Henry John Davis

1859 - 1925

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Henry John Davis

1859 - 1925
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HENRY JOHN DAVIS Henry John Davis the eleventh and last born child of Titus Davis and Mary Gwenllian Bowen-Davies, was born 7th of August 1859 in Llandeilo, Cardiganshire, South Wales. Henry's older siblings were David Lazarus Davis, Timothy Bowen Davis, Gwenllian 'Gwennie' Davis, Thomas Davis, John
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Life Information

Henry John Davis

Born:
Died:

Salt Lake City Cemetery

200-250 N St
Salt Lake City, Utah, Salt Lake County, Utah
United States
Transcriber

disbell2112

June 20, 2012
Photographer

Alj

June 9, 2012

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Life Sketch of Henry John Davis & Family

Contributor: disbell2112 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

HENRY JOHN DAVIS Henry John Davis the eleventh and last born child of Titus Davis and Mary Gwenllian Bowen-Davies, was born 7th of August 1859 in Llandeilo, Cardiganshire, South Wales. Henry's older siblings were David Lazarus Davis, Timothy Bowen Davis, Gwenllian 'Gwennie' Davis, Thomas Davis, John Henry Davis, and Jenkin Davis. Four of his siblings had died in infancy. Those who died young children were Josiah Bowen Davis,Evan Thomas Davis, Daniel John Davis and Hannah Davis who was stillborn. Henry was born to a mother and father who were dealing with an intense struggle that had begun some eight years before his birth. Henry's destiny was decided during this intense family struggle. Henry's father was raised by his grandfather. His father, Titus, became a shoemaker. He was musically talented and at some point in time became a choir master over a large choir. Mary Gwenllian Bowen, was the only daughter of a prestigious family who owned a flannel mill and a farm called Maesyfelin in Llandwenog. Mary and Titus met at choir practice and fell in love and wanted to get married, but her family was bitterly opposed. Titus was about 13 years older than Mary, but they were in love and according to dates and records of Irene E. Staples, Mary and Titus are listed as parents of a son, Josiah Bowen Davis born in Sept of 1839; the infant died a few months later and was buried on 20 Dec 1839. Titus married Mary on 2 Jan 1840. They continued their activity in the Baptist Church. On 1 Nov 1857 their oldest living child, David Lazarus Davis joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Though he was still young, David must of spoken highly of this new faith to his parents, telling them that members of the church were gathering in the mountains of the western United States in what was called Zion. Titus wanted to go to America. regardless of David's religious affliation. He had heard of the wide expanse of land available to new settlers, and the oppoortunity it offered. He had been discussing the possiblity of emigrating to America for a long time. But Mary had lost two more sons (making three), and said she did not want to leave their graves. It is the thought of the editor, that maybe her reasons for not wanting to go to America were far more complex than anyone thought. Henry's older brother, David grew in years and in strength of testimony. The more that his father learned about the Mormon church, the more he wanted Mary to learn. But Mary would not, and instead voiced her opinion steadfastly against this new church, saying that since both churches believed in baptism by immersion, there was no need for re-baptism or change of affiliation. She stood against the church, as she had previously stood against going to America. Now her two oppositions became one. Nearly three months after David was baptized, his father Titus was baptized on 12 Jan 1858. Thomas was the next one baptized, joining the church in July of 1859. Timothy was the next one to be baptized on 23 Oct 1860, John was baptized two weeks before they set sail for America, on 15 May 1863. (Family Search records lists Gwennie their sister and daughter as being baptized on 10 Oct 1854- that is why it is believed that David who was believed to be baptized first...was baptized on 1 Nov 1851 not 1857 as stated in family records.) Among the lullabies to Henry's newborn ears came intense discussion of their family's future. His father had been talking of going to America for many years, even before he became baptized into the new church. Now, Mary knew he would want to go even more. 'Much discussion' about religion and emigration went on in their home for nearly 5 years. Many spouses who had chosen not to convert to the Mormon church, still emigrated to America with their families, but Mary stood fast and Titus did not want to leave her. Finally, after years of arguing, he planned the voyage. They were set to sail around the 1st of June 1863 from London, England. Money had to be earned by the various family members so that they would have funds to support their voyage fees. They all went to work, Timothy was working at a mine, and he took on extra work to earn extra money, but found out soon, he needed his younger brothers, Thomas and John and even his sister Gwennie to come and join with him to do the work to earn the money. Their father continued on in the shoemaker trade and David had a job with a merchant. They all worked very hard trying to earn enough to sustain them. They were also getting some help with the Perpetual Immigration Fund, which had to be paid back by a certain time with interest. The wages they earned were very