Henericka Beck (Hanson)

13 Feb 1833 - 3 Dec 1915

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Henericka Beck (Hanson)

13 Feb 1833 - 3 Dec 1915
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Julius Conrad Beck taken from the book 'In Memory of the Becks' compiled by Stephen F Beck Julius Conrad Beck, one of the seven children of Frederick Beck and Henrika Hansen was born in Aalborg, Denmark November 3, 1860 making him 69 years of age at the time of death. His father Fredrick Beck was on
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Life Information

Henericka Beck (Hanson)

Born:
Died:

Alpine Cemetery

283 N 300 E
Alpine, Utah, Utah
United States

Headstone Description

Fredrick -- born in Denmark, died in Alpine Henricka -- born in Denmark, died in Alpine
Transcriber

gabrielbodard

May 28, 2011
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bobfield

July 13, 2013

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Life History of Julius Conrad Beck

Contributor: gabrielbodard Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Julius Conrad Beck taken from the book "In Memory of the Becks" compiled by Stephen F Beck Julius Conrad Beck, one of the seven children of Frederick Beck and Henrika Hansen was born in Aalborg, Denmark November 3, 1860 making him 69 years of age at the time of death. His father Fredrick Beck was one of a family of 10 sons and 5 daughters. While a young man Fredrick took part in the war between Denmark and Germany. Soon after his return home he heard of Mormonism and he and his wife were convinced of its truthfulness and were baptized. In the spring of 1866 with their three small children, Emma, Julius, and Janius started on the long journey to Utah. Julius was six years old at that time. The ocean voyage covered a period of nine weeks The trip across the plains also took them nine weeks and was made entirely by ox teams. In the same company with the Beck family was Andrew Jensen who later became assistant Church Historian. They arrived in Salt Lake City on October,1866 and remained there for two years. In 1868 they moved to Alpine, Utah County, where they homesteaded a tract of ground on the bench north of the mouth of American Fork canyon. They engaged in farming and Fredrick had learned the trade of a mason in Denmark so he was engaged in building many of the dwellings in Alpine. He was known as Mason Beck Julius was baptized when he was about 10 years of age and held all the offices of the Priesthood from a deacon to a high priest. He followed the occupation of farming and acquired considerable property. He married Rhoda Francis Vance March 13, 1889, in the Logan Temple Francis was the daughter of John Wesley Vance and Rhoda Freestone. They became the parents of six sons Wesley, Julius, Owen Vance, Sidney McCuIlough. Loy and Douglas. The latter died in infancy. The others grew to manhood and were married. Although Julius' schooling consisted of only one season under Richard T. Booth he was a man of sound judgment and belonged to many committees in the ward. He was one of the first chairmen of the Old Folks Committee and held this assignment for twelve years. He was a member of the Home Dramatic Club and being musically inclined took part in Glee Clubs and the ward choir. In 1906 he was set apart as one of the seven presidents of the Seventies. In 1904 he was appointed as Ward Clerk and for twelve years with the help of his good wife he kept the ward records accurately. In August 1903 he left his family of a wife and small children to fulfill a mission to his native land Denmark where he met and converted some of his own relatives who later came to Utah. It is an achievement of distinction how his wife managed the farm and the family of small children for two years. He was an excellent carpenter, especially in building hay barns and stock corrals and mangers. None could equal his good judgment and the durability of his work. He built many buildings in Alpine and did considerable building for his cousin Jacob Beck on his ranches at Highland, Goshen, and Gunnison, Utah. He would go into the canyons and select the best timber and bring the largest poles and construct the largest and strongest hay derricks that were built in the valley. Much of his work will be standing for years to come. It was a pleasure to work with him. He was always jolly and good natured, never complaining about a hard task. He was very careful to see that no one was injured in the hazards of building the large high hay derricks. You never had to worry about the time and the long hours he worked. He always gave an honest days work. Stephen F. Beck wrote the following: In the evening when he and I were away from home on some job we would converse far into the night about the Gospel and he would relate the experiences he had with his relatives, the Becks, in Denmark while he was on his mission there. I shall never forget an incident that took place on the Goshen ranch. One of the men took seriously ill with a bad cold which was more like pneumonia. We were a long way from a Doctor and something had to be done as he was unable to breathe. Julius said if you will kill a fat chicken I will make a plaster. A chicken was killed and a plaster was placed on the sick man's chest. Then he said "This will either kill or cure." The next morning the man was much better, but when the plaster was removed all the skin came with it. The sick man was soon well and able to work again. Two years after his return from his mission to Denmark he sent his son Wesley on a three-year mission to New Zealand. In 1917 Wesley and Sidney assisted in the first world war. At the time of his death he was chairman of the new church building committee. His health had been good up until a week before he died. He died November 18, 1929 while the elders whom he had called administered to him. The direct cause was a heart ailment. He was the father of six children, the grandfather of eighteen and the great grandfather of twenty-three.

