Henry Ballard

27 Jan 1832 - 26 Feb 1908

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Henry Ballard

27 Jan 1832 - 26 Feb 1908
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An excerpt from 'Short Stories for Short People' written by my grandmother, Myrtle Ballard Shurtliff, around 1970. Minor editing has been done. Henry Ballard, the fourth and last son of William and Hannah, is our ancestor. His long life was filled with many events, but always he was loyal to the new

Life Information

Henry Ballard

Born:
Died:

Logan City Cemetery

Tenth East
Logan, Cache, Utah
United States

Headstone Description

Logan Pioneer of 59.
Forty years Bishop of Second Ward
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R and N Englestead

June 23, 2013
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Janncwebb

February 19, 2012
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wrlowe

February 18, 2012

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Henry's River Trip - the "Saluda" explodes

Contributor: Janncwebb Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

An excerpt from "Short Stories for Short People" written by my grandmother, Myrtle Ballard Shurtliff, around 1970. Minor editing has been done. When this company arrived at New Orleans, Henry "bound himself out" to work for a company for two years to pay back his passage across the ocean and across the plains. At New Orleans the company from the "Kennebuck" was "Pride of the West." It might have been entitled to that name in an early day but not them. They had to travel near the edge of the river all the way to St. Louis. They were afraid of the deep water. This trip took them nearly two weeks. They stayed at St. Louis for two days and then they were put on another old worn out steam boat called the "Saluda" bound for Council Bluffs. They left St. Louis on the first day of April with about seventy-five or eighty Latter-day Saints on the boat; all were going to Council Bluffs, the gathering place of the Saints. In three days they reached the town of Lexington. Here the water was running very swift. The captain and the fireman did their best to make headway but after trying several hours they gave up and crossed to the other side of the river where there were no houses and tied the boat up for the night. The next day they found the river full of floating ice large blocks from two feet thick and two rods long, ( a rod is about 16 feet ) and larger so they could not move. They were tied up here fro over a week. Then they crossed back to Lexington. The ice was not floating quite so bad by that time but a large piece struck the paddle wheels and broke them. This delayed the company for the Captain had to stop another day to get the wheels fixed. It was more than a week after they left St. Louis before the boat was able to make another start. It was Friday morning, April 9th, "Good Friday-Easter time, when the "Saluda" was ready to start again on its voyage.

Henry Ballard Emigrates to America

Contributor: Janncwebb Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

An excerpt from "Short Stories for Short People" written by my grandmother, Myrtle Ballard Shurtliff around 1970. Minor editing has been done. Two years after Henry Ballard, our ancestor, was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, he set sail for America. He was a poor young man, only 19 years old, going to a New World without friends or loved ones and with the responsibility of his parents who were growing old. He left Liverpool on the 10 Jan 1852 on the sailing vessel “Kennebeck” in a company of three hundred and thirty-three passengers. He took with him his two boxes of scanty clothing and two shepherd dogs. He had signed a contract to herd sheep across the plains for his fare from Liverpool to New Orleans and then up the Mississippi River to Council Bluffs, Iowa. At Council Bluffs he was to start his walk across the plains with his faithful dogs, perhaps they were Shelties, these were his prized possession and his greatest companionship. They were to help Henry herd two hundred sheep to Salt Lake Valley. The Captain of the ship was Captain Smith. It took sixty –three days to cross the Atlantic Ocean. It was a long rough trip and Henry suffered with a very bad sore throat for two weeks of the time and besides that he was so “sea-sick” nearly all the way. This made him feel very weak and miserable. The boat was so slow on the voyage their food and water supply ran out, all but a little rice and oatmeal which had to be cooked without salt for they had none of that either. In this company was a family from Chively, a town close to Thatcham where Henry lived. Both towns were in the county of Berkshire in England. This family was a large family of father, whose name was George May, and his wife Hannah and seven children. Food was so scarce it was hard to stand the hunger and the rice and oatmeal without salt was not easy to eat. Their hunger was so great they could hardly stand it. Henry and George May found their way down into the bottom of the ship where the food was stored and prepared for the crew. They searched the garbage cans and picked out small pieces of dry bread which had been thrown away. It was covered with green mold but they ate it with relish and it satisfied their hunger a little. They lived on this for the last three days of the ocean trip and no one stopped them. George and Henry were very thankful for this cast off food. I wonder how it would taste to us today?