small, but every little bit helped. About this same time, David, the oldest son, was called to serve as a missionary in Wales for the L.D.S. church, so he would not be leaving with the family, but he planned to join them about one year later. (David was the only member of the family that spoke English.) He had learned English while living with a family after he left home seeking employment.) For over ten years the people in Wales had heard stories of people dying during the voyage, on the trek across the plains, and then enduring hardships in the harsh desert. Henry's mother sought counsel from her church leaders, her family, and friends. They all reassured her that it would be wrong for her to accompany her husband to this evil place, where plural marriage was practiced. Now Mary was fully entrenched. Titus and David went to Mary to tell her it was not too late for her to prepare for the journey. At that time she insisted that she would not go, but that she might come later, with David when he finished his mission. ( This editor feels that Mary had an intensely personal reason for not wanting to leave the area. A reason that was NOT primarily related to the graves of her children. I believe that she did not prevent her children from leaving, because she loved them, and deep inside she knew there was economic opportunity for them in America. But, her own very powerful, veiled reason would not allow HER to leave. I believe that she had made a promise and would keep it, at any price - even the sacrifice of the company of her own children and husband. It was well known that Mary was a very strong-willed personality, and a very good woman. I believe she let them think that she may come later with David, only to ease their pain.) It was decided that Jenkin would stay with Mary, since he was older and he would be of help to her now and in the future on the farm. So, it was decided that baby Henry, age 3 years would go with his father and siblings to America on the ship Amazon, in the care of his father and siblings. They set sail from London, England on 4 June 1863. Soon after they set sail, Timothy, age 20, became ill with Typhoid Fever, and required as much care, as did little Henry. Eighteen-year-old Gwennie carried great responsibility and became a "little mother to all of her brothers. Days of agonizing waiting tormented the little family while the ship was being loaded and prepared.. During this time Titus walked the wharf and wept at the thought of leaving Mary and 7 year old Jenkin behind. All their hearts were breaking, especially Gwennie's. She was so despondent at the thought of leaving her mother behind, that arrangements were made for her to return to Llandeilo. Then she became consoled with the hope that her Mother would come to America with David. Gwennie had always been strong in her conviction that joining the church was the right thing to do, and that going to America was also the right course for the family. But oh, such heavy hearts they all carried with them. There were just under 900 passengers on the ship, and their food rations were very meager. They arrived in the port of New York July 20, 1863, two weeks after the Battle of Gettysburg. Their first major mode of travel was by railroad, some by passenger car and some by box car. Due to the Civil War, their rail journey to Missouri was detoured though Canada. Food was very scare; each time the train stopped, Titus had to frantically search for food to feed his family. His older son Timothy was beginning to recover from the Typhoid and his appetite was ravenous. Titus probably went without food himself in order to feed his children. Thomas states that he is sure that Gwennie was sacrificing some of her food ration for Little Henry and for Timothy. The Missouri River carried them to Florence, Nebraska (Winter Quarters.) Florence consisted of a few log cabins, a store, and the working buildings to organize, supply, and prepare wagon trains for the trek West. Here, they were assigned to the Company of Thomas Ricks. John Lodwick Edwards Jr, a young Welshman they had known before he had emigrated from Wales eight years earlier, was one of the teamsters. He joyously helped them collect their supplies and rations for the trek, and asked to be assigned to the wagon of these old friends. The wagons carried not only their baggage, food, blankets, and cooking utensils, but also helped to carry some of the cargo ordered by the merchants in Utah. The people were all expected to walk. Thirteen- years old Thomas had a crippled hip and knee from rheumatic fever as a child. He too, walked the plains but in his biography, we hear nothing of his pain or discomfort. He does tell of his joy in learning to be a cowboy on the journey, and his escapades with his friends. Little Henry, Gwennie and Mary Jones (Gwennie's new-found friend from the ship), slept in the wagon or under the wagon at night. Young Gwennie had difficulty learning to use the "sour-dough", but she did her best to feed the family, and care for Little Henry and the others. They had no trouble with the Indians during their journey. They did have the usual trials of the journey - mainly that of not having enough food, inadequate shelter in the cold weather (especially in the high plains of Wyoming), fatigue, and the danger of crossing the rivers and down the steep canyons of the Rocky Mountains (l'm sure that Little Henry and others (probably Gwennie) occasionally sat with John on the wagon seat). Henry is described by his brothers as a quiet little child with a sweet