Hannah M. Beck

23 May 1824 - 17 Nov 1905

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Hannah M. Beck

23 May 1824 - 17 Nov 1905
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Christian J (Jensenius) Beck and Hannah M (Marie) Krants Beck By Joseph Hyrum Beck From the book “In Memory of the Becks”, compiled by Stephen F Beck Christian J Beck was born on April 14, 1822 in the Province of Saltum, City of Lut, Denmark. Hannah M Krants Beck was born in the same place May 2
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Life Information

Hannah M. Beck

Born:
Died:

Alpine Cemetery

283 N 300 E
Alpine, Utah, Utah
United States
Transcriber

crex

May 29, 2011
Photographer

Catirrel

May 26, 2011

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Christian J Beck and Hanna M Krants Beck

Contributor: crex Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Christian J (Jensenius) Beck and Hannah M (Marie) Krants Beck By Joseph Hyrum Beck From the book “In Memory of the Becks”, compiled by Stephen F Beck Christian J Beck was born on April 14, 1822 in the Province of Saltum, City of Lut, Denmark. Hannah M Krants Beck was born in the same place May 23, 1824. Christian J Beck was the son of Jacob Beck and Dortha Christensen Beck. Christian was one of a family of fourteen children. His boyhood days were spent at what they called the “Old School” in the Province of Jutland, village of Skebsted (Skibsted), where his father had moved. His father was the village school master and Deacon in the Lutheran Church, which position he held until his death. Here Christian grew to manhood. Here he met and married Hannah Maria Krants. Her parents’ names were Carl Krants and Elsie Christensen Krants. (Her father was of German descent.) And through her, he (Christian J Beck) inherited a life lease on a large farm and in time became well to do. They lived here for several years when he sold out his lease and moved to Wisburry. At this place there was a large estate named “Fuegholt” being sold. The work Fuegholt translated means the “Home of Birds.” This place he bought. In connection with the estate was a dance hall, lunch and soft drink parlors, which they operated during the winter months. This farm was located in one of the most fertile districts of Denmark. To them were born eight children as follows: Christena , born May 27, 1851. Married Louis Peterson who died February 7, 1888. Later married James L Robertson. Jacob Theador, 1st, born July 13, 1856, Died January 25, 1860 in Denmark. Carl Jacob, born February 20, 1858. Died January 27, 1872 in Alpine, Utah. Dortha Marie, born June 15, 1860. Married Jos. W. Watkins who died March 26, 1888. Later married Frank Farquharson. Jacob Theador, 2nd, born March 24, 1862. Died April 5, 1862. Jacob Theador, 3rd, born April 16, 1864. Died January 24, 1865. Christian, born February 26, 1866. Died July 3, 1866. Joseph Hyrum, born September 19, 1867. Married Bernettia McDaniel. They were living on their beautiful farm “Fuegholt” when they were converted to the divine teachings of Mormonism. They sacrificed all for their religion. Most of their means was spent in helping their poorer countrymen who had also embraced the Gospel to emigrate to Utah. He helped families to emigrate to America besides his own, one of whom was his brother Fredrick and family. On May 20, 1866, they left parents, relatives, friends, their native country; all that was near and dear to them and commenced their journeyed to Utah. They crossed the Atlantic on the sail ship “Kendelworth”. It was an old sailship. This was its last voyage across the sea. It took them eight weeks and three days to cross the Atlantic and they had many narrow escapes while crossing. The ship took fire three times. There was much sickness on board, due to a great deal to their crowded conditions. Father and Mother lost their baby son, Christian, at sea. He was buried in the Atlantic Ocean ten days before reaching New York Harbor. On reaching New York the weather was extremely hot and many of the emigrants were overcome with the heat and died. On account of the heat they were rushed on to Boston by rail and from Boston to Omaha, Nebraska. They did not travel in Pullman cars as the traveler of today, but were loaded into cattle cars and shipped in that way. It was fourteen days from the time they left New York until they reached Omaha. One can never realize the sufferings, and inconveniences enroute on account of conditions, and the delays. At Omaha and Council Bluffs they rested for one week while the men and teams from Utah (who met them there) were arranging for the trip across the plains by ox teams. Because of the shortage of teams and wagons all those who were able were forced to walk. And, so it became their lot to walk most of the way between Omaha, Nebraska, and Salt Lake City, Utah. Their diet consisted mainly of bread, pork and beans, with occasionally fresh buffalo meat. The buffaloes were killed by the men. They endured many hardships incident to travel in those early days, when rivers and streams of water had to be waded or forded as the case may have been, when the Indians held supreme sway over the entire country from Council Bluffs to Salt lake City, a distance of several hundred miles. It is little wonder then that when they reached Salt Lake City, “Their Zion”, on September 20, 1866, footsore and weary, they cried with joy, having been on the way since May 20 of that year, just four months to the day. They stayed in Salt Lake City but a few days, when they journeyed to Lehi, where a brother and his family were then living. They made Lehi their home for two years and here their last and eighth child was born to them, whom they named Joseph Hyrum Beck. They then moved to Alpine where they homesteaded 160 acres of land. Here they built them a home which consisted of one adobe room with a dirt roof. I well remember as a boy that often in the night during rainy periods my mother and father would get out of bed, take down curtains and over up articles of furniture to protect them from the rain and mud as it would drip through the dirt roof. On January 27, 1872, their son Carl took sick and died. He lacked a few days being fourteen years of age. This was a terrible blow to them as he was a very trusty boy. They had come to lean a great deal on him as he readily learned to speak the English language and to partake of the customs of this country which they were more slow to grasp because of their matured age. It took them years to overcome this sorrow. In the year 1869 Father took his roll of bedding on his back and walked to Echo and Weber Canyons, leaving my mother with the family of small children in destitute circumstances. He thought he might find better conditions, and here he labored for about six months on the road bed of the Union Pacific railroad through Echo and Weber Canyon and down to Ogden. He was present when the Union Pacific and the Central Pacific Railroad companies met at Ogden, which connected the Atlantic and Pacific by rail. He did some mining in the early 70’s in American Fork Canyon. In fact, he did any kind of work he could get to do in order to provide for his family. This was no easy task in those days for food and money were very scarce. As time went on he became the owner of an ox team and with them he began to clear and break up some of the land he had homesteaded. In this way he soon became the owner of a good farm once more. As years rolled by the ox team was replaced with horses. Their home was remodeled – more rooms were added to it. The old dirt roof was a thing of the past and shingles took its place. Thank goodness! Father and Mother were both so hard working and industrious people that in their declining years they were blessed with the comforts of life once more. Their two daughters and one son lived close by them which was a great comfort to them as they had only these three children left. They died as they had lived, faithful to the Divine teachings of Christ, which they had embraced in their native country, and for which they gave their earthly existence. On March 27, 1899, Father departed from this life and on November 17, 1905, Mother joined him in death. They are buried side by side in the Alpine Cemetery, with this epitaph written on their tombstone, which is in harmony with their lives – “In labor and in love allied In death they here sleep side by side. Resting in peace, the aged twain, Til Christ shall raise them up again.” (I heard my mother, Mrs Christian M Beck, say that she had heard Chris’ Mother remark often that Christian J Beck was the best man that ever lived.) by Reva Beck Bosone.