Life history of Janius Jacobson Beck

Contributor: gabrielbodard Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Janius Jacobson Beck taken from the book "In Memory of the Beck's" compiled by Stephen F Beck Janius Jacobson Beck was born June 8, 1864, at Aalborg, Denmark. He was the son of Fredrick Jacobson and Henrika Hansen Beck. His parents were converts to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. His father was born at Leda and his mother at Aalborg, Denmark. They were married March 23, 1856. His father served in the war of 1864 between Denmark and Germany. Shortly after returning home from war, he heard of the Mormon missionaries. He was curious to hear them and when the opportunity came, he at once became interested, and soon was convinced of the truth. He and his wife were baptized December 27, 1865. The following spring the spirit of gathering was strongly manifested in the little home circle by the preparation to come to Utah. On May 20, 1866, Fredrick, his wife Henrika, and three children, Emma, Julius, and Janius sailed for America with six other families of Saints. One of them was his brother, Christian Beck. They crossed the Atlantic on the ship, "Kenilworth". It was an old sail ship and that was its last voyage across the ocean. It took eight weeks and three days to make the trip. While crossing, it caught on fire three times and was so badly burned it was condemned in the New York Harbor. Upon reaching New York, many of the little company died with the severe heat. The rest were rushed to Omaha, Nebraska, where they rested for a week while arrangements were made for the trip across the plains. Equipment being very scarce made it necessary for those who were able, to walk most of the way. They arrived in Salt Lake City October 1866, under the command of Captain Rawlins. Andrew Jensen, the church historian, was in this company. They lived in Salt Lake City two years and then moved to Alpine. Although "Yan," as he was called, remembered little of 75 this trip, as he was between two three years old at this time, his parents never tired of telling him about it. His early life was spent much the same as other children of pioneers. It required young and old to work to make a livelihood. Yan spent a lot of his time in the surrounding hills and canyons herding cattle and sheep. Although barefoot the entire summers, roaming the hills, his boyfriends had a lot of good times and made their work their play. His education was limited to one season with Richard T. Booth as his teacher. It was remarkable, his intelligence with such little schooling. He grew to manhood never idle and always willing to take part in anything that was of upbuilding nature. He was married to Mary Jane Hemmett (Hamnett) May 2, 1885. Their first home was a little adobe home just north of his father's home. Here their first child was born. They lived for a short time on Highland while he was employed by Jacob Beck. Later, they bought a two room adobe house from Mr. Poulson. As their family grew, he built on and remodeled until a comfortable home was theirs. Here he and his wife lived until they died. He was a good provider. He owned a good farm some of the best of livestock. He was always interested in everything that went on in the little community, especially in recreation. He and his wife belonged to the Alpine Glee Club which spent many an evening at their home and homes of their friends enjoying their singing and games. This is one way they had of supplying their own amusement. This club sang at many of the gatherings in the ward . He was one of the organizers, and the largest stockholder of the Alpine Amusement Hall, built just east of where our city hall now stands. This was a great place of amusement and dancers from all over the county came here to enjoy themselves. Some of the best dramatic talent was frequently engaged to entertain the people of Alpine. He was continuously a member of the Water Board of which he was president part of the time. He was also president of the alpine Cattle Range until his death. He was chairman of the Democratic party for several years and always ready to uphold what he believed to be right. He and his wife worked on the old folks committee for years. Part of this time he spent as chairman until his death. His Iove and devotion for his mother was outstanding and many happy hours they spent together. Although not too religiously inclined, he always cheerfully paid his donations and obligations to his church. They were the parents of 12 children, ten of whom are still living. They are, Josephine Mayne, Charles Elmer, James Henry, David Fredrick, Melva, Leland, Jennie, Lerve, Orlean, and James Milton. Although a young man when he died, he had accomplished a great deal. He was a highly respected citizen and did a great deal in making our community what it is today. He died March 12, 1916, in the Provo hospital.

