Henry Druce

1820 - 1896

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Henry Druce

1820 - 1896
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Grave site information of Henry Druce (1820 - 1896) at Salt Lake City Cemetery in Salt Lake City, Utah, Salt Lake County, Utah, United States from BillionGraves

Life Information

Henry Druce

Born:
Died:

Salt Lake City Cemetery

200-250 N St
Salt Lake City, Utah, Salt Lake County, Utah
United States
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disbell2112

June 21, 2012
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SydneyW

September 20, 2015
Photographer

Jacobf

June 9, 2012

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Phyllis Druce Pugsley Oblad (1908-2002) Personal History

Contributor: disbell2112 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

FAMILY It was October the 9th, 1908, and Dr. Ewing had come to the home to deliver Nellie May Druce and Philip Pugsley’s ninth child, Phyllis. The doctor attended Nellie early and stayed throughout her labor. The rest of the family had gone to the Fair Day. Upon returning, they welcomed the new baby girl into their family. It was a joyous occasion, especially since the two children born before Phyllis had died in infancy. Phyllis’ living siblings included Warren, Lester, Earl, Nellie, Albert and Harold, with Harry soon to follow. Ancestors Phillip Pugsley II (1822-1903) and Martha Roach (1829-1906) were my grandparents on my father’s side. They were both members of the church when they were married in Bristol, England on June 28, 1851. They immigrated to Utah, leaving England March 20, 1853. They crossed the ocean on the Falcon ship and arrived in New Orleans after eight weeks. They traveled to St. Louis and then to Keokuk, Iowa. They joined the Ten Pound Company, paying their own way, ten pounds was about fifty American dollars. When they arrived in America, they started across the plains on June 5, 1853 with ten in a wagon, poorly supplied with provisions since they had to get rid of two-thirds of their luggage. They arrived in the Salt Lake Valley on September 30, 1853, with ten cents (for the complete story, see the scrapbook about my mother, Nellie May Druce Pugsley). Henry Druce (1820-1896) and Harriett Jinks (1826-1896) were my maternal grandparents, from Merton Surrey, England. He met and married Harriett Jinks at the Old Church in Manchester, England on May 4, 1845. Henry and Harriett joined Henry’s brother John and wife, Julia, in America. They took the packet ship Montezuma with their small son, Thomas, and Harriett’s mother, Julia, arriving in New York on September 18, 1846. Henry and Harriett lived in Rhode Island, where six of their children were born. They started for Utah on May 7, 1860, traveling by railroad and steamboat via Chicago and St. Joseph reaching Florence, Nebraska. There they joined the James D. Ross Company heading for Salt Lake. Henry had enough money to hire two teamsters to drive the wagon. They brought along Harriett’s melodeon that was used for nightly entertainment. The melodeon was a small keyboard with folding legs that could be put against the side of the wagon and not take up too much space. Harriet also brought a silver teapot and a petite point picture that she had made of the “Smothering of the Princess in the Tower of London.” They arrived in the Salt Lake Valley September 3, 1860. Parents My father, Philip Pugsley III was born February 10, 1859, in Salt Lake City, Utah to Philip Pugsley II and Martha Roach, immigrants from Bristol, England. He was one of the first graduates of the University of Deseret and became proficient in math and writing. He became a bookkeeper for ZCMI and then went to work at the Salt Lake Lumber Company as their foreman and bookkeeper for many years. He later retired from the lumber job and joined the Moose Club in Salt Lake City where he became the Secretary, Treasurer, and Herder. He was given a large office that I used to visit. I occasionally went to his office and do typing and filing. He would always take me to Shay’s cafeteria for lunch. I liked that. Some of my relatives belonged to the Masons, Woodmen of the World, and the Elks. My mother became the Deputy Grand Regent at the Moose Lodge. My father enjoyed the outdoors, taking the boys fishing and duck hunting. It was often said that if there wasn’t a fish in the stream he would catch one anyway. We would often eat trout or duck for dinner. My mother and I used the feathers to make quilts. My father had a quiet and calm disposition. He enjoyed playing cards and kept a large garden, which provided us with all of our vegetables. He would work in the garden early in the morning and then store the produce in the basement for canning and pickling. My father’s sister, Emily Pugsley Thompson, and her husband opened the Park City Mine. She cooked the meals at the boarding house for the miners. They eventually became millionaires and once in awhile she would drive down in her electric automobile to Salt Lake and visit her family. Later they bought the land on South Temple and 500 East and built a mansion. Another sister, Elizabeth Pugsley Hayward was an early member of the Daughters of Utah Pioneers group. She was one of the first women legislators and she made me a “granny square” afghan, which I still have. My mother, Nellie May Druce Pugsley, was a fine homemaker and musician. Nellie May was born April 11, 1864. Nellie was a gifted singer. She began about the age of nine singing solos in church and for many years took the best voice lessons available. Her high soprano voice was heard in many church socials, opera performances at the Salt Lake Theater, and as a soloist in the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. My mother and father were childhood friends and they married November 7, 1883. My father was 24 and my mother was 19 years old. My mother was always busy caring for her family. Our 6:00 p.m. dinners consisted of roast beef, steak, chicken, trout, or duck. She baked breads, pies, and cakes. I still remember the bread puddings, custards, plum puddings, and vegetable beef soup. My mother was involved in the Literary Club and the Relief Society. She was active in groups of the 1890’s to get the Manifesto passed for the right of women to vote. She was also an avid Democrat and Parent Teacher Association President at the Washington Elementary School. When the U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt visited Utah, she was invited to meet him and I went with her and shook his hand. My brother Earl was a staunch republican; he and my mother wrote political letters to each other for years while he was living in New York. Each of them tried to convince the other of the wrongs of his or her party. Neither wavered from their own beliefs. Siblings My bother Warren married Mabel. He was a plumber and contractor by profession. They ended up living in Burley, Idaho. Lester married Hattie. He worked for the Railway Express Agency in management. I remember babysitting their children, Patsy, Edna and John, when they took the train to Detroit to buy a new Ford car, which they drove back. Earl graduated from Cornell University and then came back home and got married Esther. Earl attended night school in New York City and obtained his law degree. He was then put in the legal department of AT&T in New York, where he remained until his death. Nellie was born June 19, 1893. She married A.J. Becker when she was 40 years old. She was a teacher and taught home economics, including weaving. Nellie also earned a masters degree in music from Cornell University. She lived with Earl when she was obtaining this degree. Albert (Bert) married Lila. Albert served in World War I. He was a clerk for the Salt Lake City School District until retirement. Then he worked with the church in publishing and accounting. He and his wife later served a mission in Switzerland. Harold married Opal. He worked for the Railway Express Agency, along with Lester. My brother Philip was born July 2, 1895, but only lived 20 days. Harriett followed on November 8, 1896, a stillborn. Harry married Jean. He worked for the Deseret News and graduated from the University of Utah with a law degree. He formed a law firm of Pugsley, Hayes & Rampton. He also served as secretary to Governor Herbert Maw for two years. At the time of his retirement he was the Director of Copyrights for the church for five years. Home Our home, located on 573 North 200 West (now 300 West) in Salt Lake City, Utah, was a large 8-room structure. It was built on the original site of the Philip Pugsley Flour and Salt Mill. It consisted of a parlor with sliding doors, a sitting room, a dining room, a kitchen and pantry. Upstairs were the four bedrooms, and a divided bathroom. The basement had a cement floor and a coal furnace. The parlor was used for special occasions, Sundays, entertaining, vocal and piano practicing for Mother and Nellie, and piano practicing for me. The sitting room was where we would read and listen to the wind-up victrola and later the radio. We had many records of popular songs at the time. The dining room had our large oak table where each evening the family would gather for dinner at 6:00 p.m. The kitchen was large with a separate pantry for the sink, china, and food. My brother Warren built a box in our kitchen with shelves of iron coils. This was our refrigerator. Many houses had boxes for real ice. Once a week, for a price, ice was delivered to their homes. Eventually my parents were able to afford a very nice piano. They went to Beesley Music and selected one of top quality, with real ivory keys. It also had a high top. I believe it is still in the family on my brother, Harry’s side. In the back yard was a two-story barn where my father kept his horses and buggy. In the loft he would spread out black walnuts to dry. We then used them for eating and cooking. Near the north back fence, my father made a trough for water and attempted to raise fish. We also had a well in our back yard. All of the wells were eventually bought by an oil refinery that was a few blocks north of us. I think we received about $1,000 from the purchase. My father built a duplex on the lot next to our home as an investment. It rented for $18.00 a month. My husband, Bill, and I bought it in later years and had many experiences in redecorating and renting. These homes have now all been replaced by service stations. Mother would send her laundry out to be washed to Murray Laundry. It would be returned still wet and we would hang the heavy items out to dry in the basement or outside. We would iron all of the lighter items, such as shirts and pant. We also used to iron all pillowcases and sheets. When I was married, I also sent my laundry out to be washed, and ironed all flat linens, sheets, dishcloths, etc. Bill always took his nice dress shirts to the cleaners, and continued to do so after we were married. Once when my son, Roger, was about 5 years old we took a trip to Jackson Hole, and I visited a local laundromat. I was amazed at how convenient the dryers were. When we returned home we bought a washer and eventually a dryer. My niece, Patsy, and her husband, Art, recommended a gas dryer. I kept it in my home until the year of 2001. CHILDHOOD We used to play in the front yard often with the many children in the neighborhood. Some of our favorite games included Kick the Can, No Bears out Tonight, Run Sheepie Run, Race Around the Block, etc. School was always closed for Fair Day and Baseball Day. Two of my brothers, Albert and Harold, were avid baseball players. Albert played catcher and Harold played pitcher. I attended many of their games. I used to walk to elementary school, junior high, and high school. Automobiles were rare when I was young. Wagons were the main transportation. The primary transportation in the city was the streetcar. My aunt Hattie took Harry and I to see the first airplane fly over Salt Lake City. We stood where the city and county buildings are now. I was baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in the baptismal font under the organ in the Salt Lake Tabernacle, when I was ten years old. My father would have two weeks vacation each year. We would spend the time camping at Lemmon’s Grove near Kamas. My father would pack the buckboard with all of the supplies, tents, food, etc. and leave ahead of my mother, it was a two-day trip by horse. Mother, Harry and I would take a train to Park City and hire a white top to take us to Lemmon’s Grove. Everything would be set up and ready when we arrived at the campsite. Father and the boys would hunt and fish, in the evenings our family would do programs with other families in the area, and my mother would often sing at these gatherings. Harry My younger brother Harry and I were very close friends growing up. He was two years younger than I. We often played games together; our favorite card game was “Steal the Pile.” My sister, Nellie, would read to us and then take us either to Pioneer or Liberty Park to play on the equipment. Later we began to play tennis there also. When Harry and I were teenagers, I was about 16; father and mother would occasionally take us to the Moose Club dances. Harry and I would dance together as partners. Nellie My sister, Nellie, was 15 years old at the time of my birth. She contributed greatly to my care and upbringing. Nellie read me nursery rhymes and fairy tales. She used to fix my hair and put ribbons in it. I remember having lots of freckles. I would spend every penny I could earn on freckle cream. She