Christina Beck Peterson Robertson and Louis Peterson

Contributor: crex Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Saturday morning, March 22, 1941, after nearly ninety years of varied experiences in mortal life, the spirit of a real pioneer, Christina Beck Peterson Robertson, departed for another sphere. She was the oldest of the eight children of Christian J Beck and Hannah Krantz and was born in Skebstead, Denmark, may 27, 1851. Her father was wealthy as a farmer and was living with his family on the Fuegholt Estate in Wisbury, Denmark when they were converted to the divine teaching of Mormonism. He helped six other families to emigrate to America besides his own. On May 20, 1866, they left their parents, relatives and friends – their wealth and native land all else that was dear to them and started on a long and wearisome journey to Utah, the land of promise. They crossed the Atlantic on the sailship “Kendelworth” and were on the ocean eight weeks and three days. During the voyage their ship caught fire three times and was so badly burned that it was condemned in New York Harbor and never made another voyage. To add to the sorrow of the journey the baby boy of the family passed away at sea when they were just ten days from New York. On reaching New York many of the company died of severe heat. The remainder was rushed to Boston by rail and from there to Omaha, Nebraska in cattle cars. This required fourteen days. At Omaha and Council Bluffs they rested one week while the men with ox teams from Utah made ready for the trip across the plains. On account of the shortage of teams and wagons, all who were able were compelled to walk and so it became the lot of this young girl to walk almost the entire distance from Omaha to Salt Lake City. They had many dangerous encounters with the Indians along the way. On one occasion they camped for the night on the spot where they were told by the captain of their company was one of the bloodiest battle ever fought between white man and Indian. On another occasion they had made their camp where the town of Laramie, Wyoming, now lies and after their evening meal a band of ruthless Indians rode through the camp scattering cooking utensils and making threats, but finally said if the company belonged to Brigham they would not harm them. Tired and footsore they finally reached Salt Lake City, September 20, 1866 exactly four months from the day they left their native land. When we think of Sister Peterson, then a young girl of 15 years who had been reared in wealth and plenty with the future holding out to her every advantage, and then think of her on the long ocean voyage, the wearisome trek over the rough and dreary plains and the frightful encounters with Indians, we wonder just what feelings were in her girlish heart. After a few days in Salt Lake City the family went on to Lehi where they lived for two years. They then moved to Alpine where the father took up a farm and children participated in church, school and social activities the town afforded at that early date. On May 25th 1874 Christina Beck and Louis Peterson were united in marriage by Daniel H Wells in the old Endowment House in Salt Lake City and they settled on the farm where the old house now stands. They became the parents of six children. Two of them died within five days, one a boy of 2 years and the other a girl of a few days. The couple had been married less than 14 years when the husband was suddenly taken by death and Sister Christina managed the farm and made a living for the children. To augment the family income she wove carpets for this and surrounding towns. Some years later she was married to James L Robertson and was a mother to his four motherless children. In 1908, she mourned the loss of her second husband. During the sixty-seven years of her married life in Alpine she lived on the same farm and triumphed over obstacles that would have discouraged many another. She was an excellent housekeeper and the needlework created by her dexterous hands was known far and wide. She loved flowers and her surroundings were always inviting. She loved her home and not until she was unable to care for herself could she be persuaded to live elsewhere. The last two years her physical strength has waned and she has lived most of the time with her two daughters, but her mind was clear and she was conscious to the last moment. Sister Robertson is survived by four children: Mrs Etta Graham, Mrs Amanda Graham, Clarence L and Conrad J Petersen, 14 grandchildren and 12 great grandchildren also, the four step-children: LaFell, Rellous, and Que Robertson, and Mrs Christina McDaniel. As one by one the ranks for the stalwart pioneers are lessened, may we, who enjoy the fruits of their labors, live worthy for the heritage which is ours.

