ahead to Logan and prepared a room and bed for her dear son and by the time the "white top" arrived the doctor was waiting at the door for the patient. Henry Sr. was in a serious condition for many days with his ribs crushed and his cheek bone broken and his body torn and bruised but fortunately he had no internal injuries. For two weeks he and his family stayed at his Mother's home and through great faith and tender care he was finally restored sufficiently to be moved to his own home. Here after a period of several weeks became entirely restored to health and strength. From the Logan Journal--a newspaper of Logan, we find: "I write to give my friends particulars of my son's accident. He had just finished cutting a piece of lucerne, a short distance from his house, and while he was walking and driving his team on the road home, a runaway horse came dashing up behind him. As the road was newly worked and soft he did not hear it approach until it was nearly on him. As he turned his head one of the horns of the harness struck him in the face, breaking his cheek bone. knocking him down and bruising him badly. One shoe was torn from his foot, as the line which the runaway was dragging wrapped around his leg with a half hitch and dragged him several rods. My son managed to get home but vomited blood several times on the way. He was brought to Logan and put under the care of Dr. Parkinson, who made him as comfortable as possible. We hope by the blessings of the Lord he will soon be out again." Signed Bishop Ballard. June 29, 1892 On 9 February 1895 their home was blessed by another son. This date was the birth date of Henry's brother Melvin J. Ballard, so this son was named Melvin Joseph Ballard. This son has followed in his father's footsteps and has held positions of honor and trust in the ward and the stake. On 27 September 1897 another son was born. They named him Robert LeRoy. The Robert was in honor of Elvira's father Robert Davidson. This son, like his brothers has served his church and community with honor and trust. Their last child, a daughter was born 3 September 1900 and named Leone. She was a girl of ability and was active in all the ward affairs. Henry and Elvira rejoiced in witnessing the marriages of all their children in the House of the Lord, and seeing them all take their places in the world with honor and trust and have watched them follow in their own foot steps in the service of the Gospel. Henry had asked for a release from his labors as Bishop many times but a release was not granted until after twenty one years of faithful devoted service. He finally resigned and insisted upon a release. He was released on 19 November 1911. He was succeeded by Howard Reese. After a period of ten years Henry's son Henry Jr. filled his fathers place as Bishop and so for eighty years from father to son a Henry Ballard has served as Bishop in the church. His father Henry Ballard served as bishop of the Second Ward in Logan for nearly forty years, Henry W. Ballard serves as Bishop of Benson Ward for twenty-one years and his son Henry W. Ballard Jr. served as Bishop of Benson Ward for twenty years. All have left a record untarnished. After his release Henry W. Ballard was called to the High Council of Cache Stake and was set apart by President Joseph E. Cardon on 5 June 1920. In this capacity he served faithfully for a number of years until his health failed. 8 In his young manhood Henry had as accordion which he learned to play by ear and to play an accompaniment to songs he sang to his children and grandchildren. One of those songs was a plantif tune with a sad story of a small boy which never failed to bring tears to ones eyes as he sang it. It was called "Poor Little Joe." One line I remember was "And cast out in the snow was Poor Little Joe-" Henry had a good singing voice and showed talent for music and had the opportunity come to him for training might have done well, but in his youth the struggles for bread and butter were so great that education and culture were left out. Henry had but very little schooling in the public schools of Logan but became a self educated man and leader. He was always a leader in the community and had visions far beyond the time in which he lived. He was appointed Road Supervisor and through his efforts roads were improved and travel made much safer and comfortable. He promoted education by helping to establish schools and served as trustee of the Benson Board of Education. He was always helpful and generous with those who tried to help themselves and gave aid and encouragement to those who had ambition. The President of our Utah University, Dr. George Thomas, who was a poor young man who had just finished his schooling at Logan and had ambition to go farther in the field of education, came to Henry for help. He asked him if he would sign a note at the bank for money enough to help him get through college in higher education. Henry was happy to do so and without security other than his good name the money was loaned from the bank and the boy went East to College where he graduated with honor and has since given much to Utah in the field of learning to thousands of young people of the state and other states. Henry said, "I didn't lose a cent of that money and I was paid a big interest in seeing that young man rise to distinction in the educational world." Henry took many boys into his home who worked for him, and treated them as his very own sons. He provided food, clothing and education for them, they ate with the family, they laughed with his family and prayed with them. Their joys and their sorrows were his and his worries were theirs. His home was