Janius Jacobson Beck

Contributor: gabrielbodard Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Janius Jacobson Beck was born June 8, 1864, at Aalburg, Denmark. He was the son of Fredrick Jacobson and Henrika Hanson Beck. His parents were converts to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. His father was born at Leda and his mother at Aalburg, Denmark. They were married March 23, 1856. His father served in the War of 1864 between Denmark and Germany. Shortly after returning home from war, he heard of the Mormon missionaries. He was curious to hear them and when the opportunity came, he at once became interested, and soon was convinced of the truth. He and his wife were baptized December 27, 1865. The following spring the spirit of gathering was strongly manifested in the little home circle by the preparation to come to Utah. On May 20, 1866, Fredrick, his wife Henrika, and three children, Emma, Julius, and Janius, sailed for America with six other families of Saints. One of them was his brother, Christian Beck. They crossed the Atlantic on the ship Kendleworth. It was an old sail ship and that was its last voyage across the ocean. It took 8 weeks and 3 days to make the trip. While crossing, it caught on fire three times and was so badly burned it was condemned in the New York harbor. Upon reaching New York, many of the little company died with the severe heat. The rest were rushed to Omaha, Nebraska, where they rested for a week while arrangements were made for the trip across the plains. Equipment being very scarce made it necessary for those who were able, to walk most of the way. They arrived in Salt Lake City October 1866, under the command of Captain Rawlins, Andrew Jensen, the church historian was in this company. They lived in Salt Lake two years and then moved to Alpine. Although “Yan,” as he was called, remembered little of this trip, as he was between two and three years old at this time, his parents never tired of telling him about it. His early life was much the same as other children of pioneers. It required young and old to work to make a livelihood. Yan spent a lot of his time in the surrounding hills and canyons herding cattle and sheep. Although barefoot the entire summers roaming the hills, he and his boyfriends had a lot of good times and made their work their play. His education was limited to one season with Richard T. Booth as his teacher. It was remarkable, his intelligence with such little schooling. He grew to manhood never idle and always willing to take part in anything that was of upbuilding nature. He was married to Mary Jane Hamnett May 2, 1885. Their first home was a little dobe home just north of his father’s home. Here their first child was born. They lived for a short time on Highland while he was employed by Jacob Beck. Later, they bought a two room dobe house from Mr. Poulson. As their family grew, he built on and remodeled until a comfortable home was theirs. Here he and his wife lived until they died. He was a good provider. He owned a good farm and some of the best of livestock. He was always interested in everything that went on in the little community, especially in recreation. He and his wife belonged to the Alpine Glee club which spent many an evening at their home and homes of their friends enjoying their singing and games. This is one way they had of supplying their own amusement. This club sang at many of the gatherings in the ward. He was one of the instigators and largest stock holder in the Alpine Amusement Hall, built just east of where our city hall now stands. This was a great place of amusement and dancers from all over the county came here to enjoy their selves. Some of the best dramatic talent was frequently engaged to entertain the people of Alpine. He was always interested in civic affairs. He was city councilman for two terms and mayor from 1914 until Dec. 1915 before he died March 1916. He was constantly a member of the Water Board of which he was president part of the time. He was also president of the Alpine cattle range until his death. He was chairman of the Democratic party for several years and always ready to uphold what he believed to be right. He and his wife worked on the Old Folks Committee for years. Part of this time he spent as chairman until his death. His love and devotion for his mother was outstanding and many happy hours they spent together. Although not too religiously inclined, he always cheerfully paid his donations and obligations to his church. They were the parents of 12 children—ten of whom are still living. They are: Josephine Mayne, Charles Elmer, James Henry, David Fredrick, Melva, Leland, Jennie, Lerve, Orlean, and James Milton. Although a young man when he died, he had accomplished a great deal. He was a highly respected citizen and did a great deal in making our community what it is today. He died March 12, 1916, in the Provo hospital.

Emma Dorthea Beck McDaniel

Contributor: gabrielbodard Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Emma Dorthea Beck McDaniel taken from the book "In Memory of the Becks" by Stephen F Beck. Emma Dorthea Beck was born July 26, 1857 at Aalborg, Denmark. She was the daughter of Fredrick and Henricka Beck. Her parents were converts to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. They came to Utah when Emma was just about nine years old. She was such a young child when they made the long trip that it was very hard for her. They were nine weeks crossing the ocean and nine weeks crossing the plains. They left all their worldly possessions and when they reached Salt Lake they were penniless. They had borrowed from Frederick’s brother Christian in order to make the trip. They arrived in the valley in the fall of 1866 and they remained in Salt Lake about two years. In the company with them on their journey to Utah was her Uncle Christian Beck and his family. Emma was the oldest child of the family. There were seven children, three were born in Denmark and four after arriving in Utah. When the family moved to Alpine, Emma was nine, Julius six, Janius four and Ella two. The family settled in Alpine and soon her father built them a home. He, also, built many other homes in Alpine as he was a good mason by trade. Three more children were born after arriving in Alpine, Francis, Fredrick and Henry. Emma spent her school days in Alpine and helped her parents provide the necessities of life. In about 1885 she was married to Sylvester McDaniel. Sylvester McDaniel was born April 26, 1854 at Alpine, Utah. He was baptized a member of the church August 27, 1862 by Joseph Walton and ordained a teacher by David Adams. They owned a farm southeast of town. Four children were born to them, Jesse J, Lillian, John T, and Norma. In 1912 they sold their farm at Alpine and moved to the Teton Basin, Idaho. Here at Teton Basin they had a large farm and raised hay, grain and cattle. All of their children went with them. Lillian and Jesse were married at that time Lilian’s husband was Ira Fowler and Jesse’s wife was Myrtle Dunsdon from Alpine. Sylvester passed away at Tetonia, Idaho at the age of 66. Emma passed away May 24, 1934 at the age of 78. There are 16 grandchildren and six great-great grandchildren.