Dorthea Maria Beck Watkins Farquharson

Contributor: crex Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Dorthea Maria Beck Watkins Farquharson History taken from book "In Memory of the Becks" by Stephen F Beck. Dorthea was born June 15, 1860 in Aalborg, Denmark, the fourth child in a family of eight children of Christian N and Hannah Maria Krants Beck. Her mother was of German descent and after her marriage, inherited a life lease on a large farm, and they became well-to-do. They lived on this farm for several years, they then sold out the lease and bought a large estate named "Fuegholt" which translated means "The home of birds". In connection with this estate was a dance hall, lunch and soft drink parlor, which they operated during the winter months. This farm was located in one of the most fertile districts in Denmark. It was on this beautiful estate that Dorthea spent her early childhood. Her mother was an ardent Bible reader, and when the Latter Day Saint missionaries came to her door it wasn't long until she could see the light of truth in their teachings, but her father was unable to grasp it so readily. She labored with her husband to see it as she did, but at that time he was unable to do so (he was baptized into the church two years after they emigrated to Utah.) She was thoroughly converted and wished to enjoy the promises and blessings of the restored gospel. Assocringly she went with the missionaries to a small creek and was baptized and confirmed a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Some days later when her father went to the city for supplies some one asked him if it was true that his wife had joined the despised Mormons. He said he was not aware of it, but, hurried home to ask her mother about it. He said: "Hannah, is this true that I hear about your joining the Mormon Church?" She answered that it was true and his comment was, "Well let us keep it as quite as possible so we can sell the farm and get something for it, then we will go to Zion." At this time the Latter Day Saint converts were persecuted and driven from their homes for accepting the gospel, and so her mother and father sacrificed all for their religion; most of their money for the sale of their home and farm was used in helping their poorer countrymen, who had also embraced the gospel to emigrate to America. Her father helped six families to emigrate besides his own, one being his brother Frederick's family. The only recompense he ever received was a cow from one of the emigrants. He walked from Alpine, Utah, to Moroni, Utah, a distance of 100 miles and drove the cow back. On May 20, 1866 the parents, Dorthea who was about 5 years old, a sister Christine age 14, a brother Carl age 8 and a baby brother Christian 3 months, bid farewell to relatives, friends, their native country, all that was near and dear to them and commenced their journey to Utah. They crossed the Atlantic ocean on the sail ship "Kendleworth". It was an old sail ship and this was its last voyage on the sea. It took them eight weeks and three days to cross the Atlantic, and they had many narrow escapes while crossing. The ship took fire three times. There was much sickness on board ship due to the crowded condition. Her baby brother almost five months old died and was buried at sea. Dorthea remembered plainly seeing him wrapped in sheets and slid off a board into the sea. This made such an impression upon her tender years she never forgot it. Her parents along with the others took third class passage to give others the chance to come to Zion. The food was very poor, and Dorthea's mother being of a delicate nature has often said she would have died if it hadn't been for the captain of the ship, who took a liking to one of the blond curly-headed Beck children and sent good food to the folks with the child. On reaching New York the weather was extremely hot and many of the emigrants were overcome with the heat and died. On account of the heat they were rushed in cattle cars from Boston to Omaha. Nebraska. No one can realize the suffering and inconvenience enroute because of being delayed so many times. At Omaha and Council Bluffs they rest-a week while the men and teams came from Utah (who met them there.) Because of the shortage of teams they walked the entire way between Omaha, Nebraska, and Salt Lake City. It was here at Omaha that Dorthea was forced to tear the head from her beautiful doll she had been allowed to bring from Denmark. Because of the shortage of space all excess baggage had to be thrown out, but she kept the dolls head and while they were living in Lehi she was pursuaded to trade this beautiful doll head for a big black hen. As her father fixed a box to put the hen in, she wondered how main eggs she would get a day from the hen. She knew the trade had been made to keep up with the food supply. Dorthea remembered many interesting things crossing the plains. She gathered buffalo chips to make fires to cook their meals and at one time when she was putting the chips by the fire her clothes caught fire and she ran away fanning the fire and almost enveloped in it. Brother Anderson, the undertaker for many years in American Fork and who was also one of the emigrants, caught her and rolled her in the dust and saved her life. The Indians held supreme sway over the plains and the emigrants were always in mortal dread of them. When they arrived in Salt Lake City they stayed there a few days and then journeyed to Lehi where an uncle on her father’s side lived. They made Lehi their home for two years, and then they moved to Alpine where her father homesteaded 160 acres of ground. He built a one-room adobe house with a mud roof and while they were building the home she walked from Lehi to Alpine through the sage brush many times. They were also at this time very frightened of the Indians. They would do some very mean things at times and at one time they stole a little girl from her parents and bashed out brains down in the old dry creek. Dorthea recalls many times seeing Peter Rockwell and others come riding into Alpine on horses just as hard as they could ride. Everyone would clear the street for them when they heard them coming. After moving to Alpine she worked hard helping her father clear the land of sage brush. She and her brother Carl were the only help her father had. She herded her father's cows on the hills of the land he homesteaded. She always went barefoot in the summer because she had no shoes, or if she happened to have some she kept them for best. There were many rattlesnakes in those days and she had to be careful where she stepped. When she became a little older she worked in American Fork canyon where there were mines and a smelter at the Mary Ellen Gulch, and Dorthea worked at the boarding house. The railroad ran from American Fork up to Deer Creek. One night a crowd of drunken men came up to the boarding house. A man from Alpine by the name of Worth Nash saw the danger she was in so he took Dorthea and his gun and hid out in the mountains. The men were mad because they couldn't find them and they had guns and followed them all night and were going to kill Dorthea and Mr. Nash. They walked all night to keep out of the men's way and when morning came the men came to their senses and were all right. Dorthea was glad to work and help her parents out as they were in dire need at this time. She recalled how one Sunday morning, when her father was going to fast meeting he called the family together and prayed to the Lord that he could get food for his family. When meeting was over the Bishop called him to one side and asked how he was fixed for food and told him to come to the office and get a ham and some eggs and told him to get something to get some molasses in. Her father didn't know the language very well, he thought molasses must be a vegetable so he took a sack to get it in. Dorthea remembered it was one of the best meals she ever ate because she was so hungry. Her mother made what the Danish call a "Flish Panker" which was scrambled eggs over the ham. She remembered the first tomato she ever saw. It was so beautiful and red that she was disappointed when she tasted it, she expected it to be nice and sweet. Sweets were scare in those days. On September 9, 1877, Dorthea was married to Joseph William Watkins by Bishop McCullough and sealed January 31, 1878 by Daniel H. Wells in the old endowment house and to this union five children were born, four sons and one daughter. The youngest child, a son, was born six weeks after his father died. Her husband homesteaded 160 acres one mile east of Alpine and built a log house of two rooms with logs hauled out of Preston's Canyon in American Fork Canyon. He also built a fine milk house over the spring of canyon water. They milked a large herd of cows and part of their income came from the sale of butter and eggs in American Fork. They would sell twelve to eighteen pounds of butter for sixteen or seventeen cents a pound and six to nine cents for a dozen eggs. They were sold at Dunkley's store, also the Coop store. She could make delicious butter and after anyone had eaten it, it was always in demand. Her husband would trade work with his brothers and brother-in-law; in this way they would help each other. She would always have a large crowd to cook for as they had a lot of hired help. At one time they had a fellow who had just come over from England working for them. He was supposed to hoe weeds out of the corn, but when her husband went to see how he was getting along he discovered he had hoed the corn out and left the weeds. At the time Dorthea's fourth child, John Watkins. was born, her mother came to her home to assist her for a few days. Her mother's eye sight was poor and she noticed as she crossed the porch from the house to the milk house what she supposed to be strips of gray calico that Dorthea had been sewing on. When her husband came home with one of the children he was alarmed at the two rattlesnakes on the door step. He killed one, but the other got away into the nearby bushes. Dorthea and her husband toiled along together in life raising their family and accumulating a little of this world's goods. They were happy and contented in their fine Latter Day Saints home. One Wednesday evening on March 18, 1888 her husband returned home after plowing in the fields all day. He was ill and grew steadily worse although all the help available in those days was given him. One week from the day he was taken sick he was dead and buried. He died of pneumonia on his birthday, March 26, 1888, leaving his wife and four children and an unborn child who was born six weeks after his father's death. After the death of her husband, Dorthea moved down into Alpine with her parents, which was very trying for them because of their age and very hard on her because of the crowded condition. Her husband had owned a building lot in Alpine so she decided to build a two-room adobe house on it. Her uncle Fred who was a mason laid the adobe, her Uncle Stephen did the carpenter work and on Christmas Eve, 1888, she was able to move with her children into this humble home where she was mother and father to her five small children. She lived a widow for four years. She met and married Francis (Frank) Farquharson who proved to be a real companion and helpmate to her and a father to her fatherless children. They lived happily together for thirty-seven years and dreaded to be separated even for a few days. He died April 22, 1929 and she made the remark, "That it was awful to lose her first husband and be left to care for five small children alone but it was worse in her old age to be left alone with no one to care for"—but she was not alone long, she passed away May 31, 1929 just six weeks after his death. She was a wonderful wife and mother and set a fine example for her children to follow. She was a quiet, unassuming woman, a good Latter Day Saint, never failing in paying her tithes and offerings, and has many times said "If we pay these obligations, we will never be without money to pay them with". She left a wonderful posterity who revere and honor her name, who love to get together and talk about Mother, Grandmother and Great-Grandmother. She was the mother of seven children, five by her first husband, Joseph Lorenzo Watkins, Carlos Oscar, Mary Victoria, John Rufus, Joseph Wilham. Two children by her second husband, Elfreda Farquharson Bushman, Frances Gordon Farquharson.