Autobiography

Contributor: Janncwebb Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Autobiography Of Margaret McNeil Ballard Born in Tranent, Heddingtonshire, Scotland April 14, 1846 Wife of Henry Ballard Daughter of Thomas McNeil and Jeanette Reid McNeil Baptized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints May 28,1854 Died July 21,1918 Logan, Cache County, Utah My birthplace, Tranent, was a small village located near the sea shore on the banks of the mouth of the Firth of Forth, not many miles from Edinburgh. From this village one may view the beautiful scenes of grass and hills and water, so typical of picturesque Scotland. When I was eight years old, my father baptized me a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. He had joined the Church and was baptized when I was about two years old. He was a coal miner and had to be at work every morning at 4 o'clock. Therefore, when I was baptized, I had to go early in the morning. It was a beautiful May morning when I walked to the sea shore. We carried a lantern to light our way. As I came up out of the water, the day was just beginning to dawn and the light was starting to creep over the eastern hills. It was a beautiful sight. One that I shall never forget. At this time I was filled with a sweet heavenly spirit which has remained with me to this day. That night all of the saints met at our home and I was confirmed a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. I was given my choice to either sing, pray or bear my testimony. I offered up a simple prayer, for my heart was filled with great joy and thanks to God for the privilege of becoming a member of His Church and this gratitude has remained in my heart and has increased as the years have gone by. The first ten years of my childhood was spent in Tranent. Because of being a "Mormon", I was not permitted to attend the schools and I was entirely deprived of schooling while in the old country. In pioneering there was little opportunity of an education. During those ten years, our family enjoyed the association of the Elders and Saints. My father was President of the Edinburgh Conference for a number of years. The Elders visited our home often and we were always glad to receive them, although, many times I went to bed hungry in order to give my meal to the visiting Elders. On April 27, 1856, we left Liverpool for America. There was a large company leaving. My mother was not well and was taken on board ship before the time of sailing, while the sailors were still born, with only one woman on board the ship to attend to mother. When the Captain and the doctor came on board the ship and found that a baby had been born, they were delighted and thought it would bring good luck to the company. They asked for the privilege of naming him. Brother Willis, President of the Company, thought it best to let the Captain name him, as there were eight hundred passengers and nearly all of them were "Mormons". So he was named Charles Collins Thornton McNeil, after the boat, Thornton, and Captain Charles Collins. We were on the ocean for nearly six weeks and at the end of this long tiresome journey, we landed at Castle Gardens, New York. During this time, we had many hardships to endure, but through it all we were greatly blessed. Because of my mother's condition and me being the oldest member of the family, and being blessed with good health, I had to share the responsibility with my father of taking care of the rest of the family, who suffered greatly with sea sickness. On board ship we had to prepare our own food and were permitted to take our turn using a stove which provided for the company. I was the cook for the family and sometimes experienced trouble in preparing our porridge, which was about all we had to eat. I was but ten years old and somewhat of a venturesome spirit and through this perhaps I met many more difficulties than I would have done otherwise. However, I was protected from accident and blessed with good health the entire trip. After landing, we planned to go west to Utah with the handcart company, but President Franklin D. Richards counseled my father not to go in that company. Afterwards, we were very thankful because of the great suffering, privation and cold weather which those people were subjected to. There were many of the company who were frozen that year on their journey. My father was then advised to go to Sf. Louis, spend the winter there and then prepare to go through to Utah the next year. Instead of staying at Sf. Louis, he was called on a mission to help make settlement one hundred miles west of civilization. The place was Genoa. We left Sf. Louis on the steamboat and came up the Mississippi River. The measles broke out while we were on the boat and all of my mother's children, except me, took them and were very sick. When we landed we camped on the bank of the river until our teams and wagons came. When we were all ready to start on our journey westward, my father's team of five-year, unbroken oxen ran away and we were delayed. We had never seen oxen before and the animals allotted to us had to be roped and tied in order to yoke and fasten them to the wagon. When they were released from the ropes they became unmanageable and difficult to catch. The company had gone on ahead and as my mother was anxious for me to go with them, she strapped my little brother James on my back with a shawl. He was only four years old and still quite sick with the measles. I took him since mother had all she could do to care for the other children. I hurried and caught up with the company, traveling with them all day. That night a kind lady helped me take my brother off my back. I sat up and held him on my lap with the shawl wrapped around him, alone all night. He was a little better in the morning. The people in the camp were very good to us and gave us a little fried bacon and some bread for breakfast. We traveled this way for about a week. My brother and I did not see our mother during this time. Each morning one of the men would write a note and put it in the **** of a willow stuck into the ground to tell how we were getting along. In this way Mother knew that we were all right. We stayed in Genoa about two years, during which time we had very little to eat as the people were all very poor. We raised corn, but the frost came early and it did not ripen well. We had to dry it in the oven and it was so nearly spoiled that we had to open the door while it was drying because it was so offensive. We had only one hand grinder for the whole company to use. It belonged to Brother Sleight. Of course, it kept us very busy grinding. During the settlement in Genoa, we also suffered much from hostile Indians. They were very troublesome and we were always in danger of being molested. After we had made this settlement, my father was called to another place, called Wood river. This was a very pretty place surrounded by elm trees. It was about one hundred miles east of Genoa, which made it about one hundred miles from civilization. One day while we were at Wood river, our cow ran away from us and when father found that she was lost, he sent my brother Thomas and me to hunt for her. We looked all day, but were unable to find her. Starting out early the next morning, we continued the hunt and looked all day. We were unable to find her. Toward evening we were going down along the Platte River and as we looked down the river we saw three large Sioux Indians coming towards us on horses. They seemed very warlike and I was afraid they were going to carry us away with them. So I said to my brother, "Let us pray". We were running as fast as we could and still praying even though we were unable to get down on our knees. The Indians soon came right up to us and wanted us to go with them. We were trying to be brave and told them we were on our way home and pointed toward our house. We could see the smoke coming out of our chimney. One of the Indians tried to pull my brother up on his horse, but Thomas was heavier then the Indian expected and he slipped from his grasp and dodged right under the horse's belly, between fore and hind legs, and we ran until overtaken again. The Indians laughed and had a good time at our efforts to elude them, but in our maneuvers we were getting nearer home, I asked them to go home with us and promised that my mother would give them coffee and biscuits. I was shaking all over with fright and could hardly speak, but pointed to where the men were working. The Indians left us and went over to the men. Later came to our house and mother gave them a nice warm supper and they went away peaceably. Our Heavenly Father surely blessed and protected us on this occasion, for which we were very grateful. We did not stay at Woodriver very long. My father began to make preparations to go on to Utah, and when the next company came we were ready. Wood river was abandoned because, regardless of the were ready. Wood river was abandoned because, regardless of the splendid growing crops, the Indians had become troublesome. The captain of the company was pleased to have us travel with him and was very kind to us. We had to cross the Platte River where there were so many sand bars that it made crossing very dangerous. The men were helping the women over, but my mother was so anxious to get started that she waded in with a baby in her arms, thinking she could go through alone. She had gone but a little way when she began sinking into the quicksand and was going down very fast. Some of the men saw her and ran to her assistance. It was a difficult task to get her out and we felt that she had a very narrow escape. We had many such experiences while crossing the rivers. One night our cow ran away from camp and I was sent out to bring her back. I was barefoot and not watching where I was going. All of a sudden I began to feel that I was walking on something soft and looking down to see what it could be, I found, to my horror, that I was standing in a bed of snakes, large ones and small ones. At the sight of them I became so weak that I could scarcely move. All I could think of was to pray. The lord blessed me and watched out for me so that I was protected from similar experiences. While crossing the plains, my mother's health was very poor, so I tried to assist her as much as I could. Every morning I would get up early and get breakfast for the family and milk the cow, so that I could hurry and drive her ahead of the company and let her eat in the grassy places until they passed on and the I would hurry and catch up with them. The cow furnished us our chief source of food and it was therefore important to see that she was fed as well as circumstances allowed. In this way, the cow gave plenty y of good rich milk and we felt, had it not been for her, we would have surely starved. Being alone much of the time, I had to get across the rivers as best as I could. Our cow was a jersey and she had a long tail. When it became necessary to cross the rivers, I would wind the end of her tail around my hand and swim across with her. I was always very careful to watch for every bit of wood that I could find on the way. Our fuel consisted mostly of "buffalo chips". Each morning I would gather a large apron full of them for the camp fires, where we cooked our meals. At the end of each day's journey, I milked my cow and helped prepare our supper, after which I gladly fell asleep, wherever that happened to be. We traveled very slowly until we reached "Sweet Water.» Here there was a terrible storm. The Captain got on his horse and scouted around to see if he could find a place of safety. It was snowing and the wind was blowing a terrific gale and we despaired of our lives. The Captain found shelter down at the bottom of a hollow. We camped here for several days, until the storm abated. I was very brave and wanted to go out and explore this new camping ground. I had not gone far when I saw a large ox grazing a little way from where camp was. I ran and told my father and he and some of the men went out and killed it for the company. The discovery of this ox, I thought was wonderful, and I felt it was very providential as we were almost starving. In leaving this camp, we had got not far, when we met Patriarch John Smith and Brother John P. Green. They were going on missions and were traveling with a mule team. Father went to them for advice and told them of our circumstances. Brother Smith blessed my father and gave him ten dollars and Brother Green gave him five dollars. Brother Smith told father to leave the Company and go on as fast as possible, for it was getting cold and we were short of food. He told us to go through Weber Canyon into Ogden, as it was much quicker. With the money that was given to him, Father bought fifty pounds of flour. It being $20.00 a hundred at Fort Laramie. We also got a little meat. Brother Smith advised my father to stay in Ogden until we had earned enough for food to put us through the winter and then to go on to Cache Valley and take up land there. We started on our journey alone and had a very hard time of it. Our food gave out and we had nothing but milk and wild rosehips to eat. However, we did have a good team and could travel fast. We arrived in Ogden on the 4th day of October, after a journey of hardship and hunger, with thankfulness to our Heavenly Father for His protecting care. I walked every step of the way across the plains, drove my cow, and a large part of the way carried my little brother, James, on my back. We camped on the outskirts of town and Father left us and went on into Ogden to find work. While camping here many people passed us on their way to attend General Conference of the Church in Salt Lake City. Across the field from where we were was a little home and out in the yard was a big pile of squash. We were so famished that my mother sent me over to beg for squash, for we did not have a cent of money and some of the children were very weak for want of food. I knocked at the door and an old lady came and said "Come in, come in. I knew you were coming and have been told to give you food". She gave me a large loaf of freshly baked bread and said to tell my mother that she would come over soon. It was not long until she did come and she brought us a nicely cooked dinner. This was something we had not had for such a long time. This woman was surely inspired of the Lord to help us and we were grateful for her kindness. When Father came back to us, he had found a man whom he had known in Scotland. This man took us into his home and we stayed there until we were ready to go to Cache Valley. We all worked. Mother took the smaller children and husked com. I herded cattle and Father and my older brothers worked on the threshing machine. When we had a sufficient supply of food, we left Ogden and had not gone far, when we met Henry Ballard and Aaron DeWitt, who had been to Conference and were returning to their homes in Cache Valley. This was my first meeting with my Husband. At the time of this meeting I was a barefoot, sunburned little girl driving my cow along the dusty country road. It was impressed on my mother and to my husband at that time, that I would become his wife. Brother Ballard and Aaron DeWitt helped us greatly during our journey, as we traveled together to Cache Valley. When we got to the Logan River the water was so high, it lifted the box right off the wheels and we had some difficulty in getting across. We arrived in Logan October 27, 1859. We camped in a fort made for protection from the Indians. We were in the fort which extended from the corner of Main and Center Street to what is known as 3rd West Street now. My father worked to get enough hay for the cattle, and then went to the canyon and hauled logs to make a house. We had no lumber nor glass. For the doors and windows we wove willows together and plastered them with clay. He used bulrushes and willows for the roof and the carpet. We were very comfortable until Spring. My father and older brothers worked in the canyon all winter gathering logs which they exchanged for bran or bacon or anything else we could get. At one time we were right out of everything to eat and father had a few logs he could spare so he went to a man and asked him if he would not give him some bran for them. This is all we had to eat for some little time. This man found that we were in dire need of help and told the Presiding Elder that we needed assistance. A meeting was held and the people were told that they should pay fast offerings, which they did. The first fast offerings paid in Logan were then given to my father. Father soon got work on building a bridge and after this we did not have it so hard. I carried water for the family all that winter from the north branch of the Logan River, which was about three blocks away. I had very little clothing on my body and my feet were bare. Often leaving blood stains on the snow. Sometimes I would wrap them in old rags, but this was worse then ever, because the rags froze to my feet. Early in the spring I went to work for Thomas E. Rick's for one dollar a week. I was working to get seed wheat for us to plant The wheat was $5.00 a bushel. Brother Ricks needed a man to plow and asked father if he could spare one of his boys. Father said he would let him know that night. When I got home he asked me if I would help him plough, so my brother could go to Mr. Ricks. He would be paid two dollars a day and this would pay for the seed wheat much more quickly. While my brother went to work for Mr. Ricks, I drove the cattle while father held the plow. Thus we broke ground for the first crops that were planted in Logan; it being the first spring in the settlement. After the plowing was finished, I went back to Brother Ricks and worked there until fall. I returned home to glean, so that we would have enough bread for winter and then went back to the Rick's home, where I worked all winter. Next spring Grandma Thatcher offered me $1.25 a week and as the work was easier, I went to her place and worked all summer. The first grist mill was being built in Logan and since the builders were living with her, she needed me during this time. In the fall all the workmen left and her sons were in Salt Lake to school, so I went again to work for Mrs. Ricks and stayed with her until spring. In January, Brother Ballard asked me to go to a dance with him at Providence, a little village several miles from Logan. We had a yoke of oxen and a heavy sleigh. It was very cold and it snowed three feet while we were at the dance. We were unable to come home, so we sat up all the rest of the night, for there was no room for so many of us to go to bed in one little log house. We had a very hard time getting home the next day. So you see, even courting had its hardships in the pioneer days. I had been keeping company with Brother Ballard for some time and although I was but fifteen years old, he wanted to marry me. He felt that he could take care of and provide for me without my having to work as hard as I had been doing. We were married on May 5, 1861. He was put in as Bishop of the Logan Second Ward on April 14th of that year, a position which he held for forty years. During that time I always endeavored to assist him and encourage him in his work. The following summer, we had a great deal of trouble with the Indians. They were very hostile and often the people had to seek shelter in a large cellar. The Indians were very destructive and I have seen them ride their horses into the houses and trample the gardens all to pieces. They did an enormous amount of damage in the fields. This was the worst time we had with them and the men had to take their guns with them to work. While one guarded the cattle, the others would plough. The Indians took one child from the settlement and we never got her back. Once the Indians stole a great many horses from Brother Thatcher and since my husband was a minuteman, he had to go many times without even saying goodbye to look for stolen cattle, We tried to keep a good supply of bread on hand to encourage the Indians to be more friendly towards us. One year they killed a number of settlers north of Logan and the soldiers from Fort Douglas were called and a real battle ensued. It was at the place now called Battle Creek. Nearly all the Indians were killed, but we never had any more trouble after this. The soldiers lost a few of their men and during this time they camped on the Tabernacle Square. 'sent bread, butter and eggs down for them to eat. We also had grasshopper wars. I have seen the heavens darkened with grasshoppers until one would think it was midnight I have gone out at such times and driven them into a trench with a bunch of willows and buried them alive. With all that we killed, the ground would be perfectly bare. They destroyed our crops and my husband and to go over into another valley and work on a threshing machine to get bread for the winter. A short time before the birth of my first baby, I also had my first experience in sewing. My husband had a fine young steer that he was saving to sell in order to get enough money for us to buy material for the new baby we were expecting. One of the prominent brethren of Logan at this time, suffered a great financial loss and was destitute. The people were called upon to give what they could for the support of this unfortunate family We had our winter supply of food in the house, but no money, the steer being held for such a purpose. My husband came home feeling very badly and said, "Margaret, I am very sorry and disappointed, but I have been called upon to raise some money to help out one of our brethren and the only thing I have that I can give is that steer. What shall I do?" I too was very much disappointed, but said, "Give it Henry; we will find a way." My husband's gratitude for my willingness and his regrets, brought me to tears. It was a big sacrifice for me at this time, but I knew it was right. After my husband left the house, I hunted up two of his homespun woolen shirts and pulled down the blinds and locked the doors so that no one would see me try my hand at a new art. I spread the shirts on the floor and without a pattern, cut out two little dresses and sewed them up by hand. This was practically all the clothing I had for my first child. However, she was most welcome by us and has given us much love as two doting parents were capable of receiving. She was born January 18, 1863. We named her Margaret Hannah and my husband was the proudest father in the valley. By 1864, my husband had prospered and we were able to live very comfortably. In that year, he went with his team in Captain Preston's Company to help gather in the poor from the plains before the winter weather caught them. During his absence I spun and wove a nice big piece of cloth to make our winter clothing. He returned on September 19th . On the 20th our first son was born. He was named Henry William, after his father and grandfather. Early in the fall of 1865, I took my babies down to the bottoms to gather hops, since they brought a price of $10.00 per pound in Salt Lake. My mother-in-law would go with me and help with the children. In this way we were able to buy a few extra things. On July 8, 1866 my son Thomas was born. Things were much easier for us each year and the brothers told my husband that it was his duty to support another family. He was requested twice. He also was very hesitant. However, on October 4th, 1867, my husband married my sister Emily as his second wife. Although I loved my sister dearly and we knew it was a commandment of God that we should live in the Celestial Marriage, it was a great trial and sacrifice for me. The Lord blessed and comforted me and we lived happily in this principle of the Gospel. I have thanked the Lord every day of my life that I have had the privilege of living that law. On May 15, 1868, I gave birth to twin babies, a little girl and boy. We named them Jeannette and Charles. They were two beautiful babies, but did not stay long with us on this earth. The little girl died on September 18, 1869 and ten days later the little boy died. This was a very difficult trial for me. During the winter of 1869 we had about 100 sheep wintering in Clarkston. Since it was a very hard winter and the snow was very deep, nearly all of them were dying. A man came and told my husband that if he wanted to save any of the sheep, he would have to go at once with a wagon and haul them into a shelter. I told my husband to get another wagon and team and I would drive with him. He did not want