also took me on trips to Liberty Park and on a train to Saltair. She later encouraged me to take typing, shorthand, and French. Nellie used to listen to the grand operas from New York during Opera season. Elementary School I attended the Washington Elementary School for first grade, kindergarten was not offered at the time. At Washington there were separate entrances for the boys and the girls. We were allowed to play together at recess but we always had to go through the proper entrance. My best friend growing up was Ardelle Beesley, a close cousin one year younger than I, daughter of Uncle Delbert and Aunt Adelaide Beesley. Aunt Adelaide was my father’s sister. They lived two doors south of us and my brother Harry and I spent many hours at their home. I used to walk right into their house without knocking. Uncle Dell was a great musician, a timpanist, playing the drums and other instruments. He also owned a car, played with the symphony and for the movie theater houses, before there was sound projection. Ardelle and I used to enter the stage door with Uncle Dell, laughing at the funny movies. Uncle Dell also took us to the Liberty Park band concerts on Saturday nights. After the concert a projector would be used to show the word to popular songs and the audience would stand and sing. We also went to many performances at Salt Air with Uncle Dell; Aunt Addy didn’t often attend but sent along lunches with us. I remember the day that I had my first haircut. My cousin Ardelle Beesley and I walked to town and tried to sell our long hair. There were no buyers. Later, when Ardelle married she lived across the street from Bill and me in a duplex. Ardelle became a wonderful pianist; she eventually moved to Idaho with her husband and later died in a hysterectomy operation. Middle School & high school When I was in 8th grade, at West Junior High School, my heart began racing, fibulating, rapidly. The doctor that came to our home told us the only cure was bed rest for one month. The parlor was then transformed into a bedroom for a hired woman and myself. I had to miss an entire semester of school, which I later made up with summer classes. I remember waking up to early morning sounds of the streetcar outside the parlor windows. During this time I helped mother make a quilt on the dining room table. My mother was greatly skilled in sewing and altering clothing. She was continually cutting clothing down to size for the next child. The next year was my first year at West High School. I was not allowed to participate in gym class because of my condition. I had to rest during the gym class hour throughout the first semester. I was then allowed to participate during the second half of the year, wearing the traditional gym attire, black bloomers. My favorite classes were type and shorthand, taught by my own sister, Nellie. Nellie’s friend taught my French class that I took for two years. I also remember liking algebra, but not geometry. Family Dinners & Holiday Meals Family dinners were every night at 6:00 p.m. For our birthdays we never received gifts, but we each had a large sheet cake with candles. One year I remember my brother Earl bringing me a doll for my birthday. The railroad ran two blocks west of our home. So there was a train station nearby. Men that we called hobos would ride on the freight trains for transportation. Many times they showed up in our yard and my mother would feed them a meal. As my siblings grew and became married with families of their own we used to gather together for three occasions a year. Thanksgiving was at Lester and Hattie’s home. Christmas was at Bill’s and my home, where we served the traditional plum pudding. New Years Day was celebrated at Bert and Lila’s home; they always left their Christmas decorations up until after New Year’s, which included a large Christmas Village under their Christmas tree. Nellie and Harold bought our first car. My first attempt at driving was not too successful, so I put off learning for many years. I remember the running boards where we used to carry luggage for our trips. We traveled to places such as Yellowstone and the Grand Canyon. YOUNG ADULTHOOD Church We attended the 22nd ward in Salt Lake. Alvin Beesley was our bishop for many years. He was also the owner of the Beesley Music Company on Main Street. Our family used to watch the downtown parades from there. Bishop Beesley and his family all loved music and he always led the music using the same hymns over and over. He would sometimes supplement the hymns with songs such as, Holy City, O Jerusalem, Christmas Carols, Singing in the Rain, and In the Time of Roses. Bishop Beesley received end paper rolls from the Deseret News Press, and made large copies of the words to the songs. He would place these in front of Sunday school and spend a half hour for singing time. Sunday School was at 10:00 a.m., everyone loved the singing practice. We sat on long benches before the new church was finished. During sacrament a mug of water was passed around. My first church assignment was that of teaching Primary in the Latter Day Saints Children’s Convalescent Home and Day Nursery that was located about one block north of Temple Square. I would walk there after high school and also in the summers. The hospital opened May 11, 1922 and was originally the home of Orson Hyde at 40 West North Temple. In 1934 the name was officially changed to the Primary Children’s Hospital. In 1952 it was moved to 320 12th Avenue. I taught primary on Wednesdays after high school in the 22nd Ward. I served as the Second Counselor M.I.A. in the 22nd Ward under Fern Cox, 1929-1930. I was then the First Counselor in M.I.A. under Rebecca Carr from 1931-1933. I received a call to the Stake Board of the Salt Lake Stake on January 18, 1934. I also served at the Stake Gleaner Leader in the Salt Lake Stake, called January 20, 1934. I served in the Primary as teacher, chorister, and Jr. Primary Coordinator, in the Yalecrest and Monument Park wards. World War I & II I was only about 10 years old when World War I was going on. I don’t remember much about. But World War II affected everyone in my family. My mother was living with Bill and me at the time. Gayle was a young child. We were given ration cards that limited the amount of food we could purchase at a time. My mother living with us actually helped to increase our intake. Bill’s job was not affected and he continued working at the Post Office, being too old to enlist in the military. My brother Albert enlisted and went to Texas for training. Just as he finished training and was preparing to be sent overseas the war came to an end. My brother Harry was called in the draft for WWII, but turned down at the physical examining board for a flat right foot. He then served on a volunteer committee assisting with legal needs for those who were in service in Salt Lake City. My brother Harold worked in the Bremington Naval Ship Yard in Washington for many years during the war. My husband and I seldom discussed the war efforts. I rarely listened to news about the war, even though my husband always stayed well informed. I did serve as a volunteer for the war bond committee. I would deliver pamphlets door to door that encouraged people to buy war bonds. On June 30, 1945, I received a Seventh War Loan emblem for my wartime work as a Victory Volunteer. College I graduated from the University of Utah in June 1928, with a primary-kindergarten diploma. I started teaching school in September 1928. My first year’s annual salary was $850.00. I bought bedroom furniture for my very small room, consisting of a chest of drawers and a vanity table with a tall mirror. I also purchased two fur coats, one was black and the other, my favorite, was a gray charcoal. Each fur coat cost about $100.00. I taught one year of first grade, one year of second grade, and six years of third and fourth grades. I had a Catholic friend that taught with me, she later became a nun. When I married in 1936 I resigned because there was a state law that wouldn’t allow married women to teach in the State of Utah. I was teaching 3rd grade at the Jackson Elementary School. Meeting Bill I first saw my husband, William Hans Oblad, Jr. (Bill), when he was singing in the Double Quartet, in the lobby of the Hotel Utah. It was Christmas Eve, 1925. We were both Christmas caroling with West High School singing groups. Bill asked to take me home and we rode on the streetcar together. Bill had a very nice voice and years later he used to serenade me (songs such as One Alone, Remember, The Way You Look Tonight, Little White Dove and Always) as we rode in his car. We started dating regularly a few years after we first met. Our first date was to the Cadet Hop at the Hotel Utah. He was a member of the High School U.S. Military Service. I remember mother buying me an expensive long dress for graduation. We celebrated graduation at a home party and then dated for a short time. About six years later I ran into Bill again in front of Zion’s Bank downtown and he asked me if I’d like to go dancing some time. That started our regular dancing excursions. We went to dances quite often, either in the wards or canyon resorts, such as the Old Mill in Big Cottonwood Canyon, the Hermitage in Ogden Canyon, Saltair, and Pinecrest in Emigration Canyon. The dances were very popular and completely respectable. We always went with one or two other couples. There were also many home parties with friends. We also went to movies and attended symphony concerts and the theater. We enjoyed playing tennis together on occasion. We were engaged on Christmas Day, 1935. MARRIAGE & CHILDREN Bill and I were married at noon on Christmas Day, 1936, by Bishop Alvin A. Beesley. The immediate members of both families were present. We stood in front of the mantel place of my home. We then had a regular Christmas dinner and left for our honeymoon in our new Dodge for Los Angeles, California. We stayed in hotels and ate all our meals in restaurants, spending a total of $100.00. Twelve years after we were first married, we were sealed together as a family with our children, in the Salt Lake Temple on January 16, 1948. This was a very special day for us. Our good friends, Lester and Sarah Barlow went with us. When Bill and I first married we moved into the Ashby Apartments at 358 East 100 South. It was a small, three-room apartment with a living room, small kitchen with drop-down table, and a very small bedroom. We could hardly get the new furniture in that we had saved for during the previous year. We then rented a new Duplex at 1433 Richards St. They wanted $37.50 a month but I convinced the owner that $35.00 would be better and we would be good tenants. The duplex had a living room, dining room, kitchen, and two bedrooms. Our daughter, Gayle, was born while living there. We finished building our new home at 1955 Princeton Avenue in Salt Lake City in November 1941 at a total cost of $5,500. Our Federal Housing loan was for $4,500. Our payments were never higher than $45.00 and this included all taxes. Bill drew all of the blueprints which the contractor followed, and he did all the electrical work with his self-trained skill. We were able to pass all of the Federal Housing Administration’s inspections (see William Hans Oblad Jr. History, p.6). We have always loved this home and have felt that it was just right for our family and us. Our daughter Gayle was two years old at the time we moved in. My mother moved in with us and we were happy that she seemed very contented. She had sold her home and used my father’s duplex rent fees as her income. My mother rarely tended a grandchild. She did not have the philosophy of grandparents babysitting grandchildren. Even while she was living in our home I would hire a sitter when Bill and I went out. Our first major purchase in our new home was a piano. By that time you could no longer get a piano with ivory keys. We didn’t buy a television for several years. And when we did, we didn’t seem to watch it very much. I am still living in the 1955 Princeton Avenue home 60 years later. Bill’s Career Bill worked at ZCMI printing for eight years. When the shop was closed down he worked for the Tribune and the Deseret News Press. The Tribune was unionized so he made better money there. He took the U.S. Postal test and was hired by the Post Office on a temporary basis. He continued to pass testing and moved up in job status. When he finished a 2-year business degree he became a supervisor there. He also worked as a secretary of a credit union. He then qualified to become a hearing officer. Anniversaries Our wedding anniversary was always special. Not only were we married on Christmas Day but Bill often followed the traditional anniversary gift list. I remember one morning waking up to a new large beautiful mirror installed in our bathroom overnight by my husband. I also remember for “tin” he bought a new large garbage can. One of my favorite gifts was a Royal Doulton bone china figurine “The Bridesmaid.” On our 25th anniversary we purchased four sterling silver place settings, adding one place setting each year until we acquired a total of twelve settings. For our 40th anniversary, Bill took me down to the O.C. Tanner store and he told me to pick out a ruby ring or necklace. I chose a ruby I liked and the store made a ring setting for it. After a week of wearing it I decided that I didn’t like it too well since I thought the ruby sat up too high. So we took it back and they made a ring with two rubies set into a gold band. For our wedding day Bill gave me a white