Joseph Hyrum Beck by Bernetta McDaniel Beck, his wife

Contributor: crex Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Joseph Hyrum Beck taken from the book "In Memory of the Beck's" by Stephen F Beck. By Bernetta McDaniel Beck, his wife Joseph Hyrum Beck was born September 19, 1867, in Lehi, Utah. He was the eighth and youngest child of Christian J and Hannah Maria Krants Beck. He had two living sisters, Christina and Dartha Maria, and one brother, Carl Jacob, who died at the age of 14. The other five children died in infancy. When Joseph was three years old, his parents moved to Alpine, Utah, where they homesteaded 160 acres of land. In those days they were told to share with their neighbors and so a lot of his best property went to others. The family was very poor. The first home he remembered was a one room adobe building with a dirt roof. Whenever it rained they would have to take the curtains down and cover what little furniture they had, so the mud would not soil them. When he was a young boy, he helped his father make the adobe brick to add two rooms to the house and to replace the dirt roof with shingles. Joseph had very little formal education. At times he was only able to attend school for two or three months out of a year. Whenever the town was able to obtain a school teacher, "Joe" would help his father make trips to the canyons to cut wood to heat the school building. But most of his youth was spent helping his father with the land and the animals. They were very thrifty people, and they were soon able to replace the oxen with a team of horses, and add a few comforts to the home. At the age of twenty, Joseph married his school girl sweetheart, Bernetta McDaniel. She was just eighteen. They both worked very hard but were very happy. In a period of three years they had three children: two girls and one boy, but they all died when only a few davs old. On March 9, 1893, Bernetta gave birth to a strong, healthy son and they were happy and blessed and felt they had been paid for the loss of the other three babies. Joseph named the baby Joseph Karl. Once again Joseph added two more rooms to the home, and moved his family into the new addition. His parents were growing old and soon suffered from ill health. So Joseph had to take full responsibility of the farm plus the care of his aged parents. His father passed away March 27, 1899. His mother, after spending the last eight years of her life blind, died November 17, 1905. Joseph took great pleasure in taking part in Church and civic activities. He was secretary of the Alpine M.I.A., president of the Elders Quorum and chairman of the Church finance committee, during the addition of a new wing to the Alpine ward. He was Watermaster for a number of years, secretary of the Irrigation Company for a long term and also a member of the Alpine City Council for a number of years. He was Deputy Assessor for the Alpine and Hyland district. In the fall of 1906, he was elected to the office of County Assessor for a term of four years. In December of 1906, consequently, he left Alpine, and moved his family to Provo, Utah. They made so many friends, and Karl did so well in school, that Joseph decided for the best welfare of his family, to remain in Provo. However, he still maintained his farm in Alpine, renting the land and keeping enough stock to make it profitable. After his term for County Assessor expired, he found employment with the Consolidated Wagon and Machine Company. A position he held for twenty years, and until the time of his death. His main aim was to educate Karl and see him through Medical school and help establish him as a practicing physician. With hard work, sacrifices, and the love and help of Bernetta, he accomplished his aim without going into debt. "Joe" was a kind, sympathetic and understanding man. His home was always open to those less fortunate. He made welcome many homeless members of Bernetta's family as well as his own. He was happiest when lending a helping hand to friends and family, no matter what the circumstances. He took great pride in his home, family and friends. His hobbies were fishing and growing flowers. Whenever he had a vacation or a few hours to relax, you would find him fishing the streams of Alpine or Provo Canyon. His flower garden was a thing of beauty, and he loved "puttering" with a hoe or pulling a weed that he may have over-looked. And so it was with sorrow, to all those who knew and loved him, that we mourned his untimely death, December 27, 1931, at the age of sixty-two. His funeral was held in the Provo Fourth Ward Church. President Murdock paid him this tribute, "I know of no one who has left so few enemies, so many friends, and in debt to no man." He is buried in the Alpine City Cemetery.