me to go, but I insisted. I felt so sorry to lose so many sheep and I thought we could save double the number with the two wagons. I also thought I could be company for him on such a long drive. It was very cold. We started very early and it was 11 :00 when we got home that night We brought twenty sheep back with us, but about half of them died on the way home. I never will forget the sight of so many sheep lying around dead or dying. It made my heart ache to see the suffering of these animals. On April 9, 1870, my son George Albert was born. He was a fine big, healthy boy. He brought great happiness to our home. The following September I received a Patriarchal Blessing from Brother Charles H. Hyde. This was of great comfort to me. It promised many privileges and blessings which have nearly all been fulfilled. On February 9, 1873, I gave birth to another son, whom we named Melvin Joseph. During June of 1874 there was an epidemic of scarlet fever. Many families were severely afflicted. My children all came down with it and were very sick. After being ill for about one week, George Albert died on July 7th. On the 13th , my oldest daughter Margaret died from the same disease. This was another trying ordeal for me to go through, but the Lord gave me strength and comfort, Not long after this, my son Henry was helping his father haul peas from the field. In some way he fell on the pitchfork, which ran through his bowels. His father prayed over him at the time and asked the Lord to spare his life until he could get him home to me. When they brought him in he looked like he was dead. I hurried and made an herb plaster and put his whole body in it. We also offered up a mighty prayer for him. He was again restored to health and we know that it was the power of the Lord that saved him, for at that time we had no doctors to help us. Just two weeks after this on September 19, 1875, I gave birth to another daughter whom we named Ellen Phoebe. A month later my husband was brought home from the canyon very sick, suffering with Kidney trouble. The brethren had been in and administered to him, but he was very, very bad and we felt he would surely die. I was standing at the foot of his bed and greatly grieved to see him in such agony. Looking at me he said he could die if I would only give him up. A voice came to me and said "Administer to him". However, I was very timid about doing this, for the elders had just blessed him. The voice came again and I felt with the priesthood in the house I could not do it. I thought they would think me bold and I was very weak. The voice came to me the third time. Heeding its prompting, I put my hands upon his head. The spirit of the Holy Ghost was with me and I was filled with Divine strength in performing this ordinance. When I finished, my husband had fallen asleep and slept quietly for two hours or so. There were still a number of the brethren living in the house at that time and they often spoke of this miraculous healing. On February 8, 1878, another daughter was born to us. We named her Rebecca Ann. Soon after this my husband's father and mother came to live with us. They were with us for about eight years before they passed away. His father was 96 and his mother 86. They were both very fragile and feeble and required a great deal of care and attention. I was every willing to attend to them and bestow my affection on them in order to make their lives happy. I know that they both died blessing me. This has always been a comfort. From the first organization of Relief Society in Cache Valley until 1880, I labored as a teach and on December 111h of that year, I was put in as President of this organization in the 2nd Ward, with Sister Barbara Larsen as 151 Counselor and Sister J. Smith as 2nd Counselor. Sister Emmeline James as secretary. I served in this capacity for over thirty years. During these years I tried to do my duty caring for the sick and comforting the needy. I have walked for blocks through the deep snow. I have been out in rain and wind in the darkest of nights and the early hours of the morning administering to those who were afflicted, sick, suffering and dying. I have sat up all night, time after time, with the ill, laid out the dead and made their burial clothes. I have mothered orphans, comforted widows and striven to be a peace maker to those in trouble, and through it all the Lord has directed me and I have enjoyed His Spirit as my companion in these labors. It comforts me to have done some good to those less fortunate then myself. Many, many times I have neglected my own family and home, but the Lord always came to my rescue. On December 13, 1881, I gave birth to another daughter and we named her Lettie May. Shortly after this a family by the name of Phister, who lived in our ward, were left orphans. The father had died leaving his wife and six small children and seven months later the mother gave birth to another baby and died while the baby was very young. After her death, the seven children were brought into my home and stayed until after their mother's funeral. Bishop Hardy of Salt Lake, distributed them among different people. I adopted one of the little girls. We named her Lena. We raised her as our own until she got married. On My 17, 1884, the Logan Temple was dedicated. The second day after the dedication, President John Taylor said that all members of the Church who were worthy and so desired could go through the Temple. My husband, being Bishop, was busy writing out recommends, when my daughter came in with a newspaper in her hand. She asked for father. I told her that her father was very busy, but to give the paper to me and I would give it to him. She said "No, a man gave the paper to me and I was to give it to no one but father." I let the child take the paper to her father and when he looked at it, he was greatly shocked, for he saw that the paper had been printed in Birkshire, England, which was his birth place and it was only four days from the press. He was so amazed at the incident, that he called Ellen and asked her where the man was who had given her the paper. She said she was playing on the sidewalk with some other children, when two men came down the street, walking in the middle of the road. One of the men called to her saying, "Come here, little girl." She hesitated at first, for there were other little girls with her. Then he pointed at her and said, "You". She went to him and he gave her the paper and told her to give it to her father. The paper contained about sixty names of dead acquaintances of my husband, giving the dates of births and deaths. My husband took the paper to the President of the Temple and asked what he thought about it President Merrill said, "Brother Ballard, that must have been one of the Three Nephites who brought that paper to you, for it could come in no other way in such a short time. It is for you to do the work for them." My husband was baptized for the men and I for the women and all the work was done for them. Again, I felt the Lord was mindful of us and had blessed us abundantly. Shortly after the Logan Temple had been dedicated, my father was called to be an officiator there and while in this capacity was taken ill with pneumonia. His life became very fragile. One morning early they sent for me and I hurried down lest I should never see my father alive again. I was not well myself, for I had been suffering with Erysipelas and was taken in a sleigh. When I arrived mother was feeling very bad and could not be comforted. When I looked at father and saw his condition, I was sorrowful myself, for you could hear him breathe all over the house. The Spirit of the Lord was with me and I had a desire to administer to him. I asked mother if he had been blessed yet and she said that he had been that morning. I was timid again about going ahead and doing anything of this sort, but I knew that I should. I asked mother if she did not want to assist me, but she declined because she felt it would be of little use. If the priesthood had not helped, then she deemed it useless for us to try. I hesitated, but something said to me, "Administer to him". So I went and closed the door and asked mother if she would not pray with me. She consented and we knelt by the bed and prayed and I anointed my father and administered to him. The power of the Lord was with me, for while my hands were still on his head, his breathing became much easier. When I finished, father opened his eyes and said, "Thank God for this blessing. I knew this power was in the Church and I thank Him for it". This was most wonderful to me and surely the Lord did bless us all. Father was still weak, but that night he sat up in his chair with his clothes on. It was not long after that, that he fully recovered from his sickness. I have told you these experiences to show how perfectly my patriarchal blessing had been fulfilled. I have been promised that I should heal the sick through the power of the Lord. On October 2, 1884 my son Henry was married to Elvira Davidson in the Logan Temple by Apostle Mariner W. Merrill. I gave birth to another daughter, Mary Myrtle on August 21, 1885. At this time the men were being persecuted for having more than one wife. It caused that they were treated very unkindly and imprisoned. To avoid capture, my husband left home and went to Cache Junction. He would change his hiding places, for deputies were out to find him. When he was there I prayed to know what to do for the best. I felt that the Lord would save us more than anyone else. After I had gone to bed, thinking about it, I heard a voice say, "It is time he was moving from where he is". It was repeated again and I said "Where shall he go?" The same voice replied, "Take him to Aunt Rosina Morrell's." I did not sleep any that night but wrote a note telling my husband that I felt impressed that he should return home. If he decided to do so, I told him I felt that he should ride in a load of hay as far as the old slaughter house and cut across the fields and that I would meet him below the railroad track. Early in the morning I sent my son Melvin on his horse to Cache Junction with the note for his father. My husband sent back word that he would return as I had suggested. In the meantime, I had made arrangements with Sister Morrell for him to stay with her. That evening we just saw each other for a few minutes. You may be sure it was a solemn Meeting. I told him of the plan I had had made and he hurried up through the back yard to Sister Morrell's where he stayed for three weeks. The very next morning after he had left Cache Junction, the officers came to the house where he had been hiding and ran pitchforks in the wheat and bins and haystacks to make sure that he was not there. They cursed and swore because he had escaped them. This is just one of the many times that I have been warned and guided by the Spirit of God. While my husband was at Sister Morrell's, he was fasting and praying as was I, to know what to do. One morning about two o'clock, it came to him that he should go on a mission to England, his native land, and through the help of the lord enabled himself to get away from his enemies. He consulted Apostle Franklin D. Richards about such a mission and was advised to leave in two days. These were very strenuous times and as two of the other brethren were in the same circumstances, they decided to go with him. They were Robert Davidson and William Watterson. The afternoon they were leaving, I had a large supper prepared and both of these families had supper at my home. Gave them each a room in which to say goodbye to their families without being seen. That night after dark, my son Henry drove my husband and his friends to Salt lake. Oh what a storm we had that night. It seemed that the evil one would overpower us after all. The wind howled terribly and tore up trees and the lightening was dreadful. The lord was really near us for had it not been for that storm, the brethren would have been caught, for the deputies watching for them on the road would surely have discovered them. After a tedious journey, they arrived in Salt Lake. They were set apart and left for Great Britain on November 3, 1886. It was not until I received my husbands first letter, that I learned to read and write. Up to this time I could do neither, but I was determined to learn to read his letters and to answer them. After many difficulties and obstacles, I was able to do both. While my husband was away, my family and I worked very hard, but we were blessed and got along very well. The boys hauled logs from the canyon and sold them, thus helping support us. Every Sunday we fasted and prayed to the Lord to prosper Brother Ballard in his labors. Through all my trials, I was thankful that the Lord did not forget us. There was a brother who had a plural wife. She was about to be confined. As polygamists were watched very closely, he feared that the coming of the child would be the cause of his arrest. He went to Apostle Merrill for advice and was told, "You are as near to the Lord as I, go to Him." This man fasted and prayed. When he was in one of the upper rooms of the Temple, he heard a voice say, "Take her to Margaret Ballard's. He came to me and told me that he had been sent, but did not tell me who sent him. Neither did he tell me whose wife he was asking me to take in. We were all willing to help those in trouble, so I told him I would do my best to take care of her. She was with me one week before her baby was born. The midwife and I were alone with her, but she got along well and I kept her and her baby for six months and no one molested us. When the man told me how he happened to come to me, it made my heart rejoice to know that my Father in Heaven had such confidence in me. Because of my husband's being away, the deputies did not bother my home and I sheltered a number of the polygamist brethren under my roof and gave women's clothes to dress in so they might visit their families. I also drove them in my buggy, dressed in disguise in order to get them there. While my husband was in London, he met a sister that was on the underground. She had a baby girl and wanted to come back to Utah. My husband wrote and asked me if I would take her in our home. I did so and she stayed with me for a long time and was not molested, so I was blessed once more. My husband secured a great deal of Genealogy while he was in England and sent these records home to me. My son Henry and I did the work for those names in the Temple. When my husband came back he was very pleased to know that all of the work was done. It gave me great joy to be an instrument in the hands of the Lord in working out the salvation for those who had died in darkness. Brother Ballard was away on his mission for over two years. He arrived in Logan, January 1989. In order that he might not be detected he took a freight train from Salt Lake City and traveled in the night, arriving home in the early morning. I did not know just when to expect him, but I felt impressed that he would come in this manner and sat up all night waiting for him. When I heard the train whistling into Mendon, I awakened my son Thomas and sent him to the station to meet his father. He arrived safely, but did not know Thomas because he had grown so much during the separation. Although our meeting was held in secrecy, it was a joyful one. We were thankful for the work my husband had been able to accomplish, for his protection, for the health we had all been granted during his absence. After Brother Ballard had been home for a few day, he thought it best to go to the officers and tell them he was ready to serve his term for polygamy. The officers granted him a day or two to rest and visit his family. Then he went to Ogden and was tried before a court, fined fifty dollars and sentenced to two months imprisonment. He paid the fine and served his term and then returned to us feeling free from that obligation. The following December my little daughter Ella took sick with Membranous Croup. She suffered terribly for several days and then died, the date being December 13, 1989. She was fourteen years old and a great comfort to me and such a companion during her father's absence. Of course, it was another severe blow to us. The Lord gave me strength so that I came to know that is was best that she should be taken. Ten days before her death I had a dream which troubled me greatly, for I knew it concerned the children whom I had buried. After her death, I went to the Temple to get endowments for her and was feeling very badly. I prayed that I might understand the meaning of my dream. I was sitting wondering why I had been called to go through this sacrifice once more when the interpretation of my dream went before my eyes. With great plainness I saw that which would have come upon my children if they had lived. They would have been lost to me. I saw my five beautiful children saved for me, and knew that they would be mine again. I had this vision as true as the sun ever shines upon the earth. On April 2, 1890, my son Thomas was married to Phoebe Smith in the Logan Temple by Apostle Mariner W. Merrill. On March 8, 1891, my son Henry was called to be Bishop of the Benson Ward. He was set apart by Apostle Moses Thatcher. Henry held this position for over twenty years. In the fall of 1891 my father took sick and died suddenly. This was another sorrow for me for I loved him dearly and felt his loss keenly. I relied upon him in trouble and sickness and felt that I had truly lost a good friend and loving father. His life had always been an inspiration to me as well as a guiding light. On April 6, 1893, I attended the dedication of the Salt Lake Temple. My soul was filled with joy for the privilege of being a partaker of such a heavenly feast as was given there. On June 17, 1896, my son Melvin was married to Martha Jones and my daughter Rebecca was married to Louis B. Cardon in the Logan Temple. A few weeks after his marriage, Melvin went upon his first mission. During his absence, I gave his wife a home with me and did everything I could for her welfare and comfort. While she was with me she gave birth to their son Melvin Russell. He was a very delicate child and we had many serious times to pass through with him. The Lord was good to us and answered our prayers and restored him to health street meetings and raised my voice in defense of the truth and I have borne my testimony of the truthfulness of this work to throngs of people crowded in the street of Portland. My heart rejoices for this great privilege and I thank God for the testimony which I was able to bear on such occasions. In my weak way, I feel that I have assisted in the spread of truth and am grateful for this opportunity. On September 6, 1911, my sister's daughter, Jeanette, who I raised, was married to F. Wayne Shurtliff in the Logan Temple by President Budge. I am thankful for my family, for their love and respect and for the honor they have always shown to their father and me. I appreciate their obedience and am happy in their desire to follow their parents example concerning the things of the Lord. I feel blessed that they have all had the privilege of having been married in the Temple by the Priesthood of God and sealed for time and eternity. Not just my family, but all of my husband's children, and also those whom I have raised as my own. My life has been one of varied experiences. I have had a great deal of sickness to pass through, both with my children and grandchildren, but I have always relied upon the Lord and He has never failed me. I have stood by my husband through sickness, trials, poverty and prosperity. I have labored by his side in the fields. I have done various types of work, such as soap making, weaving, spinning, reaping, sowing, plowing and gleaning. From the first day I entered this valley until this day, I have never ceased my labors to build up and beautify this city. Although my life has been one of sacrifice and service, I feel that I have lived it the best I could with the knowledge I have had. My testimony of the truthfulness of the Gospel grows stronger each day. The work grows dearer and sweeter to my soul. I know that God lived and that He lives and answers prayers. That Jesus is the Son of the Living God and that Joseph Smith was His prophet. I thank God for this knowledge and leave this as my testimony to my children and grandchildren and all who may come after me. I plead of you all to heed the Spirit of God, that you may also have this testimony burning in your hearts, that you may have His Spirit as your daily companion. Postscript The foregoing autobiography was written about one year before her death. Her last year, like all other years of her full life was spent in service and devotion to her religion, her country and her family. Shortly after her return to Logan from April Conference in 1918, she was afflicted with high blood pressure, which resulted in slow hemorrhages of the brain. During the ten weeks which it lasted, she suffered intensely without complaint or murmur. From the day she was forced to take to her bed until the last breath of life, she accepted whatever came as the will of the Father with such reSignation as is rarely found. Because she had a strong constitution, her family felt that there was no reason that she should not survive this illness and live many more years. But she was firm in her conviction that she was not to remain. She would say, "I am satisfied with my life as I have live it and I am ready to go back home". Those who were privileged to be with her during her last sickness, received the benefit of the golden hours of her well-spent life. Her mind was keen and bright to the very last She was sensitive to her appearance and to her surroundings. It has been said that some people walk and talk with God. Her faith was such and her belief so personal, that surely she was among those people whose sincerity is thus rewarded with the certainty that there is a definite plan for all things and a definite place in that plan for each. To those who knew and remember her, one of the outstanding attributes of her character, which they believe should be emphasized, was her love for her husband. He was a large, loveable man. He was sincere and deliberate. She was an energetic, noble little soul. Their characters complimented each other. He protected her and was her refuge. She inspired and was a companion in his every activity. Typical of his devotion and dependence upon her was the crisis they both met when he was asked to take another wife. When he felt that he should do as suggested, he came to her and said , "Margaret, I do not want any other woman but you. If I must, you will have to find her for me". She did. Her determination was second only to her faith, and an integral part of her. Typical of its expression was the remodeling of her house which was done when she was approaching seventy. She had asked her sons to help her remove a very bothersome partition in a closet in order to make a sitting room more spacious. Her sons agreed to do it for her, and as busy people will, put off doing so. Surprised at the change in her house some time later when her oldest son came to see her. He asked if the other brother had don it. "No" she firmly replied. 'Well, who did it then?" was the rejoinder. "I did it myself." When her son asked her why she hadn't let him help, she grew ruffled and replied, "I did ask you, you know". The Patriarchal Blessing that she refers to during her life was given to her at the time she was carrying her youngest son, Melvin. She was sad and somewhat depressed at the time. She has repeated most of it in her story, but one part that was omitted, was denied her at the time of her death. She was promised that the child she was bearing would grow to become one of the leaders of the church and that his power of good would be felt by many. Perhaps she hesitated to insert this promise until it had been fulfilled. The joy that she would have known had she lived, but a few months to realize that her faith would find its outlet in her youngest son, Melvin, who was inspired not only from the Lord, but from her too. She died on a beautiful Sunday morning, July 21 , 1918, at seventy two years of age. She was the mother of eleven children, six of whom she raised. She had numerous grandchildren and greatgrandchildren. Her funeral was held in the Logan Tabemacle and was one of simplicity and peace, so typical of her life. She was buried beside her husband in Logan Cemetery, one spot on earth very dear to her heart.