gardenia corsage from Hawaii. I accidentally left it behind in the first room we stayed in. For several of our early anniversaries Bill gave me a white gardenia. But I would never wear them to church since I felt conspicuous. So Bill started sending me a dozen roses instead. The roses would come beautifully wrapped in a large box from Miller Ellison Flower Shop, arranged with holly. I also received boxes of chocolate from Snelgroves. Bill always wrapped gifts elegantly. In 1969, my husband wrote a poem about how we met: My Christmas Present By William Hans Oblad, Jr. Under a lighted Christmas tree A group of carolers met They were a high school girls glee And a boys double quartet. They sang merry songs of Christmas To the hotel lobby throng The response, a happy applause Following each little song. The carolers shared the spirit Caroling throughout the town From store to store, place to place ‘Til shoppers were homeward bound. The cool night was full of music Love of Christmas was everywhere The singers were now departing Some as single and some a pair. A boy escorted this new found girl To her home and said goodbye A happy start to a friendship One that could never die. As each Christmas now comes and go And carolers do their singing A Christmas carol is a wedding song To the couple with a Christmas beginning. Gayle Our first child, Gayle, was born May 21, 1939. Her diapers were washed in the sink, soaked in disinfectant and hung out to dry in the backyard or downstairs. Gayle liked Sunday School and especially Primary on Wednesdays. She made very close neighborhood friends who remained close for many years. She had strong math abilities, sang in A’capella, and took several years of ballet. She attended the University of Utah, and continued her ballet dancing, performing in the Nutcracker there. She graduated with a B.S in Elementary Education in 1961. When Gayle was about 16 years old she borrowed the car and drove to the pet store. There she purchased a small dog for her brother’s 8th birthday, without anyone’s approval. We named him Spotty. He had a doghouse in the yard, but he slept in our house at night anyway. Well, then he became a she when Spotty delivered a litter of puppies the first winter with us. We advertised and gave the puppies away. We also had a large pet turtle given to us by Lester and Hattie’s daughter, Edna. He slept in the basement all winter with a blanket on. During the warm months he would roam the yard tied to a chain. One spring our turtle didn’t wake up from his long winter nap. Roger Our son, Roger, was born on April 21, 1947. He had close friends in our neighborhood. He loved to explore and enjoyed scouting activities. He helped make Indian clothing to go on an overnight hike alone in the canyon. He became an Eagle Scout. Roger had a close relationship with his father and inherited many of his father’s engineering talents. Roger spent many hours with his father building controls for the running of trains on our train board in the basement. He won 1st prize at Clayton Jr. High for designing and building a stereo. It was then entered into the University of Utah exhibition. Roger served a mission in England during the years of 1966 to 1968. We toured Europe and picked him up at the conclusion of his mission. CHURCH, CAREER & TRAVEL Church Activity Bill was the Financial Ward Clerk at the Monument Park Second Ward, 1005 South 2000 East. It was finished and dedicated in 1950 and Bill was responsible for keeping all the records on the financing of this $300,000 new building. We were very active and happy in this special ward where President Kimball resided. Bill was in charge of the ward lighting, electrical and sound. He installed the first hearing aid to be used individually in the chapel. He used all his skills for the road shows and two large productions that needed new scenery, lighting, and stage sound. Bill also served as a seventy president in the stake and as an activity counselor for M.I.A. Bill loved to research his ancestors and spent many hours with genealogy. In the Monument Park ward I served as the Jr. Sunday School Coordinator and Chorister, Sunday School teacher for the 7 and 8 year olds, then Stake Supervisor for the same age group, Relief Society Secretary (1974-1977), and Relief Society Librarian. During this time we had Sunday School at 10:00 a.m. on Sunday and Sacrament Meeting at 6:00 p.m. Relief Society, Primary and Mutual took place during the week. About one year after we moved into our new home we were meeting every Wednesday night for Gospel Doctrine classes. Oscar McConkie was our teacher and he encouraged us to read and study the Book of Mormon. I would check out scripture records from the library and Bill and I would listen to them, following along in our scriptures. We really enjoyed listening and learning this way. We were asked to donate money to buy a brick for the Bonneville Stake that was being built. When our Monument Park Ward building was being built, Bill was involved in the fundraising for the gymnasium. Many dinners were given and there would be auctions to bid on scarce wartime items such as nylon hosiery. When the Monument Stake was built we also contributed in donations. Teaching When Roger was six years old and in school all day, I went to the Board of Education to visit my friend who was in charge of the city Primary-Kindergarten program. I told her that I had some free time on my hands. I wondered if there was something I could teach, since I hadn’t taught for many years. She said that I could teach but I could not earn a full salary since I only had a two-year teaching certificate. I told her that the money wouldn’t be a problem. Therefore, in 1954 I returned to teaching school. I was not given full pay until I was able to earn a Bachelor of Science degree from University of Utah on June 9, 1958, after attending summer school and night classes for three years. I was almost 50 years old when I earned my degree. I taught first grade at Garfield Elementary and made several lifelong friends there, including, Marilyn Fellow, Helen Baxter, Colleen Shelby and Charlotte McLatchy. We ate lunch everyday together and even during the summer we would meet at each other’s homes. Eventually I was transferred to Bonneville Elementary, only one block from my home. I taught at Bonneville for four years until 1974 when I retired. At that time kindergarteners did no reading or writing. The last few years at Bonneville we started a new innovative reading program that was challenging to the children, which the parents liked. I enjoyed helping children learn to read and watched their excitement as the written page became meaningful to them. I liked to expose them to nursery rhymes and all types of fairy tales. Travel & Entertainment The year 1933-1934 was very unusual. A California like climate was enjoyed. Golf was played on both Christmas and New Year’s Day. The unusual winter was climaxed by an earthquake March 12th. Little damage was done, but it was of sufficient severity to necessitate an earthquake closing of schools for March 11 and March 12. The day after Easter, April 2, Salt Lake City had one of the heaviest snowfalls of the year. Bill and I loved to travel; we planned one long trip each year. Bill loved Dodge vehicles. So we always owned a Dodge. We visited the Southern Utah Parks, Yellowstone, Las Vegas, Sun Valley, Rhode Island, New York, Colorado, St. Louis, California, Vancouver, Lake Louise, and Quebec. Lake Louise was a very beautiful area; we stayed at a grand hotel there for $25 a night. This was very expensive at the time since an average hotel room was only $10 a night. One year my mother came with us to Jackson and Yellowstone. She then took a train home, but Bill and I continued up through Canada. We had a bad accident on a one-way bridge when a speeding car ran us off the bridge into the water. I had neck and back injuries and stayed in the Cranbrook Catholic Hospital for about a week. Those responsible for the accident paid us for damages and the hospital stay, and Bill booked a flight on an airplane home. I absolutely refused to get on an airplane, so we took a long train ride home. When our children were born and we began to travel with them, I would pack a suitcase of emergency food. I would include small boxes of cereal, canned milk, and other small items. We would mostly eat along the way at restaurants or drive-thru establishments. But when drive-thru’s weren’t plentiful, the emergency food would come in handy. We also traveled to Sweden and Denmark and then toured Europe with Roger after his mission in June 1968. In Troja, Sweden we spent three days visiting the original John F. Oblad home and other areas they lived. We picked Roger up and had dinner at the mission home. We attended the theater at Stratford on Avon. We visited family graves near London, England in a small church. We had to rent a car and it too awhile for Bill to become used to driving on the opposite side of the road. There were many Pugsleys buried in Shirwell, Devonshire. An elderly man was trimming the foliage by hand and told us that when he was gone no one else would be there to do his job (See Appendix A). We also visited a churchyard on the way to Cornwall, England where the Pascoes lived and worked. We joined an American Express tour group and toured London, Holland, Italy and France, where we then departed for the U.S. We enjoyed music and theater. We bought season tickets to the Utah Symphony and the Pioneer Memorial Theater and Ballet for many years. At the University of Utah theater there is a seat dedicated to the Pugsley family. Also in the Cedar City Shakespeare theater there is a chair with Lavina Pascoe Oblad’s name. She was a dedicated expert in Shakespeare. Bill purchased it in her honor. We went to Cedar City several summers to see the Shakespearean plays. Children’s College & Marriages Gayle graduated from the University of Utah with a Bachelor of Science degree. She met her husband, Kent Brown, while teaching school in Berkeley, California. Gayle and Scott Kent Brown were married by Elder Marion Hanks, in the Salt Lake Temple on August 15, 1966. Their reception was in the Monument Park Second Ward. Kent introduced us to the depth of scriptures and to Cairo and Jerusalem. Gayle and Kent made a wonderful combination of intelligence and spirituality. They lived in Rhode Island for four years and then moved to Utah. They have six children, Karilynne, Julianne, Heather, Shoshauna, Scott, and Emily (who passed away). As I grew older Gayle enabled me to enjoy living alone in the same home that Bill and I built. After Roger served a mission in England he married Toni Marie Fritsch who he knew before his mission. They were married on August 19, 1970 by Elder Marion Hanks in the Salt Lake Temple. Their reception was in the Lion House, downtown Salt Lake City. Toni has special abilities in decorating, flower arranging and art. She helped him finish his degree at the University of Utah in Electrical Engineering, and he graduated in 1972. They then moved to California where he became employed by Hewlett Packard. They have five children, Carl, John, Lee, Holly and Eileen (see Appendix B). FRIENDS, HEALTH & RETIREMENT Friends & Clubs When I was in 5th grade, my friends and I started a sewing club. We would meet in our homes after school and bring our sewing. I always brought the same pair of pillowcases to embroider. I don’t think that I ever actually finished them. Eventually it became just a fun club and we played games such as Pitt, Rook, etc. When we reached high school we learned to play bridge. There were eight of us in this group. We continued on even after several of us were married. The hostess would award a nice present to the winner of the evening. Years later I met Charlotte McLatchy when she was the librarian at Garfield Elementary, and we became close friends. She was on the General Board of the M.I.A. Charlotte taught bridge classes at Westminster College when she retired from Garfield, and I signed up for her class. We once set our children up on a date (my daughter and her son). It only lasted one date. Merl Hamilton was the Primary President of our ward in the 1940’s. She invited the Primary Teachers, myself included, to a nice lunch. This started an annual luncheon for many years at the Lion House. We called our group the Pri-Lum-Nae. I was elected as the secretary-treasurer. Les and Sarah Barlow were our very close friends throughout the years. We had a tradition of getting together every New Year’s Eve. We wore silly party hats and holiday good at midnight. When we met John and Marie Christensen, they joined our group. Memories of Prophets President Spencer W. Kimball and his wife, Camilla Eyring Kimball, were our neighbors and lived two blocks from us. They had moved to Salt Lake from Arizona in 1943. President Kimball and his wife would attend our ward and he often talked in Sacrament Meeting. He often spoke about loving and forgiving everyone, and maintaining your homes, yards and gardens. He used to take walks through the neighborhood, stopping and talking to everyone. I particularly remember when he offered a special prayer for rain during a severe drought, and soon after that we had rain. Spencer W. Kimball was sustained as the prophet in 1973, and eventually had to move to the Hotel Utah when he received continual threats from apostates. Camilla Kimball, wife of President Spencer W. Kimball, was my visiting teacher for many years. I had a handrail installed on my front porch so that she would be able to come