Carl Jacob Beck

Contributor: crex Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

taken from the book "In Memory of the Becks" compiled by Stephen F Beck. Carl Jacob Beck, second son and the third child of Christian N (J) and Hannah Marie Krantz Beck, was born February 20, 1858, in Skepsted Aalborg, Denmark. He, with his parents and two sisters, left Denmark as converts to the church the twentieth of May 1866 and arrived in Salt Lake City the twentieth of September 1866, just four months to the day that they left their native country. After spending some time in Salt Lake City they were sent to Lehi, where they spent one year; they then moved to Alpine where his father homesteaded a tract of land. Carl helped his father clear the land of sage brush and lived the life of a pioneer boy. This young boy was only eight years old when his parents left the old country, and he must have had a hard time in crossing the plains. This young lad probably walked the entire way to Salt Lake. In January of the year 1872 he became very ill with the dreaded diphtheria of that time which would wipe out families of children. The doctors knew very little of how to cope with it at that time. Accordingly Carl died on the twenty-seventh of January 1872, just a few weeks before he was fourteen years of age. This was a great sorrow and trial to his parents as he was a very dependable boy and his parents came to rely on him a great deal as he learned to speak the English language very quickly and to partake of the customs of this new country which his parents were slower to grasp because of their more mature years. It took them many years to overcome this sorrow. He was survived by his parents and two sisters. His baby brother died crossing the ocean and was buried in the Atlantic Ocean ten days before they reached New York harbor. Carl is buried in the Alpine Cemetery.