Ella Henrietta Beck Martin

Contributor: gabrielbodard Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Ella Henrietta Beck Martin By Cleone Cleghorn taken from book “In Memory of the Becks” by Stephen F Beck. Nestled below rugged mountains, which rise as a fortress to ever shield its villagers from harm, lies the little city of Alpine, Utah. It was in this peaceful community that Ella Henrietta Beck was born, April 7, 1871. She was the fourth child in a family of seven born to Fredrick and Henricka Hansen Beck. Her older brothers and sisters were: Emma, Julius and Janius, and the younger ones were: Francis, Fredrick and Henry. Fredrick died in childhood. Ella lived to be the last original member of the Fredrick Beck family. Grandpa Beck, a mason by trade, along with his two brothers Christian, a farmer, and Stephen, a carpenter, were natives of Denmark. After their conversion to the Latter Day Saints Church they left their comfortable homes, relatives, and friends and all their earthly possessions and in a company of saints with Andrew Jensen as their Captain brought their families to Utah. The ocean voyage in the sailing vessel “Kenilworth,” began May 20, 1866 and covered a period of nine weeks. Another nine weeks crossing the plains with ox teams brought them to Salt Lake City in October 1866. Grandpa and Grandma Beck and their three children, Emma, Julius and Janius remained in Salt lake City for two years, then in 1868 came to Alpine where the remainder of their lives was spent and where four more children were born to them. Many of the homes built by Grandpa Beck in those early days are still standing and occupied at the present time. The original home he built for his own wife and family has served as a home for three generations of his posterity. It was in this adobe home Mother was born. As a child, Mother’s days were not carefree for she, too, knew the trials and hardships of a pioneer family. She helped care for the younger children and I’ve often heard her tell of the one hour after the noon meal was over she had in which to play. She helped herd cows too on the “High Bench” some distance from her home, barefooted, and she told us how the stones and rough trails would hurt her feet. She had but one pair of shoes and they were kept for special occasions. Her lunch, while herding the cows, would be only bread. As a young girl, Mother took advantage of all opportunities offered in an educational, religious and social way. She was blessed with the gift of wit and humor and with her fun-loving disposition she was popular with both young and old. She loved music and had a sweet soprano voice and she loved to sing in the ward choir which she did for a long time. Grandmother taught her daughters the value of knowing how to work and the art of home-making. How to sew, how to cook and this training along with her own natural aptness made Mother a homemaker, a seamstress and a cook of rare ability. It seemed this preparation helped her greatly and made it much easier for Mother as a homemaker and mother to care for her own home and family with the meager means which she had. She was married to Esdras martin in the Salt Lake Temple by john R Winder, February 12, 1896 and they were the parents of three sons and three daughters. Soo after their marriage, they went to Colorado where Dad worked on a ranch and she was employed as cook for the ranch hands. Then they moved to American Fork where their first child, Huron Esdras, was born December 21, 1896 and later for about four years they made their home in Scipio. Two more of their children were born there. Erma was born March 22, 1898 and Glen Beck was born February 19, 1900. After that they came to Alpine which was their home for many, many years. Here Inez was born November 17, 1903, Cleone was born December 13, 1906 and Angus Jay born June 23, 1909. Inez died November 23, 1915 of ruptured appendix and Angus Jay died April 4, 1910 of scarlet fever. These deaths were heartaches indeed of our parents. After Grandfathers’ death on December 18, 1906 Dad and Mother moved into the old home and cared for Grandmother until she passed away December 18, 1915. Mother served on the Old Folks committee in the Alpine ward for many years and was one of its most valuable members. Perhaps her most outstanding characteristic was her willingness to help others with no thought of herself No day was too long nor nights too dark if she could be of service to one in need. As a Mother she was an ideal in our lives. She never sought a public position herself but was found in the background making it possible for others. She taught us the principles of right living and encouraged us in every way to be of service in the church organizations. While she enjoyed to the last moments of her life, a good joke we never heard fall from her lips a story that was not clean. Our friends were always welcome in our home and Mother kept a home that was immaculate and inviting to all of us. Her bread and pastries were enjoyed too by both her family and friends. She gave freely of her limited means to help every worthy cause, in fact she loved to work, help and give. It was her life. In 1924 she gave up housekeeping and made her home with my husband and me the greater part of the time. She was with the other children for a few weeks at a time and wherever she chose to go she received a hearty welcome and was counted as one of the family. She was helpful, congenial and jovial and never interfered with family affairs. She was generous to a fault with her grandchildren and seemed never to miss an opportunity to make every special occasion in their lives a little brighter by a thoughtful gift. They all idolized her and as one of them said, “She was like a grandmother out of a story book.” Her health began to fail in the fall of 1943 and she steadily grew weaker. She had her one great desire and wish fulfilled, never to be a burden on her children and she was only bedfast one or two days. When Mother passed away it left a vacancy in the hearts of her children and grandchildren that no other can fill and while the years of her greatest activity had passed we felt a source of strength and security in her presence. She was 73 years old when she passed away, February 4, 1944. God sent his choicest spirit upon the earth to dwell, That she might teach his children and of His love would tell, Her heart was full of goodness so loving and so kind And we could meet with millions; but never would we find A Pal that we could talk to and trust from day to day. For in our hours of sorrow, she made our hearts feel gay. And never could we hope to find or feel there is another For God has blessed us most of all, He made this soul our Mother, So when God calls us back to Him, we pray our reward will be, A place beside our Mother, in sweet Eternity.