up the stairs. When she became homebound after President Kimball’s death I would visit her. She was always taking classes of some kind and even had an artist come to her home and teach her oil painting. Camilla invited the Relief Society sisters in our ward to read good books. Then she would host a special luncheon for those that read the book she recommended. Everyone loved her homemade strawberry jam. She still came to church in her later years in a wheelchair and carrying oxygen. I also remember President David O. McKay with fondness. He was always statuesque and attentive. He was a very powerful speaker and he always had something important to speak about. I still remember scriptures and quotes. Bill’s illness and death In April 1979 Bill was tested and diagnosed with cancer of the esophagus. The cancer could not be controlled or cured and Bill passed away on December 13, 1979. We had been married forty-three years and were best friends. Bill and I had a life of love and togetherness in many and various facets of our years together. Bill wrote this poem about our special relationship the year before he died: Their love life was a Triangle with Phyllis, Bill and God. It was sacred. It was pure love. It cannot be told on earth, because the public has tendencies to earthylize everything. To distort, to sensuate, and to implicate. The love life of Phyllis and Bill can only be told among the angles in eternity when God gives the nod, for it was and still is beautiful and eternal. Volunteer work In 1984, I became one of the first docents (guide) to be trained to work in the new Museum of Church History and Art, about one month before it opened. I had to learn the history of all the exhibits and artifacts. Training was early Sunday mornings before church. There were three levels that I showed tourist around. I also worked at the front desk and made two good friends there. One taught me how to crochet, she made afghans of every type and she told me she crocheted every night until midnight. I volunteered at the museum for about ten years. In 1999, I attended the 15th Anniversary Reunion on August 28. I also joined the Daughters of Utah Pioneers (DUP), on November 17, 1988, and held several offices. The DUP was organized in Salt Lake in 1901 and by 2001 there were many camps, nationally and internationally. The 100 year anniversary was celebrated with a special program and festivities. I volunteered at the museum one day a week for about ten years. My mother and my sister, Nellie, were also members. Nellie served as a librarian and a stenographer for them. I became a docent and enjoyed all of the artifacts on the four levels. Later Travels I went on three trips with my sister-in-law, Opal. The first one was to Spain, where we stayed for one month in 1981. We traveled with her two sisters and their husbands. We rented a van and toured the country.Opal and I also went on two cruises, one of them to the Panama Canal on the Royal Princess Cruise in 1986. The other to the Mexican Riviera in 1989. I also had the opportunity to visit the Middle East on two different occasions. I took a trip with Kent and Gayle to Egypt and Israel in 1983. We spent a week on the Nile River on a boat. I again traveled to Israel in 1987 with my granddaughter Karilynne and her new husband, Russell. I stayed over there longer than they did, we were visiting Gayle and Kent, and their children Heather, Shoshauna and Scott. They lived in an apartment in a Jewish neighborhood. While I was staying there they made the transition of moving into an apartment at the BYU Jerusalem Center. I thoroughly enjoyed exploring and touring that grand center. I also traveled many times to California to visit Roger and Toni and their children, Carl, John, Lee, Holly and Eileen. I attended their children’s baptisms, mission farewells and homecomings, and weddings. Health milestones When I was a young girl, penicillin and other antibiotics had not been invented. So, I was given Stern’s wine of cod liver oil if I was sick. It tasted awful. Mustard plasters were administered to the chest if someone had a heavy cough. Also, gargling with salt water was another cough treatment. A dose of castor oil was a common vitamin to take. I have been very grateful over my lifetime for the treatment and skills of specialists and surgeons. I have been greatly helped when I required treatments for skin cancer, operations on both knees, a broken pelvis, and a bad shoulder. I experienced the following health ailments: 1. Tonsillitis 2. Rheumatic Fever 3. Hay Fever and skin allergies 4. Hernia & appendicitis 5. Laser treatment of eyes 6. Knee replacement on both knees 7. Broken pelvis, hospital, 24 hour bed rest for 4 weeks CONCLUDING REFLECTIONS I know that I have been very blessed to be a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, and partake of the enrichment this has been in my life. I have read the Book of Mormon several times and have also listened to the entire book by recordings. The first time I read it, I wondered how anyone could really comprehend all that it contained, but with later readings and class studies, I became very convinced that it had to be of divine origin. It is certainly a miracle book. I now enjoy reading the Book of Mormon and find it contains great wisdom that helps us, through the great history of past generations, to give guidance to all who will be receptive. Some of my favorite quotations include: 1. “Be pleasant, you have not fulfilled every duty unless you have fulfilled that of being pleasant.” –Charles Buxton 2. “The world is so full of a number of things. I am sure we should all be as happy as kings.” –Robert Louis Stevenson 3. “Let nothing disturb thee—Nothing afright thee—All things are passing—God never changeth.” –Henry W. Longfellow 4. “I would be true for there are those who trust me—I would be pure for there are those who care—I would be strong for there is much to suffer—I would be brave for there is much to dare—I would be friend to all, the foe, the friendless—I would be giving and forget the gift—I would be humble for I know my weakness; I would look up, and laugh, and love, and lift.” –Howard Arnold Walters I have always believed in the Articles of Faith written by the prophet Joseph Smith. The first one states, “We believe in God, the Eternal Father, His son, Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Ghost.” My favorite one that I have always had memorized is the 13th Article of Faith. “We believe in being honest, true, chaste, benevolent, virtuous, and in doing good to all men; indeed, we may say that we follow the admonition of Paul—We believe all things, we hope all things, we have endured many things, and hope to be able to endure all things. If there is anything virtuous, lovely, or of good report or praiseworthy, we seek after these things.” I believe these are great rules to live by and would counsel all of my grandchildren to live by these principles. TRIBUTES 100 Memories of my Mother, by Gayle Oblad Brown Creamed chipped beef Chili sauce Mint sauce for lamb Waffles on card table Shrimp cocktail Reading to grandchildren Helping Roger with his spelling Laughing and giggling with bridge friends Charts for school room UEA luncheons with friends Ovaltine Penicillin shots Storybook dolls Aunt Nellie’s birthday music box Painting the duplex Cruise on the Nile Suitcase of food for trips Visit to Israel Ironing board in living room Naps on couch “Take it easy and put your feet up” Very narrow feet Dinners at Harry and Jeanne’s Teaching primary with Ann Maughan Pri-Lumni luncheons Frosted goblets String in attic Mouse traps Deer in garage The dog Spot Easter egg roll on capital grounds This is the Place Monument DUP meetings Docent at the museum Knee replacements Ocuvite Pig with toothpicks Scriptures by bedside Pollywog from Brighton Autumn leaves for classroom Bonneville School Garfield School Trip to Rhode Island Physical therapy 100% support for grandchildren Room and board for all family members Rosebud wallpaper in my bedroom 6:00 p.m. dinner time Liver and veal for dinner Egg poacher Laundered shirts Hotel Utah dining room “Keep the change” Washing the kitchen sink Spring house cleaning Magic penny day Crab for Christmas Eve Crab forks Hearing aides Pioneer heritage Silver pitcher Anais Anais Estee Lauder Visits to Bert and Lila’s Lester and Hattie’s giant turtle Fishing trip to Etna, Wyoming Five drop-in grandchildren for one month Lester smoking outside Toy closet for grandchildren Savings bonds AT&T Earl and Cornell Income taxes Camilla Kimball visiting teacher Neal A. Maxwell’s books Miller Ellison’s flowers Morrison meat pies Brattens Saltaire West High School Lemon Grove Edna’s dress fittings Shopping at ZCMI Stories of ancestors “Always” Minimal mechanical ability Peace maker Pendleton jackets Crocheted afghans New Year’s Eve with Barlows Visits to St. Joseph’s San Francisco Jackson Hole with Julianne Green olives Asparagus Long toenails Visit to Berkeley Leaves in the table Mildred, Julie and Marjorie Spotting points in Scrabble Favorite Memories of My Mother, by Roger P. Oblad The thoughts that keep coming to my mind as I think of my mother are of her example and many positive influences. She has always been positive and would not get caught up into negative talk about others. She does not complain amid adversity. She would not allow inappropriate language or discussion in the home and is deft in switching the subject during any gathering when she felt the topic was edging toward the inappropriate. She believes in the value of education. This resulted in my being presented with many "flash cards" when I was trying to learn math and then encouraging myself as well as other family members to work toward advanced college degrees. She got her own BS degree at the age of 52. She wanted me to wear appropriate clothing for any occasion and made sure I was aware that it was important to shine the back of my shoes not just the front. She believed in the value of music and encouraged me in piano lessons, clarinet lessons, and singing in choirs. She believes in attending to her finances with care and frugality. Into her 90s she still checks the newspaper for the stock market prices daily. She believes in reading good books and has spent her life in reading and giving meaningful books to others to read. She believes in good nutrition and has provided for herself three balanced meals a day during the many years she has been alone. She is a gracious host providing food, comfort, and pleasant conversation to anyone who came to her home. She keeps track of the life of her grandchildren and great grandchildren, speaking about them often and being aware of what is happening in their lives. She loves my father, her "Bill". She is full of faith and has a firm testimony of the restored gospel. She is a source of spiritual blessing to her entire family as a result of her consistent daily prayers. Roger Pugsley Oblad - Dec 2001 APPENDIX A: Churchyard of Shirwell, Devonshire, England Visited by Phyllis and Bill Oblad, June of 1968 William Gibbs Died March 24, 1865 Age 84 Years Ann Gibbs Died Jan. 31, 1860 Age 82 YearsJames Kingdon, husband Died Oct. 24, 1843 Age 86 Years Mary Kingdon, wife Died July 2, 1855 Age 87 YearsBessie and Beloved Wife Of Anthony Pugsley of Plakton, Barton died June 21, 1885 Age 54 Years Grace Pugsley, wife Died Aug. 29, 1833 Age 71 Years John Pugsley, husband [father of Philip Pugsley I] Died Apr. 22, 1836 Age 80 Years Farewell, Farewell Our Children Dear And all our friends farewell We hope we are going To that place Where Saints and Angels dwellWilliam Kingdon, father Died Sept. 27, 1850 Age 58 Years John Kingdon, son Died Nov. 2, 1853 Age 27 YearsRichard Barrow Died Jan. 7, 1891 Age 62 Years Agnes Barrow Died Nov. 9, 1895 Age 72 Years William Barrow, son Died Oct. 4, 1888 Age 33 Ann Pugsley, wife Died Dec. 16, 1871 Age 84 Years George Pugsley, husband Died Apr. 30, 1872 Age 86 YearsElizabeth Pugsley, wife Died Feb. 12, 1869 Age 74 Years William Pugsley, husband Died May 18, 1877 Age 85 YearsAt Lynton-Lynmouth A watering trough “Erected by Mrs. Barlow August 1899.” George Pugsley, husband Died April 22, 1886 Age 68 Years Mary Pugsley, wife Died April 24, 1891 Age 75 YearsGeorge Pugsley Died Jan. 20, 1898 Age 37 Years Annie Lou Pugsley Died Aug. 14, 1946 Age 81 YearsSacred to the Memory of Ann Pugsley who died 19 of January 1858 Age 51 Years Benjamin Pugsley Husband of the above named who died 10 of June 1861 Age 53 Years Blessed is the man that Trusteth in the Lord George Pugsley, husband Died Apr. 8, 1885 Age 83 Years Elizabeth Pugsley, wife Died Feb. 14, 1887 Age 83 YearsIsmena wife of John Kidwell Died Dec. 20, 1893 Age 47 Years John Kidwell, husband Died Dec. 20, 1937 Age 89 Years APPENDIX B: Grandchildren and Great Grandchildren Karilynne Brown Pearson and Russell Pearson 1. Nashelle Pearson 2. Taylor Pearson 3. Larissa Pearson 4. Parker Pearson 5. Marinn Pearson 6. Megan Pearson Julianne Brown Clegg and Jason Clegg 1. Tanner Noah Clegg 2. Cassidy Clegg 3.Ellie Clegg 4.Spencer Jason Clegg Heather Brown Moore and Christopher Moore 1. Kaelin Moore 2. Kara Moore 3. Dana Moore Shoshauna Brown and Joel Jacquart Scott Brown and Jill Pugmire Brown 1. Scott Kent Brown III 2. Joshua Mark Brown Carl William Oblad and Nicole Watson Oblad 1. Kyle William Oblad 2. Emily Nicole Oblad John Roger Oblad and Lauren Mari Marten Oblad 1. Elise Marie Oblad 2. Eric John Oblad Lee Fritsch Oblad Holly Anna Oblad and Michael George Robertson Eileen Marie Oblad and Ryan McKay Payne 1. Jordan McKay Payne