Henry Ballard

Contributor: Janncwebb Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

An excerpt from "Short Stories for Short People" written by my grandmother, Myrtle Ballard Shurtliff, around 1970. Minor editing has been done. Henry Ballard, the fourth and last son of William and Hannah, is our ancestor. His long life was filled with many events, but always he was loyal to the new religion, Mormonism, which he accepted in his youth. His religion was his most prized possession and he lived up to its principles all the days of his life. Soon after they decided to come to America and on to Utah to live with the Saints of God. Henry arranged for the passage of his parents on a boat and a month later Henry followed them on to Utah. Hannah and William and Henry emigrated from England to America in 1852 and became our first American Ballard ancestors. I will tell you about them later. They all spent most of their lives while in America in Logan, Cache Valley, Utah and are all buried in the Logan City Cemetery. I hope someday you can visit this cemetery and offer up a little silent prayer of thanks to our Heavenly Father for these noble ancestors and all they have done for us..

Henry Ballard

Contributor: R and N Englestead Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

An excerpt from "Short Stories for Short People" written by my grandmother, Myrtle Ballard Shurtliff, around 1970. Minor editing has been done. Henry Ballard, the fourth and last son of William and Hannah, is our ancestor. His long life was filled with many events, but always he was loyal to the new religion, Mormonism, which he accepted in his youth. His religion was his most prized possession and he lived up to its principles all the days of his life. Soon after they decided to come to America and on to Utah to live with the Saints of God. Henry arranged for the passage of his parents on a boat and a month later Henry followed them on to Utah. Hannah and William and Henry emigrated from England to America in 1852 and became our first American Ballard ancestors. I will tell you about them later. They all spent most of their lives while in America in Logan, Cache Valley, Utah and are all buried in the Logan City Cemetery. I hope someday you can visit this cemetery and offer up a little silent prayer of thanks to our Heavenly Father for these noble ancestors and all they have done for us..