Biography of Dorthea Maria Beck

Contributor: crex Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

(The following is a compilation of two histories of Dorthea Maria Beck and a little from what I have been told growing up. I am a namesake of this great woman and hope that this history can give credit to her life. -- Tia Nicole Hullinger) Dorthea Maria Beck Watkins Farquharson, daughter of Christian J. Beck and Hannah Maria Krants Beck, she was born at Skebstead, Denmark June 15, 1860, and died May 31, 1929. She would have been 69 years of age had she lived to her next birthday. Dorthea Maria was the fourth of eight children. Her mother was of German descent, and after her marriage, inherited a life lease on a large farm, and her and her husband became well-to-do. They lived on this farm for several years, then sold out the lease and bought a large estate named "Fuegholt" which translated means "The home of birds". This estate was at Wisbury, Denmark, in one of the most fertile districts. In connection with the estate was a dance hall, lunch and soft drink parlor, which they operated during the winter months. Her father was a wealthy farmer and her mother was an ardent bible reader. When the Latter-day Saint missionaries came to her door it wasn't long until she could see the light of truth in their teachings. Her father, however, was unable to grasp it so readily. Hannah labored with her husband but at that time he was unable to do so. He was later baptized, however. Hannah was thoroughly converted and wished to enjoy the promises and blessings of the restored gospel. Accordingly she went with the missionaries to a small creek and was baptized and confirmed a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Some days later, when Christian went to the city for supplies someone asked him if it was true that his wife had joined the despised Mormons. He said he was not aware of it, but hurried home to ask Hannah about it. He said, "Hannah, is it true that I hear about your joining the Mormon church?" She answered that it was true and his comment was, "Well let us keep it as quiet as possible so we can sell the farm and get something for it. Then we will go to Zion." At this time, Latter-day Saint converts in Denmark were persecuted and driven from their homes for accepting the gospel. They sacrificed all for their religion. Most of their money from the sale of their home and farm was used in helping their poorer countrymen who had also embraced the gospel to emigrate to America. Christian emigrated six other families besides his own to this country. The only recompense he ever received was a cow from one of the emigrants. It was on May 20, 1866 that Dorthea, then 5, her parents, a sister and two brothers left parents, relatives, friends, their native country and all that was near and dear to them and started their journey to Utah. They crossed the Atlantic Ocean on the sail ship Kendelworth. It was an old sail ship, and it caught fire three times while crossing the ocean during the voyage. During the voyage, an infant brother, Christian jr. died at just 5 months old and was buried in the ocean. Dorthea remembered plainly seeing him wrapped in sheets and slid off a board into the sea. This made such an impression upon her tender years that she never forgot it. It took them eight weeks and three days to cross the Atlantic. The ship caught fire three times while crossing the ocean and was condemned upon reaching the New York harbor. On reaching New York, many of the company died from the severe heat. The rest were rushed to Boston by rail, and from Boston to Omaha, Nebraska. It was here in Omaha that Dorthea was forced to tear the head from her beautiful doll she had been allowed to bring from Denmark. Because of the shortage of space, all excess baggage had to be thrown out, but she kept the doll's head and while they were living in Lehi she was persuaded to trade this beautiful doll head for a big black hen. As her father fixed a box to put the hen in, she wondered how many eggs she would get a day from the hen. She knew the trade had been made to keep up with the food supply. On account of not having enough teams, it became the task of those who were able, to walk from Omaha to Salt Lake City. Dorthea remembered many interesting things crossing the plains. She gathered buffalo chips to make fires to cook their meals and at one time when she was putting the chips by the fire, her clothes caught fire and she ran away fanning the fire and was almost engulfed in it. Brother Anderson, the undertaker for many years in American Fork and who was also one of the emigrants, caught her and rolled her in the dust and saved her life. With faith in their destination they reached Salt Lake City, September 20, 1866, just four months to the day from the time they left home. When they arrived in Salt Lake, they stayed there a few days and then journeyed to Lehi where an uncle on her father's side lived. They lived for two years and finally moved to Alpine where Dorthea's father took up a homestead of 160 acres and raised his family to man and womanhood. He built a one-room adobe house with a mud roof and while they were building the home, Dorthea walked through the sage brush from Lehi to Alpine many times. Dorthea remained in Alpine from that time on. Dorthea recalls many times seeing Porter Rockwell and others come riding into Alpine on horses just as hard as they could ride. Everyone would clear the street for them when they heard them coming. After moving to Alpine she worked hard helping her father clear the land of sagebrush. She and her brother Carl were the only help her father had. She herded her father's cows on the hills of the land he homesteaded. She always went barefoot in the summer because she had no shoes, or if she happened to have some she kept them for best. There were many rattlesnakes, so she had to be careful where she stepped. When she became a little older she worked in American Fork canyon where there were mines and a smelter at the Mary Ellen Gulch, and Dorthea worked at the boarding house. The railroad ran from American Fork up to Deer Creek. One night a crowd of drunken men with guns came to the boarding house. A man from Alpine by the name of Worth Nash saw the danger Dorthea was in and took her and his gun and hid out in the mountains. The drunken men were angry when they weren't able to find them at the boarding house. They