Phyllis Druce Pugsley Oblad (1908-2002) Personal History

Contributor: SydneyW Created: 2 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

FAMILY It was October the 9th, 1908, and Dr. Ewing had come to the home to deliver Nellie May Druce and Philip Pugsley’s ninth child, Phyllis. The doctor attended Nellie early and stayed throughout her labor. The rest of the family had gone to the Fair Day. Upon returning, they welcomed the new baby girl into their family. It was a joyous occasion, especially since the two children born before Phyllis had died in infancy. Phyllis’ living siblings included Warren, Lester, Earl, Nellie, Albert and Harold, with Harry soon to follow. Ancestors Phillip Pugsley II (1822-1903) and Martha Roach (1829-1906) were my grandparents on my father’s side. They were both members of the church when they were married in Bristol, England on June 28, 1851. They immigrated to Utah, leaving England March 20, 1853. They crossed the ocean on the Falcon ship and arrived in New Orleans after eight weeks. They traveled to St. Louis and then to Keokuk, Iowa. They joined the Ten Pound Company, paying their own way, ten pounds was about fifty American dollars. When they arrived in America, they started across the plains on June 5, 1853 with ten in a wagon, poorly supplied with provisions since they had to get rid of two-thirds of their luggage. They arrived in the Salt Lake Valley on September 30, 1853, with ten cents (for the complete story, see the scrapbook about my mother, Nellie May Druce Pugsley). Henry Druce (1820-1896) and Harriett Jinks (1826-1896) were my maternal grandparents, from Merton Surrey, England. He met and married Harriett Jinks at the Old Church in Manchester, England on May 4, 1845. Henry and Harriett joined Henry’s brother John and wife, Julia, in America. They took the packet ship Montezuma with their small son, Thomas, and Harriett’s mother, Julia, arriving in New York on September 18, 1846. Henry and Harriett lived in Rhode Island, where six of their children were born. They started for Utah on May 7, 1860, traveling by railroad and steamboat via Chicago and St. Joseph reaching Florence, Nebraska. There they joined the James D. Ross Company heading for Salt Lake. Henry had enough money to hire two teamsters to drive the wagon. They brought along Harriett’s melodeon that was used for nightly entertainment. The melodeon was a small keyboard with folding legs that could be put against the side of the wagon and not take up too much space. Harriet also brought a silver teapot and a petite point picture that she had made of the “Smothering of the Princess in the Tower of London.” They arrived in the Salt Lake Valley September 3, 1860. Parents My father, Philip Pugsley III was born February 10, 1859, in Salt Lake City, Utah to Philip Pugsley II and Martha Roach, immigrants from Bristol, England. He was one of the first graduates of the University of Deseret and became proficient in math and writing. He became a bookkeeper for ZCMI and then went to work at the Salt Lake Lumber Company as their foreman and bookkeeper for many years. He later retired from the lumber job and joined the Moose Club in Salt Lake City where he became the Secretary, Treasurer, and Herder. He was given a large office that I used to visit. I occasionally went to his office and do typing and filing. He would always take me to Shay’s cafeteria for lunch. I liked that. Some of my relatives belonged to the Masons, Woodmen of the World, and the Elks. My mother became the Deputy Grand Regent at the Moose Lodge. My father enjoyed the outdoors, taking the boys fishing and duck hunting. It was often said that if there wasn’t a fish in the stream he would catch one anyway. We would often eat trout or duck for dinner. My mother and I used the feathers to make quilts. My father had a quiet and calm disposition. He enjoyed playing cards and kept a large garden, which provided us with all of our vegetables. He would work in the garden early in the morning and then store the produce in the basement for canning and pickling. My father’s sister, Emily Pugsley Thompson, and her husband opened the Park City Mine. She cooked the meals at the boarding house for the miners. They eventually became millionaires and once in awhile she would drive down in her electric automobile to Salt Lake and visit her family. Later they bought the land on South Temple and 500 East and built a mansion. Another sister, Elizabeth Pugsley Hayward was an early member of the Daughters of Utah Pioneers group. She was one of the first women legislators and she made me a “granny square” afghan, which I still have. My mother, Nellie May Druce Pugsley, was a fine homemaker and musician. Nellie May was born April 11, 1864. Nellie was a gifted singer. She began about the age of nine singing solos in church and for many years took the best voice lessons available. Her high soprano voice was heard in many church socials, opera performances at the Salt Lake Theater, and as a soloist in the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. My mother and father were childhood friends and they married November 7, 1883. My father was 24 and my mother was 19 years old. My mother was always busy caring for her family. Our 6:00 p.m. dinners consisted of roast beef, steak, chicken, trout, or duck. She baked breads, pies, and cakes. I still remember the bread puddings, custards, plum puddings, and vegetable beef soup. My mother was involved in the Literary Club and the Relief Society. She was active in groups of the 1890’s to get the Manifesto passed for the right of women to vote. She was also an avid Democrat and Parent Teacher Association President at the Washington Elementary School. When the U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt visited Utah, she was invited to meet him and I went with her and shook his hand. My brother Earl was a staunch republican; he and my mother wrote political letters to each other for years while he was living in New York. Each of them tried to convince the other of the wrongs of his or her party. Neither wavered from their own beliefs. Siblings My bother Warren married Mabel. He was a plumber and contractor by profession. They ended up living in Burley, Idaho. Lester married Hattie. He worked for the Railway Express Agency in management. I remember babysitting their children, Patsy, Edna and John, when they took the train to Detroit to buy a new Ford car, which they drove back. Earl graduated from Cornell University and then came back home and got married Esther. Earl attended night school in New York City and obtained his law degree. He was then put in the legal department of AT&T in New York, where he remained until his death. Nellie was born June 19, 1893. She married A.J. Becker when she was 40 years old. She was a teacher and taught home economics, including weaving. Nellie also earned a masters degree in music from Cornell University. She lived with Earl when she was obtaining this degree. Albert (Bert) married Lila. Albert served in World War I. He was a clerk for the Salt Lake City School District until retirement. Then he worked with the church in publishing and accounting. He and his wife later served a mission in Switzerland. Harold married Opal. He worked for the Railway Express Agency, along with Lester. My brother Philip was born July 2, 1895, but only lived 20 days. Harriett followed on November 8, 1896, a stillborn. Harry married Jean. He worked for the Deseret News and graduated from the University of Utah with a law degree. He formed a law firm of Pugsley, Hayes & Rampton. He also served as secretary to Governor Herbert Maw for two years. At the time of his retirement he was the Director of Copyrights for the church for five years. Home Our home, located on 573 North 200 West (now 300 West) in Salt Lake City, Utah, was a large 8-room structure. It was built on the original site of the Philip Pugsley Flour and Salt Mill. It consisted of a parlor with sliding doors, a sitting room, a dining room, a kitchen and pantry. Upstairs were the four bedrooms, and a divided bathroom. The basement had a cement floor and a coal furnace. The parlor was used for special occasions, Sundays, entertaining, vocal and piano practicing for Mother and Nellie, and piano practicing for me. The sitting room was where we would read and listen to the wind-up victrola and later the radio. We had many records of popular songs at the time. The dining room had our large oak table where each evening the family would gather for dinner at 6:00 p.m. The kitchen was large with a separate pantry for the sink, china, and food. My brother Warren built a box in our kitchen with shelves of iron coils. This was our refrigerator. Many houses had boxes for real ice. Once a week, for a price, ice was delivered to their homes. Eventually my parents were able to afford a very nice piano. They went to Beesley Music and selected one of top quality, with real ivory keys. It also had a high top. I believe it is still in the family on my brother, Harry’s side. In the back yard was a two-story barn where my father kept his horses and buggy. In the loft he would spread out black walnuts to dry. We then used them for eating and cooking. Near the north back fence, my father made a trough for water and attempted to raise fish. We also had a well in our back yard. All of the wells were eventually bought by an oil refinery that was a few blocks north of us. I think we received about $1,000 from the purchase. My father built a duplex on the lot next to our home as an investment. It rented for $18.00 a month. My husband, Bill, and I bought it in later years and had many experiences in redecorating and renting. These homes have now all been replaced by service stations. Mother would send her laundry out to be washed to Murray Laundry. It would be returned still wet and we would hang the heavy items out to dry in the basement or outside. We would iron all of the lighter items, such as shirts and pant. We also used to iron all pillowcases and sheets. When I was married, I also sent my laundry out to be washed, and ironed all flat linens, sheets, dishcloths, etc. Bill always took his nice dress shirts to the cleaners, and continued to do so after we were married. Once when my son, Roger, was about 5 years old we took a trip to Jackson Hole, and I visited a local laundromat. I was amazed at how convenient the dryers were. When we returned home we bought a washer and eventually a dryer. My niece, Patsy, and her husband, Art, recommended a gas dryer. I kept it in my home until the year of 2001. CHILDHOOD We used to play in the front yard often with the many children in the neighborhood. Some of our favorite games included Kick the Can, No Bears out Tonight, Run Sheepie Run, Race Around the Block, etc. School was always closed for Fair Day and Baseball Day. Two of my brothers, Albert and Harold, were avid baseball players. Albert played catcher and Harold played pitcher. I attended many of their games. I used to walk to elementary school, junior high, and high school. Automobiles were rare when I was young. Wagons were the main transportation. The primary transportation in the city was the streetcar. My aunt Hattie took Harry and I to see the first airplane fly over Salt Lake City. We stood where the city and county buildings are now. I was baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in the baptismal font under the organ in the Salt Lake Tabernacle, when I was ten years old. My father would have two weeks vacation each year. We would spend the time camping at Lemmon’s Grove near Kamas. My father would pack the buckboard with all of the supplies, tents, food, etc. and leave ahead of my mother, it was a two-day trip by horse. Mother, Harry and I would take a train to Park City and hire a white top to take us to Lemmon’s Grove. Everything would be set up and ready when we arrived at the campsite. Father and the boys would hunt and fish, in the evenings our family would do programs with other families in the area, and my mother would often sing at these gatherings. Harry My younger brother Harry and I were very close friends growing up. He was two years younger than I. We often played games together; our favorite card game was “Steal the Pile.” My sister, Nellie, would read to us and then take us either to Pioneer or Liberty Park to play on the equipment. Later we began to play tennis there also. When Harry and I were teenagers, I was about 16; father and mother would occasionally take us to the Moose Club dances. Harry and I would dance together as partners. Nellie My sister, Nellie, was 15 years old at the time of my birth. She contributed greatly to my care and upbringing. Nellie read me nursery rhymes and fairy tales. She used to fix my hair and put ribbons in it. I remember having lots of freckles. I would spend every penny I could earn on freckle cream. She also took me on trips to Liberty Park and on a train to Saltair. She later encouraged me to take typing, shorthand, and French. Nellie used to listen to the grand operas from New York during Opera season. Elementary School I attended the Washington Elementary School for first grade, kindergarten was not offered at the time. At Washington there were separate entrances for the boys and the girls. We were allowed to play together at recess but we always had to go through the proper entrance. My best friend growing up was Ardelle Beesley, a close cousin one year younger than I, daughter of Uncle Delbert and Aunt Adelaide Beesley. Aunt Adelaide was my father’s sister. They lived two doors south of us and my brother Harry and I spent many hours at their home. I used to walk right into their house without knocking. Uncle Dell was a great musician, a timpanist, playing the drums and other instruments. He also owned a car, played with the symphony and for the movie