Joseph Henry Beck and Nora Henefer

Contributor: gabrielbodard Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Joseph Henry Beck and Nora Henefer Taken from the book, “In Memory of the Becks” by Stephen F Beck. Joseph Henry Beck was born April 7, 1874, the seventh child of Fredrick and Henricka Beck. His older brothers and sisters were Emma, Julius, Janius, Ella and Francis: then young Henry came to make their home very happy. He must have been a happy child because his daughter Wanda tells us that as a man he was always singing and was very often telling them stories of his happy boyhood. Henry’s life was spent on the farm and helping others with their farm work. He worked often for his cousin, Jacob Beck, on his ranch at Highland. He married Nora Henefer on December 26, 1899, in Salt Lake City, Utah. They were married on Nora’s birthday. Nora was born in Salt Lake City, December 26, 1883. As a boy Henry like to ride horses and he was always taking part in the horse races. One day while he was racing his horse he ran over some sheep on the street and he was knocked unconscious for several days. He never did entirely recover from this injury. Henry and Nora were the parents of five children, Wanda, Syble, Elaine, Myra, and Welton. Dorcas Wanda was born November 24, 1900. Xenia Syble was born October 10, 1902. Elaine was born December 23, 1903. Julia Myra was born August 12, 1907 and Welton Henry born September 30, 1910. Henry was very good to his children. He had a farm upon the high bench and he nearly always brought home a bouquet of wild flowers in the evening. He came home singing most of the time. In 1918 after a short illness his beloved wife Nora died with the flu. She died the 28th of October 1918 and Henry was broken-hearted. Wanda at this time was just eighteen and she helped her father to take care of the younger children. Henry died after a short illness the 29th of October 1927. This was just nine short years after his wife Nora died. They are both buried in the Alpine City Cemetery. He was only 52 years old when he died. He was a fine father and was much loved by his family and friends.