Autobiography

Contributor: R and N Englestead Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

Autobiography Of Margaret McNeil Ballard Born in Tranent, Heddingtonshire, Scotland April 14, 1846 Wife of Henry Ballard Daughter of Thomas McNeil and Jeanette Reid McNeil Baptized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints May 28,1854 Died July 21,1918 Logan, Cache County, Utah My birthplace, Tranent, was a small village located near the sea shore on the banks of the mouth of the Firth of Forth, not many miles from Edinburgh. From this village one may view the beautiful scenes of grass and hills and water, so typical of picturesque Scotland. When I was eight years old, my father baptized me a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. He had joined the Church and was baptized when I was about two years old. He was a coal miner and had to be at work every morning at 4 o'clock. Therefore, when I was baptized, I had to go early in the morning. It was a beautiful May morning when I walked to the sea shore. We carried a lantern to light our way. As I came up out of the water, the day was just beginning to dawn and the light was starting to creep over the eastern hills. It was a beautiful sight. One that I shall never forget. At this time I was filled with a sweet heavenly spirit which has remained with me to this day. That night all of the saints met at our home and I was confirmed a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. I was given my choice to either sing, pray or bear my testimony. I offered up a simple prayer, for my heart was filled with great joy and thanks to God for the privilege of becoming a member of His Church and this gratitude has remained in my heart and has increased as the years have gone by. The first ten years of my childhood was spent in Tranent. Because of being a "Mormon", I was not permitted to attend the schools and I was entirely deprived of schooling while in the old country. In pioneering there was little opportunity of an education. During those ten years, our family enjoyed the association of the Elders and Saints. My father was President of the Edinburgh Conference for a number of years. The Elders visited our home often and we were always glad to receive them, although, many times I went to bed hungry in order to give my meal to the visiting Elders. On April 27, 1856, we left Liverpool for America. There was a large company leaving. My mother was not well and was taken on board ship before the time of sailing, while the sailors were still born, with only one woman on board the ship to attend to mother. When the Captain and the doctor came on board the ship and found that a baby had been born, they were delighted and thought it would bring good luck to the company. They asked for the privilege of naming him. Brother Willis, President of the Company, thought it best to let the Captain name him, as there were eight hundred passengers and nearly all of them were "Mormons". So he was named Charles Collins Thornton McNeil, after the boat, Thornton, and Captain Charles Collins. We were on the ocean for nearly six weeks and at the end of this long tiresome journey, we landed at Castle Gardens, New York. During this time, we had many hardships to endure, but through it all we were greatly blessed. Because of my mother's condition and me being the oldest member of the family, and being blessed with good health, I had to share the responsibility with my father of taking care of the rest of the family, who suffered greatly with sea sickness. On board ship we had to prepare our own food and were permitted to take our turn using a stove which provided for the company. I was the cook for the family and sometimes experienced trouble in preparing our porridge, which was about all we had to eat. I was but ten years old and somewhat of a venturesome spirit and through this perhaps I met many more difficulties than I would have done otherwise. However, I was protected from accident and blessed with good health the entire trip. After landing, we planned to go west to Utah with the handcart company, but President Franklin D. Richards counseled my father not to go in that company. Afterwards, we were very thankful because of the great suffering, privation and cold weather which those people were subjected to. There were many of the company who were frozen that year on their journey. My father was then advised to go to Sf. Louis, spend the winter there and then prepare to go through to Utah the next year. Instead of staying at Sf. Louis, he was called on a mission to help make settlement one hundred miles west of civilization. The place was Genoa. We left Sf. Louis on the steamboat and came up the Mississippi River. The measles broke out while we were on the boat and all of my mother's children, except me, took them and were very sick. When we landed we camped on the bank of the river until our teams and wagons came. When we were all ready to start on our journey westward, my father's team of five-year, unbroken oxen ran away and we were delayed. We had never seen oxen before and the animals allotted to us had to be roped and tied in order to yoke and fasten them to the wagon. When they were released from the ropes they became unmanageable and difficult to catch. The company had gone on ahead and as my mother was anxious for me to go with them, she strapped my little brother James on my back with a shawl. He was only four years old and still quite sick with the measles. I took him since mother had all she could do to care for the other children. I hurried and caught up with the company, traveling with them all day. That night a kind lady helped me take my brother off my back. I sat up and held him on my lap with the shawl wrapped around him, alone all night. He was a little better in the morning. The people in the camp were very good to us and gave us a little fried bacon and some bread for breakfast. We traveled this way for about a week. My brother and I did not see our mother during this time. Each morning one of the men would write a note and put it in the **** of a willow stuck into the ground to tell how we were getting along. In this way Mother knew that we were all right. We stayed in Genoa about two years, during which time we had very little to eat as the people were all very poor. We raised corn, but the frost came early and it did not ripen well. We had to dry it in the oven and it was so nearly spoiled that we had to open the door while it was drying because it was so offensive. We had only one hand grinder for the whole company to use. It belonged to Brother Sleight. Of course, it kept us very busy grinding. During the settlement in Genoa, we also suffered much from hostile Indians. They were very troublesome and we were always in danger of being molested. After we had made this settlement, my father was called to another place, called Wood river. This was a very pretty place surrounded by elm trees. It was about one hundred miles east of Genoa, which made it about one hundred miles from civilization. One day while we were at Wood river, our cow ran away from us and when father found that she was lost, he sent my brother Thomas and me to hunt for her. We looked all day, but were unable to find her. Starting out early the next morning, we continued the hunt and looked all day. We were unable to find her. Toward evening we were going down along the Platte River and as we looked down the river we saw three large Sioux Indians coming towards us on horses. They seemed very warlike and I was afraid they were going to carry us away with them. So I said to my brother, "Let us pray". We were running as fast as we could and still praying even though we were unable to get down on our knees. The Indians soon came right up to us and wanted us to go with them. We were trying to be brave and told them we were on our way home and pointed toward our house. We could see the smoke coming out of our chimney. One of the Indians tried to pull my brother up on his horse, but Thomas was heavier then the Indian expected and he slipped from his grasp and dodged right under the horse's belly, between fore and hind legs, and we ran until overtaken again. The Indians laughed and had a good time at our efforts to elude them, but in our maneuvers we were getting nearer home, I asked them to go home with us and promised that my mother would give them coffee and biscuits. I was shaking all over with fright and could hardly speak, but pointed to where the men were working. The Indians left us and went over to the men. Later came to our house and mother gave them a nice warm supper and they went away peaceably. Our Heavenly Father surely blessed and protected us on this occasion, for which we were very grateful. We did not stay at Woodriver very long. My father began to make preparations to go on to Utah, and when the next company came we were ready. Wood river was abandoned because, regardless of the were ready. Wood river was abandoned because, regardless of the splendid growing crops, the Indians had become troublesome. The captain of the company was pleased to have us travel with him and was very kind to us. We had to cross the Platte River where there were so many sand bars that it made crossing very dangerous. The men were helping the women over, but my mother was so anxious to get started that she waded in with a baby in her arms, thinking she could go through alone. She had gone but a little way when she began sinking into the quicksand and was going down very fast. Some of the men saw her and ran to her assistance. It was a difficult task to get her out and we felt that she had a very narrow escape. We had many such experiences while crossing the rivers. One night our cow ran away from camp and I was sent out to bring her back. I was barefoot and not watching where I was going. All of a sudden I began to feel that I was walking on something soft and looking down to see what it could be, I found, to my horror, that I was standing in a bed of snakes, large ones and small ones. At the sight of them I became so weak that I could scarcely move. All I could think of was to pray. The lord blessed me and watched out for me so that I was protected from similar experiences. While crossing the plains, my mother's health was very poor, so I tried to assist her as much as I could. Every morning I would get up early and get breakfast for the family and milk the cow, so that I could hurry and drive her ahead of the company and let her eat in the grassy places until they passed on and the I would hurry and catch up with them. The cow furnished us our chief source of food and it was therefore important to see that she was fed as well as circumstances allowed. In this way, the cow gave plenty y of good rich milk and we felt, had it not been for her, we would have surely starved. Being alone much of the time, I had to get across the rivers as best as I could. Our cow was a jersey and she had a long tail. When it became necessary to cross the rivers, I would wind the end of her tail around my hand and swim across with her. I was always very careful to watch for every bit of wood that I could find on the way. Our fuel consisted mostly of "buffalo chips". Each morning I would gather a large apron full of them for the camp fires, where we cooked our meals. At the end of each day's journey, I milked my cow and helped prepare our supper, after which I gladly fell asleep, wherever that happened to be. We traveled very slowly until we reached "Sweet Water.» Here there was a terrible storm. The Captain got on his horse and scouted around to see if he could find a place of safety. It was snowing and the wind was blowing a terrific gale and we despaired of our lives. The Captain found shelter down at the bottom of a hollow. We camped here for several days, until the storm abated. I was very brave and wanted to go out and explore this new camping ground. I had not gone far when I saw a large ox grazing a little way from where camp was. I ran and told my father and he and some of the men went out and killed it for the company. The discovery of this ox, I thought was wonderful, and I felt it was very providential as we were almost starving. In leaving this camp, we had got not far, when we met Patriarch John Smith and Brother John P. Green. They were going on missions and were traveling with a mule team. Father went to them for advice and told them of our circumstances. Brother Smith blessed my father and gave him ten dollars and Brother Green gave him five dollars. Brother Smith told father to leave the Company and go on as fast as possible, for it was getting cold and we were short of food. He told us to go through Weber Canyon into Ogden, as it was much quicker. With the money that was given to him, Father bought fifty pounds of flour. It being $20.00 a hundred at Fort Laramie. We also got a little meat. Brother Smith advised my father to stay in Ogden until we had earned enough for food to put us through the winter and then to go on to Cache Valley and take up land there. We started on our journey alone and had a very hard time of it. Our food gave out and we had nothing but milk and wild rosehips to eat. However, we did have a good team and could travel fast. We arrived in Ogden on the 4th day of October, after a journey of hardship and hunger, with thankfulness to our Heavenly Father for His protecting care. I walked every step of the way across the plains, drove my cow, and a large part of the way carried my little brother, James, on my back. We camped on the outskirts of town and Father left us and went on into Ogden to find work. While camping here many people passed us on their way to attend General Conference of the Church in Salt Lake City. Across the field from where we were was a little home and out in the yard was a big pile of squash. We were so famished that my mother sent me over to beg for squash, for we did not have a cent of money and some of the children were very weak for want of food. I knocked at the door and an old lady came and said "Come in, come in. I knew you were coming and have been told to give you food". She gave me a large loaf of freshly baked bread and said to tell my mother that she would come over soon. It was not long until she did come and she brought us a nicely cooked dinner. This was something we had not had for such a long time. This woman was surely inspired of the Lord to help us and we were grateful for her kindness. When Father came back to us, he had found a man whom he had known in Scotland. This man took us into his home and we stayed there until we were ready to go to Cache Valley. We all worked. Mother took the smaller children and husked com. I herded cattle and Father and my older brothers worked on the threshing machine. When we had a sufficient supply of food, we left Ogden and had not gone far, when we met Henry Ballard and Aaron DeWitt, who had been to Conference and were returning to their homes in Cache Valley. This was my first meeting with my Husband. At the time of this meeting I was a barefoot, sunburned little girl driving my cow along the dusty country road. It was impressed on my mother and to my husband at that time, that I would become his wife. Brother Ballard and Aaron DeWitt helped us greatly during our journey, as we traveled together to Cache Valley. When we got to the Logan River the water was so high, it lifted the box right off the wheels and we had some difficulty in getting across. We arrived in Logan October 27, 1859. We camped in a fort made for protection from the Indians. We were in the fort which extended from the corner of Main and Center Street to what is known as 3rd West Street now. My father worked to get enough hay for the cattle, and then went to the canyon and hauled logs to make a house. We had no lumber nor glass. For the doors and windows we wove willows together and plastered them with clay. He used bulrushes and willows for the roof and the carpet. We were very comfortable until Spring. My father and older brothers worked in the canyon all winter gathering logs which they exchanged for bran or bacon or anything else we could get. At one time we were right out of everything to eat and father had a few logs he could spare so he went to a man and asked him if he would not give him some bran for them. This is all we had to eat for some little time. This man found that we were in