theater houses, before there was sound projection. Ardelle and I used to enter the stage door with Uncle Dell, laughing at the funny movies. Uncle Dell also took us to the Liberty Park band concerts on Saturday nights. After the concert a projector would be used to show the word to popular songs and the audience would stand and sing. We also went to many performances at Salt Air with Uncle Dell; Aunt Addy didn’t often attend but sent along lunches with us. I remember the day that I had my first haircut. My cousin Ardelle Beesley and I walked to town and tried to sell our long hair. There were no buyers. Later, when Ardelle married she lived across the street from Bill and me in a duplex. Ardelle became a wonderful pianist; she eventually moved to Idaho with her husband and later died in a hysterectomy operation. Middle School & high school When I was in 8th grade, at West Junior High School, my heart began racing, fibulating, rapidly. The doctor that came to our home told us the only cure was bed rest for one month. The parlor was then transformed into a bedroom for a hired woman and myself. I had to miss an entire semester of school, which I later made up with summer classes. I remember waking up to early morning sounds of the streetcar outside the parlor windows. During this time I helped mother make a quilt on the dining room table. My mother was greatly skilled in sewing and altering clothing. She was continually cutting clothing down to size for the next child. The next year was my first year at West High School. I was not allowed to participate in gym class because of my condition. I had to rest during the gym class hour throughout the first semester. I was then allowed to participate during the second half of the year, wearing the traditional gym attire, black bloomers. My favorite classes were type and shorthand, taught by my own sister, Nellie. Nellie’s friend taught my French class that I took for two years. I also remember liking algebra, but not geometry. Family Dinners & Holiday Meals Family dinners were every night at 6:00 p.m. For our birthdays we never received gifts, but we each had a large sheet cake with candles. One year I remember my brother Earl bringing me a doll for my birthday. The railroad ran two blocks west of our home. So there was a train station nearby. Men that we called hobos would ride on the freight trains for transportation. Many times they showed up in our yard and my mother would feed them a meal. As my siblings grew and became married with families of their own we used to gather together for three occasions a year. Thanksgiving was at Lester and Hattie’s home. Christmas was at Bill’s and my home, where we served the traditional plum pudding. New Years Day was celebrated at Bert and Lila’s home; they always left their Christmas decorations up until after New Year’s, which included a large Christmas Village under their Christmas tree. Nellie and Harold bought our first car. My first attempt at driving was not too successful, so I put off learning for many years. I remember the running boards where we used to carry luggage for our trips. We traveled to places such as Yellowstone and the Grand Canyon. YOUNG ADULTHOOD Church We attended the 22nd ward in Salt Lake. Alvin Beesley was our bishop for many years. He was also the owner of the Beesley Music Company on Main Street. Our family used to watch the downtown parades from there. Bishop Beesley and his family all loved music and he always led the music using the same hymns over and over. He would sometimes supplement the hymns with songs such as, Holy City, O Jerusalem, Christmas Carols, Singing in the Rain, and In the Time of Roses. Bishop Beesley received end paper rolls from the Deseret News Press, and made large copies of the words to the songs. He would place these in front of Sunday school and spend a half hour for singing time. Sunday School was at 10:00 a.m., everyone loved the singing practice. We sat on long benches before the new church was finished. During sacrament a mug of water was passed around. My first church assignment was that of teaching Primary in the Latter Day Saints Children’s Convalescent Home and Day Nursery that was located about one block north of Temple Square. I would walk there after high school and also in the summers. The hospital opened May 11, 1922 and was originally the home of Orson Hyde at 40 West North Temple. In 1934 the name was officially changed to the Primary Children’s Hospital. In 1952 it was moved to 320 12th Avenue. I taught primary on Wednesdays after high school in the 22nd Ward. I served as the Second Counselor M.I.A. in the 22nd Ward under Fern Cox, 1929-1930. I was then the First Counselor in M.I.A. under Rebecca Carr from 1931-1933. I received a call to the Stake Board of the Salt Lake Stake on January 18, 1934. I also served at the Stake Gleaner Leader in the Salt Lake Stake, called January 20, 1934. I served in the Primary as teacher, chorister, and Jr. Primary Coordinator, in the Yalecrest and Monument Park wards. World War I & II I was only about 10 years old when World War I was going on. I don’t remember much about. But World War II affected everyone in my family. My mother was living with Bill and me at the time. Gayle was a young child. We were given ration cards that limited the amount of food we could purchase at a time. My mother living with us actually helped to increase our intake. Bill’s job was not affected and he continued working at the Post Office, being too old to enlist in the military. My brother Albert enlisted and went to Texas for training. Just as he finished training and was preparing to be sent overseas the war came to an end. My brother Harry was called in the draft for WWII, but turned down at the physical examining board for a flat right foot. He then served on a volunteer committee assisting with legal needs for those who were in service in Salt Lake City. My brother Harold worked in the Bremington Naval Ship Yard in Washington for many years during the war. My husband and I seldom discussed the war efforts. I rarely listened to news about the war, even though my husband always stayed well informed. I did serve as a volunteer for the war bond committee. I would deliver pamphlets door to door that encouraged people to buy war bonds. On June 30, 1945, I received a Seventh War Loan emblem for my wartime work as a Victory Volunteer. College I graduated from the University of Utah in June 1928, with a primary-kindergarten diploma. I started teaching school in September 1928. My first year’s annual salary was $850.00. I bought bedroom furniture for my very small room, consisting of a chest of drawers and a vanity table with a tall mirror. I also purchased two fur coats, one was black and the other, my favorite, was a gray charcoal. Each fur coat cost about $100.00. I taught one year of first grade, one year of second grade, and six years of third and fourth grades. I had a Catholic friend that taught with me, she later became a nun. When I married in 1936 I resigned because there was a state law that wouldn’t allow married women to teach in the State of Utah. I was teaching 3rd grade at the Jackson Elementary School. Meeting Bill I first saw my husband, William Hans Oblad, Jr. (Bill), when he was singing in the Double Quartet, in the lobby of the Hotel Utah. It was Christmas Eve, 1925. We were both Christmas caroling with West High School singing groups. Bill asked to take me home and we rode on the streetcar together. Bill had a very nice voice and years later he used to serenade me (songs such as One Alone, Remember, The Way You Look Tonight, Little White Dove and Always) as we rode in his car. We started dating regularly a few years after we first met. Our first date was to the Cadet Hop at the Hotel Utah. He was a member of the High School U.S. Military Service. I remember mother buying me an expensive long dress for graduation. We celebrated graduation at a home party and then dated for a short time. About six years later I ran into Bill again in front of Zion’s Bank downtown and he asked me if I’d like to go dancing some time. That started our regular dancing excursions. We went to dances quite often, either in the wards or canyon resorts, such as the Old Mill in Big Cottonwood Canyon, the Hermitage in Ogden Canyon, Saltair, and Pinecrest in Emigration Canyon. The dances were very popular and completely respectable. We always went with one or two other couples. There were also many home parties with friends. We also went to movies and attended symphony concerts and the theater. We enjoyed playing tennis together on occasion. We were engaged on Christmas Day, 1935. MARRIAGE & CHILDREN Bill and I were married at noon on Christmas Day, 1936, by Bishop Alvin A. Beesley. The immediate members of both families were present. We stood in front of the mantel place of my home. We then had a regular Christmas dinner and left for our honeymoon in our new Dodge for Los Angeles, California. We stayed in hotels and ate all our meals in restaurants, spending a total of $100.00. Twelve years after we were first married, we were sealed together as a family with our children, in the Salt Lake Temple on January 16, 1948. This was a very special day for us. Our good friends, Lester and Sarah Barlow went with us. When Bill and I first married we moved into the Ashby Apartments at 358 East 100 South. It was a small, three-room apartment with a living room, small kitchen with drop-down table, and a very small bedroom. We could hardly get the new furniture in that we had saved for during the previous year. We then rented a new Duplex at 1433 Richards St. They wanted $37.50 a month but I convinced the owner that $35.00 would be better and we would be good tenants. The duplex had a living room, dining room, kitchen, and two bedrooms. Our daughter, Gayle, was born while living there. We finished building our new home at 1955 Princeton Avenue in Salt Lake City in November 1941 at a total cost of $5,500. Our Federal Housing loan was for $4,500. Our payments were never higher than $45.00 and this included all taxes. Bill drew all of the blueprints which the contractor followed, and he did all the electrical work with his self-trained skill. We were able to pass all of the Federal Housing Administration’s inspections (see William Hans Oblad Jr. History, p.6). We have always loved this home and have felt that it was just right for our family and us. Our daughter Gayle was two years old at the time we moved in. My mother moved in with us and we were happy that she seemed very contented. She had sold her home and used my father’s duplex rent fees as her income. My mother rarely tended a grandchild. She did not have the philosophy of grandparents babysitting grandchildren. Even while she was living in our home I would hire a sitter when Bill and I went out. Our first major purchase in our new home was a piano. By that time you could no longer get a piano with ivory keys. We didn’t buy a television for several years. And when we did, we didn’t seem to watch it very much. I am still living in the 1955 Princeton Avenue home 60 years later. Bill’s Career Bill worked at ZCMI printing for eight years. When the shop was closed down he worked for the Tribune and the Deseret News Press. The Tribune was unionized so he made better money there. He took the U.S. Postal test and was hired by the Post Office on a temporary basis. He continued to pass testing and moved up in job status. When he finished a 2-year business degree he became a supervisor there. He also worked as a secretary of a credit union. He then qualified to become a hearing officer. Anniversaries Our wedding anniversary was always special. Not only were we married on Christmas Day but Bill often followed the traditional anniversary gift list. I remember one morning waking up to a new large beautiful mirror installed in our bathroom overnight by my husband. I also remember for “tin” he bought a new large garbage can. One of my favorite gifts was a Royal Doulton bone china figurine “The Bridesmaid.” On our 25th anniversary we purchased four sterling silver place settings, adding one place setting each year until we acquired a total of twelve settings. For our 40th anniversary, Bill took me down to the O.C. Tanner store and he told me to pick out a ruby ring or necklace. I chose a ruby I liked and the store made a ring setting for it. After a week of wearing it I decided that I didn’t like it too well since I thought the ruby sat up too high. So we took it back and they made a ring with two rubies set into a gold band. For our wedding day Bill gave me a white gardenia corsage from Hawaii. I accidentally left it behind in the first room we stayed in. For several of our early anniversaries Bill gave me a white gardenia. But I would never wear them to church since I felt conspicuous. So Bill started sending me a dozen roses instead. The roses would come beautifully wrapped in a large box from Miller Ellison Flower Shop, arranged with holly. I also received boxes of chocolate from Snelgroves. Bill always wrapped gifts elegantly. In 1969, my husband wrote a poem about how we met: My Christmas Present By William Hans Oblad, Jr. Under a lighted Christmas tree A group of carolers met They were a high school girls glee And a boys double quartet. They sang merry songs of Christmas To the hotel lobby throng The response, a happy applause Following each little song. The carolers shared the spirit Caroling throughout the town From store to store, place to place ‘Til shoppers were homeward bound. The cool night was full of music Love of Christmas was everywhere The singers were now departing Some as single and some a pair. A boy escorted this new found girl To her home and said goodbye A happy start to a friendship One that could never die. As each Christmas now comes and go And carolers do