followed the two refuges all that night with the intentions of killing them as soon as they found them. Dorthea and Mr. Nash walked all night to keep out of the men's way. When morning came the men came to their senses and all was well. Dorthea was glad to work and help her parents out as they were in dire need at this time. She recalled how one Sunday morning when her father was going to fast meeting he called the family together and prayed to the Lord that he could get food for his family. When the meeting was over, the Bishop called him to one side and asked how he was fixed for food and told him to come to the office and get a ham and some eggs and told him to get something to get molasses in. Christian didn't know the language very well and thought molasses must be a vegetable, so he took a sack to get it in. Dorthea remembered it was one of the best meals she ever ate because she was so hungry. Her mother made what the Danish call a "Flish Panker," which was scrambled eggs over the ham. She remembered the first tomato she ever saw. It was so beautiful and red that she was disappointed when she tasted it. She expected it to be nice and sweet. Sweets were scarce in those days. She was married to Joseph W. Watkins in September of 1877 by Bishop McCullaugh and then was married for eternity in the old endowment house in Salt Lake on 31 Jan 1878 by Daniel H. Wells. To this union there were five children born: (1)Joseph Lorenzo, (2) Carlos Oscar, (3) Mary Hannah Victoria, (4) John Rufus and (5) Joseph William jr., named for his father after being born 6 weeks after his father's death. Dorthea was kind and loving and did all that was possible for any mother to do for her children, teaching them the divine doctrine of Mormonism. Her husband homesteaded 160 acres one mile east of Alpine and built a log house of two rooms with logs hauled out of Preston's Canyon in American Fork Canyon. He also built a fine milk house over the spring of canyon water. They milked a large herd of cows and part of their income came from the sale of butter and eggs in American Fork. They would sell twelve to eighteen pounds of butter for sixteen or seventeen cents a pound and six to nine cents for a dozen eggs. They were sold at Dunkley's store and the Co-op store. She could make delicious butter and it was in high demand. Her husband would trade work with his brothers and brother-in-law; in this way they would help each other. She would always have a large crowd to cook for as they had a lot of hired help. At one time they had a fellow who had just come over from England working for them. He was supposed to hoe weeds out of the corn, but when her husband went to see how he was getting along he discovered that he had hoed the corn out and left the weeds. At the time Dorthea's fourth child, John Watkins was born, her mother came to Joseph and Dorthea's home to assist her for a few days. Her mother's eye sight was poor and she noticed as she crossed the porch from the house to the milk house what she supposed to be strips of gray calico that Dorthea had been sewing on. When Joseph came home with one of the children he was alarmed at the two rattlesnakes on the doorstep. He killed one, but the other got away into the nearby bushes. One of Dorthea's outstanding characteristics was her love for her children and friends and neighbors and all of her associates. It can be said that she never spoke evil of anyone. She always spoke good of everybody and trusted the Lord in all things. Dorthea and her husband toiled along together in life, raising their family and accumulating a little of this world's goods. They were happy and contented in their fine Latter-day Saint home. One Wednesday evening on 18 Mar 1888, her husband returned home after plowing in the fields all day. He was ill and grew steadily worse, though he was given all the help available in those days. On March 26th of 1888, she and her family mourned the loss of their father and husband, Joseph William Watkins, who died with pneumonia on his birthday while they were living on the farm east of Alpine. After the death of her husband, Dorthea moved down into Alpine with her parents, which was very trying for them because of their age and very hard on her because of the crowded conditions. Her husband had owned a building lot in Alpine, so she decided to build a two-room adobe house on it. Her uncle Fred, who was a mason, laid the adobe and her Uncle Stephen did the Carpentry work. On Christmas Eve, 1888, she was able to move with her children into the humble home where she was mother and father to her five small children. She lived a widow for four years. It was while living here that she became acquainted with Francis Farquharson whom she married December 3, 1892, and to this union was blessed two children. Mrs. Effie Bushman and Gordon Francis. Frank proved to be a real companion and helpmate to her and a father to her fatherless children. They lived happily together for thirty-seven years and dreaded to be separated even for a few days. He died 22 Apr 1929 and she made the remark that it was awful to lose her first husband and to be left to care for five small children alone, but it was worse in her old age to be left alone with no one to care for. She was not alone for long, though. While staying with her daughter Mrs. Effie Bushman at Lehi, she was forced to her bed with gangrene. Though under the faithful care of her daughter and folks she seemed to gradually fail in health until she died on 31 May, 1929, just six weeks after Frank's death. Her granddaughter and my grandmother, Dorthea Elsie Watkins Monson, told me once that her father, Joseph William Watkins, Jr., had always told her that his mother's name was Dorthea "Tia" Maria. We have no written confirmation of this, but this is how I received my name. Sister Dorthea Maria withstood many sorrows and hardships, and learned to love the gospel as did her family and as her noble parents had taught her. She was a wonderful wife and mother and set a fine example for her children to follow. She was a quiet, unassuming woman and a good Latter-day Saint. She never failed in paying her tithes and offerings and had many times said, "If we pay these obligation, we will never be without money to pay them with." She left a wonderful posterity who revere and honor her name. (One of the histories from which this is compiled is by Joseph Hyrum Beck, her brother.)