dire need of help and told the Presiding Elder that we needed assistance. A meeting was held and the people were told that they should pay fast offerings, which they did. The first fast offerings paid in Logan were then given to my father. Father soon got work on building a bridge and after this we did not have it so hard. I carried water for the family all that winter from the north branch of the Logan River, which was about three blocks away. I had very little clothing on my body and my feet were bare. Often leaving blood stains on the snow. Sometimes I would wrap them in old rags, but this was worse then ever, because the rags froze to my feet. Early in the spring I went to work for Thomas E. Rick's for one dollar a week. I was working to get seed wheat for us to plant The wheat was $5.00 a bushel. Brother Ricks needed a man to plow and asked father if he could spare one of his boys. Father said he would let him know that night. When I got home he asked me if I would help him plough, so my brother could go to Mr. Ricks. He would be paid two dollars a day and this would pay for the seed wheat much more quickly. While my brother went to work for Mr. Ricks, I drove the cattle while father held the plow. Thus we broke ground for the first crops that were planted in Logan; it being the first spring in the settlement. After the plowing was finished, I went back to Brother Ricks and worked there until fall. I returned home to glean, so that we would have enough bread for winter and then went back to the Rick's home, where I worked all winter. Next spring Grandma Thatcher offered me $1.25 a week and as the work was easier, I went to her place and worked all summer. The first grist mill was being built in Logan and since the builders were living with her, she needed me during this time. In the fall all the workmen left and her sons were in Salt Lake to school, so I went again to work for Mrs. Ricks and stayed with her until spring. In January, Brother Ballard asked me to go to a dance with him at Providence, a little village several miles from Logan. We had a yoke of oxen and a heavy sleigh. It was very cold and it snowed three feet while we were at the dance. We were unable to come home, so we sat up all the rest of the night, for there was no room for so many of us to go to bed in one little log house. We had a very hard time getting home the next day. So you see, even courting had its hardships in the pioneer days. I had been keeping company with Brother Ballard for some time and although I was but fifteen years old, he wanted to marry me. He felt that he could take care of and provide for me without my having to work as hard as I had been doing. We were married on May 5, 1861. He was put in as Bishop of the Logan Second Ward on April 14th of that year, a position which he held for forty years. During that time I always endeavored to assist him and encourage him in his work. The following summer, we had a great deal of trouble with the Indians. They were very hostile and often the people had to seek shelter in a large cellar. The Indians were very destructive and I have seen them ride their horses into the houses and trample the gardens all to pieces. They did an enormous amount of damage in the fields. This was the worst time we had with them and the men had to take their guns with them to work. While one guarded the cattle, the others would plough. The Indians took one child from the settlement and we never got her back. Once the Indians stole a great many horses from Brother Thatcher and since my husband was a minuteman, he had to go many times without even saying goodbye to look for stolen cattle, We tried to keep a good supply of bread on hand to encourage the Indians to be more friendly towards us. One year they killed a number of settlers north of Logan and the soldiers from Fort Douglas were called and a real battle ensued. It was at the place now called Battle Creek. Nearly all the Indians were killed, but we never had any more trouble after this. The soldiers lost a few of their men and during this time they camped on the Tabernacle Square. 'sent bread, butter and eggs down for them to eat. We also had grasshopper wars. I have seen the heavens darkened with grasshoppers until one would think it was midnight I have gone out at such times and driven them into a trench with a bunch of willows and buried them alive. With all that we killed, the ground would be perfectly bare. They destroyed our crops and my husband and to go over into another valley and work on a threshing machine to get bread for the winter. A short time before the birth of my first baby, I also had my first experience in sewing. My husband had a fine young steer that he was saving to sell in order to get enough money for us to buy material for the new baby we were expecting. One of the prominent brethren of Logan at this time, suffered a great financial loss and was destitute. The people were called upon to give what they could for the support of this unfortunate family We had our winter supply of food in the house, but no money, the steer being held for such a purpose. My husband came home feeling very badly and said, "Margaret, I am very sorry and disappointed, but I have been called upon to raise some money to help out one of our brethren and the only thing I have that I can give is that steer. What shall I do?" I too was very much disappointed, but said, "Give it Henry; we will find a way." My husband's gratitude for my willingness and his regrets, brought me to tears. It was a big sacrifice for me at this time, but I knew it was right. After my husband left the house, I hunted up two of his homespun woolen shirts and pulled down the blinds and locked the doors so that no one would see me try my hand at a new art. I spread the shirts on the floor and without a pattern, cut out two little dresses and sewed them up by hand. This was practically all the clothing I had for my first child. However, she was most welcome by us and has given us much love as two doting parents were capable of receiving. She was born January 18, 1863. We named her Margaret Hannah and my husband was the proudest father in the valley. By 1864, my husband had prospered and we were able to live very comfortably. In that year, he went with his team in Captain Preston's Company to help gather in the poor from the plains before the winter weather caught them. During his absence I spun and wove a nice big piece of cloth to make our winter clothing. He returned on September 19th . On the 20th our first son was born. He was named Henry William, after his father and grandfather. Early in the fall of 1865, I took my babies down to the bottoms to gather hops, since they brought a price of $10.00 per pound in Salt Lake. My mother-in-law would go with me and help with the children. In this way we were able to buy a few extra things. On July 8, 1866 my son Thomas was born. Things were much easier for us each year and the brothers told my husband that it was his duty to support another family. He was requested twice. He also was very hesitant. However, on October 4th, 1867, my husband married my sister Emily as his second wife. Although I loved my sister dearly and we knew it was a commandment of God that we should live in the Celestial Marriage, it was a great trial and sacrifice for me. The Lord blessed and comforted me and we lived happily in this principle of the Gospel. I have thanked the Lord every day of my life that I have had the privilege of living that law. On May 15, 1868, I gave birth to twin babies, a little girl and boy. We named them Jeannette and Charles. They were two beautiful babies, but did not stay long with us on this earth. The little girl died on September 18, 1869 and ten days later the little boy died. This was a very difficult trial for me. During the winter of 1869 we had about 100 sheep wintering in Clarkston. Since it was a very hard winter and the snow was very deep, nearly all of them were dying. A man came and told my husband that if he wanted to save any of the sheep, he would have to go at once with a wagon and haul them into a shelter. I told my husband to get another wagon and team and I would drive with him. He did not want me to go, but I insisted. I felt so sorry to lose so many sheep and I thought we could save double the number with the two wagons. I also thought I could be company for him on such a long drive. It was very cold. We started very early and it was 11 :00 when we got home that night We brought twenty sheep back with us, but about half of them died on the way home. I never will forget the sight of so many sheep lying around dead or dying. It made my heart ache to see the suffering of these animals. On April 9, 1870, my son George Albert was born. He was a fine big, healthy boy. He brought great happiness to our home. The following September I received a Patriarchal Blessing from Brother Charles H. Hyde. This was of great comfort to me. It promised many privileges and blessings which have nearly all been fulfilled. On February 9, 1873, I gave birth to another son, whom we named Melvin Joseph. During June of 1874 there was an epidemic of scarlet fever. Many families were severely afflicted. My children all came down with it and were very sick. After being ill for about one week, George Albert died on July 7th. On the 13th , my oldest daughter Margaret died from the same disease. This was another trying ordeal for me to go through, but the Lord gave me strength and comfort, Not long after this, my son Henry was helping his father haul peas from the field. In some way he fell on the pitchfork, which ran through his bowels. His father prayed over him at the time and asked the Lord to spare his life until he could get him home to me. When they brought him in he looked like he was dead. I hurried and made an herb plaster and put his whole body in it. We also offered up a mighty prayer for him. He was again restored to health and we know that it was the power of the Lord that saved him, for at that time we had no doctors to help us. Just two weeks after this on September 19, 1875, I gave birth to another daughter whom we named Ellen Phoebe. A month later my husband was brought home from the canyon very sick, suffering with Kidney trouble. The brethren had been in and administered to him, but he was very, very bad and we felt he would surely die. I was standing at the foot of his bed and greatly grieved to see him in such agony. Looking at me he said he could die if I would only give him up. A voice came to me and said "Administer to him". However, I was very timid about doing this, for the elders had just blessed him. The voice came again and I felt with the priesthood in the house I could not do it. I thought they would think me bold and I was very weak. The voice came to me the third time. Heeding its prompting, I put my hands upon his head. The spirit of the Holy Ghost was with me and I was filled with Divine strength in performing this ordinance. When I finished, my husband had fallen asleep and slept quietly for two hours or so. There were still a number of the brethren living in the house at that time and they often spoke of this miraculous healing. On February 8, 1878, another daughter was born to us. We named her Rebecca Ann. Soon after this my husband's father and mother came to live with us. They were with us for about eight years before they passed away. His father was 96 and his mother 86. They were both very fragile and feeble and required a great deal of care and attention. I was every willing to attend to them and bestow my affection on them in order to make their lives happy. I know that they both died blessing me. This has always been a comfort. From the first organization of Relief Society in Cache Valley until 1880, I labored as a teach and on December 111h of that year, I was put in as President of this organization in the 2nd Ward, with Sister Barbara Larsen as 151 Counselor and Sister J. Smith as 2nd Counselor. Sister Emmeline James as secretary. I served in this capacity for over thirty years. During these years I tried to do my duty caring for the sick and comforting the needy. I have walked for blocks through the deep snow. I have been out in rain and wind in the darkest of nights and the early hours of the morning administering to those who were afflicted, sick, suffering and dying. I have sat up all night, time after time, with the ill, laid out the dead and made their burial clothes. I have mothered orphans, comforted widows and striven to be a peace maker to those in trouble, and through it all the Lord has directed me and I have enjoyed His Spirit as my companion in these labors. It comforts me to have done some good to those less fortunate then myself. Many, many times I have neglected my own family and home, but the Lord always came to my rescue. On December 13, 1881, I gave birth to another daughter and we named her Lettie May. Shortly after this a family by the name of Phister, who lived in our ward, were left orphans. The father had died leaving his wife and six small children and seven months later the mother gave birth to another baby and died while the baby was very young. After her death, the seven children were brought into my home and stayed until after their mother's funeral. Bishop Hardy of Salt Lake, distributed them among different people. I adopted one of the little girls. We named her Lena. We raised her as our own until she got married. On My 17, 1884, the Logan Temple was dedicated. The second day after the dedication, President John Taylor said that all members of the Church who were worthy and so desired could go through the Temple. My husband, being Bishop, was busy writing out recommends, when my daughter came in with a newspaper in her hand. She asked for father. I told her that her father was very busy, but to give the paper to me and I would give it to him. She said "No, a man gave the paper to me and I was to give it to no one but father." I let the child take the paper to her father and when he looked at it, he was greatly shocked, for he saw that the paper had been printed in Birkshire, England, which was his birth place and it was only four days from the press. He was so amazed at the incident, that he called Ellen and asked her where the man was who had given her the paper. She said she was playing on the sidewalk with some other children, when two men came down the street, walking in the middle of the road. One of the men called to her saying, "Come here, little girl." She hesitated at first, for there were other little girls with her. Then he pointed at her and said, "You". She went to him and he gave her the paper and told her to give it to her father. The paper contained about sixty names of dead acquaintances of my husband, giving the dates of births and deaths. My husband took the paper to the President of the Temple and asked what he thought about it President Merrill said, "Brother Ballard, that must have been one of the Three Nephites who brought that paper to you, for it could come in no other way in such a short time. It is for you to do the work for them." My husband was baptized for the men and I for the women and all the work was done for them. Again, I felt the Lord was mindful of us and had blessed us abundantly. Shortly after the Logan Temple had been dedicated, my father was called to be an officiator there and while in this capacity was taken ill with pneumonia. His life became very fragile. One morning early they sent for me and I hurried down lest I should never see my father alive again. I was not well myself, for I had been suffering with Erysipelas and was taken in a sleigh. When I arrived mother was feeling very bad and could not be comforted. When I looked at father and saw his condition, I was sorrowful myself, for you could hear him breathe all over the house. The Spirit of the Lord was with me and I had a desire to administer to him. I asked mother if he had been blessed yet and she said that he had been that morning. I was timid again about going ahead and doing anything of this sort, but I knew that I should. I asked mother if she did not want to assist me, but she declined because she felt it would be of little use. If the priesthood had not helped, then she deemed it useless for us to try. I hesitated, but something said to me, "Administer to him". So I went and closed the door and asked mother if she