a happy home, hospitality was unlimited and loved ones and friends found a peace and welcome seldom found elsewhere. His wife was truly a help mate to him under all conditions and at no time was he other than good to her and proud of her and her home. In his later years he once said. "Never in my life have I ever been afraid to take anyone to my home or ashamed of the condition of my home or my wife. She has always been neat and clean and kept a clean home for me." 9 10 King or slave were treated with equal courtesy and attention and at his table both distinguished guest and the poor wanderer have feasted. In addition to her home and family Elvira was active and efficient in all the affairs of the ward. She served for thirty- five years as a counselor in the Relief Society and worked in the Primary many years and was faithful and loyal to all of the organizations. Besides farming Henry owned and milked a large herd of cows and sold milk to the creamery. His wife helped with the milking, raised chickens and with the aid of the sale of eggs she beautified their home by enlarging it and improving it until it stood for many years as a monument to their thrift and industry and their love for the beautiful. Henry was a large strong man, well developed and blessed with a wonderful body. His hair was black, his eyes blue, penetrating and unflinching. He possessed a generous disposition, was kindly but was uncompromising with wrong doing. No matter what others thought. Henry had carried the burden of debt for many years but lived to pay every dollar he owed in the world. His last donation to his ward was just prior to his death; he traded a tract of his own land across the river to a member of the ward who owned the present site of the Ward Chapel. The land he gave in exchange was three times the size of the chapel property but he gave it freely as a gift for the present site for his ward to erect a new meeting house upon it for the saints of the ward. Under the leadership of his son a very creditable chapel was erected, paid for and dedicated by President Heber J. Grant. For several years before his death Henry had been failing in health. He had undergone a serious operation and was a sufferer of high blood pressure and a weakened heart. However, he kept up with his work until he could work no longer. At the last he suffered for several days very seriously and one morning he said he wanted to get out of bed for he felt better. His wife was alone with him and got him up in a chair and went to the kitchen to fix his breakfast. When she returned to the room where he was sitting up he gave a little sigh and his spirit was gone. He died 11 November 1936 at the age of seventy-two years, one month and twenty one days. His funeral was held in the amusement hall of the new school building for the new chapel was not yet finished. It was held on 15 November 1936, and he was buried in the Logan City cemetery by the side of his dear little daughter, Ada. While Henry left but little property and small savings he died a wealthy man. He left riches that will never perish. He was rich in experience, he left rich memories, a priceless family and a lovable honored wife. Elvira wrote: "My husband Henry William Ballard Sr died, 11 November 1936, it has left me all alone to live on memories." She lived on in her dearly beloved home alone, save for the memories of a happy life and a devoted husband, for fifteen years waiting for her call to come so she might join her Henry Sr. Those fifteen years were spent in service to her family and church as long as she was able to serve. She suffered their joys and sorrows and loved each one, children, grandchildren and great grandchildren with great devotion. On 10 January 1949, her grandson William, (Bill) died of cancer of the brain and the following year, on 11 January 1950, her son Henry Jr. died suddenly of a heart attack. She sorrowed over their passing and was very lonely but felt sure of a reunion and a welcome for her when her time would come to join them. From a letter she wrote to me on 1 February 1950 we find: "We miss dear Henry Jr. so--it is three weeks today since he died and it seems like three years. My, I will sure miss him. He was so kind and thoughtful of me. He would call me up every night over the phone and say--Mother are you all right? I couldn't go to bed till I heard from you. They would come over so often and spend the evening. He came over three different times this fall to get me to go over and stay with them. When the snow came he came over and drained the water pipes. I went over and stayed with them four weeks. I was with him when he took so sick. We can't understand why he had to go unless the Lord wanted him for some work over there. The whole ward misses him, everyone that speaks say how we miss Brother Henry Ballard Jr. for we all loved him. Our homes won't be the same now he has gone for all loved him so." Elvira loved her home dearly and refused to be moved from it. She was ill the last few years of her life. Death finally took her from her home on 2 September 1951. She was eighty-five years of age. Her funeral services were held on, 5 September 1951, in the Benson Ward meeting house and she was buried by her dearly beloved Henry Sr. in the Logan City Cemetery. Henry Sr. and Elvira were the parents of six children, five lived to maturity. They knew the joy of sending two of their sons into the world to preach the gospel. Henry Jr. filled a mission to the Northwestern States Mission. He left, 25 July 1911 and returned, 28 June 1913. In March 1921 he was set apart as Bishop of Benson Ward by Apostle Melvin J. Ballard and served until