Frances Maria Beck Cayton and Edward Cayton

Contributor: gabrielbodard Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Frances Maria Beck Cayton and Edward Cayton Taken from the book “In Memory of the Becks” by Stephen F Beck. Frances Maria Beck Cayton was born on April 25, 1873. Her father, Fredrick Beck and his wife Renricka (Henricka) Hanson, had been asked by President Brigham Young to settle in Alpine to work at his trade as a stone mason, and so with their three children, Emma, Julius, and Janius they moved to the region known as the High Bench. There were five more children born to the couple and two did not survive. Ella was the fourth surviving child, Francis the next, Fredrich and Henry the youngest. In Denmark, the family had enjoyed living in comfortable surroundings, but getting started in a new land, with a new language brought with it the hardships and sacrifice that have been repeated thousands of times in the lives of our immigrant converts. The incident in the lives of these hardy people have come down by way of mouth to their children and children's children and the written records will make monuments forever of their faith and integrity. So Frances, as the next youngest of the Fredrick Becks, grew from infancy under conditions that were far different from the times when even her own children were small. From her home on the high bench, she and her brothers and sisters walked to church, to town, or over to the fort. The only shoes she remembered wearing until she was twelve, were made by hand of several thicknesses of overall cloth, with soles of pads of paper or card-board. Frances and Henry being the youngest, were given the work of looking after the animals — so in their shoes made from overalls, they herded the cows and sheep through the hay stubble after the hay had been cut. On one occasion when they were gathering eggs from a nest in the sage brush, Frances almost put her hand in a nest where a rattlesnake was curled up eating the eggs. When Ella was about thirteen and Frances was a couple of years younger, they had their first pair of "store bought" shoes — together. Of course these were just for Sunday, and the girls walked barefooted to the Dry Creek Bridge and carried the precious shoes. One Sunday Ella would put on the shoes at the bridge and the next Sunday Frances would wear the shoes. In 1887 Frances was fourteen, and at the time she came to Salt Lake City to work. She was fortunate in finding work in the home of the Willard Richards on 9th East in Sugarhouse. There were five Richards' children and their home was large, so there was a lot of hard work. Sister Richards was a good manager, and had the means to run her household well. Two girls lived in with the family most of the time. One day the upstairs was swept and dusted, another day the downstairs was swept and dusted, another day the washing was done which took all the day on the washboard, another day was for the ironing. The house was kept immaculate always. Frances worked hard for a girl in her teens, but Brother and Sister Richards were good and kind to her. Through the next four or five years, she lived with them and it was only natural that through this formative period of her life she spoke of the Richard's home as being her home, almost more than the one at Alpine. In the summer of 1891 Frances went home to Alpine for a visit and while there was taken ill with what was called inflammation of the bowels, but was later believed to be a ruptured appendix. She was sick all summer and it was during that summer that a young man, Edward Clark Cayton came to Alpine from Logan, Nebraska, to visit his Uncle, Lee Clark. Edward liked the little town, nestled at the foot of the mountain with the streams of water running through it. He liked the people too, so he stayed and made it his home. He immediately became interested in the activities of the church and attended meetings in the Alpine Ward regularly. In this way he became acquainted with the young people of the town, and in due time began to take out Ella and Frances Beck, at first it was one then the other, and sometimes both. But soon he became seriously interested in Frances and they "kept steady company" for about two years. During that time, Edward or Ed as he was always called, was working in the mines at Bingham, so when Frances had recovered completely from her illness, she went to Bingham to work. At Christmas time 1893 they drove home together from Bingham on a two-wheel cart. They had bought some chocolates to take home for a Christmas treat. It started to snow and kept snowing all the way to Alpine. Frances was carrying the chocolates in her lap and by the time Ed and she arrived home, the chocolates had melted and run all over them and the cart too. The dollars worth of chocolates was gone. It was while they were at home that they decided to get married. They went to American Fork and were married December 28, 1893. Ed had not yet joined the church, his people were very much opposed to his being baptized, and consequently were not too pleased when he married a Mormon girl. However, he was baptized soon after and four years later they came to t the Salt Lake Temple and received their endowments and were sealed together for time and all eternity. They made the trip to Salt Lake City in a covered wagon, and slept in the wagon in the tithing yard while they were there. After their marriage in 1893 they went , back to Bingham—but not to stay, because by then Ed had no job. The "Panic of '93" was very real, and everyone was feeling the depression. The newly weds went back to American Fork and lived with Ed's s sister and her husband that winter. Utah Lake was frozen over and Ed cut and hauled cedar post over the lake in a bobsled for grocery money. One load bought groceries for two days. In the spring, Ed and Frances went in debt for a piece of property on the Bench between Alpine and American Fork. There was a two-room house on the ground and this was their first home. It was situated on the road leading to American Fork Canyon and at that time in the winter the snow drifted until they were completely isolated. In the summer following their move to the Bench, Ed fell out of a cherry tree, while he was picking cherries and broke his leg. Money being non-existant and doctors a distance away, he did not have it taken care of, instead, made himself a wooden leg. He did all his work and harvested his crops that summer on his broken leg, supported by the homemade wooden one. The following winter Frances and Ed decided to move to Alpine. They were expecting their first baby and were fearful of being snowed in as they had been the winter before—so they moved into a room in Joseph Beck's home. After spending another summer in the little house on the bench, they lived the next winter in Ren Vance's home. The next spring they bought a house on Back Street and this was their home for five years. On June 12, 1903 while they were living on the Back Street their second child, Edward Rumel was born. During the next period of time the little family prospered and the years of hard work were starting to pay off. There was never any work too hard or under too bad conditions for Ed to do, to help him give Frances and the family the necessities of life. He bought what the family called "The Field", and raised potatoes and cabbage on it in the summer, then in the winter sold them in Salt Lake City. It would take nearly three days to make the trip with his wagon and team. He worked all winter selling the harvest of the summer. Whenever he could spare time from his own work, he used his team to haul ore out of American Fork Canyon. After about two years, the family moved to the house on Front Street. By now, the farm was paying well, it was good ground and Ed worked it wisely and well and ever mindful of the comfort of Frances and the children. They were very happy and it seemed that everything was favorable for a comfortable and prosperous life. The third child, James Orland, was born October 4, 1907 and from that time on, Frances' health was never very good. In 1909 the baby Jim had scarlet fever followed closely by polio. The strain and shock of this crippling illness left its mark on Frances, too, she still under the doctor's care following Jim's birth. When Dr. Kerr, whom she liked so much, and had so much faith in, moved to Salt Lake from Provo, the Cayton family also moved to be near him. After living in Salt Lake City for about two years, they sold all the property they had in Alpine and bought a home in Salt Lake City. Frances and Ed and their children, lived in several wards, in the Sugarhouse area, —Sugarhouse, Waterloo and