would not pray with me. She consented and we knelt by the bed and prayed and I anointed my father and administered to him. The power of the Lord was with me, for while my hands were still on his head, his breathing became much easier. When I finished, father opened his eyes and said, "Thank God for this blessing. I knew this power was in the Church and I thank Him for it". This was most wonderful to me and surely the Lord did bless us all. Father was still weak, but that night he sat up in his chair with his clothes on. It was not long after that, that he fully recovered from his sickness. I have told you these experiences to show how perfectly my patriarchal blessing had been fulfilled. I have been promised that I should heal the sick through the power of the Lord. On October 2, 1884 my son Henry was married to Elvira Davidson in the Logan Temple by Apostle Mariner W. Merrill. I gave birth to another daughter, Mary Myrtle on August 21, 1885. At this time the men were being persecuted for having more than one wife. It caused that they were treated very unkindly and imprisoned. To avoid capture, my husband left home and went to Cache Junction. He would change his hiding places, for deputies were out to find him. When he was there I prayed to know what to do for the best. I felt that the Lord would save us more than anyone else. After I had gone to bed, thinking about it, I heard a voice say, "It is time he was moving from where he is". It was repeated again and I said "Where shall he go?" The same voice replied, "Take him to Aunt Rosina Morrell's." I did not sleep any that night but wrote a note telling my husband that I felt impressed that he should return home. If he decided to do so, I told him I felt that he should ride in a load of hay as far as the old slaughter house and cut across the fields and that I would meet him below the railroad track. Early in the morning I sent my son Melvin on his horse to Cache Junction with the note for his father. My husband sent back word that he would return as I had suggested. In the meantime, I had made arrangements with Sister Morrell for him to stay with her. That evening we just saw each other for a few minutes. You may be sure it was a solemn Meeting. I told him of the plan I had had made and he hurried up through the back yard to Sister Morrell's where he stayed for three weeks. The very next morning after he had left Cache Junction, the officers came to the house where he had been hiding and ran pitchforks in the wheat and bins and haystacks to make sure that he was not there. They cursed and swore because he had escaped them. This is just one of the many times that I have been warned and guided by the Spirit of God. While my husband was at Sister Morrell's, he was fasting and praying as was I, to know what to do. One morning about two o'clock, it came to him that he should go on a mission to England, his native land, and through the help of the lord enabled himself to get away from his enemies. He consulted Apostle Franklin D. Richards about such a mission and was advised to leave in two days. These were very strenuous times and as two of the other brethren were in the same circumstances, they decided to go with him. They were Robert Davidson and William Watterson. The afternoon they were leaving, I had a large supper prepared and both of these families had supper at my home. Gave them each a room in which to say goodbye to their families without being seen. That night after dark, my son Henry drove my husband and his friends to Salt lake. Oh what a storm we had that night. It seemed that the evil one would overpower us after all. The wind howled terribly and tore up trees and the lightening was dreadful. The lord was really near us for had it not been for that storm, the brethren would have been caught, for the deputies watching for them on the road would surely have discovered them. After a tedious journey, they arrived in Salt Lake. They were set apart and left for Great Britain on November 3, 1886. It was not until I received my husbands first letter, that I learned to read and write. Up to this time I could do neither, but I was determined to learn to read his letters and to answer them. After many difficulties and obstacles, I was able to do both. While my husband was away, my family and I worked very hard, but we were blessed and got along very well. The boys hauled logs from the canyon and sold them, thus helping support us. Every Sunday we fasted and prayed to the Lord to prosper Brother Ballard in his labors. Through all my trials, I was thankful that the Lord did not forget us. There was a brother who had a plural wife. She was about to be confined. As polygamists were watched very closely, he feared that the coming of the child would be the cause of his arrest. He went to Apostle Merrill for advice and was told, "You are as near to the Lord as I, go to Him." This man fasted and prayed. When he was in one of the upper rooms of the Temple, he heard a voice say, "Take her to Margaret Ballard's. He came to me and told me that he had been sent, but did not tell me who sent him. Neither did he tell me whose wife he was asking me to take in. We were all willing to help those in trouble, so I told him I would do my best to take care of her. She was with me one week before her baby was born. The midwife and I were alone with her, but she got along well and I kept her and her baby for six months and no one molested us. When the man told me how he happened to come to me, it made my heart rejoice to know that my Father in Heaven had such confidence in me. Because of my husband's being away, the deputies did not bother my home and I sheltered a number of the polygamist brethren under my roof and gave women's clothes to dress in so they might visit their families. I also drove them in my buggy, dressed in disguise in order to get them there. While my husband was in London, he met a sister that was on the underground. She had a baby girl and wanted to come back to Utah. My husband wrote and asked me if I would take her in our home. I did so and she stayed with me for a long time and was not molested, so I was blessed once more. My husband secured a great deal of Genealogy while he was in England and sent these records home to me. My son Henry and I did the work for those names in the Temple. When my husband came back he was very pleased to know that all of the work was done. It gave me great joy to be an instrument in the hands of the Lord in working out the salvation for those who had died in darkness. Brother Ballard was away on his mission for over two years. He arrived in Logan, January 1989. In order that he might not be detected he took a freight train from Salt Lake City and traveled in the night, arriving home in the early morning. I did not know just when to expect him, but I felt impressed that he would come in this manner and sat up all night waiting for him. When I heard the train whistling into Mendon, I awakened my son Thomas and sent him to the station to meet his father. He arrived safely, but did not know Thomas because he had grown so much during the separation. Although our meeting was held in secrecy, it was a joyful one. We were thankful for the work my husband had been able to accomplish, for his protection, for the health we had all been granted during his absence. After Brother Ballard had been home for a few day, he thought it best to go to the officers and tell them he was ready to serve his term for polygamy. The officers granted him a day or two to rest and visit his family. Then he went to Ogden and was tried before a court, fined fifty dollars and sentenced to two months imprisonment. He paid the fine and served his term and then returned to us feeling free from that obligation. The following December my little daughter Ella took sick with Membranous Croup. She suffered terribly for several days and then died, the date being December 13, 1989. She was fourteen years old and a great comfort to me and such a companion during her father's absence. Of course, it was another severe blow to us. The Lord gave me strength so that I came to know that is was best that she should be taken. Ten days before her death I had a dream which troubled me greatly, for I knew it concerned the children whom I had buried. After her death, I went to the Temple to get endowments for her and was feeling very badly. I prayed that I might understand the meaning of my dream. I was sitting wondering why I had been called to go through this sacrifice once more when the interpretation of my dream went before my eyes. With great plainness I saw that which would have come upon my children if they had lived. They would have been lost to me. I saw my five beautiful children saved for me, and knew that they would be mine again. I had this vision as true as the sun ever shines upon the earth. On April 2, 1890, my son Thomas was married to Phoebe Smith in the Logan Temple by Apostle Mariner W. Merrill. On March 8, 1891, my son Henry was called to be Bishop of the Benson Ward. He was set apart by Apostle Moses Thatcher. Henry held this position for over twenty years. In the fall of 1891 my father took sick and died suddenly. This was another sorrow for me for I loved him dearly and felt his loss keenly. I relied upon him in trouble and sickness and felt that I had truly lost a good friend and loving father. His life had always been an inspiration to me as well as a guiding light. On April 6, 1893, I attended the dedication of the Salt Lake Temple. My soul was filled with joy for the privilege of being a partaker of such a heavenly feast as was given there. On June 17, 1896, my son Melvin was married to Martha Jones and my daughter Rebecca was married to Louis B. Cardon in the Logan Temple. A few weeks after his marriage, Melvin went upon his first mission. During his absence, I gave his wife a home with me and did everything I could for her welfare and comfort. While she was with me she gave birth to their son Melvin Russell. He was a very delicate child and we had many serious times to pass through with him. The Lord was good to us and answered our prayers and restored him to health street meetings and raised my voice in defense of the truth and I have borne my testimony of the truthfulness of this work to throngs of people crowded in the street of Portland. My heart rejoices for this great privilege and I thank God for the testimony which I was able to bear on such occasions. In my weak way, I feel that I have assisted in the spread of truth and am grateful for this opportunity. On September 6, 1911, my sister's daughter, Jeanette, who I raised, was married to F. Wayne Shurtliff in the Logan Temple by President Budge. I am thankful for my family, for their love and respect and for the honor they have always shown to their father and me. I appreciate their obedience and am happy in their desire to follow their parents example concerning the things of the Lord. I feel blessed that they have all had the privilege of having been married in the Temple by the Priesthood of God and sealed for time and eternity. Not just my family, but all of my husband's children, and also those whom I have raised as my own. My life has been one of varied experiences. I have had a great deal of sickness to pass through, both with my children and grandchildren, but I have always relied upon the Lord and He has never failed me. I have stood by my husband through sickness, trials, poverty and prosperity. I have labored by his side in the fields. I have done various types of work, such as soap making, weaving, spinning, reaping, sowing, plowing and gleaning. From the first day I entered this valley until this day, I have never ceased my labors to build up and beautify this city. Although my life has been one of sacrifice and service, I feel that I have lived it the best I could with the knowledge I have had. My testimony of the truthfulness of the Gospel grows stronger each day. The work grows dearer and sweeter to my soul. I know that God lived and that He lives and answers prayers. That Jesus is the Son of the Living God and that Joseph Smith was His prophet. I thank God for this knowledge and leave this as my testimony to my children and grandchildren and all who may come after me. I plead of you all to heed the Spirit of God, that you may also have this testimony burning in your hearts, that you may have His Spirit as your daily companion. Postscript The foregoing autobiography was written about one year before her death. Her last year, like all other years of her full life was spent in service and devotion to her religion, her country and her family. Shortly after her return to Logan from April Conference in 1918, she was afflicted with high blood pressure, which resulted in slow hemorrhages of the brain. During the ten weeks which it lasted, she suffered intensely without complaint or murmur. From the day she was forced to take to her bed until the last breath of life, she accepted whatever came as the will of the Father with such reSignation as is rarely found. Because she had a strong constitution, her family felt that there was no reason that she should not survive this illness and live many more years. But she was firm in her conviction that she was not to remain. She would say, "I am satisfied with my life as I have live it and I am ready to go back home". Those who were privileged to be with her during her last sickness, received the benefit of the golden hours of her well-spent life. Her mind was keen and bright to the very last She was sensitive to her appearance and to her surroundings. It has been said that some people walk and talk with God. Her faith was such and her belief so personal, that surely she was among those people whose sincerity is thus rewarded with the certainty that there is a definite plan for all things and a definite place in that plan for each. To those who knew and remember her, one of the outstanding attributes of her character, which they believe should be emphasized, was her love for her husband. He was a large, loveable man. He was sincere and deliberate. She was an energetic, noble little soul. Their characters complimented each other. He protected her and was her refuge. She inspired and was a companion in his every activity. Typical of his devotion and dependence upon her was the crisis they both met when he was asked to take another wife. When he felt that he should do as suggested, he came to her and said , "Margaret, I do not want any other woman but you. If I must, you will have to find her for me". She did. Her determination was second only to her faith, and an integral part of her. Typical of its expression was the remodeling of her house which was done when she was approaching seventy. She had asked her sons to help her remove a very bothersome partition in a closet in order to make a sitting room more spacious. Her sons agreed to do it for her, and as busy people will, put off doing so. Surprised at the change in her house some time later when her oldest son came to see her. He asked if the other brother had don it. "No" she firmly replied. 'Well, who did it then?" was the rejoinder. "I did it myself." When her son asked her why she hadn't let him help, she grew ruffled and replied, "I did ask you, you know". The Patriarchal Blessing that she refers to during her life was given to her at the time she was carrying her youngest son, Melvin. She was sad and somewhat depressed at the time. She has repeated most of it in her story, but one part that was omitted, was denied her at the time of her death. She was promised that the child she was bearing would grow to become one of the leaders of the church and that his power of good would be felt by many. Perhaps she hesitated to insert this promise until it had been fulfilled. The joy that she would have known had she lived, but a few months to realize that her faith would find its outlet in her youngest son, Melvin, who was inspired not only from the Lord, but from her too. She died on a beautiful Sunday morning, July 21 , 1918, at seventy two years of age. She was the mother of eleven children, six of whom she raised. She had numerous grandchildren and greatgrandchildren. Her funeral was held in the Logan Tabemacle and was one of simplicity and peace, so typical of her life. She was buried beside her husband in Logan Cemetery, one spot on earth very dear to her heart.