Oct 1941. In 1941 he became second counselor to the President of Cache Stake 12 which position he held until February 1947 when the stake• was divided. At that time he was asked to serve as Stake President but upon the advice of his doctor he declined to take the position. Robert LeRoy, their youngest son filled a mission to the North Western States Mission also. He left 12 January 1921 and since that time has served as a home missionary for the church. Melvin Joseph has served many positions and at present is on the High Council of his stake. Retta's husband served a mission to the North Western States Mission and Retta has served as Ward Relief Society President for many years as well as in the Mutual and Primary Work. Leone made her home in Salt Lake City. In all her wards she has been active in the organizations and served on the Stake Board of Primary. All their children have married and have children and grandchildren and today Henry Sr and Elvira have a large posterity who hold in reverence their Grandparents. After Elvira's death the old homestead was sold and in 1956 the old home was torn down--and another chapter is closed. No parents were blessed with better sons and daughters. The boys in their youth worked with their father on the farm clearing the sage brush, plowing, planting and harvesting, counting the dollars to help "pay father's debts." Their conduct in life is without blemish. Children of Henry William Sr and Elvira Davidson Ballard: Elvira Ada b. 14 Mar 1886 d. 8 Apr 1889 Henry William Jr b. 1 Dec 1888 m. Almeda Jane Roundy d. 11 Jan 1950 Margaret Elvaretta b. 28 Dec 1891 m. Edwin Shadrack Roundy d 22 May 1968 Melvin Joseph b. 9 Feb 1895 m. Audria Una Munk d. 18 Dec 1974 Robert LeRoy b. 27 Sep 1897 m. Agatha Almira Toombs d. 10 Aug 1966 Leone b. 3 Sep 1900 m. Oliver Wendell Wilkes d. 14 Feb 1988 Information for this sketch was taken from the journal of Henry Ballard. From the memory of Elvira Ballard and from her written sketch. Written by Myrtle Ballard Shurtliff

Life timeline of Henry W Ballard

1864
Henry W Ballard was born on 20 Sep 1864
Henry W Ballard was 10 years old when Winston Churchill, English colonel, journalist, and politician, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1965) Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill was a British politician, army officer, and writer, who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. As Prime Minister, Churchill led Britain to victory in the Second World War. Churchill represented five constituencies during his career as Member of Parliament (MP). Ideologically an economic liberal and British imperialist, he began and ended his parliamentary career as a member of the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955, but for twenty years from 1904 he was a prominent member of the Liberal Party.
Henry W Ballard was 23 years old when Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West Show opens in London. William Frederick "Buffalo Bill" Cody was an American scout, bison hunter, and showman. He was born in Le Claire, Iowa Territory, but he lived for several years in his father's hometown in Toronto Township, Ontario, Canada, before the family returned to the Midwest and settled in the Kansas Territory.
Henry W Ballard was 30 years old when Mahatma Gandhi forms the Natal Indian Congress (NIC) in order to fight discrimination against Indian traders in Natal. Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was an Indian activist who was the leader of the Indian independence movement against British rule. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The honorific Mahātmā – applied to him first in 1914 in South Africa – is now used worldwide. In India, he is also called Bapu and Gandhi ji, and known as the Father of the Nation.
Henry W Ballard was 39 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
Henry W Ballard was 48 years old when The British passenger liner RMS Titanic sinks in the North Atlantic at 2:20 a.m., two hours and forty minutes after hitting an iceberg. Only 710 of 2,227 passengers and crew on board survive. RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early hours of 15 April 1912, after colliding with an iceberg during its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City. There were an estimated 2,224 passengers and crew aboard, and more than 1,500 died, making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history. RMS Titanic was the largest ship afloat at the time it entered service and was the second of three Olympic-class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line. It was built by the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast. Thomas Andrews, her architect, died in the disaster.
Henry W Ballard was 64 years old when Walt Disney character Mickey Mouse premieres in his first cartoon, "Plane Crazy". Walter Elias Disney was an American entrepreneur, animator, voice actor and film producer. A pioneer of the American animation industry, he introduced several developments in the production of cartoons. As a film producer, Disney holds the record for most Academy Awards earned by an individual, having won 22 Oscars from 59 nominations. He was presented with two Golden Globe Special Achievement Awards and an Emmy Award, among other honors. Several of his films are included in the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress.
Henry W Ballard died on 11 Nov 1936 at the age of 72
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Henry W Ballard (20 Sep 1864 - 11 Nov 1936), BillionGraves Record 4043658 Logan, Cache, Utah, United States

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