their singing A Christmas carol is a wedding song To the couple with a Christmas beginning. Gayle Our first child, Gayle, was born May 21, 1939. Her diapers were washed in the sink, soaked in disinfectant and hung out to dry in the backyard or downstairs. Gayle liked Sunday School and especially Primary on Wednesdays. She made very close neighborhood friends who remained close for many years. She had strong math abilities, sang in A’capella, and took several years of ballet. She attended the University of Utah, and continued her ballet dancing, performing in the Nutcracker there. She graduated with a B.S in Elementary Education in 1961. When Gayle was about 16 years old she borrowed the car and drove to the pet store. There she purchased a small dog for her brother’s 8th birthday, without anyone’s approval. We named him Spotty. He had a doghouse in the yard, but he slept in our house at night anyway. Well, then he became a she when Spotty delivered a litter of puppies the first winter with us. We advertised and gave the puppies away. We also had a large pet turtle given to us by Lester and Hattie’s daughter, Edna. He slept in the basement all winter with a blanket on. During the warm months he would roam the yard tied to a chain. One spring our turtle didn’t wake up from his long winter nap. Roger Our son, Roger, was born on April 21, 1947. He had close friends in our neighborhood. He loved to explore and enjoyed scouting activities. He helped make Indian clothing to go on an overnight hike alone in the canyon. He became an Eagle Scout. Roger had a close relationship with his father and inherited many of his father’s engineering talents. Roger spent many hours with his father building controls for the running of trains on our train board in the basement. He won 1st prize at Clayton Jr. High for designing and building a stereo. It was then entered into the University of Utah exhibition. Roger served a mission in England during the years of 1966 to 1968. We toured Europe and picked him up at the conclusion of his mission. CHURCH, CAREER & TRAVEL Church Activity Bill was the Financial Ward Clerk at the Monument Park Second Ward, 1005 South 2000 East. It was finished and dedicated in 1950 and Bill was responsible for keeping all the records on the financing of this $300,000 new building. We were very active and happy in this special ward where President Kimball resided. Bill was in charge of the ward lighting, electrical and sound. He installed the first hearing aid to be used individually in the chapel. He used all his skills for the road shows and two large productions that needed new scenery, lighting, and stage sound. Bill also served as a seventy president in the stake and as an activity counselor for M.I.A. Bill loved to research his ancestors and spent many hours with genealogy. In the Monument Park ward I served as the Jr. Sunday School Coordinator and Chorister, Sunday School teacher for the 7 and 8 year olds, then Stake Supervisor for the same age group, Relief Society Secretary (1974-1977), and Relief Society Librarian. During this time we had Sunday School at 10:00 a.m. on Sunday and Sacrament Meeting at 6:00 p.m. Relief Society, Primary and Mutual took place during the week. About one year after we moved into our new home we were meeting every Wednesday night for Gospel Doctrine classes. Oscar McConkie was our teacher and he encouraged us to read and study the Book of Mormon. I would check out scripture records from the library and Bill and I would listen to them, following along in our scriptures. We really enjoyed listening and learning this way. We were asked to donate money to buy a brick for the Bonneville Stake that was being built. When our Monument Park Ward building was being built, Bill was involved in the fundraising for the gymnasium. Many dinners were given and there would be auctions to bid on scarce wartime items such as nylon hosiery. When the Monument Stake was built we also contributed in donations. Teaching When Roger was six years old and in school all day, I went to the Board of Education to visit my friend who was in charge of the city Primary-Kindergarten program. I told her that I had some free time on my hands. I wondered if there was something I could teach, since I hadn’t taught for many years. She said that I could teach but I could not earn a full salary since I only had a two-year teaching certificate. I told her that the money wouldn’t be a problem. Therefore, in 1954 I returned to teaching school. I was not given full pay until I was able to earn a Bachelor of Science degree from University of Utah on June 9, 1958, after attending summer school and night classes for three years. I was almost 50 years old when I earned my degree. I taught first grade at Garfield Elementary and made several lifelong friends there, including, Marilyn Fellow, Helen Baxter, Colleen Shelby and Charlotte McLatchy. We ate lunch everyday together and even during the summer we would meet at each other’s homes. Eventually I was transferred to Bonneville Elementary, only one block from my home. I taught at Bonneville for four years until 1974 when I retired. At that time kindergarteners did no reading or writing. The last few years at Bonneville we started a new innovative reading program that was challenging to the children, which the parents liked. I enjoyed helping children learn to read and watched their excitement as the written page became meaningful to them. I liked to expose them to nursery rhymes and all types of fairy tales. Travel & Entertainment The year 1933-1934 was very unusual. A California like climate was enjoyed. Golf was played on both Christmas and New Year’s Day. The unusual winter was climaxed by an earthquake March 12th. Little damage was done, but it was of sufficient severity to necessitate an earthquake closing of schools for March 11 and March 12. The day after Easter, April 2, Salt Lake City had one of the heaviest snowfalls of the year. Bill and I loved to travel; we planned one long trip each year. Bill loved Dodge vehicles. So we always owned a Dodge. We visited the Southern Utah Parks, Yellowstone, Las Vegas, Sun Valley, Rhode Island, New York, Colorado, St. Louis, California, Vancouver, Lake Louise, and Quebec. Lake Louise was a very beautiful area; we stayed at a grand hotel there for $25 a night. This was very expensive at the time since an average hotel room was only $10 a night. One year my mother came with us to Jackson and Yellowstone. She then took a train home, but Bill and I continued up through Canada. We had a bad accident on a one-way bridge when a speeding car ran us off the bridge into the water. I had neck and back injuries and stayed in the Cranbrook Catholic Hospital for about a week. Those responsible for the accident paid us for damages and the hospital stay, and Bill booked a flight on an airplane home. I absolutely refused to get on an airplane, so we took a long train ride home. When our children were born and we began to travel with them, I would pack a suitcase of emergency food. I would include small boxes of cereal, canned milk, and other small items. We would mostly eat along the way at restaurants or drive-thru establishments. But when drive-thru’s weren’t plentiful, the emergency food would come in handy. We also traveled to Sweden and Denmark and then toured Europe with Roger after his mission in June 1968. In Troja, Sweden we spent three days visiting the original John F. Oblad home and other areas they lived. We picked Roger up and had dinner at the mission home. We attended the theater at Stratford on Avon. We visited family graves near London, England in a small church. We had to rent a car and it too awhile for Bill to become used to driving on the opposite side of the road. There were many Pugsleys buried in Shirwell, Devonshire. An elderly man was trimming the foliage by hand and told us that when he was gone no one else would be there to do his job (See Appendix A). We also visited a churchyard on the way to Cornwall, England where the Pascoes lived and worked. We joined an American Express tour group and toured London, Holland, Italy and France, where we then departed for the U.S. We enjoyed music and theater. We bought season tickets to the Utah Symphony and the Pioneer Memorial Theater and Ballet for many years. At the University of Utah theater there is a seat dedicated to the Pugsley family. Also in the Cedar City Shakespeare theater there is a chair with Lavina Pascoe Oblad’s name. She was a dedicated expert in Shakespeare. Bill purchased it in her honor. We went to Cedar City several summers to see the Shakespearean plays. Children’s College & Marriages Gayle graduated from the University of Utah with a Bachelor of Science degree. She met her husband, Kent Brown, while teaching school in Berkeley, California. Gayle and Scott Kent Brown were married by Elder Marion Hanks, in the Salt Lake Temple on August 15, 1966. Their reception was in the Monument Park Second Ward. Kent introduced us to the depth of scriptures and to Cairo and Jerusalem. Gayle and Kent made a wonderful combination of intelligence and spirituality. They lived in Rhode Island for four years and then moved to Utah. They have six children, Karilynne, Julianne, Heather, Shoshauna, Scott, and Emily (who passed away). As I grew older Gayle enabled me to enjoy living alone in the same home that Bill and I built. After Roger served a mission in England he married Toni Marie Fritsch who he knew before his mission. They were married on August 19, 1970 by Elder Marion Hanks in the Salt Lake Temple. Their reception was in the Lion House, downtown Salt Lake City. Toni has special abilities in decorating, flower arranging and art. She helped him finish his degree at the University of Utah in Electrical Engineering, and he graduated in 1972. They then moved to California where he became employed by Hewlett Packard. They have five children, Carl, John, Lee, Holly and Eileen (see Appendix B). FRIENDS, HEALTH & RETIREMENT Friends & Clubs When I was in 5th grade, my friends and I started a sewing club. We would meet in our homes after school and bring our sewing. I always brought the same pair of pillowcases to embroider. I don’t think that I ever actually finished them. Eventually it became just a fun club and we played games such as Pitt, Rook, etc. When we reached high school we learned to play bridge. There were eight of us in this group. We continued on even after several of us were married. The hostess would award a nice present to the winner of the evening. Years later I met Charlotte McLatchy when she was the librarian at Garfield Elementary, and we became close friends. She was on the General Board of the M.I.A. Charlotte taught bridge classes at Westminster College when she retired from Garfield, and I signed up for her class. We once set our children up on a date (my daughter and her son). It only lasted one date. Merl Hamilton was the Primary President of our ward in the 1940’s. She invited the Primary Teachers, myself included, to a nice lunch. This started an annual luncheon for many years at the Lion House. We called our group the Pri-Lum-Nae. I was elected as the secretary-treasurer. Les and Sarah Barlow were our very close friends throughout the years. We had a tradition of getting together every New Year’s Eve. We wore silly party hats and holiday good at midnight. When we met John and Marie Christensen, they joined our group. Memories of Prophets President Spencer W. Kimball and his wife, Camilla Eyring Kimball, were our neighbors and lived two blocks from us. They had moved to Salt Lake from Arizona in 1943. President Kimball and his wife would attend our ward and he often talked in Sacrament Meeting. He often spoke about loving and forgiving everyone, and maintaining your homes, yards and gardens. He used to take walks through the neighborhood, stopping and talking to everyone. I particularly remember when he offered a special prayer for rain during a severe drought, and soon after that we had rain. Spencer W. Kimball was sustained as the prophet in 1973, and eventually had to move to the Hotel Utah when he received continual threats from apostates. Camilla Kimball, wife of President Spencer W. Kimball, was my visiting teacher for many years. I had a handrail installed on my front porch so that she would be able to come up the stairs. When she became homebound after President Kimball’s death I would visit her. She was always taking classes of some kind and even had an artist come to her home and teach her oil painting. Camilla invited the Relief Society sisters in our ward to read good books. Then she would host a special luncheon for those that read the book she recommended. Everyone loved her homemade strawberry jam. She still came to church in her later years in a wheelchair and carrying oxygen. I also remember President David O. McKay with fondness. He was always statuesque and attentive. He was a very powerful speaker and he always had something important to speak about. I still remember scriptures and quotes. Bill’s illness and death In April 1979 Bill was tested and diagnosed with cancer of the esophagus. The cancer could not be controlled or cured and Bill passed away on December 13, 1979. We had been married forty-three years and were best friends. Bill and I had a life of love and togetherness in many and various facets of our years together. Bill wrote this poem about our special relationship the year before he died: Their love life was a Triangle with Phyllis, Bill and God. It was sacred. It was pure love. It cannot be told on earth, because the public has tendencies to earthylize everything. To distort, to sensuate, and to implicate. The love life of Phyllis and Bill can only be told among the angles in eternity when God gives the nod, for it was and still is beautiful and eternal. Volunteer