and mild disposition, never complaining, regardless of the scant food or the hardships they endured. The wagon train led by Thomas Ricks arrived in Salt Lake October 8, 1863. After spending a couple of days resting at Emigration square, the Davies family remained in the company of John L. Edwards Jr., and settled in Willard (then known as Willow Creek). Their friends, the Edwards family and other Welshmen, had settled there eight years earlier. Nearly two months after their arrival, Gwennie married the young John Lodwick Edwards Jr. At some early point, the family name was changed from Davies to "Davis". The younger boys lived with Titus in Willard, where he spent the remainder of his life. He again became the Choirmaster of the Willard Ward for many years. Mary and Jenkin remained in Wales and subsisted mainly "hand to mouth". Bitterness filled their lives. In the 1860's to 1880's there was barely enough food for the Mormon Settlers. I am sure that small tokens were sent to Mary and Jenkin, but since cash was practically nonexistent, and Titus was paying interest for their emigration debts, it surely could not have been much (see letters from Henry's brother Jenkin). Mary died in 1879. Jenkin became an itinerant salesman, and had five or six children. After Mary's death, his brothers spent many years trying to convince him to come to America, but he never did. In America, Henry lived with his father and his brothers Thomas and John. ln a part of Gwennie's history, we learn that the Welsh children were teased because of their language. Little Henry who had just turned four, probably began picking up English from neighboring children and from Gwennie's husband, John, who had been in America for a few years already. As with most children of that day, schooling was simple and work was hard with long hours. When he came of age, Henry went to Salt Lake to work for his brother David Lazarus (20 years older than Henry) at his store (David L. Davis Merchantile) at 140 West South Temple . It was while he was in Salt Lake that he met Sarah Alice Stephens. After a short courtship they were married on November 25, 1885. Henry worked as a traveling salesman for ZCMI Wholesale Men's Department. He and a special driver traveled all over Utah in a horse and buggy. They sold everything from the high-button shoes, to shirts with unattached high stiff collars. These were either celluloid (similar to plastic) or collars that were stiff starched; they were attached to the shirt front and back with 'collar buttons'. In this outfit, he would be a 'real gentleman', especially if he wore a "Bowler' hat with it. Work clothes were also part of Henry's display of men's clothing. Henry worked for 28 years in this position until he retired. Henry and Alice first lived in a small home on the Stephens farm in 256 West 5th South in Salt Lake City. Her parents, Thomas David and Mary Ann Webb Stephens, had moved into their new modern brick home on the same property. Henry was devoted to Alice and wrote her a letter every day, each one beginning - "Dear Alice". After 28 years as a traveling salesman,many, many letters were saved, filled with love and happenings of the day. Henry was a loving father with never a harsh word. It was said that the strongest word he ever used was 'O' shucks'. His children remember him mending their shoes and putting new leather soles on them as he held the shoes on the 'iron last' to mend them. This he possibly learned from his father, who was a "Corvisor' which in Welsh language, is one who made the complete shoe or mended them as necessary. Henry and Alice had eight children. Their first child Harry Stephens Davis-born 21 Jan 1887 died at age four on 10 Apr 1891; Thomas Stephens Davis-born 5 Sep 1888-Married Sarepta Cutler in Sep 1916- he died on 3 Jan 1956, Mary Alice Stephens Davis-born 27 Oct 1890-married John Elkins on 28 Apr 1915-Mary died 26 Dec 1930, William John Davis-born 28 Aug 1892-He never married and we do not have a death date for him, Helen Lorena Davis-born 4 Apr 1897-married Stanley Youngman Lakin on 29 May 1925- Helen died on 22 May 1994, Norma Louise Davis-born 4 Oct 1903-married David Clyde Lloyd-Norma died in 1988, Rula Merle Davis-born 26 Jul 1908- she never married and she died on 10 Jun 1993. Having been raised without a Mother---surely Henry appreciated the wonderful family and home he and his "Dear Alice" had together. They left a great heritage to their posterity, and their posterity in turn--remembers them with love and appreciation for having been blessed with a wonderful Father and Mother. After Alice's parents died, she inherited their new, centrally heated home at 45 East North Temple. They lived in this home until Henry became ill and retired. He wanted to move back in their little home on the farm at 56 South; it was filled with precious and wonderful memories, where all their children had been born. He said he "felt at home out there." So for a time, his loving wife Alice moved back into the little home on the farm to care for him. Henry died 18 or 25 April, 1925 at Salt Lake City, Utah, at the age of sixty-six. He was buried in the Salt Lake City Cemetery. The above history was written by Elease Williams King from documents found in the Daughters of Utah Pioneers Museum in Salt Lake City, Utah in 1999. This history was added to the Individual Notes of Henry John Davis, by Arthur Davis Williams and his wife, Vee Ann Weaver Williams this 15th day of June 2011 at 850 Parkway Dr. # 17-Blackfoot, Idaho 83221-phone 208-785-6656-email adwvaw@q.com.