finally Emerson Ward. They were well known and active in ward affairs, and did a great deal of geneological research and temple work. Ed's Mother came often to stay with them and would stay for several months each year for a number of years. She had no home of her own after her husband's passing. She was always asked to attend church with Frances and Ed, but she remained bitter toward the church and against Ed for having married a Mormon and joining the church. Ed was the only one of his family who had affiliated himself with the church until very recently. Bessie, the daughter received a letter from a granddaughter of one of Ed's nieces, a young girl of twenty-two, who had met the missionaries and had been baptized. The family have since kept in touch with her and she is very happy in her activities and very much interested in her geneological background. Thanks to the efforts of Frances and Ed, the work is all finished and recorded. The last time that Ed's Mother visited the Cayton home in Salt Lake, she attended church with them quite regularly. Ed arranged for her to attend an Old Folk's Party in the Granite Stake House. She was very much impressed with the people she met and the program. She began to talk more favorablely about the church and some of the principles she had learned about. Before leaving to go to a daughter's home; she asked Frances if she would do her Temple work for her, after she passed away. This was the only admission she ever made that they or the church had made any impression on her. As soon as possible after her death her work was done as was her husband's and two daughters that had passed away previously. It was in 1920 that Frances and Ed moved into Emerson Ward, and here it was that they were happier than anywhere since leaving Alpine. They had been burdened always by heavy doctor bills and medical care for Frances and also Jim, but they managed to get along. Ed had an ingenious way of making enough money to keep going. They made many close friends and were respected and loved by their neighbors and ward members. Ed was well known all over Salt Lake. He drove a team of little white horses and worked with them on the school grounds for the Salt Lake School Board. He went from school to school, doing landscaping and cleaning up the grounds during the summer. He was remembered everywhere for his cheery "hello's" and was never too busy to pick up some children and give them a ride or let them help eat his lunch. Some of the best times Bessie's boys remember, are when they went to the school grounds with grandpa and his team, and he gave them a quarter to go alone to the store to buy what they wanted for lunch. In the winter time the wagon became a bob-sled and Ed took the young people out on sleighing parties. On the days preceeding the sleigh parties, Frances would spend the afternoon heating rocks and bricks in the oven to keep him warm while he drove in the cold night air. In June 1922 after completing three and one half years of high school, Rumel was called to California on a mission. The family knew it would not be possible on its income so Rumel went to work that summer for a State surveying crew, and left for his mission in September. He had a little Jersey cow that had been his main support during high school, so Bessie produced further and helped pay his missionary expense. Jim delivered the milk in bottles to the neighbors, and boy-like, he sometimes referred to the white bottles of milk as "Ambassadors of Truth". Mel was able to stay on his mission for twenty-eight months. He fulfilled his mission honorably, and made many friends for himself and his church. He helped establish branches and Sunday Schools in towns, where now there are several stakes organized. The last nine months, he was President of the Long Beach Conference. These were long months of waiting for Frances and even though she was not well, she wanted him to remain as long as there was need of him in California. As was mentioned before, Frances health was not good from the time of Jim's birth. She suffered intensely with nervousness and had a bad inward goiter, which affected her digestion. So in 1928 the Doctor advised a rest in the hospital for a couple of weeks. While there her attending doctor and Dr. Ralph Richards of the Salt Lake Clinic made daily calls on her. The two weeks became six weeks but by that time the Doctors persuaded her to have the goiter removed. Dr. Richards performed the operation and at that time remarked that it was one of the worst he had ever seen. Before the operation took place, the Relief Society of the Emerson Ward called a special prayer meeting. Bishop Joseph Lloyd offered a prayer in her behalf, and promised Frances that she would live to enjoy her children and grandchildren more than she ever had before. The summer following she realized Bishop Lloyd's prayer was answered. The terrible goiter she had feared and hated nearly all of her life was gone. Her body mended and strength returned — she looked ahead to years of feeling good and enjoying her family. Her whole attitude was different and once again she had hopes of doing her own work and many thing that had passed her by, having friends in for an afternoon or evening—even going to the Temple again. By Christmas she did her own house cleaning and all of her Christmas shopping. With the return of vitality there seemed to be an aura of happiness and contentment radiate from her that had been lacking for so long. On December 28, 1928 the family gathered at Mel's home for a family dinner honoring the 35th wedding anniversary Frances and Ed. In the night following their return home, Frances was taken desperately ill. She was terribly sick for four days and then operated on, but spite of all the medical help available the time, and the faith and prayers of her family and friends she passed away January 1, 1929. Her death was the result of peritonitis, but the doctors were doubt as to what caused it. Frances had been a wonderful wife, mother, and homemaker. She was happy with her husband and family, and matter how little or how much she had to do with, she took a great deal of pride in taking care of them. She will long remembered for her fine cooking and a daughter-in-law often remarked admiringly, "There never was a lose button or an undarned sock in her house." Ed survived Frances eighteen years, and although he never recovered from the deep hurt of losing his Frances, he was always cheerful and happy. He spent a great deal of time continuing the Temple work and searching the geneological records that he and Frances enjoyed doing so much together. In spite of a serious accident he was in, a few years prior to his death, he recovered enough so that every available name in his family was recorded in his family record and the Temple work finished. This was an answer to a blessing given him by President Chipman of the Salt Lake Temple at the time when he lay with a broken hip and arm and it looked as though he could not survive. President Chipman promised him he would live to finish the work for his family. The three years preceding his passing, he went to the Temple on crutches and often went through two sessions each day. Although his body was crippled the same cheerfulness and good humor that had characterized his whole life, and brought him through so many trials, and heart breaks, endeared him to everyone he met and was forever a part of his nature. It was said of him, "He never met a stranger in his life." He passed away quietly on May 1, 1946 after five years of suffering from the accident. Both Frances and Ed are resting in the quiet surroundings of Wasatch Lawn Cemetery, and we who remember them, know that they are again together and happy, the sickness and trials of their earthly existance past, and they are going on working together in the wonderful plan of eternal salvation. The oldest child a daughter, Bessie Frances, married Oscar R. Holbrook of Bountiful and they live in Salt Lake City. They have three grown children, all married, Everett LeRoy, Donald Cayton, and Maxine Ruth Holbrook Nelson. The second child, a son, Edward Rumel, married Gwendolyn Nelson, of Ogden, a California Missionary Companion, and they have three daughters, Lou Jen Cayton DeJong, Marilyn Cayton, and Frances Ruth Cayton Wagstaff. They also live in Salt Lake. The youngest child, James Orland lives in Torrance, California with his wife, the former Margaret Helen Green of Salt Lake City. They have four children, James Richard, David Walter. Charles Edward, and Margaret Helen. The posterity now numbers twenty-eight— three children, ten grandchildren and fifteen great-grandchildren, one deceased.