work In 1984, I became one of the first docents (guide) to be trained to work in the new Museum of Church History and Art, about one month before it opened. I had to learn the history of all the exhibits and artifacts. Training was early Sunday mornings before church. There were three levels that I showed tourist around. I also worked at the front desk and made two good friends there. One taught me how to crochet, she made afghans of every type and she told me she crocheted every night until midnight. I volunteered at the museum for about ten years. In 1999, I attended the 15th Anniversary Reunion on August 28. I also joined the Daughters of Utah Pioneers (DUP), on November 17, 1988, and held several offices. The DUP was organized in Salt Lake in 1901 and by 2001 there were many camps, nationally and internationally. The 100 year anniversary was celebrated with a special program and festivities. I volunteered at the museum one day a week for about ten years. My mother and my sister, Nellie, were also members. Nellie served as a librarian and a stenographer for them. I became a docent and enjoyed all of the artifacts on the four levels. Later Travels I went on three trips with my sister-in-law, Opal. The first one was to Spain, where we stayed for one month in 1981. We traveled with her two sisters and their husbands. We rented a van and toured the country.Opal and I also went on two cruises, one of them to the Panama Canal on the Royal Princess Cruise in 1986. The other to the Mexican Riviera in 1989. I also had the opportunity to visit the Middle East on two different occasions. I took a trip with Kent and Gayle to Egypt and Israel in 1983. We spent a week on the Nile River on a boat. I again traveled to Israel in 1987 with my granddaughter Karilynne and her new husband, Russell. I stayed over there longer than they did, we were visiting Gayle and Kent, and their children Heather, Shoshauna and Scott. They lived in an apartment in a Jewish neighborhood. While I was staying there they made the transition of moving into an apartment at the BYU Jerusalem Center. I thoroughly enjoyed exploring and touring that grand center. I also traveled many times to California to visit Roger and Toni and their children, Carl, John, Lee, Holly and Eileen. I attended their children’s baptisms, mission farewells and homecomings, and weddings. Health milestones When I was a young girl, penicillin and other antibiotics had not been invented. So, I was given Stern’s wine of cod liver oil if I was sick. It tasted awful. Mustard plasters were administered to the chest if someone had a heavy cough. Also, gargling with salt water was another cough treatment. A dose of castor oil was a common vitamin to take. I have been very grateful over my lifetime for the treatment and skills of specialists and surgeons. I have been greatly helped when I required treatments for skin cancer, operations on both knees, a broken pelvis, and a bad shoulder. I experienced the following health ailments: 1. Tonsillitis 2. Rheumatic Fever 3. Hay Fever and skin allergies 4. Hernia & appendicitis 5. Laser treatment of eyes 6. Knee replacement on both knees 7. Broken pelvis, hospital, 24 hour bed rest for 4 weeks CONCLUDING REFLECTIONS I know that I have been very blessed to be a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, and partake of the enrichment this has been in my life. I have read the Book of Mormon several times and have also listened to the entire book by recordings. The first time I read it, I wondered how anyone could really comprehend all that it contained, but with later readings and class studies, I became very convinced that it had to be of divine origin. It is certainly a miracle book. I now enjoy reading the Book of Mormon and find it contains great wisdom that helps us, through the great history of past generations, to give guidance to all who will be receptive. Some of my favorite quotations include: 1. “Be pleasant, you have not fulfilled every duty unless you have fulfilled that of being pleasant.” –Charles Buxton 2. “The world is so full of a number of things. I am sure we should all be as happy as kings.” –Robert Louis Stevenson 3. “Let nothing disturb thee—Nothing afright thee—All things are passing—God never changeth.” –Henry W. Longfellow 4. “I would be true for there are those who trust me—I would be pure for there are those who care—I would be strong for there is much to suffer—I would be brave for there is much to dare—I would be friend to all, the foe, the friendless—I would be giving and forget the gift—I would be humble for I know my weakness; I would look up, and laugh, and love, and lift.” –Howard Arnold Walters I have always believed in the Articles of Faith written by the prophet Joseph Smith. The first one states, “We believe in God, the Eternal Father, His son, Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Ghost.” My favorite one that I have always had memorized is the 13th Article of Faith. “We believe in being honest, true, chaste, benevolent, virtuous, and in doing good to all men; indeed, we may say that we follow the admonition of Paul—We believe all things, we hope all things, we have endured many things, and hope to be able to endure all things. If there is anything virtuous, lovely, or of good report or praiseworthy, we seek after these things.” I believe these are great rules to live by and would counsel all of my grandchildren to live by these principles. TRIBUTES 100 Memories of my Mother, by Gayle Oblad Brown Creamed chipped beef Chili sauce Mint sauce for lamb Waffles on card table Shrimp cocktail Reading to grandchildren Helping Roger with his spelling Laughing and giggling with bridge friends Charts for school room UEA luncheons with friends Ovaltine Penicillin shots Storybook dolls Aunt Nellie’s birthday music box Painting the duplex Cruise on the Nile Suitcase of food for trips Visit to Israel Ironing board in living room Naps on couch “Take it easy and put your feet up” Very narrow feet Dinners at Harry and Jeanne’s Teaching primary with Ann Maughan Pri-Lumni luncheons Frosted goblets String in attic Mouse traps Deer in garage The dog Spot Easter egg roll on capital grounds This is the Place Monument DUP meetings Docent at the museum Knee replacements Ocuvite Pig with toothpicks Scriptures by bedside Pollywog from Brighton Autumn leaves for classroom Bonneville School Garfield School Trip to Rhode Island Physical therapy 100% support for grandchildren Room and board for all family members Rosebud wallpaper in my bedroom 6:00 p.m. dinner time Liver and veal for dinner Egg poacher Laundered shirts Hotel Utah dining room “Keep the change” Washing the kitchen sink Spring house cleaning Magic penny day Crab for Christmas Eve Crab forks Hearing aides Pioneer heritage Silver pitcher Anais Anais Estee Lauder Visits to Bert and Lila’s Lester and Hattie’s giant turtle Fishing trip to Etna, Wyoming Five drop-in grandchildren for one month Lester smoking outside Toy closet for grandchildren Savings bonds AT&T Earl and Cornell Income taxes Camilla Kimball visiting teacher Neal A. Maxwell’s books Miller Ellison’s flowers Morrison meat pies Brattens Saltaire West High School Lemon Grove Edna’s dress fittings Shopping at ZCMI Stories of ancestors “Always” Minimal mechanical ability Peace maker Pendleton jackets Crocheted afghans New Year’s Eve with Barlows Visits to St. Joseph’s San Francisco Jackson Hole with Julianne Green olives Asparagus Long toenails Visit to Berkeley Leaves in the table Mildred, Julie and Marjorie Spotting points in Scrabble Favorite Memories of My Mother, by Roger P. Oblad The thoughts that keep coming to my mind as I think of my mother are of her example and many positive influences. She has always been positive and would not get caught up into negative talk about others. She does not complain amid adversity. She would not allow inappropriate language or discussion in the home and is deft in switching the subject during any gathering when she felt the topic was edging toward the inappropriate. She believes in the value of education. This resulted in my being presented with many "flash cards" when I was trying to learn math and then encouraging myself as well as other family members to work toward advanced college degrees. She got her own BS degree at the age of 52. She wanted me to wear appropriate clothing for any occasion and made sure I was aware that it was important to shine the back of my shoes not just the front. She believed in the value of music and encouraged me in piano lessons, clarinet lessons, and singing in choirs. She believes in attending to her finances with care and frugality. Into her 90s she still checks the newspaper for the stock market prices daily. She believes in reading good books and has spent her life in reading and giving meaningful books to others to read. She believes in good nutrition and has provided for herself three balanced meals a day during the many years she has been alone. She is a gracious host providing food, comfort, and pleasant conversation to anyone who came to her home. She keeps track of the life of her grandchildren and great grandchildren, speaking about them often and being aware of what is happening in their lives. She loves my father, her "Bill". She is full of faith and has a firm testimony of the restored gospel. She is a source of spiritual blessing to her entire family as a result of her consistent daily prayers. Roger Pugsley Oblad - Dec 2001 APPENDIX A: Churchyard of Shirwell, Devonshire, England Visited by Phyllis and Bill Oblad, June of 1968 William Gibbs Died March 24, 1865 Age 84 Years Ann Gibbs Died Jan. 31, 1860 Age 82 YearsJames Kingdon, husband Died Oct. 24, 1843 Age 86 Years Mary Kingdon, wife Died July 2, 1855 Age 87 YearsBessie and Beloved Wife Of Anthony Pugsley of Plakton, Barton died June 21, 1885 Age 54 Years Grace Pugsley, wife Died Aug. 29, 1833 Age 71 Years John Pugsley, husband [father of Philip Pugsley I] Died Apr. 22, 1836 Age 80 Years Farewell, Farewell Our Children Dear And all our friends farewell We hope we are going To that place Where Saints and Angels dwellWilliam Kingdon, father Died Sept. 27, 1850 Age 58 Years John Kingdon, son Died Nov. 2, 1853 Age 27 YearsRichard Barrow Died Jan. 7, 1891 Age 62 Years Agnes Barrow Died Nov. 9, 1895 Age 72 Years William Barrow, son Died Oct. 4, 1888 Age 33 Ann Pugsley, wife Died Dec. 16, 1871 Age 84 Years George Pugsley, husband Died Apr. 30, 1872 Age 86 YearsElizabeth Pugsley, wife Died Feb. 12, 1869 Age 74 Years William Pugsley, husband Died May 18, 1877 Age 85 YearsAt Lynton-Lynmouth A watering trough “Erected by Mrs. Barlow August 1899.” George Pugsley, husband Died April 22, 1886 Age 68 Years Mary Pugsley, wife Died April 24, 1891 Age 75 YearsGeorge Pugsley Died Jan. 20, 1898 Age 37 Years Annie Lou Pugsley Died Aug. 14, 1946 Age 81 YearsSacred to the Memory of Ann Pugsley who died 19 of January 1858 Age 51 Years Benjamin Pugsley Husband of the above named who died 10 of June 1861 Age 53 Years Blessed is the man that Trusteth in the Lord George Pugsley, husband Died Apr. 8, 1885 Age 83 Years Elizabeth Pugsley, wife Died Feb. 14, 1887 Age 83 YearsIsmena wife of John Kidwell Died Dec. 20, 1893 Age 47 Years John Kidwell, husband Died Dec. 20, 1937 Age 89 Years APPENDIX B: Grandchildren and Great Grandchildren Karilynne Brown Pearson and Russell Pearson 1. Nashelle Pearson 2. Taylor Pearson 3. Larissa Pearson 4. Parker Pearson 5. Marinn Pearson 6. Megan Pearson Julianne Brown Clegg and Jason Clegg 1. Tanner Noah Clegg 2. Cassidy Clegg 3.Ellie Clegg 4.Spencer Jason Clegg Heather Brown Moore and Christopher Moore 1. Kaelin Moore 2. Kara Moore 3. Dana Moore Shoshauna Brown and Joel Jacquart Scott Brown and Jill Pugmire Brown 1. Scott Kent Brown III 2. Joshua Mark Brown Carl William Oblad and Nicole Watson Oblad 1. Kyle William Oblad 2. Emily Nicole Oblad John Roger Oblad and Lauren Mari Marten Oblad 1. Elise Marie Oblad 2. Eric John Oblad Lee Fritsch Oblad Holly Anna Oblad and Michael George Robertson Eileen Marie Oblad and Ryan McKay Payne 1. Jordan McKay Payne

Life timeline of Henry Druce

1820
Henry Druce was born in 1820
Henry Druce was 11 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
Henry Druce was 20 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
Henry Druce was 39 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
Henry Druce was 42 years old when U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring the freedom of all slaves in Confederate territory by January 1, 1863. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
Henry Druce was 54 years old when Winston Churchill, English colonel, journalist, and politician, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1965) Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill was a British politician, army officer, and writer, who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. As Prime Minister, Churchill led Britain to victory in the Second World War. Churchill represented five constituencies during his career as Member of Parliament (MP). Ideologically an economic liberal and British imperialist, he began and ended his parliamentary career as a member of the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955, but for twenty years from 1904 he was a prominent member of the Liberal Party.
Henry Druce was 61 years old when The world's first international telephone call is made between St. Stephen, New Brunswick, Canada, and Calais, Maine, United States. A telephone call is a connection over a telephone network between the called party and the calling party.
Henry Druce died in 1896 at the age of 76
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Henry Druce (1820 - 1896), BillionGraves Record 1519445 Salt Lake City, Utah, Salt Lake County, Utah, United States

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