Life Sketch of Henry John Davis & Family

Contributor: disbell2112 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

HENRY JOHN DAVIS Henry John Davis the eleventh and last born child of Titus Davis and Mary Gwenllian Bowen-Davies, was born 7th of August 1859 in Llandeilo, Cardiganshire, South Wales. Henry's older siblings were David Lazarus Davis, Timothy Bowen Davis, Gwenllian 'Gwennie' Davis, Thomas Davis, John Henry Davis, and Jenkin Davis. Four of his siblings had died in infancy. Those who died young children were Josiah Bowen Davis,Evan Thomas Davis, Daniel John Davis and Hannah Davis who was stillborn. Henry was born to a mother and father who were dealing with an intense struggle that had begun some eight years before his birth. Henry's destiny was decided during this intense family struggle. Henry's father was raised by his grandfather. His father, Titus, became a shoemaker. He was musically talented and at some point in time became a choir master over a large choir. Mary Gwenllian Bowen, was the only daughter of a prestigious family who owned a flannel mill and a farm called Maesyfelin in Llandwenog. Mary and Titus met at choir practice and fell in love and wanted to get married, but her family was bitterly opposed. Titus was about 13 years older than Mary, but they were in love and according to dates and records of Irene E. Staples, Mary and Titus are listed as parents of a son, Josiah Bowen Davis born in Sept of 1839; the infant died a few months later and was buried on 20 Dec 1839. Titus married Mary on 2 Jan 1840. They continued their activity in the Baptist Church. On 1 Nov 1857 their oldest living child, David Lazarus Davis joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Though he was still young, David must of spoken highly of this new faith to his parents, telling them that members of the church were gathering in the mountains of the western United States in what was called Zion. Titus wanted to go to America. regardless of David's religious affliation. He had heard of the wide expanse of land available to new settlers, and the oppoortunity it offered. He had been discussing the possiblity of emigrating to America for a long time. But Mary had lost two more sons (making three), and said she did not want to leave their graves. It is the thought of the editor, that maybe her reasons for not wanting to go to America were far more complex than anyone thought. Henry's older brother, David grew in years and in strength of testimony. The more that his father learned about the Mormon church, the more he wanted Mary to learn. But Mary would not, and instead voiced her opinion steadfastly against this new church, saying that since both churches believed in baptism by immersion, there was no need for re-baptism or change of affiliation. She stood against the church, as she had previously stood against going to America. Now her two oppositions became one. Nearly three months after David was baptized, his father Titus was baptized on 12 Jan 1858. Thomas was the next one baptized, joining the church in July of 1859. Timothy was the next one to be baptized on 23 Oct 1860, John was baptized two weeks before they set sail for America, on 15 May 1863. (Family Search records lists Gwennie their sister and daughter as being baptized on 10 Oct 1854- that is why it is believed that David who was believed to be baptized first...was baptized on 1 Nov 1851 not 1857 as stated in family records.) Among the lullabies to Henry's newborn ears came intense discussion of their family's future. His father had been talking of going to America for many years, even before he became baptized into the new church. Now, Mary knew he would want to go even more. 'Much discussion' about religion and emigration went on in their home for nearly 5 years. Many spouses who had chosen not to convert to the Mormon church, still emigrated to America with their families, but Mary stood fast and Titus did not want to leave her. Finally, after years of arguing, he planned the voyage. They were set to sail around the 1st of June 1863 from London, England. Money had to be earned by the various family members so that they would have funds to support their voyage fees. They all went to work, Timothy was working at a mine, and he took on extra work to earn extra money, but found out soon, he needed his younger brothers, Thomas and John and even his sister Gwennie to come and join with him to do the work to earn the money. Their father continued on in the shoemaker trade and David had a job with a merchant. They all worked very hard trying to earn enough to sustain them. They were also getting some help with the Perpetual Immigration Fund, which had to be paid back by a certain time with interest. The wages they earned were very small, but every little bit helped. About this same time, David, the oldest son, was called to serve as a missionary in Wales for the L.D.S. church, so he would not be leaving with the family, but he planned to join them about one year later. (David was the only member of the family that spoke English.) He had learned English while living with a family after he left home seeking employment.) For over ten years the people in Wales had heard stories of people dying during the voyage, on the trek across the plains, and then