Henricka Hansine Hanson Beck

Contributor: gabrielbodard Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Henricka Hanson Beck Written by her Granddaughter Orleen Beck Taken from the book “In Memory of the Becks” by Stephen F Beck Henricka Hansen was born in Aalborg in Denmark, February 10, 1833. She married Fredrick Beck March 23, 1856 in her native land among her friends and home people. Having heard the gospel, she together with her husband evidenced their faith in the same way by being baptized the 27th of December 1865, into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The following spring the spirit of gathering was strongly made manifest in their little home. Preparations and final departure were made by this worthy couple and their three children, Julius Conrad, Emma, and Janus J for Utah, the home of the Saints. The journey took four and one-half months. Eight weeks and three days on the water and nine weeks on the ocean with all of its attendant dangers and the lack of food. They suffered greatly from the heat in New York and some of the people died from heat exhaustion. They were rushed by cattle cars to Omaha, but still it took them fourteen days to reach there. It is hard to imagine what this mother went through for the gospel. I am sure her heart must have ached for a nice clean bed and some good food for her three little children. I wonder how she kept them clean those long, hard months on the boat and the fourteen days on the train. They were nine weeks on the plains and they came to Utah with the Captain’s company and used an ox team belonging to William Bateman. They reached the Salt Lake Valley in October 1866. After making a home in Salt Lake City for two years they came out to Alpine to live. Fredrick’s brother Stephen was making his home in Alpine at this time. Quiet and unassuming with a heart full of humility, she was a woman who made friends and retained them throughout prosperity and poverty alike. Sacrificing much for the gospel’s sake made her realize how dear it was to her and she extended her knowledge of the principles so they were blended and intermingled with her every living day. The greatest thing that can be said of her is, she was a great Latter Day Saint. It has been said, she was a good friend and neighbor, which is praise indeed and a true index of her righteous living. Among the saints she will be blessed because she lived her religion as she knew it. She taught her children both by example and by precept. She was indeed a good pioneer mother. She was the mother of seven children, Emma, Julius, Janius, Ella Henrietta, Francis, Fredrick, and Henry.

Life timeline of Henericka Beck (Hanson)

1833
Henericka Beck (Hanson) was born on 13 Feb 1833
Henericka Beck (Hanson) was 7 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
1840
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Henericka Beck (Hanson) was 27 years old when Charles Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
1859
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Henericka Beck (Hanson) was 28 years old when American Civil War: Fort Sumter surrenders to Confederate forces. The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865. As a result of the long-standing controversy over slavery, war broke out in April 1861, when Confederate forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina, shortly after U.S. President Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated. The nationalists of the Union proclaimed loyalty to the U.S. Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States, who advocated for states' rights to expand slavery.
1861
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Henericka Beck (Hanson) was 47 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
1879
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Henericka Beck (Hanson) was 51 years old when Eruption of Krakatoa: Four enormous explosions destroy the island of Krakatoa and cause years of climate change. The 1883 eruption of Krakatoa in the Dutch East Indies began in the afternoon of Sunday, 26 August 1883, and peaked in the late morning of Monday, 27 August when over 70% of the island and its surrounding archipelago were destroyed as it collapsed into a caldera. Additional seismic activity was reported to have continued until February 1884, though reports of seismic activity after October 1883 were later dismissed by Rogier Verbeek's investigation into the eruption. The 1883 eruption was one of the deadliest and most destructive volcanic events in recorded history. At least 36,417 deaths are attributed to the eruption and the tsunamis it created. Significant additional effects were also felt around the world in the days and weeks after the volcano's eruption.
1883
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Henericka Beck (Hanson) was 63 years old when George VI of the United Kingdom (d. 1952) George VI was King of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Commonwealth from 11 December 1936 until his death in 1952. He was the last Emperor of India and the first Head of the Commonwealth.
1895
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Henericka Beck (Hanson) was 71 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
1903
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Henericka Beck (Hanson) died on 3 Dec 1915 at the age of 82
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Henericka Beck (Hanson) (13 Feb 1833 - 3 Dec 1915), BillionGraves Record 2457 Alpine, Utah, Utah, United States

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