Henry Ballard Emigrates to America

Contributor: R and N Englestead Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

An excerpt from "Short Stories for Short People" written by my grandmother, Myrtle Ballard Shurtliff around 1970. Minor editing has been done. Two years after Henry Ballard, our ancestor, was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, he set sail for America. He was a poor young man, only 19 years old, going to a New World without friends or loved ones and with the responsibility of his parents who were growing old. He left Liverpool on the 10 Jan 1852 on the sailing vessel “Kennebeck” in a company of three hundred and thirty-three passengers. He took with him his two boxes of scanty clothing and two shepherd dogs. He had signed a contract to herd sheep across the plains for his fare from Liverpool to New Orleans and then up the Mississippi River to Council Bluffs, Iowa. At Council Bluffs he was to start his walk across the plains with his faithful dogs, perhaps they were Shelties, these were his prized possession and his greatest companionship. They were to help Henry herd two hundred sheep to Salt Lake Valley. The Captain of the ship was Captain Smith. It took sixty –three days to cross the Atlantic Ocean. It was a long rough trip and Henry suffered with a very bad sore throat for two weeks of the time and besides that he was so “sea-sick” nearly all the way. This made him feel very weak and miserable. The boat was so slow on the voyage their food and water supply ran out, all but a little rice and oatmeal which had to be cooked without salt for they had none of that either. In this company was a family from Chively, a town close to Thatcham where Henry lived. Both towns were in the county of Berkshire in England. This family was a large family of father, whose name was George May, and his wife Hannah and seven children. Food was so scarce it was hard to stand the hunger and the rice and oatmeal without salt was not easy to eat. Their hunger was so great they could hardly stand it. Henry and George May found their way down into the bottom of the ship where the food was stored and prepared for the crew. They searched the garbage cans and picked out small pieces of dry bread which had been thrown away. It was covered with green mold but they ate it with relish and it satisfied their hunger a little. They lived on this for the last three days of the ocean trip and no one stopped them. George and Henry were very thankful for this cast off food. I wonder how it would taste to us today?

Henry's River Trip - the "Saluda" explodes

Contributor: R and N Englestead Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

An excerpt from "Short Stories for Short People" written by my grandmother, Myrtle Ballard Shurtliff, around 1970. Minor editing has been done. When this company arrived at New Orleans, Henry "bound himself out" to work for a company for two years to pay back his passage across the ocean and across the plains. At New Orleans the company from the "Kennebuck" was "Pride of the West." It might have been entitled to that name in an early day but not them. They had to travel near the edge of the river all the way to St. Louis. They were afraid of the deep water. This trip took them nearly two weeks. They stayed at St. Louis for two days and then they were put on another old worn out steam boat called the "Saluda" bound for Council Bluffs. They left St. Louis on the first day of April with about seventy-five or eighty Latter-day Saints on the boat; all were going to Council Bluffs, the gathering place of the Saints. In three days they reached the town of Lexington. Here the water was running very swift. The captain and the fireman did their best to make headway but after trying several hours they gave up and crossed to the other side of the river where there were no houses and tied the boat up for the night. The next day they found the river full of floating ice large blocks from two feet thick and two rods long, ( a rod is about 16 feet ) and larger so they could not move. They were tied up here fro over a week. Then they crossed back to Lexington. The ice was not floating quite so bad by that time but a large piece struck the paddle wheels and broke them. This delayed the company for the Captain had to stop another day to get the wheels fixed. It was more than a week after they left St. Louis before the boat was able to make another start. It was Friday morning, April 9th, "Good Friday-Easter time, when the "Saluda" was ready to start again on its voyage.

Life timeline of Henry Ballard

1832
Henry Ballard was born on 27 Jan 1832
Henry Ballard was 8 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
Henry Ballard was 28 years old when Charles Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
Henry Ballard was 31 years old when U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring the freedom of all slaves in Confederate territory by January 1, 1863. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
Henry Ballard was 43 years old when Winston Churchill, English colonel, journalist, and politician, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1965) Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill was a British politician, army officer, and writer, who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. As Prime Minister, Churchill led Britain to victory in the Second World War. Churchill represented five constituencies during his career as Member of Parliament (MP). Ideologically an economic liberal and British imperialist, he began and ended his parliamentary career as a member of the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955, but for twenty years from 1904 he was a prominent member of the Liberal Party.
Henry Ballard was 53 years old when Louis Pasteur successfully tests his vaccine against rabies on Joseph Meister, a boy who was bitten by a rabid dog. Louis Pasteur was a French biologist, microbiologist and chemist renowned for his discoveries of the principles of vaccination, microbial fermentation and pasteurization. He is remembered for his remarkable breakthroughs in the causes and prevention of diseases, and his discoveries have saved many lives ever since. He reduced mortality from puerperal fever, and created the first vaccines for rabies and anthrax. His medical discoveries provided direct support for the germ theory of disease and its application in clinical medicine. He is best known to the general public for his invention of the technique of treating milk and wine to stop bacterial contamination, a process now called pasteurization. He is regarded as one of the three main founders of bacteriology, together with Ferdinand Cohn and Robert Koch, and is popularly known as the "father of microbiology".
Henry Ballard was 61 years old when Electrical engineer Nikola Tesla gives the first public demonstration of radio in St. Louis, Missouri. Nikola Tesla was a Serbian American inventor, electrical engineer, mechanical engineer, physicist, and futurist who is best known for his contributions to the design of the modern alternating current (AC) electricity supply system.
Henry Ballard died on 26 Feb 1908 at the age of 76
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Henry Ballard (27 Jan 1832 - 26 Feb 1908), BillionGraves Record 730772 Logan, Cache, Utah, United States

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