enduring hardships in the harsh desert. Henry's mother sought counsel from her church leaders, her family, and friends. They all reassured her that it would be wrong for her to accompany her husband to this evil place, where plural marriage was practiced. Now Mary was fully entrenched. Titus and David went to Mary to tell her it was not too late for her to prepare for the journey. At that time she insisted that she would not go, but that she might come later, with David when he finished his mission. ( This editor feels that Mary had an intensely personal reason for not wanting to leave the area. A reason that was NOT primarily related to the graves of her children. I believe that she did not prevent her children from leaving, because she loved them, and deep inside she knew there was economic opportunity for them in America. But, her own very powerful, veiled reason would not allow HER to leave. I believe that she had made a promise and would keep it, at any price - even the sacrifice of the company of her own children and husband. It was well known that Mary was a very strong-willed personality, and a very good woman. I believe she let them think that she may come later with David, only to ease their pain.) It was decided that Jenkin would stay with Mary, since he was older and he would be of help to her now and in the future on the farm. So, it was decided that baby Henry, age 3 years would go with his father and siblings to America on the ship Amazon, in the care of his father and siblings. They set sail from London, England on 4 June 1863. Soon after they set sail, Timothy, age 20, became ill with Typhoid Fever, and required as much care, as did little Henry. Eighteen-year-old Gwennie carried great responsibility and became a "little mother to all of her brothers. Days of agonizing waiting tormented the little family while the ship was being loaded and prepared.. During this time Titus walked the wharf and wept at the thought of leaving Mary and 7 year old Jenkin behind. All their hearts were breaking, especially Gwennie's. She was so despondent at the thought of leaving her mother behind, that arrangements were made for her to return to Llandeilo. Then she became consoled with the hope that her Mother would come to America with David. Gwennie had always been strong in her conviction that joining the church was the right thing to do, and that going to America was also the right course for the family. But oh, such heavy hearts they all carried with them. There were just under 900 passengers on the ship, and their food rations were very meager. They arrived in the port of New York July 20, 1863, two weeks after the Battle of Gettysburg. Their first major mode of travel was by railroad, some by passenger car and some by box car. Due to the Civil War, their rail journey to Missouri was detoured though Canada. Food was very scare; each time the train stopped, Titus had to frantically search for food to feed his family. His older son Timothy was beginning to recover from the Typhoid and his appetite was ravenous. Titus probably went without food himself in order to feed his children. Thomas states that he is sure that Gwennie was sacrificing some of her food ration for Little Henry and for Timothy. The Missouri River carried them to Florence, Nebraska (Winter Quarters.) Florence consisted of a few log cabins, a store, and the working buildings to organize, supply, and prepare wagon trains for the trek West. Here, they were assigned to the Company of Thomas Ricks. John Lodwick Edwards Jr, a young Welshman they had known before he had emigrated from Wales eight years earlier, was one of the teamsters. He joyously helped them collect their supplies and rations for the trek, and asked to be assigned to the wagon of these old friends. The wagons carried not only their baggage, food, blankets, and cooking utensils, but also helped to carry some of the cargo ordered by the merchants in Utah. The people were all expected to walk. Thirteen- years old Thomas had a crippled hip and knee from rheumatic fever as a child. He too, walked the plains but in his biography, we hear nothing of his pain or discomfort. He does tell of his joy in learning to be a cowboy on the journey, and his escapades with his friends. Little Henry, Gwennie and Mary Jones (Gwennie's new-found friend from the ship), slept in the wagon or under the wagon at night. Young Gwennie had difficulty learning to use the "sour-dough", but she did her best to feed the family, and care for Little Henry and the others. They had no trouble with the Indians during their journey. They did have the usual trials of the journey - mainly that of not having enough food, inadequate shelter in the cold weather (especially in the high plains of Wyoming), fatigue, and the danger of crossing the rivers and down the steep canyons of the Rocky Mountains (l'm sure that Little Henry and others (probably Gwennie) occasionally sat with John on the wagon seat). Henry is described by his brothers as a quiet little child with a sweet and mild disposition, never complaining, regardless of the scant food or the hardships they endured. The wagon train led by Thomas Ricks arrived in Salt Lake October 8, 1863. After spending a couple of days resting at Emigration square, the Davies family remained