Life Timeline of Hannah M. Beck

1824
Hannah M. Beck was born on 23 May 1824
Hannah M. Beck was 8 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
1831
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Hannah M. Beck was 16 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
1840
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Hannah M. Beck was 35 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
1859
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Hannah M. Beck was 37 years old when American Civil War: Fort Sumter surrenders to Confederate forces. The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865. As a result of the long-standing controversy over slavery, war broke out in April 1861, when Confederate forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina, shortly after U.S. President Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated. The nationalists of the Union proclaimed loyalty to the U.S. Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States, who advocated for states' rights to expand slavery.
1861
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Hannah M. Beck was 56 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
1879
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Hannah M. Beck was 64 years old when The Great Blizzard of 1888 struck the northeastern United States, producing snowdrifts in excess of 50 ft (15 m) and confining some people to their houses for up to a week. The Great Blizzard of 1888 or Great Blizzard of '88 was one of the most severe recorded blizzards in the history of the United States of America. The storm, referred to as the Great White Hurricane, paralyzed the East Coast from the Chesapeake Bay to Maine, as well as the Atlantic provinces of Canada. Snowfalls of 10 to 58 inches fell in parts of New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, and sustained winds of more than 45 miles per hour (72 km/h) produced snowdrifts in excess of 50 feet (15 m). Railroads were shut down, and people were confined to their houses for up to a week. Railway and telegraph lines were disabled, and this provided the impetus to move these pieces of infrastructure underground. Emergency services were also affected.
1888
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Hannah M. Beck was 70 years old when Mahatma Gandhi forms the Natal Indian Congress (NIC) in order to fight discrimination against Indian traders in Natal. Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was an Indian activist who was the leader of the Indian independence movement against British rule. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The honorific Mahātmā – applied to him first in 1914 in South Africa – is now used worldwide. In India, he is also called Bapu and Gandhi ji, and known as the Father of the Nation.
1894
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Hannah M. Beck died on 17 Nov 1905 at the age of 81
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Hannah M. Beck (23 May 1824 - 17 Nov 1905), BillionGraves Record 4130 Alpine, Utah, Utah, United States

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