in the company of John L. Edwards Jr., and settled in Willard (then known as Willow Creek). Their friends, the Edwards family and other Welshmen, had settled there eight years earlier. Nearly two months after their arrival, Gwennie married the young John Lodwick Edwards Jr. At some early point, the family name was changed from Davies to "Davis". The younger boys lived with Titus in Willard, where he spent the remainder of his life. He again became the Choirmaster of the Willard Ward for many years. Mary and Jenkin remained in Wales and subsisted mainly "hand to mouth". Bitterness filled their lives. In the 1860's to 1880's there was barely enough food for the Mormon Settlers. I am sure that small tokens were sent to Mary and Jenkin, but since cash was practically nonexistent, and Titus was paying interest for their emigration debts, it surely could not have been much (see letters from Henry's brother Jenkin). Mary died in 1879. Jenkin became an itinerant salesman, and had five or six children. After Mary's death, his brothers spent many years trying to convince him to come to America, but he never did. In America, Henry lived with his father and his brothers Thomas and John. ln a part of Gwennie's history, we learn that the Welsh children were teased because of their language. Little Henry who had just turned four, probably began picking up English from neighboring children and from Gwennie's husband, John, who had been in America for a few years already. As with most children of that day, schooling was simple and work was hard with long hours. When he came of age, Henry went to Salt Lake to work for his brother David Lazarus (20 years older than Henry) at his store (David L. Davis Merchantile) at 140 West South Temple . It was while he was in Salt Lake that he met Sarah Alice Stephens. After a short courtship they were married on November 25, 1885. Henry worked as a traveling salesman for ZCMI Wholesale Men's Department. He and a special driver traveled all over Utah in a horse and buggy. They sold everything from the high-button shoes, to shirts with unattached high stiff collars. These were either celluloid (similar to plastic) or collars that were stiff starched; they were attached to the shirt front and back with 'collar buttons'. In this outfit, he would be a 'real gentleman', especially if he wore a "Bowler' hat with it. Work clothes were also part of Henry's display of men's clothing. Henry worked for 28 years in this position until he retired. Henry and Alice first lived in a small home on the Stephens farm in 256 West 5th South in Salt Lake City. Her parents, Thomas David and Mary Ann Webb Stephens, had moved into their new modern brick home on the same property. Henry was devoted to Alice and wrote her a letter every day, each one beginning - "Dear Alice". After 28 years as a traveling salesman,many, many letters were saved, filled with love and happenings of the day. Henry was a loving father with never a harsh word. It was said that the strongest word he ever used was 'O' shucks'. His children remember him mending their shoes and putting new leather soles on them as he held the shoes on the 'iron last' to mend them. This he possibly learned from his father, who was a "Corvisor' which in Welsh language, is one who made the complete shoe or mended them as necessary. Henry and Alice had eight children. Their first child Harry Stephens Davis-born 21 Jan 1887 died at age four on 10 Apr 1891; Thomas Stephens Davis-born 5 Sep 1888-Married Sarepta Cutler in Sep 1916- he died on 3 Jan 1956, Mary Alice Stephens Davis-born 27 Oct 1890-married John Elkins on 28 Apr 1915-Mary died 26 Dec 1930, William John Davis-born 28 Aug 1892-He never married and we do not have a death date for him, Helen Lorena Davis-born 4 Apr 1897-married Stanley Youngman Lakin on 29 May 1925- Helen died on 22 May 1994, Norma Louise Davis-born 4 Oct 1903-married David Clyde Lloyd-Norma died in 1988, Rula Merle Davis-born 26 Jul 1908- she never married and she died on 10 Jun 1993. Having been raised without a Mother---surely Henry appreciated the wonderful family and home he and his "Dear Alice" had together. They left a great heritage to their posterity, and their posterity in turn--remembers them with love and appreciation for having been blessed with a wonderful Father and Mother. After Alice's parents died, she inherited their new, centrally heated home at 45 East North Temple. They lived in this home until Henry became ill and retired. He wanted to move back in their little home on the farm at 56 South; it was filled with precious and wonderful memories, where all their children had been born. He said he "felt at home out there." So for a time, his loving wife Alice moved back into the little home on the farm to care for him. Henry died 18 or 25 April, 1925 at Salt Lake City, Utah, at the age of sixty-six. He was buried in the Salt Lake City Cemetery. The above history was written by Elease Williams King from documents found in the Daughters of Utah Pioneers Museum in Salt Lake City, Utah in 1999. This history was added to the Individual Notes of Henry John Davis, by Arthur Davis Williams and his wife, Vee Ann Weaver Williams this 15th day of June 2011 at 850 Parkway Dr. # 17-Blackfoot, Idaho 83221-phone 208-785-6656-email adwvaw@q.com.

Life timeline of Henry John Davis

1859
Henry John Davis was born in 1859
Henry John Davis was 10 years old when Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton founded the National Woman Suffrage Association, breaking away from the American Equal Rights Association which they had also previously founded. Susan B. Anthony was an American social reformer and women's rights activist who played a pivotal role in the women's suffrage movement. Born into a Quaker family committed to social equality, she collected anti-slavery petitions at the age of 17. In 1856, she became the New York state agent for the American Anti-Slavery Society.
Henry John Davis was 20 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Henry John Davis was 26 years old when Louis Pasteur successfully tests his vaccine against rabies on Joseph Meister, a boy who was bitten by a rabid dog. Louis Pasteur was a French biologist, microbiologist and chemist renowned for his discoveries of the principles of vaccination, microbial fermentation and pasteurization. He is remembered for his remarkable breakthroughs in the causes and prevention of diseases, and his discoveries have saved many lives ever since. He reduced mortality from puerperal fever, and created the first vaccines for rabies and anthrax. His medical discoveries provided direct support for the germ theory of disease and its application in clinical medicine. He is best known to the general public for his invention of the technique of treating milk and wine to stop bacterial contamination, a process now called pasteurization. He is regarded as one of the three main founders of bacteriology, together with Ferdinand Cohn and Robert Koch, and is popularly known as the "father of microbiology".
Henry John Davis was 32 years old when Thomas Edison patents the motion picture camera. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Henry John Davis was 46 years old when Albert Einstein publishes his first paper on the special theory of relativity. Albert Einstein was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics. His work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. He is best known to the general public for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2, which has been dubbed "the world's most famous equation". He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect", a pivotal step in the development of quantum theory.
Henry John Davis was 58 years old when Tsar Nicholas II of Russia was forced to abdicate in the February Revolution, ending three centuries of Romanov rule. Nicholas II or Nikolai II, known as Saint Nicholas in the Russian Orthodox Church, was the last Emperor of Russia, ruling from 1 November 1894 until his forced abdication on 15 March 1917. His reign saw the fall of the Russian Empire from one of the foremost great powers of the world to economic and military collapse. He was given the nickname Nicholas the Bloody or Vile Nicholas by his political adversaries due to the Khodynka Tragedy, anti-Semitic pogroms, Bloody Sunday, the violent suppression of the 1905 Russian Revolution, the executions of political opponents, and his perceived responsibility for the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905). Soviet historians portray Nicholas as a weak and incompetent leader whose decisions led to military defeats and the deaths of millions of his subjects.
Henry John Davis died in 1925 at the age of 66
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Henry John Davis (1859 - 1925), BillionGraves Record 1509389 Salt Lake City, Utah, Salt Lake County, Utah, United States

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